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The Info List - Larry Bird


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As player:

NBA champion (1981, 1984, 1986) 2× NBA Finals MVP
NBA Finals MVP
(1984, 1986) 3× NBA Most Valuable Player (1984–1986) 12× NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
(1980–1988, 1990–1992) NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game MVP (1982) 9× All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
(1980–1988) All-NBA Second Team
All-NBA Second Team
(1990) 3× NBA All-Defensive Second Team
NBA All-Defensive Second Team
(1982–1984) NBA Rookie of the Year (1980) 3× NBA 3-Point Shootout champion (1986–1988) 2× 50–40–90 club
50–40–90 club
(1987, 1988) AP Athlete of the Year (1986) No. 33 retired by Boston
Boston
Celtics NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team National college player of the year (1979) 2× Consensus first-team All-American (1978, 1979) Third-team All-American – NABC, UPI (1977) 2× MVC Player of the Year (1978, 1979) No. 33 retired by Indiana State

As coach:

NBA Coach of the Year
NBA Coach of the Year
(1998) NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game head coach (1998)

As executive:

NBA Executive of the Year (2012)

Career NBA statistics

Points 21,791 (24.3 ppg)

Rebounds 8,974 (10.0 rpg)

Assists 5,695 (6.3 apg)

Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Basketball Hall of Fame as player

College Basketball Hall of Fame Inducted in 2006

Medals

Men's Basketball

Representing the  United States

World University Games

1977 Sofia Men's Basketball

Olympic Games

1992 Barcelona Men's Basketball

Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is an American professional basketball executive, former coach and former player, most recently serving as president of the Indiana Pacers
Indiana Pacers
in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Since retiring as a player for the Boston
Boston
Celtics, he was a mainstay in the Indiana Pacers
Indiana Pacers
organization, but stepped down from the position of president following the first-round of the 2017 Eastern Conference playoffs. He has been described as one of the greatest basketball players of all time.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7] Drafted into the NBA sixth overall by the Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
in 1978, Bird started at small forward and power forward for thirteen seasons, spearheading one of the NBA's most formidable frontcourts that included center Robert Parish
Robert Parish
and power forward Kevin McHale. Bird was a 12-time NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
and was named the league's Most Valuable Player (MVP) three consecutive times (1984–1986). He played his entire professional career for Boston, winning three NBA championships and two NBA Finals MVP
NBA Finals MVP
awards. He was a member of the 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team ("The Dream Team") that won the gold medal at the 1992 Summer Olympics. Bird was voted to the NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team[8] in 1996 and inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame[9] in 1998 (and was inducted again in 2010 as a member of the "Dream Team"). He served as head coach of the Indiana Pacers
Indiana Pacers
from 1997 to 2000. In 2003, he assumed the role of President of Basketball Operations for the Pacers, holding the position until retiring in 2012.[10] After a year away from the position, he announced he would return to the Pacers as president of basketball operations in 2013.[11] In addition to being part of the 50–40–90 club, he is the only person in NBA history to be named Rookie of the Year, Regular Season MVP, Finals MVP, Coach of the Year, and Executive of the Year.[12]

Contents

1 Early life 2 College career

2.1 College statistics

3 Professional career

3.1 Joining the Celtics (1978–1979) 3.2 Early success (1979–1983) 3.3 Battles with the Lakers and MVP tenure (1983–1987) 3.4 Waning years (1988–1992)

4 Post-retirement career 5 Awards and honors 6 Personal life 7 Head coaching record 8 Legacy 9 Player profile

9.1 Trash-talking 9.2 Memorable moments 9.3 Memorable games

10 In popular culture 11 NBA career statistics

11.1 Regular season 11.2 Playoffs

12 See also 13 References 14 Further reading 15 External links

Early life Bird was born in West Baden Springs, Indiana, to Georgia (née Kerns) and Claude Joseph "Joe" Bird, a veteran of the Korean War.[13] He was raised in nearby French Lick, where his mother worked two jobs to support Larry and his five siblings.[14] Bird has said that being poor as a child still motivates him "to this day".[15] Georgia and Joe divorced when Larry was in high school, and Joe committed suicide about a year later.[16] Larry used basketball as an escape from his family troubles, starring for Springs Valley High School and averaging 31 points, 21 rebounds, and 4 assists as a senior on his way to becoming the school's all-time scoring leader.[13][17] College career Bird received a scholarship to play college basketball for the Indiana University Hoosiers in 1974.[18] After less than a month on campus he dropped out of school, finding the adjustment between his small hometown and the large student population of Bloomington to be overwhelming.[13] He returned to French Lick, enrolling at Northwood Institute (now Northwood University) in nearby West Baden, and working municipal jobs for a year before enrolling at Indiana State University in Terre Haute
Terre Haute
in 1975.[19][20][21] He had a successful three-year career with the Sycamores, helping them reach the NCAA tournament for the first time in school history with a 33-0 record where they played the 1979 championship game against Michigan State.[22][23] Indiana State would lose the game 75–64, with Bird scoring 19 points but making only 7 of 21 shots for 33.3 percent shooting rate.[13] The game achieved the highest ever television rating for a college basketball game, in large part because of the match-up between Bird and Spartans' point guard Earvin "Magic" Johnson,[14] a rivalry that lasted throughout their professional careers. Despite failing to win the championship, Bird earned numerous year-end awards and honors for his outstanding play, including the Naismith College Player of the Year Award.[23] For his college career, he averaged 30.3 points, 13.3 rebounds, and 4.6 assists per game,[24] leading the Sycamores to an 81–13 record during his tenure.[23] Bird also appeared in one game for the baseball team, going 1-for-2 with 2 RBI.[25] College statistics

Cited from Basketball Reference.[24]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1976–77 Indiana State 28 … 36.9 .544 … .840 13.3 4.4 … … 32.8

1977–78 Indiana State 32 … … .524 … .793 11.5 3.9 … … 30.0

1978–79 Indiana State 34 … … .532 … .831 14.9 5.5 … … 28.6

Career

94 … … .533 … .822 13.3 4.6 … … 30.3

Professional career Joining the Celtics (1978–1979) Bird was selected by the Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
with the sixth overall pick in the 1978 NBA draft.[24] He did not sign with the Celtics immediately; instead, he played out his final season at Indiana State and led the Sycamores to the NCAA title game. Red Auerbach
Red Auerbach
publicly stated that he would not pay Bird more than any Celtic on the current roster, but Bird's agent bluntly told Red that Bird would reject any sub-market offers and simply enter the 1979 NBA Draft
NBA Draft
instead, where Boston's rights would expire the second the draft began and Bird would have been the likely top pick. After protracted negotiations, Bird inked a five-year, $3.25 million contract with the team, making him the highest paid rookie in league history at the time.[17][26] Shortly afterwards, NBA draft
NBA draft
eligibility rules were changed to prevent teams from drafting players before they were ready to sign, a rule known as the Bird Collegiate Rule.[26] Early success (1979–1983)

Bird recorded 14 points, 10 rebounds and five assists in his NBA debut against the Houston Rockets on October 12, 1979.

Bird immediately transformed the Celtics into a title contender, helping them improve their win total by 32 games from the year before he was drafted and finish first in the Eastern Conference.[27][28] With averages of 21.3 points, 10.4 rebounds, 4.5 assists, and 1.7 steals per game for the season, he was selected to the All-Star Team and named Rookie of the Year.[24] In the Conference Finals, Boston
Boston
was eliminated by the Philadelphia 76ers.[28] Before the 1980–81 season, the Celtics selected forward Kevin McHale in the draft and acquired center Robert Parish
Robert Parish
from the Golden State Warriors,[29][30] forming a Hall of Fame trio for years to come. Behind Bird's leadership and Boston's upgraded roster, the Celtics again advanced to the Conference Finals for a rematch with the 76ers.[31] Boston
Boston
fell behind 3–1 to start the series but won the next three games to advance to the Finals against the Houston Rockets,[32] winning in six games and earning Bird his first championship.[31] He averaged 21.9 points, 14 rebounds, 6.1 assists, and 2.3 steals per game for the postseason and 15.3 points, 15.3 rebounds, and 7 assists per game for the Finals but lost out on the Finals MVP Award to teammate Cedric Maxwell.[24][33] At the 1982 All-Star Game, Bird scored 19 points en route to winning the All-Star Game MVP Award.[34] At the conclusion of the season, he earned his first All-Defensive Team selection.[24] He eventually finished runner-up in Most Valuable Player Award voting to Moses Malone.[34] In the Conference Finals, the Celtics faced the 76ers for the third consecutive year, losing in seven games.[35] Boston's misfortunes continued into the next season, with Bird again finishing second in MVP voting to Malone and the team losing in the Conference Semifinals to the Milwaukee Bucks.[34][36] Battles with the Lakers and MVP tenure (1983–1987)

Bird playing against the Washington Bullets

Bird was named MVP of the 1983–84 season with averages of 24.2 points, 10.1 rebounds, 6.6 assists, and 1.8 steals per game.[24] In the playoffs, the Celtics avenged their loss from the year before to the Bucks, winning in five games in the Conference Finals to advance to the Finals against the Los Angeles Lakers.[37] In Game Four, the Lakers--led by Bird's college rival Magic Johnson--were on the verge of taking a commanding 3-1 series lead before a flagrant foul was committed on Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
that resulted in a brawl and caused the Lakers to lose their composure.[38] Boston
Boston
came back to win the game, eventually winning the series in seven.[37] Bird was named Finals MVP behind 27.4 points, 14 rebounds, and 3.6 assists per game.[37] On March 12 of the 1984–85 season, Bird scored a career-high and franchise record 60 points in a game against the Atlanta Hawks.[39] The performance came just nine days after Kevin McHale set the previous Celtics record for points in a game with 56.[40] At the conclusion of the year, Bird was named MVP for the second consecutive season behind averages of 28.7 points, 10.5 rebounds, and 6.6 assists per game.[24] Boston
Boston
advanced through the playoffs to earn a rematch with the Lakers, this time losing in six games.[41] In the summer of 1985, Larry injured his back shoveling crushed rock to create a driveway at his mother's house. At least partially as a result of this, he experienced back problems for the remainder of his career.[42] Before the start of the 1985–86 season, the Celtics made a daring trade for Bill Walton, an All-Star center with a history of injury.[43] The risk paid off; Walton's acquisition helped Boston
Boston
win a league best 67 games.[44] One of Bird's career highlights occurred at the 1986 NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Weekend when he walked into the locker room at the inaugural Three-Point Shootout
Three-Point Shootout
and asked who was going to finish second before winning the shootout.[45][46] With averages of 25.8 points, 9.8 rebounds, and 6.8 assists, and 2 steals per game, Bird became just the third player in NBA history to win three consecutive MVP Awards.[47] In the playoffs, the Celtics lost only one game through the first three rounds en route to a match-up against the Rockets in the Finals.[43] Bird averaged 24 points, 9.7 rebounds, and 9.5 assists per game for the championship round, leading Boston
Boston
to victory in six games.[48] The '86 Celtics are commonly ranked as one of the greatest basketball teams of all-time, with the Boston
Boston
Globe's Peter May and Grantland's Bill Simmons
Bill Simmons
listing them at number one.[49] In 1987, the Celtics made their last Finals appearance of Bird's career, fighting through difficult series against the Milwaukee Bucks and Detroit Pistons
Detroit Pistons
but as they reached the NBA Finals, the Celtics, hampered by devastating injuries, lost to a dominant Lakers team which had won 65 games during the season. The Celtics ended up losing to the Lakers in six games, with Bird averaging 24.2 points on .445 shooting, 10 rebounds and 5.5 assists per game in the championship series.[50] The Celtics would fall short in 1988 losing to the Detroit Pistons
Detroit Pistons
in 6 games in the Eastern Conference Finals as the Pistons made up from the heartbreak the previous season. Between them, Bird and Johnson captured eight NBA championships during the 1980s, with Magic getting five and Bird three. During the 1980s, either Boston
Boston
or Los Angeles appeared in every NBA Finals.[51][52] Throughout the 1980s, contests between the Celtics and the Lakers—both during the regular season and in the Finals—attracted enormous television audiences. The first regular season game between the Celtics and the Lakers in the 1987–88 season proved to be a classic with Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
banking in an off balance shot from near the three-point line at the buzzer for a 115–114 Lakers win at Boston
Boston
Garden.[53] The historical rift between the teams, which faced each other several times in championship series of the 1960s, fueled fan interest in the rivalry. Not since Bill Russell
Bill Russell
squared off against Wilt Chamberlain
Wilt Chamberlain
had professional basketball enjoyed such a marquee matchup. The apparent contrast between the two players and their respective teams seemed scripted for television: Bird, the introverted small-town hero with the blue-collar work ethic, fit perfectly with the throwback, hard-nosed style of the Celtics, while the stylish, gregarious Johnson ran the Lakers' fast-paced Showtime offense amidst the bright lights and celebrities of Los Angeles. A 1980s Converse commercial for its "Weapon" line of basketball shoes (endorsed by both Bird and Johnson) reflected the perceived dichotomy between the two players. In the commercial, Bird is practicing alone on a rural basketball court (in reality the court was one Bird had had made on the property in French Lick that he had purchased for his mother), when Johnson pulls up in a sleek limousine and challenges him to a one-on-one match. Despite the intensity of their rivalry, Bird and Johnson became friends off the court. Their friendship blossomed when the two players worked together to film the Converse commercial, which depicted them as archenemies. Johnson appeared at Bird's retirement ceremony on February 4, 1993 and emotionally described Bird as a "friend forever". Waning years (1988–1992)

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In 1988, Bird had the best statistical season of his career, but the Celtics failed to reach the NBA Finals for the first time in five years, losing to the Pistons in six games during the Eastern Conference Finals. Bird started the 1988–89 season, but ended his season after six games to have bone spurs surgically removed from both of his heels. He returned to the Celtics in 1989, but debilitating back problems and an aging Celtic roster prevented him from regaining his mid-1980s form. Nonetheless, through the final years of his career, Bird maintained his status as one of the premier players in the game. He averaged over 20 points, 9 rebounds and 7 assists a game in his last three seasons with the Celtics, and shot better than 45% from the field in each. Bird led the Celtics to playoff appearances in each of those three seasons. Bird's body, however, continued to break down. He had been bothered by back problems for years, and his back became progressively worse. After leading the Celtics to a 29–5 start to the 1990–91 season, he missed 22 games due to a compressed nerve root in his back, a condition that would eventually lead to his retirement. He had off-season surgery to remove a disc from his back, but his back problems continued and he missed 37 games during the 1991–92 season. His past glory would be briefly rekindled, however, in a game that season in which he scored 49 points in a double-overtime victory over the Portland Trail Blazers. During the 1992 Eastern Conference semi-finals against the Cleveland Cavaliers, Bird missed four of the seven games in the series due to those recurring back problems. In the summer of 1992, Bird joined Magic Johnson, Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
and other NBA stars to play for the United States basketball team in that year's Olympics in Barcelona, Spain.[54] It was the first time in the United States’ Olympic history that the country sent professional basketball players to compete. The "Dream Team" won the men's basketball gold medal. Following his Olympic experience, on August 18, 1992, Bird announced his retirement as an NBA player. He finished his career with averages of more than 24 points, 10 rebounds and 6 assists per game, while shooting 49.6% from the field, 88.6% from the free throw line and 37.6% from three-point range. Following Bird's departure, the Celtics promptly retired his jersey number 33. In 1989, Bird published his autobiography, Drive: The Story of My Life with Bob Ryan. The book chronicles his life and career up to the 1989 NBA season. Post-retirement career

A Larry Bird
Larry Bird
plaque at Quincy Market, Boston

The Celtics employed Bird as a special assistant in the team's front office from 1992 until 1997. In 1997, Bird accepted the position of coach of the Indiana Pacers
Indiana Pacers
and said he would be on the job for no more than three years. Despite having no previous coaching experience, Bird led the Pacers to a 58–24 record—the franchise's best as an NBA team at the time—in the 1997–98 season, and pushed the Bulls to seven games in the Eastern Conference finals. He was named the NBA Coach of the Year for his efforts, becoming the only man in NBA history to have won both the MVP and Coach of the Year awards. He then led the Pacers to two consecutive Central Division titles in 1999 and 2000, and a berth in the 2000 NBA Finals. Bird will be always known for his playing in the Boston
Boston
Garden, but what he did in 3 years with the Pacers was impressive, becoming an excellent coach and player. Bird resigned as Pacers coach shortly after the end of the 2000 season, following through on his initial promise to coach for only three years. In 2003, he returned as the Pacers' president of basketball operations, overseeing team personnel and coaching moves, as well as the team's draft selections. Bird promoted David Morway to general manager in 2008, but Bird still had the final say in basketball matters. After the 2011–2012 NBA season, Bird was named NBA Executive of the Year, becoming the only man in NBA history to win the NBA MVP, Coach of the Year and Executive of the Year.[55] On June 27, 2012, a day before the 2012 NBA draft, Bird and the Pacers announced that they would be parting ways later that year. Bird said health issues were among the reasons for his leaving.[56] Donnie Walsh was named to replace him.[57] On June 26, 2013, almost exactly a year later, it was announced that Bird would be returning to the Pacers as president of basketball operations.[11] Pacers owner Herb Simon briefly addressed Bird's prior health concerns, stating that "He's got his energy back, his health back and he's raring to go". On May 1, 2017, Bird resigned as president of basketball operations, but stayed with the team in an advisory capacity.[58] Awards and honors As player:

NBA champion (1981, 1984, 1986) 2× NBA Finals MVP
NBA Finals MVP
(1984, 1986) 3× NBA Most Valuable Player (1984–1986) 12× NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
(1980–1988, 1990–1992) NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game MVP (1982) 9× All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
(1980–1988) All-NBA Second Team
All-NBA Second Team
(1990) 3× NBA All-Defensive Second Team
NBA All-Defensive Second Team
(1982–1984) NBA Rookie of the Year (1980) NBA All-Rookie First Team
NBA All-Rookie First Team
(1980) 3× Three-point Shootout champion (1986–1988) NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team No. 33 retired by Boston
Boston
Celtics John R. Wooden Award
John R. Wooden Award
(1979) Naismith College Player of the Year
Naismith College Player of the Year
(1979) AP National Player of the Year (1979) Oscar Robertson Trophy
Oscar Robertson Trophy
(1979) Adolph Rupp Trophy
Adolph Rupp Trophy
(1979) NABC Player of the Year
NABC Player of the Year
(1979) 2× MVC Player of the Year (1978–1979) 2× Consensus first team All-American (1978–1979)

As coach:

NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game head coach (1998) NBA Coach of the Year
NBA Coach of the Year
(1998)

As executive:

NBA Executive of the Year (2012)

Personal life

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Bird married Dinah Mattingly in 1989. They have two adopted children, Conner and Mariah. Bird also has a biological daughter, Corrie, from his first marriage to high school classmate Janet Condra.[59] He has four brothers, Mike, Mark, Jeff, and Eddie, and a sister, Linda. Eddie also played basketball at Indiana State from 1986 to 1990 and today is the city park superintendent at Terre Haute. In the 1980s and 1990s, Bird co-owned Larry Bird's Boston
Boston
Connection, a hotel and restaurant in downtown Terre Haute.[60] The property is now a Quality Inn. Head coaching record

Legend

Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss %

Post season PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss %

Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result

Indiana 1997–98 82 58 24 .707 2nd in Central 16 10 6 .625 Lost in Conf. Finals

Indiana 1998–99 50 33 17 .660 1st in Central 13 9 4 .692 Lost in Conf. Finals

Indiana 1999–00 82 56 26 .683 1st in Central 23 13 10 .565 Lost in NBA Finals

Career

214 147 67 .687

52 32 20 .615

Legacy

Larry, you only told me one lie. You said there will be another Larry Bird. Larry, there will never, ever be another Larry Bird. — Magic Johnson, as quoted at Bird's retirement party.[61]

In 1999, Bird ranked No. 30 in ESPN's SportsCentury's 50 Greatest Athletes of the 20th century. For the 2008 NBA Finals, which featured a rematch of the Celtics-Lakers rivalry, Bird appeared in a split-screen advertisement with Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
(as part of the "There Can Only Be One" campaign which had played throughout the 2008 NBA Playoffs but to that point only featured players from the two teams competing in a given series) discussing the meaning of rivalries. Bird was widely considered one of Red Auerbach's favorite players. He considered Bird to be the greatest basketball player of all time.[62] Auerbach was so enamored with the player that he drafted him out of Indiana State and waited a year before Bird was eligible to suit up for the Celtics. During his introductory press conference, after Auerbach's contentious negotiations with agent Bob Woolf, Bird announced he "would have played for free". This was after Woolf asked for the most lucrative contract in NBA history, to which Auerbach was quick to point out that Bird had not played a game in the NBA yet.[citation needed] Bird is the only man to be named an MVP, Coach of the Year, and Executive of the Year in the NBA.[12] Player profile

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Bird, a wing who played the small forward and power forward positions, was nominated to twelve All-Star teams. He won two NBA Finals MVP
NBA Finals MVP
and three regular-season MVP awards, all consecutively, a feat only equaled by Bill Russell
Bill Russell
and Wilt Chamberlain. Bird possessed an uncanny and unparalleled ability to anticipate and react to the strategies of his opponents. His talent for recognizing the moves of opponents and teammates prompted his first coach with the Celtics, Bill Fitch, to nickname him "Kodak", because he seemed to formulate mental pictures of every play that took place on the court. Bird scored 24.3 points per game in his career on a .496 field goal average, an .886 free throw average (9th best all-time) and a 37.6 percentage on three-point shots. Bird had an average of 10.0 rebounds per game for his career and 6.3 assists. His multidimensional game made him a consistent triple-double threat; Bird currently ranks seventh all-time in triple-doubles with 59, not including the 10 he recorded in the playoffs. Bird's lifetime player efficiency rating (PER) is 23.5, 18th all-time.[63] Additionally, he is the only 20, 10, 5 player in NBA history (points, rebounds, assists per game) with a lifetime PRA rating (points + rebounds + assists per game) of 40.6, which is 8th all-time. Bird was the first player in NBA history to shoot 50% or better on field goals, 40% on three-pointers, and 90% on free-throws in a single NBA season while achieving the league minimum for makes in each category. Bird accomplished this feat twice and is second only to Steve Nash
Steve Nash
for seasons in the 50–40–90 club. Bird is also remembered as an excellent defender. While he was neither fast nor quick-footed, and could not always shut down an individual player one-on-one, he consistently displayed a knack for anticipating the moves of his opponent, allowing him to intercept passes and create turnovers. His 1,556 career steals ranks 34th all-time.[64] Unspectacular but effective defensive moves, such as jumping into a passing lane to make a steal or allowing his man to step past and drive to the hoop, then blocking the opponent's shot from behind, were staples of Bird's defensive game. In recognition of his defensive abilities, Bird was named to three All-Defensive Second Teams. Bird's humble roots were the source of his most frequently used moniker, "The Hick from French Lick". Other observers called him "The Great White Hope".[22] He has also acquired the nickname "Larry Legend".[65] Trash-talking Bird's competitive nature often emerged in nearly constant trash-talking on the court. Some notable examples follow:

Before the inaugural Three-Point Shootout
Three-Point Shootout
during NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Weekend 1986, Bird entered the locker room, looked around without saying a word, then finally said, "I want all of you to know I am winning this thing. I'm just looking around to see who's gonna finish up second." Bird went on to defeat Craig Hodges of the Milwaukee Bucks
Milwaukee Bucks
in the finals to win his first of three consecutive Three-Point Shootout championships, a record that he currently shares with Hodges.[66][67] In 1987, the Chicago Bulls
Chicago Bulls
had gaffed[clarification needed] Bird's complimentary tickets. Prior to tip-off, Bird confronted Bulls coach Doug Collins on the sideline, informed Collins about the ticket situation, and asked him what the visitor scoring record was, vowing to break it. As the game started, the Bulls defended Bird with Ben Poquette, a Caucasian forward. Bird, who was known to take insult when an opposing team put a white player on him, laughed at Collins, "Ben Poquette? Are you fucking kidding me?" Bird had 33 at the half and ended up scoring 41 points.[68][citation needed] During one game on Christmas Day against the Indiana Pacers, before the game Bird told Chuck Person
Chuck Person
that he had a Christmas present waiting for him. During the game, when Person was on the bench, Bird shot a three-pointer on the baseline right in front of Person. Immediately after releasing the ball, Bird said to Person, "Merry fucking Christmas!", and then the shot went in. Prior to the game, Person (nicknamed the "Rifleman") stated "The Rifleman is coming, and he's going Bird hunting."[69] Reggie Miller
Reggie Miller
recalled his encounter with Larry Bird's legendary trash talking ability in his book I Love Being the Enemy. Miller tried to disrupt Bird's concentration when he was shooting free throws late in a game. Bird glared at him, made the first free throw and said, "You got to be kidding me. Rook, I'm the best shooter in the league right now. In the league. Understand? And you're up here trying to say something?" Bird then buried the second free throw.[70] Late in a tied game against the Seattle SuperSonics, Bird told SuperSonics forward Xavier McDaniel, who was guarding him, "I'm going to get [the ball] right here and I am going to bury it in your face." As McDaniel remembers it, he responded by saying, "I know, I'll be waiting." After a timeout, Bird made two baseline cuts, then posted in the exact spot he had indicated to McDaniel, paused, turned, and made it in his face. He finished up the sequence by telling McDaniel, "I didn't mean to leave two seconds on the clock."[71][72] On November 9, 1984, Bird was ejected along with Julius Erving
Julius Erving
with 1:38 remaining in the third quarter after an on court scuffle. At the point of both ejections, Bird had outscored Erving 42 to 6 (Bird shot 17–23 from the field in the game; Erving 3–13). During the game, Bird had continuously informed Erving of their tallies with every chance he got to score. Bird denies this stating that it was teammate "M.L. (Carr) talking trash from the bench" during that game.[73] Eventually a shoving match ensued, then swings taken by both players, and finally a bench-clearing brawl. Bird and Erving were each fined $7,500 by the NBA, while a total of $15,500 in fines was levied amongst Philadelphia 76ers
Philadelphia 76ers
head coach Billy Cunningham
Billy Cunningham
and 15 players from both teams.[74]

Memorable moments Bird is remembered as one of the foremost clutch performers in the history of the NBA. Few players have performed as brilliantly in critical moments of games.

In Game 7 of the 1981 Eastern Conference finals against the rival Philadelphia 76ers, the Sixers led all game. Inside the final minute, Boston
Boston
and Philadelphia were tied 89–89 when Bird sank a fast-break mid-range pull-up bank shot with his left hand, a very difficult shot to execute under intense pressure. That basket put the Celtics up 91–89. The Sixers had a chance to win the game, but threw away the lob inbounds pass intended for Julius Erving. The Celtics' 91–90 win put them into the NBA Finals for the first time since 1976 and they would go on to win the NBA championship in the Finals, beating the Houston Rockets in 6 games. In the late stages of the game, Bird also had two key steals, two free throws made, a rebound, and a blocked shot. On January 27, 1985, Bird hit an amazing baseline jumper at the buzzer while falling out of bounds to give the Celtics a 128–127 win over Portland. In the series-clinching Game 6 of the 1986 Finals, Bird recorded a triple-double with 29 points, 11 rebounds and 12 assists. In Game 5 of the 1987 Eastern Conference Finals against the Detroit Pistons, with five seconds remaining in the fourth quarter and Boston trailing the Pistons 107–106, Bird stole an inbound pass from Isiah Thomas that was intended for Bill Laimbeer. Falling out of bounds, Bird turned and passed the ball to teammate Dennis Johnson, who was cutting to the basket and converted a 2-point layup with less than a second left. The Pistons called a timeout but had no chance of getting off a shot. The dramatic play saved the series for the Celtics who won in 7 games, and they advanced to the Finals. In a game in Washington against the Bullets in 1987, the Celtics trailed the Bullets by 3 points with 6 seconds remaining in regulation. A three-pointer by Bird had been waved off because their coach, K. C. Jones, had already called a timeout. Bird then made another three-pointer to send the game into overtime. When the Celtics trailed by two points near the end of the first overtime, Bird was fouled and converted both free throws. In the second overtime, trailing by 1 point with 2 seconds remaining, Bird made a buzzer-beating running shot to win the game, 140–139. In Game 7 of the 1988 Eastern Conference semifinals against the Atlanta Hawks, Bird shot 9 of 10 from the floor in the fourth quarter, scoring 20 points in that quarter and lifting the Celtics to a series-clinching victory over Atlanta. Bird finished with 34 points. His effort helped to overcome a 47-point performance by Dominique Wilkins also in the game. Wilkins remarked, "The basket was like a well. I couldn't miss. He couldn't miss. And it went down to the last shot of the game. Who was going to make the last shot? That's the greatest game I've ever played in or seen played. It was two guys who just did not want to lose." On March 31, 1991, the Celtics played a double overtime game with the Chicago Bulls
Chicago Bulls
in their last meeting of the season. In the second overtime period, Bird scored 9 points on 4 of 5 shooting from the field and helped the Celtics beat the Bulls, 135–132. Many called this particular game Bird's finest performance against Michael Jordan. In the last seconds of a nationally televised regular season game with the Portland Trail Blazers
Portland Trail Blazers
in March 1992, Bird sent the game into overtime with an off balance running one-handed three-point shot. Bird tallied 49 points, 14 rebounds, 12 assists and 4 steals for his 59th and final career triple-double in what many fans called his last great game in the NBA. The Celtics won in double overtime over the Blazers, 152–148. Bird's 49 points stands as the 3rd highest scoring game while registering a triple-double. Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
once was asked who he would want to take a shot with the game on the line, other than himself. Before the question could be finished, Jordan quickly responded, "Larry Bird."[citation needed] On August 18, 1992, Larry Bird
Larry Bird
announced his retirement during the day. At Fenway Park that day, the Boston
Boston
Red Sox were playing the California Angels. Roger Clemens, the Red Sox starting pitcher, had a small 33 on his hat as a tribute to Larry Bird. Angels manager John Wathan immediately protested, saying it did not meet regulations. The crowd booed relentlessly, chanting the words, "Larry, Larry, Larry." Clemens threw his hat into the dugout in disgust when told it was not allowed. He then proceeded to throw a four-hit shutout for an 8–0 victory for the Red Sox.[75]

Memorable games

On March 30, 1983, Bird scored 53 points against the Indiana Pacers
Indiana Pacers
to set the Celtic record for highest scoring output in a game by an individual player (the previous record belonged to Sam Jones who scored 51 points against the Detroit Pistons
Detroit Pistons
on October 29, 1965). Bird also set the franchise record for most points scored in a quarter with 24 points in the third quarter which has since been equaled by Todd Day against the Minnesota Timberwolves on December 22, 1995. On February 18, 1985, Bird registered a triple double (30 points, 12 rebounds, 10 assists) and also had 9 steals in three quarters of play against the Utah Jazz. Bird sat out the fourth quarter, as the Celtics led 90–66 after the third quarter and won the game 110–94. When asked by reporters if he actually wanted to play in the 4th quarter to get the quadruple double, Bird said "What for? I already did enough damage to them." On March 12, 1985, Bird scored 60 points against the Atlanta Hawks
Atlanta Hawks
to reclaim the record for highest scoring output in a game by a Celtic, just nine days after teammate Kevin McHale broke Bird's previous record by scoring 56 points against the Detroit Pistons. On April 1, 1987, Bird registered a triple-double (17 points, 11 rebounds, 10 assists) by halftime against the Washington Bullets. He finished the game with 30 points, 17 rebounds, and 15 assists. On November 11, 1987, Bird completed the first 40 point–20 rebound game in Celtics history against the Indiana Pacers. On November 10, 1989, Bird scored 50 points against the Atlanta Hawks to register his fourth and final 50 point game in his career. Bird's four career 50 point games stand as the record for most 50 point games by a Celtic. Bird recorded three 40 point triple–double games in his professional career. The first was on February 14, 1986 in an overtime win against the Portland Trail Blazers. He finished that game with 47 points, 14 rebounds, and 11 assists. The second occurred on December 13, 1989 in a win over the Seattle SuperSonics
Seattle SuperSonics
(40 points, 11 rebounds, 10 assists). The last was in a double overtime win against the Portland Trail Blazers on March 15, 1992 where Bird finished with 49 points (the then record for the most points scored while recording a triple double), 14 rebounds, and 12 assists. Bird also totaled 69 triple doubles (59 regular season and 10 postseason) which stands behind Oscar Robertson, Magic Johnson, Jason Kidd, Russell Westbrook, Wilt Chamberlain, LeBron James
LeBron James
for 7th most all-time.

In popular culture

Bird has appeared in three movies, each time playing himself: Blue Chips, released in 1994 by Paramount; the Warner Brothers
Warner Brothers
film Space Jam with Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
and Bill Murray, in 1996; and Celtic Pride with Dan Aykroyd, Daniel Stern, and Damon Wayans, which was also released in 1996.[76] Bird also voiced himself in the Futurama
Futurama
episode Saturday Morning Fun Pit, where a team of himself and his clones plays basketball against the Harlem Globetrotters. Bird's likeness has appeared in several video games. In One on One: Dr. J vs. Larry Bird, Bird plays opposite Julius Erving
Julius Erving
in a game of one-on-one. A sequel, Jordan vs Bird: One on One, was a 1988 basketball video game. In 2011, Bird was featured on the cover of NBA 2K12, alongside Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
and Michael Jordan. Bird is also a playable character in the revamped NBA Jam.[77] The band Dispatch has a song called "Just Like Larry" about Larry Bird, who is their hometown hero from his days as a member of the Boston
Boston
Celtics.[78] Larry Bird
Larry Bird
and Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
wrote a book together (with Jackie MacMullan) titled When The Game Was Ours.[79] In a commercial during Super Bowl XLIV, Dwight Howard
Dwight Howard
and LeBron James challenge each other at trick shots for a McDonald's
McDonald's
lunch. After they finish, clapping is heard, then the camera pans to the crowd and Bird says "Great show, guys. Thanks for lunch." Howard and James share a confused look. Howard asks, "Who was that?" James replies, "I have no idea." This refers to a McDonald's
McDonald's
commercial from 1991 in which Bird and Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
have a trick shot contest, in which the winner got the lunch and the loser had to watch the winner eat.[80] In October 2005, a man in Oklahoma City, Eric James Torpy, was convicted of shooting with intent to kill and robbery. He asked that his sentence be changed from 30 years' imprisonment to 33 so that it would match Bird's jersey number. His request was granted.[81] Twitter's logo is named Larry in honor of Larry Bird.[82] One of the lead characters in the television series The Neighbors is an alien named Larry Bird, played by Simon Templeman.[83]

NBA career statistics

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

† Denotes seasons in which Bird won an NBA championship

* Led the league

Cited from Basketball Reference's Larry Bird
Larry Bird
page.[24]

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1979–80 Boston 82 82 36.0 .474 .406 .836 10.4 4.5 1.7 .6 21.3

1980–81† Boston 82 82 39.5 .478 .270 .863 10.9 5.5 2.0 .8 21.2

1981–82 Boston 77 58 38.0 .503 .212 .863 10.9 5.8 1.9 .9 22.9

1982–83 Boston 79 79 37.7 .504 .286 .840 11.0 5.8 1.9 .9 23.6

1983–84† Boston 79 77 38.3 .492 .247 .888* 10.1 6.6 1.8 .9 24.2

1984–85 Boston 80 77 39.5* .522 .427 .882 10.5 6.6 1.6 1.2 28.7

1985–86† Boston 82 81 38.0 .496 .423 .896* 9.8 6.8 2.0 .6 25.8

1986–87 Boston 74 73 40.6* .525 .400 .910* 9.2 7.6 1.8 .9 28.1

1987–88 Boston 76 75 39.0 .527 .414 .916 9.3 6.1 1.6 .8 29.9

1988–89 Boston 6 6 31.5 .471 … .947 6.2 4.8 1.0 .8 19.3

1989–90 Boston 75 75 39.3 .473 .333 .930* 9.5 7.5 1.4 .8 24.3

1990–91 Boston 60 60 38.0 .454 .389 .891 8.5 7.2 1.8 1.0 19.4

1991–92 Boston 45 45 36.9 .466 .406 .926 9.6 6.8 .9 .7 20.2

Career 897 870 38.4 .496 .376 .886 10.0 6.3 1.7 0.8 24.3

All-Star 10 9 28.7 .423 .231 .844 7.9 4.1 2.3 0.3 13.4

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1980 Boston 9 9 41.3 .469 .267 .880 11.2 4.7 1.6 0.9 21.3

1981† Boston 17 17 44.1 .470 .375 .894 14.0 6.1 2.3 1.0 21.9

1982 Boston 12 12 40.8 .427 .167 .822 12.5 5.6 1.9 1.4 17.8

1983 Boston 6 6 40.0 .422 .250 .828 12.5 6.8 2.2 0.5 20.5

1984† Boston 23 23 41.8 .524 .412 .879 11.0 5.9 2.3 1.2 27.5

1985 Boston 20 20 40.8 .461 .280 .890 9.1 5.8 1.7 1.0 26.0

1986† Boston 18 18 42.8 .517 .411 .927 9.3 8.2 2.1 .6 25.9

1987 Boston 23 23 44.1 .476 .341 .912 10.0 7.2 1.2 0.8 27.0

1988 Boston 17 17 44.9 .450 .375 .894 8.8 6.8 2.1 0.8 24.5

1990 Boston 5 5 41.4 .444 .263 .906 9.2 8.8 1.0 1.0 24.4

1991 Boston 10 10 39.6 .408 .143 .863 7.2 6.5 1.3 0.3 17.1

1992 Boston 4 2 26.8 .500 .000 .750 4.5 5.3 0.3 0.5 11.3

Career 164 162 42.0 .472 .321 .890 10.3 6.5 1.8 0.9 23.8

See also

Biography portal Indiana portal National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
portal

List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career assists leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career playoff assists leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career playoff free throw scoring leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career playoff rebounding leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career playoff scoring leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career playoff steals leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career playoff turnovers leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career scoring leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career steals leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career turnovers leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
players with most points in a game List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
players with most steals in a game List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
annual minutes leaders List of NBA players who have spent their entire career with one franchise List of NCAA Division I men's basketball career scoring leaders List of NCAA Division I men's basketball players with 2000 points and 1000 rebounds

References

^ http://www.nba.com/history/legends/profiles/larry-bird#/ ^ https://hoopshabit.com/2014/12/19/50-greatest-nba-players-1980s/52/ ^ https://www.cheatsheet.com/sports/5-all-time-great-nba-basketball-players-by-position.html/?a=viewall ^ http://boston.cbslocal.com/2016/06/22/whos-the-best-small-forward-of-all-time-larry-bird-or-lebron-james/ ^ http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1745748-lebron-james-michael-jordan-larry-bird-julius-erving-are-best-3-players-ever ^ https://larrylegend.wordpress.com/case-for-larry-bird/ ^ http://classic.esquire.com/editors-notes/the-long-goodbye-of-the-basketball-greats/ ^ " Larry Bird
Larry Bird
Summary". NBA.com. Retrieved May 13, 2015.  ^ "The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame
Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame
– Hall of Famers". Hoophall.com. December 7, 1956. Archived from the original on August 29, 2009. Retrieved May 13, 2015.  ^ "Sports Essentials". USA Today. Archived from the original on 2016-03-08.  ^ a b "Bird Returns The Official Site Of The Indiana Pacers". Nba.com. June 26, 2013. Retrieved May 13, 2015.  ^ a b "Pacers' Bird named NBA's top exec". CNN Sports Illustrated. May 16, 2012. Archived from the original on May 19, 2012. Indiana Pacers president Larry Bird
Larry Bird
was voted the NBA's Executive of the Year on Wednesday, becoming the first person to win that award, plus the MVP and Coach of the Year honors.  ^ a b c d Schwartz, Larry. "Plain and simple, Bird one of the best". ESPN. Retrieved July 29, 2013.  ^ a b Schwartz, Larry. "Eye for victory". ESPN. Retrieved July 29, 2013.  ^ Deford, Frank (March 21, 1988). "Boston's Larry Bird, in what may be his finest season, gets Red Auerbach's vote—over Bill Russell—as the best ever". CNNSI.com. Archived from the original on September 30, 2013. Retrieved May 24, 2011. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) ^ Papanek, John (November 9, 1981). "Gifts That God Didn't Give". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on November 9, 2013. Retrieved July 29, 2013. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) ^ a b "Larry Bird: Biography". Retrieved June 28, 2013.  ^ Davis, Seth (March 4, 2009). "When March Went Mad". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on September 30, 2013. Retrieved May 17, 2012. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) ^ Bird, Larry (1989), Drive: The Story of My Life. Doubleday, pp. 39–40. ISBN 0-385-24921-7 ^ "Throwback Thursday: Celtics Draft Larry Bird
Larry Bird
Sixth Overall". Boston Magazine. Retrieved December 31, 2015.  ^ Professor Parquet (January 7, 2015). "The story of how rookie phenom Larry Bird
Larry Bird
led the NBA's greatest turnaround season – CelticsBlog". CelticsBlog. Retrieved December 31, 2015.  ^ a b Magic & Bird: A Courtship of Rivals. HBO, 2010. ^ a b c " Larry Bird
Larry Bird
Bio". NBA Encyclopedia. Retrieved July 29, 2013.  ^ a b c d e f g h i " Larry Bird
Larry Bird
NBA Stats". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 13, 2015.  ^ Dana Hunsinger (May 4, 2015). "Larry Bird's baseball career: A lofty .500 batting average". www.indystar.com. Indianapolis Star. Retrieved December 8, 2016.  ^ a b May, Peter (2007) [1994]. The Big Three. New York: Simon and Schuster. p. 57. ISBN 978-1-4165-5207-9. OCLC 86221987. Retrieved March 21, 2013.  ^ "1978–79 NBA Season Summary". Basketball Reference. Retrieved March 2, 2014.  ^ a b "1979–80 NBA Season Summary". Basketball Reference. Retrieved March 2, 2014.  ^ "Kevin McHale NBA & ABA Stats". Basketball Reference. Retrieved March 2, 2014.  ^ " Robert Parish
Robert Parish
NBA & ABA Stats". Basketball Reference. Retrieved March 2, 2014.  ^ a b "1980–81 NBA Season Summary". Basketball Reference. Retrieved March 2, 2014.  ^ "1981 NBA Eastern Conference Finals". Basketball Reference. Retrieved March 2, 2014.  ^ "1981 NBA Finals". Basketball Reference. Retrieved March 2, 2014.  ^ a b c "NBA.com: Larry Bird
Larry Bird
Bio". NBA.com. Retrieved March 8, 2014.  ^ " 1982 NBA Playoffs Summary". Basketball Reference. Retrieved March 8, 2014.  ^ " 1983 NBA Playoffs Summary". Basketball Reference. Retrieved March 8, 2014.  ^ a b c " 1984 NBA Playoffs Summary". Basketball Reference. Retrieved March 20, 2014.  ^ MacMullan, Jackie (2009). When the Game Was Ours. Mariner. p. 136. ISBN 978-0-547-39458-9.  ^ Schwartz, Larry. "Eye for victory". ESPN. Retrieved March 29, 2014.  ^ MacMullan, Jackie (2009). When the Game Was Ours. Mariner. p. 15. ISBN 978-0-547-39458-9.  ^ " 1985 NBA Finals Composite Box Score". basketballreference.com. Retrieved December 31, 2015.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 7, 2016. Retrieved April 15, 2016.  ^ a b "1985–86 Boston
Boston
Celtics". NBA.com. Retrieved March 30, 2014.  ^ "1985–86 NBA Season Summary". Basketball Reference. Retrieved March 30, 2014.  ^ Caplan, Jeff (February 5, 2010). "With Bird in, good things came with 3s". ESPN. Retrieved June 15, 2014.  ^ "Relive the Moment: Larry Bird
Larry Bird
Easily Wins Inaugural 3-Point Contest After Asking Field Who Would Finish Second". New England Sports Network. August 17, 2011. Retrieved June 15, 2014.  ^ "Larry Legend – Bird wins third straight MVP". ESPN
ESPN
Classic. Retrieved March 30, 2014.  ^ " 1986 NBA Finals
1986 NBA Finals
Composite Box Score". basketballreference.com. Retrieved December 31, 2015.  ^ Poulard, JM. "The 1985–86 Boston
Boston
Celtics". Warriors World. Archived from the original on April 14, 2014. Retrieved April 13, 2014.  ^ " 1987 NBA Finals
1987 NBA Finals
Composite Box Score". basketballreference.com. Retrieved December 31, 2015.  ^ [1][dead link] ^ [2] ^ "Celtics-Lakers Box Score". basketballreference.com.  ^ "Dream Team a star-studded sight to behold for gazers on, off court". Sports Illustrated. July 20, 2011. Archived from the original on April 27, 2014. Retrieved June 28, 2013. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) ^ [3] https://web.archive.org/web/20151016091710/https://sports.yahoo.com/news/pacers-larry-bird-nba-executive-180548406--nba.html Archived July 12, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. ^ " Indiana Pacers
Indiana Pacers
part ways with Larry Bird". CBS/AP. Retrieved June 27, 2012.  ^ "NBA: Bird leaves Pacers as Walsh returns to replace him". The Times Of India. June 28, 2012. Archived from the original on September 7, 2012. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) ^ "Bird Steps Down; Pritchard Named President of Basketball Operations". NBA.com. May 1, 2017. Retrieved May 2, 2017.  ^ " Larry Bird
Larry Bird
Biography – ESPN". Espn.go.com. December 7, 1956. Retrieved May 13, 2015.  ^ "Terre Haute's Top 40". Specials.tribstar.com. Archived from the original on March 13, 2015. Retrieved May 13, 2015.  ^ "Classic NBA Quotes". NBA. Retrieved September 12, 2009.  ^ "CNN.com". Sports Illustrated. April 6, 1979. Retrieved July 11, 2010.  https://web.archive.org/web/20151120132151/ and http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/basketball/nba/1998/bird/flashbacks/1988flash.html ^ "Career Leaders and Records for Player Efficiency Rating –". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved July 11, 2010.  ^ "Career Leaders and Records for Steals". Basketball-reference.com. Retrieved July 11, 2010.  ^ "NBA.com: Larry Bird
Larry Bird
Summary". Retrieved June 3, 2009.  ^ Jeff Caplan (February 5, 2010). "With Bird in, good things came with 3s". ESPN
ESPN
Dallas. Retrieved April 23, 2014.  ^ "All-Star History: Three-Point Shootout
Three-Point Shootout
winners". NBA.com. July 4, 2013. Retrieved April 23, 2014.  ^ "Bird: NBA 'a black man's game'" (November 6, 2004). ESPN. Retrieved December 11, 2015. ^ Ross, Tommy. (March 5, 2010). "Top 5 NBA Clutch Performers Of All Time". Bleacher Report. Retrieved September 23, 2015. ^ Reggie Miller; Gene Wojciechowski; Spike Lee (April 1, 1999). I Love Being the Enemy: A Season on the Court with the NBA's Best Shooter and Sharpest Tongue. Simon and Schuster. p. 150. ISBN 978-0-684-87039-7. Retrieved June 28, 2011.  ^ "Happy 50th, Larry Legend". NBA. Retrieved July 11, 2010.  ^ Winkel, Stew (March 17, 2010). "If Only Larry Bird
Larry Bird
Was Walking Through That Door". 4sportboston.com. Archived from the original on November 30, 2011. Retrieved May 24, 2011.  ^ Bird, Larry (1989), Drive: The Story of My Life. Doubleday, p. 87. ISBN 0-385-24921-7 ^ "Bird, Erving Fined $7,500 for Fighting". The New York Times. November 14, 1984. p. A27.  ^ "August 18, 1992 California Angels at Boston
Boston
Red Sox Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 13, 2015.  ^ "Larry Bird". IMDb.com. Retrieved May 13, 2015.  ^ "Your NBA Jam Rosters Are Set". Kotaku.com. Retrieved May 13, 2015.  ^ "lyrics Dispatch – Just Like Larry". SongMeanings. Retrieved July 11, 2010.  ^ Sheinin, Dave (December 13, 2009). "Book review: When the Game Was Ours by Larry Bird
Larry Bird
and Magic Johnson". The Washington Post. Retrieved December 23, 2015. ^ "FULL VERSION: McDonald's
McDonald's
Commercial with LeBron James
LeBron James
and Dwight Howard". YouTube. Retrieved April 16, 2011.  ^ "Felon gets longer sentence to match Bird jersey". Sports.espn.go.com. Retrieved May 13, 2015.  ^ Freeman, Eric (August 2011). "Twitter's Logo Is Named After Larry Bird". Yahoo!Sports. Retrieved March 1, 2012.  ^ " Simon Templeman
Simon Templeman
as Larry Bird
Larry Bird
– The Neighbors Characters & Cast Bios – ABC.com". ABC. November 2012. Archived from the original on May 10, 2013. 

Further reading

MacCambridge, Michael, ed. (1999). "Larry Bird: Bird of Prey". ESPN SportsCentury. New York: Hyperion- ESPN
ESPN
Books. pp. 253–254. ISBN 978-0786864713.  May, Peter (2007) [1994]. The Big Three: Larry Bird, Kevin McHale, and Robert Parish: The Best Frontcourt in the History of Basketball. New York: Simon and Schuster. ISBN 978-1-4165-5207-9. OCLC 86221987. Retrieved March 21, 2013. 

External links

Find more aboutLarry Birdat's sister projects

Media from Wikimedia Commons Quotations from Wikiquote

Career statistics and player information from Basketball-Reference.com Larry Bird
Larry Bird
at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame NBA profile

Larry Bird—coaching tenures, championships, awards, and honors

v t e

Indiana Pacers
Indiana Pacers
head coaches

Larry Staverman
Larry Staverman
(1967–1968) Bobby Leonard
Bobby Leonard
(1968–1980) Jack McKinney (1980–1984) George Irvine (1984–1986) Jack Ramsay (1986–1988) Mel Daniels
Mel Daniels
(1988) George Irvine (1988–1989) Dick Versace (1989–1990) Bob Hill
Bob Hill
(1990–1993) Larry Brown (1993–1997) Larry Bird
Larry Bird
(1997–2000) Isiah Thomas
Isiah Thomas
(2000–2003) Rick Carlisle
Rick Carlisle
(2003–2007) Jim O'Brien (2007–2011) Frank Vogel
Frank Vogel
(2011–2016) Nate McMillan
Nate McMillan
(2016– )

(#) denotes interim head coach.

v t e

1978 NBA Draft

First round

Mychal Thompson Phil Ford Rick Robey Micheal Ray Richardson Purvis Short Larry Bird Ron Brewer Freeman Williams Reggie Theus Butch Lee James Hardy George Johnson Winford Boynes Roger Phegley Mike Mitchell Jack Givens Rod Griffin Dave Corzine Marty Byrnes Frankie Sanders Mike Evans Raymond Townsend

Second round

Terry Tyler Keith Herron Rick Wilson Ron Carter Wayne Radford Buster Matheney John Long Jeff Judkins Marvin Johnson John Rudd Harry Davis Greg Bunch Tommie Green Maurice Cheeks Terry Sykes Lew Massey James Lee Wayne Cooper Jerome Whitehead Keven McDonald Glenn Hagan Clemon Johnson

v t e

1978 NCAA Men's Basketball Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Larry Bird Phil Ford David Greenwood Butch Lee Mychal Thompson

Second Team

Ron Brewer Jack Givens Rod Griffin Rick Robey Freeman Williams

v t e

1979 NCAA Men's Basketball Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Larry Bird Mike Gminski David Greenwood Earvin Johnson Sidney Moncrief

Second Team

Bill Cartwright Calvin Natt Mike O'Koren Jim Paxson Jim Spanarkel Kelly Tripucka Sly Williams

v t e

Adolph Rupp Trophy
Adolph Rupp Trophy
winners

1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: Johnson 1978: Lee 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Ewing 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: Elliott 1990: Simmons 1991: O'Neal 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: West 2004: Nelson 2005: Redick 2006: Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Wall 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Oladipo 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky

v t e

Associated Press Men's College Basketball Player of the Year

1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Bradds 1965: Bradley 1966: Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Carr 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Thompson 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: Johnson 1978: Lee 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Ewing 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: Elliott 1990: Simmons 1991: O'Neal 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: West 2004: Nelson 2005: Bogut 2006: Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Burke 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Valentine 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

v t e

Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year

1931: Pepper Martin 1932: Gene Sarazen 1933: Carl Hubbell 1934: Dizzy Dean 1935: Joe Louis 1936: Jesse Owens 1937: Don Budge 1938: Don Budge 1939: Nile Kinnick 1940: Tom Harmon 1941: Joe DiMaggio 1942: Frank Sinkwich 1943: Gunder Hägg 1944: Byron Nelson 1945: Byron Nelson 1946: Glenn Davis 1947: Johnny Lujack 1948: Lou Boudreau 1949: Leon Hart 1950: Jim Konstanty 1951: Dick Kazmaier 1952: Bob Mathias 1953: Ben Hogan 1954: Willie Mays 1955: Howard Cassady 1956: Mickey Mantle 1957: Ted Williams 1958: Herb Elliott 1959: Ingemar Johansson 1960: Rafer Johnson 1961: Roger Maris 1962: Maury Wills 1963: Sandy Koufax 1964: Don Schollander 1965: Sandy Koufax 1966: Frank Robinson 1967: Carl Yastrzemski 1968: Denny McLain 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: George Blanda 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Mark Spitz 1973: O. J. Simpson 1974: Muhammad Ali 1975: Fred Lynn 1976: Bruce Jenner 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Ron Guidry 1979: Willie Stargell 1980: U.S. Olympic Hockey Team 1981: John McEnroe 1982: Wayne Gretzky 1983: Carl Lewis 1984: Carl Lewis 1985: Dwight Gooden 1986: Larry Bird 1987: Ben Johnson 1988: Orel Hershiser 1989: Joe Montana 1990: Joe Montana 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Michael Jordan 1993: Michael Jordan 1994: George Foreman 1995: Cal Ripken Jr. 1996: Michael Johnson 1997: Tiger Woods 1998: Mark McGwire 1999: Tiger Woods 2000: Tiger Woods 2001: Barry Bonds 2002: Lance Armstrong 2003: Lance Armstrong 2004: Lance Armstrong 2005: Lance Armstrong 2006: Tiger Woods 2007: Tom Brady 2008: Michael Phelps 2009: Jimmie Johnson 2010: Drew Brees 2011: Aaron Rodgers 2012: Michael Phelps 2013: LeBron James 2014: Madison Bumgarner 2015: Stephen Curry 2016: LeBron James 2017: José Altuve

v t e

Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States Olympic Team 1992 United States Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

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Boston
Boston
Celtics

Founded in 1946 Based in Boston, Massachusetts

Franchise

Franchise Team history All-time roster Seasons Accomplishments Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Boston
Boston
Arena Boston
Boston
Garden Hartford Civic Center TD Garden

Administration

Boston
Boston
Basketball Partners (owner) Wyc Grousbeck (CEO) Wyc Grousbeck, H. Irving Grousbeck, Stephen Pagliuca (managing partners) Danny Ainge
Danny Ainge
(General manager) Brad Stevens
Brad Stevens
(Head coach)

General managers

Brown Auerbach Volk Wallace Ainge

Retired numbers

00 1 2 3 6 10 14 15 16 17 18 LOSCY 19 21 22 23 24 25 31 32 33 34 35 MIC

Hall of Famers

Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
Hall of Famers

G League affiliate

Maine Red Claws

Rivalries

Detroit Pistons Los Angeles Lakers New York Knicks Philadelphia 76ers

Culture

Celtic Pride Greatest game ever played Tommy Points "Love ya, Cooz!" Close, but no cigar! Bill Russell Beat L.A. Celtics/Lakers: Best of Enemies Mike Gorman Johnny Most "Havlicek stole the ball!" Henderson steals the ball! Bird steals the ball! Boston
Boston
Garden North Station Larry Legend DJ The Chief The Truth The Sports Museum
The Sports Museum
of New England

NBA Championships (17)

1957 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1968 1969 1974 1976 1981 1984 1986 2008

Eastern Conference Championships (21)

1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1968 1969 1974 1976 1981 1984 1985 1986 1987 2008 2010

Media

TV NBC Sports Boston Radio WBZ-FM Announcers Mike Gorman Tom Heinsohn Brian Scalabrine Sean Grande Cedric Maxwell John Wallach

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Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
1980–81 NBA champions

00 Parish 7 Archibald 30 Carr 31 Maxwell (Finals MVP) 32 McHale 33 Bird 40 Duerod 42 Ford 43 Henderson 45 Fernsten 53 Robey

Head coach Fitch

Assistant coaches Jones Rodgers

Regular season Playoffs

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Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
1983–84 NBA champions

00 Parish 3 Johnson 8 Wedman 28 Buckner 30 Carr 31 Maxwell 32 McHale 33 Bird (Finals MVP) 40 Clark 43 Henderson 44 Ainge 50 Kite

Head coach Jones

Assistant coaches Rodgers Ford

Regular season Playoffs

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Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
1985–86 NBA champions

00 Parish 3 Johnson 5 Walton 8 Wedman 11 Vincent 12 Sichting 32 McHale 33 Bird (Finals MVP) 34 Carlisle 44 Ainge 45 Thirdkill 50 Kite

Head coach Jones

Assistant coaches Rodgers Ford Badger

Regular season Playoffs

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United States squad – 1992 Tournament of the Americas
1992 Tournament of the Americas
– Gold medal

4 Laettner 5 Robinson 6 Ewing 7 Bird 8 Pippen 9 Jordan 10 Drexler 11 Malone 12 Stockton 13 Mullin 14 Barkley 15 Johnson Coach: Daly

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United States men's basketball squad – 1992 Summer Olympics
1992 Summer Olympics
– Gold medal

4 Laettner 5 Robinson 6 Ewing 7 Bird 8 Pippen 9 Jordan 10 Drexler 11 Malone 12 Stockton 13 Mullin 14 Barkley 15 Johnson Coach: Daly

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Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year

1905: Steinmetz 1906: Grebenstein 1907: Kinney 1908: Keinath 1909: Schommer 1910: Page 1911: Kiendl 1912: Stangel 1913: Calder 1914: Halstead 1915: Houghton 1916: Levis 1917: Woods 1918: Chandler 1919: Platou 1920: Cann 1921: Williams 1922: Carney 1923: Endacott 1924: Black 1925: Mueller 1926: Cobb 1927: Hanson 1928: Holt 1929: C. Thompson 1930: Hyatt 1931: Carlton 1932: Wooden 1933: Sale 1934: Bennett 1935: Edwards 1936: Moir 1937: Luisetti 1938: Luisetti 1939: Jaworski 1940: Glamack 1941: Glamack 1942: Modzelewski 1943: Senesky 1944: Mikan 1945: Mikan 1946: Kurland 1947: Tucker 1948: Macauley 1949: Lavelli 1950: Arizin 1951: Groat 1952: Lovellette 1953: Houbregs 1954: Gola 1955: B. Russell 1956: B. Russell 1957: Rosenbluth 1958: Baylor 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Hogue 1963: Heyman 1964: Hazzard 1965: Bradley & Goodrich 1966: C. Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Alcindor 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich & Wicks 1971: Carr & Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: D. Thompson 1975: D. Thompson 1976: Benson & May 1977: Johnson 1978: Givens 1979: Bird

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Missouri Valley Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

1969: B. Smith 1970: Ard 1971: Halliburton 1972: Finch 1973: Kenon 1974: Bridgeman 1975: Bridgeman 1976: Glenn 1977: Phegley 1978: Bird 1979: Bird 1980: Lloyd 1981: Lloyd 1982: Pressey 1983: A. Carr 1984: McDaniel 1985: McDaniel 1986: Les 1987: Hawkins 1988: Hawkins 1989: Manuel 1990: Harstad 1991: Gallagher 1992: Amaya 1993: C. Smith 1994: Collier 1995: C. Carr 1996: Parker 1997: Daisy 1998: Hill 1999: Wilson 2000: Green 2001: Bryson 2002: Korver 2003: Korver 2004: Brooks 2005: Brooks 2006: Miller 2007: Tatum 2008: Emmenecker 2009: Woodfox 2010: Koch 2011: Weems 2012: McDermott 2013: McDermott 2014: VanVleet 2015: Tuttle 2016: VanVleet 2017: Lee 2018: Custer

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NABC Player of the Year

1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: M. Johnson 1978: Ford 1979: Bird 1980: Brooks 1981: Ainge 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Ewing 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Manning 1989: Elliott 1990: Simmons 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Respert 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Williams 2002: Gooden & Williams 2003: Collison 2004: Nelson & Okafor 2005: Bogut 2006: Morrison & Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Green 2013: Burke 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Valentine 2017: Mason 2018: Brunson

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Naismith Men's College Player of the Year

1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Carr 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: M. Johnson 1978: Lee 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Ewing 1986: Dawkins 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Manning 1989: Ferry 1990: Simmons 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: Ford 2004: Nelson 2005: Bogut 2006: Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Burke 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Hield 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

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NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game Most Valuable Player Award

1951: Macauley 1952: Arizin 1953: Mikan 1954: Cousy 1955: Sharman 1956: Pettit 1957: Cousy 1958: Pettit 1959: Baylor & Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Pettit 1963: Russell 1964: Robertson 1965: Lucas 1966: A. Smith 1967: Barry 1968: Greer 1969: Robertson 1970: Reed 1971: Wilkens 1972: West 1973: Cowens 1974: Lanier 1975: Frazier 1976: Bing 1977: Erving 1978: R. Smith 1979: Thompson 1980: Gervin 1981: Archibald 1982: Bird 1983: Erving 1984: Thomas 1985: Sampson 1986: Thomas 1987: Chambers 1988: Jordan 1989: Malone 1990: Johnson 1991: Barkley 1992: Johnson 1993: Stockton & Malone 1994: Pippen 1995: Richmond 1996: Jordan 1997: Rice 1998: Jordan 1999: No game played 2000: O'Neal & Duncan 2001: Iverson 2002: Bryant 2003: Garnett 2004: O'Neal 2005: Iverson 2006: James 2007: Bryant 2008: James 2009: Bryant & O'Neal 2010: Wade 2011: Bryant 2012: Durant 2013: Paul 2014: Irving 2015: Westbrook 2016: Westbrook 2017: Davis

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NBA Coach of the Year
NBA Coach of the Year
Award

1963: Gallatin 1964: Hannum 1965: Auerbach 1966: Schayes 1967: J. Kerr 1968: Guerin 1969: Shue 1970: Holzman 1971: Motta 1972: Sharman 1973: Heinsohn 1974: R. Scott 1975: P. Johnson 1976: Fitch 1977: Nissalke 1978: H. Brown 1979: Fitzsimmons 1980: Fitch 1981: McKinney 1982: Shue 1983: Nelson 1984: Layden 1985: Nelson 1986: Fratello 1987: Schuler 1988: Moe 1989: Fitzsimmons 1990: Riley 1991: Chaney 1992: Nelson 1993: Riley 1994: Wilkens 1995: Harris 1996: Jackson 1997: Riley 1998: Bird 1999: Dunleavy 2000: Rivers 2001: L. Brown 2002: Carlisle 2003: Popovich 2004: H. Brown 2005: D'Antoni 2006: A. Johnson 2007: Mitchell 2008: B. Scott 2009: M. Brown 2010: Brooks 2011: Thibodeau 2012: Popovich 2013: Karl 2014: Popovich 2015: Budenholzer 2016: S. Kerr 2017: D'Antoni

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NBA Executive of the Year Award

1973: Axelson 1974: Donovan 1975: Vertlieb 1976: J. Colangelo 1977: Patterson 1978: Drossos 1979: Ferry 1980: Auerbach 1981: J. Colangelo 1982: Ferry 1983: Volchok 1984: Layden 1985: Boryla 1986: Kasten 1987: Kasten 1988: Krause 1989: J. Colangelo 1990: Bass 1991: Buckwalter 1992: Embry 1993: J. Colangelo 1994: Whitsitt 1995: West 1996: Krause 1997: Bass 1998: Embry 1999: Petrie 2000: Gabriel 2001: Petrie 2002: Thorn 2003: Dumars 2004: West 2005: B. Colangelo 2006: Baylor 2007: B. Colangelo 2008: Ainge 2009: Warkentien 2010: Hammond 2011: Forman & Riley 2012: Bird 2013: Ujiri 2014: Buford 2015: Myers 2016: Buford 2017: Myers

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Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame
Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame
Class of 1998

Players

Larry Bird Marques Haynes Arnie Risen

Coach

Jody Conradt Alex Hannum Aleksandar Nikolić Lenny Wilkens

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Bill Russell
Bill Russell
NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award

1969: West 1970: Reed 1971: Alcindor 1972: Chamberlain 1973: Reed 1974: Havlicek 1975: Barry 1976: White 1977: Walton 1978: Unseld 1979: D. Johnson 1980: E. Johnson 1981: Maxwell 1982: E. Johnson 1983: Malone 1984: Bird 1985: Abdul-Jabbar 1986: Bird 1987: E. Johnson 1988: Worthy 1989: Dumars 1990: Thomas 1991: Jordan 1992: Jordan 1993: Jordan 1994: Olajuwon 1995: Olajuwon 1996: Jordan 1997: Jordan 1998: Jordan 1999: Duncan 2000: O'Neal 2001: O'Neal 2002: O'Neal 2003: Duncan 2004: Billups 2005: Duncan 2006: Wade 2007: Parker 2008: Pierce 2009: Bryant 2010: Bryant 2011: Nowitzki 2012: James 2013: James 2014: Leonard 2015: Iguodala 2016: James 2017: Durant

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NBA Most Valuable Player Award

1956: Pettit 1957: Cousy 1958: Russell 1959: Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Russell 1962: Russell 1963: Russell 1964: Robertson 1965: Russell 1966: Chamberlain 1967: Chamberlain 1968: Chamberlain 1969: Unseld 1970: Reed 1971: Alcindor 1972: Abdul-Jabbar 1973: Cowens 1974: Abdul-Jabbar 1975: McAdoo 1976: Abdul-Jabbar 1977: Abdul-Jabbar 1978: Walton 1979: M. Malone 1980: Abdul-Jabbar 1981: Erving 1982: M. Malone 1983: M. Malone 1984: Bird 1985: Bird 1986: Bird 1987: Johnson 1988: Jordan 1989: Johnson 1990: Johnson 1991: Jordan 1992: Jordan 1993: Barkley 1994: Olajuwon 1995: Robinson 1996: Jordan 1997: K. Malone 1998: Jordan 1999: K. Malone 2000: O'Neal 2001: Iverson 2002: Duncan 2003: Duncan 2004: Garnett 2005: Nash 2006: Nash 2007: Nowitzki 2008: Bryant 2009: James 2010: James 2011: Rose 2012: James 2013: James 2014: Durant 2015: Curry 2016: Curry 2017: Westbrook

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NBA Rookie of the Year Award

1953: Meineke 1954: Felix 1955: Pettit 1956: Stokes 1957: Heinsohn 1958: Sauldsberry 1959: Baylor 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Bellamy 1963: Dischinger 1964: Lucas 1965: Reed 1966: Barry 1967: Bing 1968: Monroe 1969: Unseld 1970: Alcindor 1971: Cowens & Petrie 1972: Wicks 1973: McAdoo 1974: DiGregorio 1975: Wilkes 1976: Adams 1977: Dantley 1978: Davis 1979: Ford 1980: Bird 1981: Griffith 1982: Williams 1983: Cummings 1984: Sampson 1985: Jordan 1986: Ewing 1987: Person 1988: Jackson 1989: Richmond 1990: Robinson 1991: Coleman 1992: Johnson 1993: O'Neal 1994: Webber 1995: Hill & Kidd 1996: Stoudamire 1997: Iverson 1998: Duncan 1999: Carter 2000: Brand & Francis 2001: Miller 2002: Gasol 2003: Stoudemire 2004: James 2005: Okafor 2006: Paul 2007: Roy 2008: Durant 2009: Rose 2010: Evans 2011: Griffin 2012: Irving 2013: Lillard 2014: Carter-Williams 2015: Wiggins 2016: Towns 2017: Brogdon

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National Basketball Association's 50 Greatest Players in NBA History

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Nate Archibald Paul Arizin Charles Barkley Rick Barry Elgin Baylor Dave Bing Larry Bird Wilt Chamberlain Bob Cousy Dave Cowens Billy Cunningham Dave DeBusschere Clyde Drexler Julius Erving Patrick Ewing Walt Frazier George Gervin Hal Greer John Havlicek Elvin Hayes Magic Johnson Sam Jones Michael Jordan Jerry Lucas Karl Malone Moses Malone Pete Maravich Kevin McHale George Mikan Earl Monroe Hakeem Olajuwon Shaquille O'Neal Robert Parish Bob Pettit Scottie Pippen Willis Reed Oscar Robertson David Robinson Bill Russell Dolph Schayes Bill Sharman John Stockton Isiah Thomas Nate Thurmond Wes Unseld Bill Walton Jerry West Lenny Wilkens James Worthy

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Oscar Robertson Trophy
Oscar Robertson Trophy
winners

1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Hazzard 1965: Bradley 1966: Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Alcindor 1969: Maravich 1970: Maravich 1971: Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: Dantley 1977: M. Johnson 1978: Ford 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Mullin 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: Ferry 1990: Simmons 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: O'Bannon 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: West 2004: Nelson 2005: Bogut 2006: Morrison & Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Burke 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Hield 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

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Sporting News Sportsman/Pro Athlete of the Year

1968: Denny McLain 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: John Wooden 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Charlie Finley 1973: O. J. Simpson 1974: Lou Brock 1975: Archie Griffin 1976: Larry O'Brien 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Ron Guidry 1979: Willie Stargell 1980: George Brett 1981: Wayne Gretzky 1982: Whitey Herzog 1983: Bowie Kuhn 1984: Peter Ueberroth 1985: Pete Rose 1986: Larry Bird 1987: None 1988: Jackie Joyner-Kersee 1989: Joe Montana 1990: Nolan Ryan 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Mike Krzyzewski 1993: Cito Gaston
Cito Gaston
& Pat Gillick 1994: Emmitt Smith 1995: Cal Ripken Jr. 1996: Joe Torre 1997: Mark McGwire 1998: Mark McGwire
Mark McGwire
& Sammy Sosa 1999: New York Yankees 2000: Marshall Faulk
Marshall Faulk
& Kurt Warner 2001: Curt Schilling 2002: Tyrone Willingham 2003: Dick Vermeil
Dick Vermeil
& Jack McKeon 2004: Tom Brady 2005: Matt Leinart 2006: Dwyane Wade 2007: Tom Brady 2008: Eli Manning 2009: Mariano Rivera 2010: Roy Halladay 2011: Aaron Rodgers 2012: LeBron James

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Sporting News Men's College Basketball Player of the Year

1943: Phillip 1944: Hall 1945: Mikan 1946: Kurland 1947–49: None selected 1950: Arizin 1951: White 1952–57: None selected 1958: Robertson 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Bradley 1965: Bradley 1966: Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: M. Johnson 1978: P. Ford 1979: Bird 1980: Griffith 1981: Aguirre 1982: Sampson 1983: Jordan 1984: Jordan 1985: Ewing 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: King 1990: Scott 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Respert 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: T. J. Ford 2004: Nelson 2005: Brown 2006: Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Oladipo 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Hield 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

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Three-Point Contest
Three-Point Contest
winners

1986: Bird 1987: Bird 1988: Bird 1989: Ellis 1990: Hodges 1991: Hodges 1992: Hodges 1993: Price 1994: Price 1995: Rice 1996: Legler 1997: Kerr 1998: Hornacek 2000: Hornacek 2001: Allen 2002: Stojaković 2003: Stojaković 2004: Lenard 2005: Richardson 2006: Nowitzki 2007: Kapono 2008: Kapono 2009: Cook 2010: Pierce 2011: Jones 2012: Love 2013: Irving 2014: Belinelli 2015: Curry 2016: Thompson 2017: Gordon 2018: Booker

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UPI College Basketball Player of the Year
UPI College Basketball Player of the Year
Award winners

1955: Gola 1956: B. Russell 1957: Forte 1958: Robertson 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Bradds 1965: Bradley 1966: C. Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Carr 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: Johnson 1978: Lee 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Mullin 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: Ferry 1990: Simmons 1991: O'Neal 1992: Jackson 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Allen

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John R. Wooden Men's Player of the Year Award winners

1977: M. Johnson 1978: P. Ford 1979: Bird 1980: Griffith 1981: Ainge 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Mullin 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Manning 1989: Elliott 1990: Simmons 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: O'Bannon 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: T. J. Ford 2004: Nelson 2005: Bogut 2006: Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Burke 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Hield 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 702376

.