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The Info List - Land Rover





Land Rover
Land Rover
is a car brand that specialises in four-wheel-drive vehicles, owned by British multinational car manufacturer Jaguar Land Rover, which has been owned by India's Tata Motors
Tata Motors
since 2008.[4] The Land Rover
Land Rover
is regarded as a British icon, and was granted a Royal Warrant by King George VI
George VI
in 1951.[5][6] The Land Rover
Land Rover
name was originally used by the Rover Company
Rover Company
for the Land Rover
Land Rover
Series, launched in 1948. It developed into a brand encompassing a range of four-wheel-drive models, including the Defender, Discovery, Freelander, Range Rover, Range Rover
Range Rover
Sport, and Range Rover
Range Rover
Evoque. Land Rovers are currently assembled in England, India, China, and other markets.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Ford era 1.2 Tata Motors
Tata Motors
era 1.3 Timeline

2 Manufacturing 3 Global sales 4 Models

4.1 Historic 4.2 Current

5 Concepts

5.1 Military 5.2 Engines

6 Electric vehicles 7 Abilities

7.1 Military use 7.2 Competitive use

8 Driver training 9 Safety 10 Clubs 11 Brand extensions

11.1 Bicycles 11.2 Coffee 11.3 Pushchairs

12 Similar vehicles 13 See also 14 References 15 External links

History

Series I

Series II 88in

Series IIA dashboard

Land Rover
Land Rover
conversion to fight forest fires, Cascina, Italy (August 2016)

The design for the original vehicle was started in 1947 by Maurice Wilks. It was simply called Land Rover
Land Rover
(the terms "Series" and "Defender" are retroactive and only introduced in the 1990s). Wilks, chief designer at the Rover Company, on his farm in Newborough, Anglesey, working in conjunction with his brother Spencer who was the managing director of Rover.[7] The design may have been influenced by the Jeep[8] and the prototype, later nicknamed Centre Steer, was built on a Jeep chassis and axles.[9] The early choice of colour was dictated by military surplus supplies of aircraft cockpit paint, so early vehicles only came in various shades of light green; all models until recently feature sturdy box section ladder-frame chassis. Early vehicles like the Series I were field-tested at Long Bennington and designed to be field-serviced. Land Rover
Land Rover
as a company has existed since 1978. Prior to this, it was a product line of the Rover Company
Rover Company
which was subsequently absorbed into the Rover-Triumph division of the British Leyland
British Leyland
Motor Corporation (BL) following Leyland Motor Corporation’s takeover of Rover in 1967. The ongoing commercial success of the original Land Rover series models, and latterly the Range Rover
Range Rover
in the 1970s in the midst of BL's well-documented business troubles prompted the establishment of a separate Land Rover
Land Rover
company but still under the BL umbrella, remaining part of the subsequent Rover Group
Rover Group
in 1988, under the ownership of British Aerospace
British Aerospace
after the remains of British Leyland were broken up and privatised. In 1994 Rover Group
Rover Group
PLC, including Land Rover, was acquired by BMW. In 2000, Rover Group
Rover Group
was broken up by BMW
BMW
and Land Rover
Land Rover
was sold to Ford Motor Company, becoming part of its Premier Automotive
Automotive
Group. Ford era In 2006 Ford also purchased the Rover brand from BMW
BMW
for around £6 million. BMW
BMW
had retained ownership of the brand to protect the integrity of the Land Rover
Land Rover
brand, with which 'Rover' might be confused in the US 4x4 market and allowed it to be used under licence by MG Rover
MG Rover
until it collapsed in 2005, at which point it was offered to the Ford Motor Company, who by then owned Land Rover. On 11 June 2007, Ford announced that it planned to sell Land Rover
Land Rover
along with Jaguar Cars. Private equity firms such as Alchemy Partners
Alchemy Partners
of the UK, TPG Capital, Ripplewood Holdings, Cerberus Capital Management
Cerberus Capital Management
and One Equity Partners of the US, Tata Motors
Tata Motors
of India and a consortium comprising Mahindra and Mahindra
Mahindra and Mahindra
of India and Apollo Management
Apollo Management
all initially expressed interest in purchasing the marques from the Ford Motor Company.[10][11] On 1 January 2008, Ford formally declared that Tata was the preferred bidder.[12] In 2008, On 26 March 2008, Ford announced that it had agreed to sell its Jaguar and Land Rover operations to Tata Motors
Tata Motors
of India, and that they expected to complete the sale by the end of the second quarter of 2008.[13] Tata Motors
Tata Motors
era On 18 January 2008, Tata Motors, a part of the Tata Group, established Jaguar Land Rover
Jaguar Land Rover
Limited as a British-registered and wholly owned subsidiary. The new company was to be used as a holding company for the acquisition of the two businesses from Ford - Jaguar Cars
Jaguar Cars
Limited and Land Rover. That acquisition was completed on 2 June 2008 at a cost of £1.7 billion.[14][15][16][17] Included in the deal to buy Land Rover
Land Rover
and Jaguar Cars
Jaguar Cars
were the rights to three other British brands: the Daimler marque, as well as two dormant brands Lanchester and Rover.[18] On 1 January 2013, the group, which had been operating as two separate companies ( Jaguar Cars
Jaguar Cars
Limited and Land Rover), although on an integrated basis, underwent a fundamental restructuring. The parent company was renamed to Jaguar Land Rover
Jaguar Land Rover
Automotive
Automotive
PLC, Jaguar Cars Limited was renamed to Jaguar Land Rover
Jaguar Land Rover
Limited and the assets (excluding certain Chinese interests) of Land Rover
Land Rover
were transferred to it. The consequence was that Jaguar Land Rover
Jaguar Land Rover
Limited became responsible in the UK for the design, manufacture and marketing of both Jaguar and Land Rover
Land Rover
branded products, and Land Rover
Land Rover
and Jaguar Cars ceased to be separate vehicle producing entities.[19] Timeline

1947: Rover's chief designer Maurice Wilks
Maurice Wilks
and his associates create a prototype using Jeep chassis and components[20] 1948: The first Land Rover
Land Rover
was officially launched 30 April 1948, at the Amsterdam Motor Show 1958: Series II launched 1961: Series IIA began production 1967: Rover becomes part of Leyland Motors
Leyland Motors
Ltd, later British Leyland (BL) as Rover Triumph 1970: Introduction of the Range Rover 1971: Series III launched 1974: Land Rover
Land Rover
abandons US market[21] facing competitive pressure from Japanese 4x4 brands 1975: BL collapses and is nationalised, publication of the Ryder Report recommends that Land Rover
Land Rover
be split from Rover and be treated as a separate company within BL and becomes part of the new commercial vehicle division called the Land Rover
Land Rover
Leyland Group 1976: One-millionth Land Rover
Land Rover
leaves the production line 1978: Land Rover
Land Rover
Limited formed as a separate subsidiary of British Leyland[22] 1980: Rover car production ends at Solihull with the transfer of SD1 production to Cowley, Oxford; Solihull is now exclusively for Land Rover manufacture. 5-door Range Rover
Range Rover
introduced 1983: Land Rover
Land Rover
90 (Ninety)/110 (One-Ten)/127 (renamed Defender in 1990) introduced 1986: BL plc becomes Rover Group
Rover Group
PLC; Project Llama started 1987: Range Rover
Range Rover
is finally introduced to the US market, following many years of demand being filled by grey market sales[23][24] 1988: Rover Group
Rover Group
is privatised and becomes part of British Aerospace, and is now known simply as Rover 1989: Introduction of Discovery 1990: The Ninety and One-Ten range of models are given the generic name of Defender 1994: Rover Group
Rover Group
is taken over by BMW. Introduction of second-generation Range Rover. (The original Range Rover
Range Rover
was continued under the name ' Range Rover
Range Rover
Classic' until 1995) 1997: Land Rover
Land Rover
introduces the Special
Special
Edition Discovery XD with AA yellow paint, subdued wheels, SD type roof racks, and a few other off-road upgrades directly from the factory. Produced only for the North American market, the Special
Special
Vehicles Division of Land Rover created only 250 of these bright yellow SUVs. 1997: Introduction of Freelander 1998: Introduction of second generation of Discovery 2000: BMW
BMW
breaks up the Rover Group
Rover Group
and sells Land Rover
Land Rover
to Ford for £1.8 billion[25] 2002: Introduction of third-generation Range Rover 2004: Introduction of third-generation Discovery/LR3 2005: Introduction of Range Rover
Range Rover
Sport 2005: Adoption of Jaguar AJ-V8 engine
Jaguar AJ-V8 engine
to replace the BMW
BMW
M62 V8 in the Range Rover 2006: Announcement of a new 2.4-litre diesel engine, 6-speed gearbox, dash and forward-facing rear seats for Defender. Introduction of second generation of Freelander (Freelander 2). Ford acquires the Rover trademark from BMW, who previously licensed its use to MG Rover Group 8 May 2007: 4,000,000th Land Rover
Land Rover
rolls off the production line, a Discovery 3 (LR3), donated to The Born Free Foundation 12 June 2007: Announcement from the Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
that it plans to sell Land Rover
Land Rover
and also Jaguar Cars August 2007: Tata Motors
Tata Motors
and Mahindra and Mahindra
Mahindra and Mahindra
as well as financial sponsors Cerberus Capital Management, TPG Capital
TPG Capital
and Apollo Global Management expressed their interest in purchasing Jaguar Cars and Land Rover
Land Rover
from the Ford Motor Company.[26] 26 March 2008: Ford agreed to sell their Jaguar and Land Rover operations to Tata Motors.[13] 2 June 2008: Tata Motors
Tata Motors
finalised their purchase of Jaguar and Land Rover from Ford and put them into their new subsidiary, Jaguar Land Rover[14] 2010: Introduction of fourth-generation Discovery/LR4 2011: The Range Rover
Range Rover
Evoque introduced 2012: Fourth-generation Range Rover
Range Rover
was exhibited at the 2012 Paris Motor Show 1 January 2013 : Land Rover
Land Rover
and Jaguar Cars
Jaguar Cars
merged to form a single company, Jaguar Land Rover
Jaguar Land Rover
Limited, producing vehicles under both marques 2014: The New Discovery Range was unveiled at the 2014 New York Motor Show[27] 1 March 2017: The Range Rover
Range Rover
Velar was unveiled in London[28]

Manufacturing Land Rovers were manufactured primarily at the Solihull plant, near Birmingham, but production of the Freelander was moved to the Halewood Body & Assembly plant near Liverpool, a former Ford car plant. The Freelander is also assembled in knock-down kit (CKD) form at Land Rover's facility in Pune, India.[29] As of 2015, the company continued to expand by building locally in India as well as increasing the number of models made at JLR’s Chikhali facility near Pune
Pune
to include the Discovery Sport and Evoque.[30] Defender models are assembled under licence in several locations worldwide, including Spain
Spain
(Santana Motors), Iran
Iran
(Pazhan Morattab), Brazil (Karmann), and Turkey (Otokar).[31] In May 2010, Tata Motors
Tata Motors
announced that it plans to build Land Rover and Jaguar models in Mainland China
Mainland China
(PRC) as the company seeks to cut costs and expand sales.[32] Global sales

Year 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

Units sold 144,371 181,395 223,602 303,926 348,338 381,108 403,079 434,582

[33] Models

Land Rover
Land Rover
Freelander

The 1997 Defender 90

Series IIB Forward Control

Series II 109in

6-wheel Land Rover
Land Rover
Defender, Hong Kong Police Bomb Disposal

2016 Land Rover Discovery
Land Rover Discovery
4 - front

2016 Land Rover Discovery
Land Rover Discovery
4 - rear

2016 Land Rover Defender
Land Rover Defender
110 Station Wagon

2015 Land Rover Defender
Land Rover Defender
110 XS TD DC

2016 Range Rover
Range Rover
Autobiography

Historic

Series I, II, IIA and III – the original 4×4 Range Rover
Range Rover
Classic – the original Range Rover, produced from 1970 to 1996 Defender - Large off-road 4×4 Freelander 2 (Were sold in some markets as LR2)- Small off-road 4×4

Current

2017 UK Land Rover
Land Rover
model line-up

Model Type

Discovery Sport Medium off-road 4x4

Discovery 5 Large off-road 4×4

Range Rover
Range Rover
Evoque Small off-road 4×4

Range Rover
Range Rover
Velar Large off-road 4×4

Range Rover
Range Rover
Sport Large off-road 4×4

Range Rover Large off-road 4×4

Concepts Range Stormer
Range Stormer
– Land Rover's first concept vehicle, unveiled at the 2004 North American International Auto Show, later became the Range Rover Sport.(Gritzinger, 2004). Land Rover LRX
Land Rover LRX
– Land Rover's second concept vehicle, first unveiled at the 2008 Detroit Auto Show. Originally a vehicle with ERAD technology, the production version did not include this. The car was then launched in 2011 as the Range Rover
Range Rover
Evoque, and was the first Range Rover
Range Rover
branded product to be offered with front wheel drive, and no low ratio transfer box. Land Rover DC100
Land Rover DC100
– Land Rover's third concept vehicle, first unveiled at the 2011 Frankfurt Auto Show, designed to be a replacement for the Land Rover
Land Rover
Defender, though it is unlikely that the Defender's replacement will be exactly the same as the DC100 concept. Land Rover Discovery
Land Rover Discovery
Vision Concept – Land Rover's fourth concept vehicle, first unveiled at the 2014, was designed to be a replacement for the Land Rover
Land Rover
Discovery, This concept features Transparent Bonnet, Suicide doors, and Laser assisted lamps (there is a very little chance this will be included in any future production vehicles). Military Models developed for the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) include:

101 Forward Control – also known as the " Land Rover
Land Rover
One Tonne FC" 1/2 ton Lightweight – airportable military short-wheelbase from the Series 2a Land Rover Wolf
Land Rover Wolf
– an uprated Military Defender Snatch Land Rover
Snatch Land Rover
Land Rover
Land Rover
with composite armoured body in UK Armed Forces Service 109 Series IIa and III ambulance (body by Marshalls of Cambridge) Range Rover
Range Rover
'6x6' Fire Appliance (conversion by Carmichael and Sons of Worcester) for RAF airfield use 130 Defender ambulance 'Llama' prototypes for 101 replacement.

Models developed for the Australian Army

Land Rover Perentie
Land Rover Perentie
4X4 and 6X6

Engines Main article: Land Rover
Land Rover
engines During the history of the Land Rover
Land Rover
many different engines have been fitted:

The inlet-over-exhaust petrol engines ("semi side-valve"), in both four- and six-cylinder variants, which were used for the very first Land Rovers in 1948, and which had their origins in pre-war Rover cars. Displacement of the first models was 1,600 cc. The four-cylinder overhead-valve engines, both petrol and diesel, which first appeared (in diesel form) in 1957, near the end of Series One production, and evolved over the years to the 300 TDi turbodiesel, which remains in production today for some overseas markets. The Buick-sourced all aluminium Rover V8
Rover V8
engine. 1,997 cc Petrol, inlet-over-exhaust: Series I engine, carried over for the first few months of Series II production. 2,052 cc Diesel, overhead-valve: Land Rover's first diesel engine, and one of the first small high-speed diesels produced in the UK. It appeared in 1957, and was used in Series II production until 1961. Looks almost identical to the later 2,286 cc engine, but many internal differences. It produced 51 bhp (38 kW). 2,286 cc Petrol, overhead-valve, three-bearing crank: 2,286 cc Diesel, overhead-valve, three-bearing crank: Appeared in 1961 alongside the redesigned 2,286 cc petrol engine at the start of Series IIA production, and shared its cylinder block and some other components. It produced 62 bhp (46 kW). 2,625 cc Petrol, inlet-over-exhaust: Borrowed from the Rover saloon range, in response to demands from mid-1960s Land Rover
Land Rover
users for more power and torque. 2,286 cc petrol/diesel, overhead-valve type 11J: five-bearing crank: In 1980, Land Rover
Land Rover
finally did something about the crank failures which had plagued its four-cylinder engines for 22 years.[citation needed] These engines lasted beyond the end of Series III production and into the first couple of years of the new Ninety and One Ten ranges. 3,258 cc V8 Petrol: The ex- Buick
Buick
all alloy V8 engine
V8 engine
appeared in the Range Rover
Range Rover
right from the start of production in 1970, but did not make its way into the company's utility vehicles until 1979. 2,495 cc petrol, overhead valve: The final development of Land Rover's ohv petrol 'four', with hardened valve seats which allow running on unleaded (or LPG). 2,495 cc diesel, overhead valve, type 12J: Land Rover
Land Rover
reworked the old 'two and a quarter' diesel for the 1980s. The injection pump was driven off a toothed belt at the front of the engine (together with the camshaft), a change compared with the older diesels. 2,495 cc turbodiesel, overhead valve, type 19J 2,495 cc turbodiesel, overhead valve, 200TDi and 300TDi: Used in the Defender and Discovery from 1990. The cylinder block was similar to the previous engine, although strengthened but the cylinder head was all-new and a direct injection fuel system was used. 2,495 cc turbodiesel, five-cylinder, TD5: An all-new engine for the second generation Discovery, and the Defender featuring electronic control of the fuel injection system, 'drive by wire' throttle, and other refinements The original Freelander models were available with various Rover K-series engines. In beginning of 2015 they start to use the all new Ingenium engine family, to replaced Ford sourced engines.

As of August 2012[update], most Land Rovers in production are powered by Ford engines.[34] Under the terms of the acquisition, Tata has the right to buy engines from Ford until 2019.[35] Electric vehicles Integrated Electric Rear Axle Drive (ERAD) technology, dubbed e-terrain technology,[36] will allow the vehicle to move off without starting the engine as well as supplying extra power over tough terrain.[36] Land Rover's Diesel ERAD Hybrid was developed as part of a multimillion-pound project supported by the UK Government's Energy Saving Trust, under the low carbon research and development programme. ERAD programme is one of a broad range of sustainability-focused engineering programmes that Land Rover
Land Rover
is pursuing, brought together by the company under the collective name "e TERRAIN Technologies".[37] Land Rover
Land Rover
presented at the 2008 London Motor Show
London Motor Show
its new ERAD diesel-electric hybrid in a pair of Freelander 2 (LR2) prototypes. The new hybrid system is being designed as a scalable and modular system that could be applied across a variety of Land Rover
Land Rover
models and powertrains.[38] Land Rover
Land Rover
unveiled the LRX hybrid concept at the 2008 North American International Auto Show in Detroit, for it to be going into production.[39] An ERAD will enable the car to run on electric power at speeds below 20 mph (32 km/h).[40] In September 2011, the Range Rover
Range Rover
Evoque was launched, though it was based on the LRX hybrid concept presented at the 2008 North American International Auto Show, it did not include the ERAD system, included in the original concept. In February 2013, Land Rover
Land Rover
unveiled[41][42] at the 83rd Geneva Motor Show an All- Terrain
Terrain
Electric Defender that produces zero emissions. The electric vehicle was developed for research purposes following successful trials of the Defender-based electric vehicle, Leopard 1. The vehicle is capable of producing 70kW and 330Nm of torque and has a range of 80 kilometres or in low speed off-road use it can last for up to eight hours before recharging. Abilities

Land-Rovers at AgQuip, Gunnedah, Australia

Power take-off
Power take-off
(PTO) was integral to the Land Rover
Land Rover
concept from 1948, enabling farm machinery and many other items to be run with the vehicle stationary. Maurice Wilks' original instruction was "...to have power take-offs everywhere!" The 1949 report by British National Institute of Agricultural Engineering and Scottish Machinery Testing Station contained this description: "the power take-off is driven through a Hardy Spicer propeller shaft from the main gearbox output and two interchangeable pinions giving two ratios. The PTO gearbox casing is bolted to the rear chassis cross-member and an 8 by 8 inches (200 mm × 200 mm) belt pulley driven from the PTO shaft through two bevel gears can be bolted to the PTO gearbox casing." PTOs remained regular options on Series I, II and III Land Rovers up to the demise of the Series Land Rover
Land Rover
in 1985. An agricultural PTO on a Defender is possible as a special order. Land Rovers (the Series/Defender models) are available in a variety of body styles, from a simple canvas-topped pick-up truck to a twelve-seat fully trimmed station wagon. Both Land Rover
Land Rover
and out-of-house contractors have offered conversions and adaptations to the basic vehicle, such as fire engines, excavators, 'cherry picker' hydraulic platforms, ambulances, snowploughs, and six-wheel-drive versions, as well as one-off special builds including amphibious Land Rovers and vehicles fitted with tracks instead of wheels. Military use

British Land Rover
Land Rover
near Pyongyang, November 1950, during the Korean War

A mired Land Rover
Land Rover
of the 1st Armoured Division being extracted during the Gulf War

Ex- Australian Army
Australian Army
Land Rover Series
Land Rover Series
2 "gunbuggy", with an M40 recoilless rifle used in the anti-tank role, at the Australian War Memorial.

Defenders of the Bermuda Regiment, 1994

Land Rovers on parade with the Italian Army, Navy and Air Force, June 2007

Various Land Rover
Land Rover
models have been used in a military capacity, most notably by the British Army
British Army
and Australian Army. Modifications may include military "blackout" lights, heavy-duty suspension, uprated brakes, 24 volt electrics, convoy lights, electronic suppression of the ignition system, blackout curtains and mounts for special equipment and small arms. Dedicated military models have been produced such as the 101 Forward Control and the air-portable 1/2 ton Lightweight. Military uses include light utility vehicle; communications platform; weapon platform for recoilless rifles, Anti-tank
Anti-tank
(e.g. TOW or M40 recoilless rifle) / Surface-to-Air Guided Weapons or machine guns; ambulances and workshops. The Discovery has also been used in small numbers, mostly as liaison vehicles. Two models that have been designed for military use from the ground up are the 101 Forward Control from the early 1970s and the Lightweight or Airportable from the late 1960s. The latter was intended to be transported under a helicopter. The Royal Air Force Mountain Rescue Service (RAFMRS) teams were early users in the late 1950s and early 1960s, and their convoys of Land Rovers and larger military trucks are a sight often seen in the mountain areas of the United Kingdom. Originally RAFMRS Land Rovers had blue bodies and bright yellow tops, to be better seen from above. In 1981, the colour scheme was changed to green with yellow stripes. More recently, vehicles have been painted white, and are issued with fittings similar to civilian UK Mountain Rescue
Mountain Rescue
teams. An adaptation of Land Rovers to military purposes is the "Pink Panther" models. Approximately 100 Series IIA models were adapted to reconnaissance use by British special operations forces the SAS. For desert use they were often painted pink, hence the name. The vehicles were fitted with among other gear a sun compass, machine guns, larger fuel tanks and smoke dischargers. Similar adaptations were later made to Series IIIs and 90/110/Defenders.[43] The Australian Army
Australian Army
adapted the Land Rover Series
Land Rover Series
2 into the Long Range Patrol Vehicle for use by the Special Air Service
Special Air Service
Regiment and as an anti-tank "gunbuggy" fitted with an M40 recoilless rifle. The 75th Ranger Regiment
75th Ranger Regiment
of the United States Army
United States Army
also adapted twelve versions of the Land Rover
Land Rover
that were officially designated the Ranger Special
Special
Operations Vehicle. Series and Defender models have also been armoured. The most widespread of these is the Shorts Shorland, built by Shorts Brothers of Belfast. The first of these were delivered in 1965 to the Royal Ulster Constabulary, the Northern Ireland police force. They were originally 109-inch (2,800 mm) wheelbase models with an armoured body and a turret from the Ferret armoured car. By 1990, there had been more than 1,000 produced.[44] In the 1970s, a more conventional armoured Land Rover
Land Rover
was built for the Royal Ulster Constabulary
Royal Ulster Constabulary
in Wales called the Hotspur. The Land Rover Tangi
Land Rover Tangi
was built by the Royal Ulster Constabulary's own vehicle engineering team during the 1990s. The British Army
British Army
has used various armoured Land Rovers, first in Northern Ireland but also in more recent campaigns. They first added protective panels to Series General Service vehicles (the Vehicle Protection Kit (VPK)). Later they procured the Glover Webb APV and finally the Courtaulds (later NP Aerospace) Composite Armoured Vehicle, commonly known as Snatch. These were originally based on heavy-duty V8 110 chassis but some have recently been re-mounted on new chassis from Otokar
Otokar
of Turkey and fitted with diesel engines and air-conditioning for Iraq. Although these now have more in common with the 'Wolf' (Defender XD) Land Rovers that many mistakenly confuse them with, the Snatch and the Wolf are different vehicles. The most radical conversion of a Land Rover
Land Rover
for military purposes was the Centaur half-track. It was based on a Series III with a V8 engine and a shortened belt drive from the Alvis Scorpion
Alvis Scorpion
light tank. A small number was manufactured, and they were used by Ghana, among others. The Land Rover
Land Rover
is used by military forces throughout the world. The current generation of Land Rover
Land Rover
used by British Army, the Snatch 2, have upgraded and strengthened chassis and suspension compared to civilian-specification vehicles. There is also the Land Rover
Land Rover
WMIK (weapon mounted installation kit) used by British Army. The WMIK consists of a driver, a raised gun, usually a Browning heavy machine gun or a grenade machine gun, this used for ground support, and a GPMG (general-purpose machine gunner) located next to the driver, this used for vehicle protection. Competitive use Highly modified Land Rovers have competed in the Dakar Rally
Dakar Rally
and won the Macmillan 4x4 UK Challenge
Macmillan 4x4 UK Challenge
almost every year, as well as having been the vehicle used for the Camel Trophy. Now, Land Rover
Land Rover
has its own G4 challenge.[45] Driver training Land Rover
Land Rover
Experience was established in 1990, and consists of a network of centres throughout the world, set up to help customers get the most out of their vehicles' on and off-road capability. The flagship centres are Land Rover's bases at Solihull, Eastnor, Gaydon and Halewood. Courses offered include off-road driving, winching and trailer handling, along with a variety of corporate and individual 'Adventure Days'. The factory centres at Solihull and Halewood have manufacturing tours, while Gaydon has an engineering tour. Safety Model-by-model road accident statistics from the UK Department for Transport show that the Land Rover Defender
Land Rover Defender
is one of the safest cars on British roads as measured by chance of death in two-car injury accidents.[46] The figures, which were based on data collected by police forces following accidents between 2000 and 2004 in Great Britain, showed that Defender drivers had a 1% chance of being killed or seriously injured and a 33% chance of sustaining any kind of injury. Other four-wheel-drive vehicles scored equally highly, and collectively these vehicles were much safer for their passengers than those in other classes such as passenger cars and MPVs. These figures reflect the fact that drivers of large mass vehicles are likely to be safer, often at the expense of other drivers if they collide with smaller cars. Clubs The original Land Rover
Land Rover
Owners Club was set up by the Rover Company
Rover Company
in 1954. The company published the Land Rover
Land Rover
Owners Club Review magazine for members from 1957 to 1968 when the club became the Rover Owners Association. This original association fell away when the company merged with British Leyland. There are many Land Rover
Land Rover
clubs throughout the UK and internationally. Land Rover
Land Rover
clubs break down into a number of groups of varying interests. Single Marque
Marque
Clubs – Bring together owners of a specific model or series of vehicle such as the Land Rover Series
Land Rover Series
One Club,[47] or the Discovery Owners Club.[48] Single marque clubs have a global membership. Special
Special
Vehicle Clubs – At various times Land Rover
Land Rover
have produced vehicles for specific events or on a specific theme, most notable are the Camel Trophy and G4 Challenge vehicles which have been sold on to the general public, and a range of Defenders that were loosely based on the custom vehicles produced for the Tomb Raider motion picture. Regional Clubs in the UK break down into two groups, competitive and non-competitive. The non-competitive clubs activities generally relate to social events, off-road driving or green laning on un-surfaced public highways or 'pay and play' days at off-road centres. Competitive clubs are a phenomenon almost exclusively found within the UK, who as well as the non-competitive activities detailed above run competitive events such as Tyro, Road Taxed Vehicle (RTV) and Cross Country Vehicle (CCV) trials, winch and recovery challenges or speed events such as Competitive Safaries. All UK competitive events are run within the framework of rules created by the Motor Sports Association (MSA) with further vehicle specific rules applied by the host club or association. Outside of the UK regional clubs are independent and mostly non-competitive. A number of clubs are affiliated to the Association of Land Rover Clubs (ALRC),[49] formerly known as the Association of Rover Clubs (ARC) the association applies its own vehicle regulations to all of its member clubs who have the opportunity to compete together at regional events and an annual national event with vehicles approved to the same standard. In recent years some non-competitive clubs have dropped their affiliation fifth ALRC. Few clubs outside of the UK are affiliated with ALRC.[50] Other than ALRC and the short lived Association of North American Rover Clubs (ANARC), which was created 1998 to celebrate Land Rover's 50th anniversary and disbanded in 2001, other groups of Land Rover
Land Rover
clubs have affiliated with each other. Land Rover
Land Rover
owners were also early adopters of virtual clubs that are entirely based online. Bill Caloccia [51] created the original Land Rover Owner[52] email list (LRO) as single marque offshoot of the British Cars email list in May 1990.[53] Bill later created email lists in the mid 1990s for Range Rovers (RRO) and various regions (e.g., UK-LRO, AU-LRO, ZA-LRO, EU-LRO, IT-LRO, NL-LRO). In California members of the LRO list created mendo_recce in 1995.[54] In 2005, under Ford ownership, Land Rover
Land Rover
became more interested in the club environment. An internal club was formed, The Land Rover Club,[55] exclusive to employees of Ford's Premier Automotive
Automotive
Group (Now exclusive to the new 'Jaguar – Land Rover' group since the brand moved away from the Ford stable). Also, an agreement was generated to allow other clubs to use the Land Rover
Land Rover
green oval logo under licence. In 2006, the Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire and Cambridgeshire club were the pilot licensees for the new agreement, who now benefit from a reciprocal arrangement where their own logo is trade marked[56] and owned by Land Rover
Land Rover
and they can refer to themselves as a ' Land Rover
Land Rover
Approved Club'. Brand extensions Bicycles In 1995, Land Rover
Land Rover
endorsed the production of a hand-made bicycle using its logo. The bicycle, called the Land Rover
Land Rover
APB and manufactured by Pashley Cycles
Pashley Cycles
of Stratford-upon-Avon,[57] was the collapsible version of Pashley Cycles' Moulton APB (All Purpose Bicycle) model, with leading link front suspension and adjustable damping and stroke. Two more models immediately followed: the Land Rover XCB V-20, aimed primarily at younger riders (children); and the Land Rover
Land Rover
XCB D-26, also available as the M26 with hydraulic rim brakes, front suspension and suspension seat pillar. In June 2004, Land Rover
Land Rover
released a comprehensive 25 model range of bicycles. The three main ranges are the "Defender", the "Discovery", and the "Freelander", each with different attributes. The "Discovery" is an all-rounder bicycle suited to a variety of terrains, "Defender" is most suited to rugged terrain and off-road pursuits, whereas the "Freelander" is designed for an urban lifestyle. All bikes are made from lightweight aluminium. In 2010 the range was relaunched in conjunction with British manufacturer 2x2.[58] Coffee Land Rover
Land Rover
has had its name associated with coffee since 2005, when the Land Rover
Land Rover
Coffee company was established.[59] Pushchairs Land Rover
Land Rover
gave UK pram company Pegasus a licence to produce a three-wheeler range of Land Rover
Land Rover
ATP pushchairs. The design reflected the heritage of the marque, with a light metal frame with canvas seating, held together with push-studs and tough simple parts like brakes and hinges. They could be collapsed completely flat, with wheels removed in seconds. The basic frame could be adapted with modules to allow a baby to lie flat or a bubble windscreen to completely enclose the child. The frame also came in long or short-handled versions, and could be repaired with home tools. The design was simple, light, and rugged and able to travel in all terrains (hence the ATP for all-terrain pushchair.) It came in three military looking colours: a light blue, a sand colour and olive drab. Production was discontinued in 2002.[60] Similar vehicles

Santana Motor
Santana Motor
Spanish licensed producer of modified Land Rovers

Iveco Massif
Iveco Massif
Italian variant of Santana Anibal (produced jointly with Iveco, essentially a rebadged and branded PS-10) – rebadged and restyled version of the Santana PS-10. In 2010, the sales of the Iveco Massif were not as expected and Iveco decided to stop the agreement with Santana.

Morattab, an SUV
SUV
manufacturer based in Tehran, Iran, has produced the Herour, a clone of the Series, since 1962. The currently produced models are versions of the "Series IV" made by Santana Motor
Santana Motor
of Spain until the early 1990s, when the production tooling and design were sold to Morattab and shipped to Iran. As such unlicensed Morattab clones differ significantly from the final Series III built by Land Rover in the United Kingdom. For example, Series IV models have parabolic leaf springs, one-piece windscreens and fully fitted interiors. Morattab also fits locally built 1.8-litre 4-cylinder petrol engines derived from Nissan
Nissan
instead of the 2.25-litre 4-cylinder or 3.3-litre 6-cylinder engines fitted to the Santana Series IV.[61] Bush Ranger (also known as Bush Rangie) is an Australian permanent 4WD buggy based on a scrapped Range Rover
Range Rover
or Discovery.

See also

Ralf Speth

References

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Land Rover
is a wholly owned subsidiary of Tata Motors
Tata Motors
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Jaguar Land Rover
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Land Rover
marques from Ford". The Independent. London. Archived from the original on 5 January 2008. Retrieved 4 January 2008.  ^ Krisher, Tom (3 January 2008). "Indian Company Top Bidder for Jaguar". Time. Associated Press. Archived from the original on 6 January 2008. Retrieved 4 January 2008.  ^ a b " Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
Announces Agreement to Sell Jaguar Land Rover to Tata Motors" (Press release). Ford Motor Company. 26 March 2008. Archived from the original on 13 February 2012. Retrieved 14 February 2012.  ^ a b " Tata Motors
Tata Motors
completes acquisition of Jag, Land Rover". Thomson Reuters. 2 June 2008. Retrieved 2 June 2008.  ^ "On U.S. tour, Mr. Tata gives Jaguar and Rover dealers a hug: AutoWeek Magazine". Autoweek.com. Retrieved 4 May 2009.  ^ "Jobs warning at Jaguar Land Rover". BBC News. 26 June 2009. Retrieved 26 June 2009.  ^ "2010/2011 Annual Report" (PDF). Jaguar Land Rover
Jaguar Land Rover
PLC. p. 5. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2018-01-26. Retrieved 26 January 2018.  ^ "5 for 2 special: Tata acquires 3 other British marques in Jaguar, Land Rover
Land Rover
deal". Leftlane News. 28 March 2008. Retrieved 28 March 2008.  ^ "Annual Report 2012/2013" (PDF). Jaguar Land Rover
Jaguar Land Rover
Automotive
Automotive
PLC. p. 91. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2018-01-26. Retrieved 26 January 2018.  ^ Robson, Graham (1986). The Range Rover/Land-Rover. David & Charles. p. 210. ISBN 9780715387863. Retrieved 14 June 2012.  ^ Bargo, Michael (1988). Off-road High-performance Handbook: How to Build, Modify and Play with Your Offroad Truck. Motorbooks International. p. 15. ISBN 9780879383091. Retrieved 21 October 2017.  ^ "Sixty Years and Four Million Vehicles: Milestones of Land Rover's History" (Press release). Land Rover. Archived from the original on 28 May 2008. Retrieved 6 April 2008.  ^ "The History of Land Rover". iFixit. Retrieved 21 October 2017.  ^ "1978 Range Rover
Range Rover
2-Door". bringatrailer.com. 29 December 2010. Retrieved 21 October 2017.  ^ "BMW, Ford seal Land Rover
Land Rover
deal". BBC News. 24 May 2000. Retrieved 10 March 2011.  ^ "India's Tata confirms interest in Land Rover, Jaguar". Forbes.com. 24 August 2007. Archived from the original on 31 May 2009. Retrieved 15 July 2010.  ^ "New York Motor Show 2014 preview". Auto Car India. 9 April 2014. Retrieved 21 October 2017.  ^ Hudson, Paul. " Range Rover
Range Rover
Velar revealed ahead of Geneva motor show debut". Telegraph Media Group. Retrieved 25 February 2017.  ^ "Corporate News: Our new plant in Pune". Land Rover. 6 July 2011. Archived from the original on 18 August 2012. Retrieved 25 July 2012. On 27th May, 2011 Land Rover
Land Rover
officially opened its first assembly plant in India. Situated in Pune
Pune
in the state of Maharashtra, the plant will assemble Land Rover Freelander
Land Rover Freelander
2 (LR2) vehicles...  ^ " Jaguar Land Rover
Jaguar Land Rover
to Increase Production in India". Business Standard India. 20 November 2015. Retrieved 21 October 2017.  ^ "geocites.com query result". www.webcitation.org. 2007. Archived from the original on 25 October 2009. Retrieved 21 October 2017.  ^ Rothwell, Steven; Nair, Vipin V. (28 May 2010). " Tata Motors
Tata Motors
Plans to Build Jaguar, Land Rover
Land Rover
Models in China". Business Week. Retrieved 27 July 2010.  ^ " Tata Motors
Tata Motors
- Investors - JLR Volumes". tatamotors.com. Archived from the original on 31 July 2017.  ^ Bajaj, Vikas (30 August 2012). " Tata Motors
Tata Motors
Finds Success in Jaguar Land Rover". The New York Times. Photo credit:Prashanth Vishwanathan for The New York Times. New York: NYTC. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on 19 June 2014. Retrieved 19 June 2014.  ^ Nair, Vipin V.; Philip, Siddharth (11 August 2010). "Tata's Jaguar Land Rover
Land Rover
Asks Ford for More Engines". Bloomberg News. New York, NY: Bloomberg L.P.
Bloomberg L.P.
Archived from the original on 19 June 2014. Retrieved 19 June 2014.  ^ a b Vijayenthiran, Viknesh (22 July 2008). " Land Rover
Land Rover
Announces Diesel ERAD Hybrid & e_ Terrain
Terrain
Technologies". Worldcarfans. Retrieved 10 March 2011.  ^ "Factory News". Roversnorth.com. Archived from the original on 25 December 2008. Retrieved 19 June 2009.  ^ " Land Rover
Land Rover
presents ERAD diesel-hybrid prototypes". MotorAuthority. 22 July 2008. Retrieved 19 June 2009.  ^ " Land Rover
Land Rover
Working on Diesel Erad Hybrid And E_Terrain Technologies". cubi[CC]apacity. Archived from the original on 8 July 2011. Retrieved 10 March 2011.  ^ " Land Rover
Land Rover
unveils eco-car". Energy Saving Trust. Archived from the original on 16 July 2011. Retrieved 19 June 2009.  ^ " Land Rover
Land Rover
Unveils Electric Defender Research Vehicle". Land Rover Australia. 28 February 2013. Archived from the original on 27 May 2013.  ^ " Land Rover Defender
Land Rover Defender
110 SW SE". Geneva Motor Show
Geneva Motor Show
2013. Archived from the original on 5 March 2013.  ^ Bob Morrison: Land Rovers in military service, Brooklands Books 1993, ISBN 1-85520-205-0 ^ "The Shorland Site". Clive Elliott. Retrieved 29 December 2012.  ^ " Land Rover
Land Rover
International – Latest News – Corporate News". Landroverg4challenge.com. 11 March 2009. Archived from the original on 18 February 2008. Retrieved 19 June 2009.  ^ "Cars: make and model: the risk of driver injury in GB: 2000–2004". Department for Transport. 12 October 2006. Archived from the original on 13 June 2008. Retrieved 28 July 2009.  ^ " Land Rover Series
Land Rover Series
One Club website". lrsoc.com. Retrieved 3 August 2011.  ^ "Discovery Owners' Club website". Discoveryownersclub.org. Retrieved 15 July 2010.  ^ "Association of Land Rover
Land Rover
Clubs website". Alrc.co.uk. Retrieved 15 July 2010.  ^ "Association of Land Rover
Land Rover
Clubs Member Clubs". Alrc.co.uk. Retrieved 2 November 2014.  ^ "Obituary for William Caloccia". Philbin-Comeau Funeral Home. 8 October 2014. Archived from the original on 1 July 2017. Retrieved 21 October 2017.  ^ "www.land-rover.team.net Mailing Lists". www.land-rover.team.net. Archived from the original on 2 November 2014. Retrieved 2 November 2014.  ^ "www.fourfold.org/RoverWeb/lro/Year-1990/9005.03". www.fourfold.org. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 2 November 2014.  ^ "Mendo_Recce Email list aka the Lazy Buggers". www.fourfold.org. Retrieved 2 November 2014.  ^ " Land Rover
Land Rover
Club website". Landroversclub.org. Archived from the original on 21 May 2010. Retrieved 15 July 2010.  ^ "IPO UK". Ipo.gov.uk. Retrieved 15 July 2010.  ^ "Landrover Bikes". Formbycycles. Retrieved 24 November 2014.  ^ "First look: Land Rover
Land Rover
2010 mountain bikes". Bike Radar. 24 December 2009. Retrieved 24 November 2014.  ^ " Land Rover
Land Rover
Coffee – the journey". Land Rover
Land Rover
Coffee. Archived from the original on 26 April 2012. Retrieved 16 December 2011.  ^ " Land Rover
Land Rover
Pushchairs Online". Landroverpushchairs.co.uk. Archived from the original on 27 August 2010. Retrieved 15 July 2010.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 14 July 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2014. 

External links

The Wikibook Vehicle Identification Numbers (VIN codes) has a page on the topic of: Land Rover
Land Rover
VIN codes

Media related to Land Rover
Land Rover
at Wikimedia Commons

Land Rover
Land Rover
at Curlie (based on DMOZ) List of current and former U.S. and Canadian Land Rover
Land Rover
Clubs

v t e

Land Rover, vehicle timeline, 1940s–present

Type 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s

5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Off-road vehicle

Series I Series II Series III

101 FC

Ninety & One Ten Defender

Compact SUV

Freelander Freelander 2 Discovery Sport

Range Rover Evoque

Mid-size SUV

Discovery I Discovery II Discovery 3 Discovery 4 Discovery 5

Range Rover
Range Rover
Velar

Range Rover
Range Rover
Sport Range Rover
Range Rover
Sport 2

Full-size SUV

Range Rover
Range Rover
Classic

Range Rover Range Rover Range Rover

Links to related articles

v t e

Jaguar Land Rover

Subsidiaries and divisions

Jaguar Land Rover Chery Jaguar Land Rover
Jaguar Land Rover
(Joint venture)

Facilities and places

Browns Lane plant
Browns Lane plant
(closed) Castle Bromwich Assembly Gaydon Centre Halewood Body & Assembly Solihull plant Whitley plant Engine Manufacturing Centre Nitra plant

Vehicles

Current Jaguar models

E-Pace F-Pace F-Type XE XF XJ

Future Jaguar models

I-Pace

Historic Jaguar models

1935–1948 2½ Litre saloon 1935–1949 1½ Litre saloon 1937–1948 3½ Litre saloon 1948–1954 XK120 1948–1951 Mark V 1951–1957 Mark VII (& VIIM) 1954–1957 XK140 1950s C-Type 1950s D-Type 1955–1959 Mark 1 1957–1959 Mark VIII 1957–1961 XK150 1959–1961 Mark IX 1959–1967 Mark 2 1961–1966 Mark X 1961–1974 E-Type 1960s E-Type Lightweight 1963–1968 S-type 1966–1970 420G 1966–1968 420 1966–1968 240 & 340 1968–1987 XJ6 Series 1, 2 & 3 1972–1992 XJ12 1975–1996 XJ-S 1985–1992 XJR-5 through XJR-17 1992–1994 XJ220 1997–2006 XK8/XKR (X100) 1999–2008 S-type 2001–2009 X-type 2006–2015 XK/XKR (X150)

Current Land Rover
Land Rover
models

Discovery Sport Discovery/LR4 Range Rover
Range Rover
Evoque Range Rover
Range Rover
Sport Range Rover
Range Rover
Velar Range Rover RSOV Wolf LRPV

Future Land Rover
Land Rover
models

Historic Land Rover
Land Rover
models

Defender Defender 130CC-R 101 Range Rover
Range Rover
Classic Series I Series II Series III

Other

Daimler vehicles Jaguar vehicles Land Rover
Land Rover
vehicles

Category: Jaguar Land Rover Category: Tata Motors

v t e

Tata Motors

Tata Group

Subsidiaries and divisions

Jaguar Land Rover

Daimler Jaguar Land Rover

Tata Daewoo Tata Hispano Tata Motors
Tata Motors
Cars

Joint ventures

Chery Jaguar Land Rover
Jaguar Land Rover
(50%) Fiat India Automobiles
Fiat India Automobiles
(50%) Tata Marcopolo (51%) Tata Hitachi Construction Machinery
Tata Hitachi Construction Machinery
(40%)

Chairmen

J.R.D. Tata Ratan Tata Cyrus Mistry

Facilities and places

Castle Bromwich Assembly Gaydon Centre Halewood Body & Assembly Pune
Pune
Plant Sanand Plant Solihull plant Whitley Plant Wolverhampton Plant

Current Tata Motors
Tata Motors
marque models

Cars

Bolt Indigo Indigo Manza Manza Nano Tiago Tigor Zest Racemo

Pickup trucks

Magic Xenon

Crossovers/SUVs

Aria Movus Sumo Grande Sumo Safari Dicor Safari Storme Nexon

Vans

Magic Iris Venture Winger

Commercial trucks

Ace Construck Novus Prima

Buses

Golbus Hispano Golbus Marcopolo Bus Starbus

Historic and discontinued models

407 Estate Indica Indica EV Mobile Sierra Vista

Concept models

Aria Coupe Cliffrider Elegante Indica Silhouette Megapixel Nexon OneCAT Pixel Xover

Other

Daimler vehicles Jaguar vehicles Land Rover
Land Rover
vehicles T1 Prima Truck Racing Championship

Category

v t e

British Leyland
British Leyland
– car companies and marques

Marque 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s

Jaguar

SS Cars Jaguar Jaguar & Daimler BMH BLMC
BLMC
/ British Leyland Jaguar & Daimler Ford (PAG) Tata

Daimler Daimler BSA BSA

Lanchester Lanchester

Rover

Rover Company Rover Company Rover Company Austin Rover Group & Land Rover Group
Rover Group
(BL plc) Rover Group
Rover Group
(BAe) Rover Group (BMW) MG Rover Group
Rover Group
(PVH)

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Alvis

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Standard

Standard Standard Triumph Leyland Motors British Motor Heritage

Triumph

Dawson Triumph BMW

Riley Riley Nuffield Organisation BMC BMH

MG

Morris Garages (MG) Rover Group (BMW) MG Rover Group
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(PVH) SAIC & NAC SAIC

Morris

Morris Morris

Wolseley Wolseley

Austin

Austin Austin

Vanden Plas

Vanden Plas

Mini

BMW

Princess

BMC

BLMC
BLMC
/ British Leyland

Austin-Healey

Austin (BMC) & Donald Healey

Marque 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s

v t e

Rover

Divisions

Bicycles (1904–1925) Motorcycles (1904–1925) Automobiles (1905–2005)

Owners

Rover Company
Rover Company
(1904–1967) Leyland Motor Corporation
Leyland Motor Corporation
(1967–1968) British Leyland Motor Corporation
Leyland Motor Corporation
(1968–1975) British Leyland
British Leyland
(1975–1978) BL Ltd/plc (1978–1986) Rover Group
Rover Group
(1986–1988) British Aerospace
British Aerospace
(1988–1994) BMW
BMW
(1994–2006) Licence for use by the MG Rover Group
Rover Group
(2000–2005) Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
(2006–2008) Tata Motors
Tata Motors
(2008–present)

v t e

Automotive
Automotive
industry in the United Kingdom

Manufacturing in the United Kingdom Economy of the United Kingdom

Companies and marques

Commercial vehicle producers

Current

Alexander Dennis

Plaxton

Dennis Eagle Arrival IBC Vehicles JCB Leyland Trucks London EV Company Mellor Coachcraft Optare Smith Electric Vehicles Stevens Wrightbus

Former

Albion AEC Bedford Bristol Charles H Roe Clough, Smith Commer Daimler ERF Foden Ford

Southampton plant

Guy Hallford Jensen Karrier LDV LTI Modec Scammell Seddon Atkinson Sentinel Shelvoke & Drewry Straker-Squire Thornycroft Tilling-Stevens

Motorsport

Advanced Engine Research Arena Motorsport Carlin Chevron Cars Cosworth Engine Developments Ltd Force India Ford World Rally Team Fortec Hewland Ilmor Lola Cars McLaren Mercedes AMG High Performance Powertrains Mercedes AMG M-Sport Munchi's Prodrive Radical Red Bull Racing Renault Sport F1 Team Ricardo RML Group Roger Dowson Engineering Sumo Power Team Dynamics Triple Eight Racing Van Diemen Williams F1 Wirth Xtrac Zytek
Zytek
Motorsport

Passenger car producers

Current

Ariel Aston Martin Bentley

Crewe plant

BMW
BMW
Group

Mini Plant Oxford Plant Swindon Rolls-Royce

Goodwood plant

Brabham Automotive Briggs Bristol Caparo Caterham Electric Car Corporation Ford of Britain

Bridgend Engine Dagenham plant Dunton Technical Centre

Ginetta Honda UK Jaguar Land Rover

Jaguar Land Rover Castle Bromwich plant Gaydon Centre Halewood plant Solihull plant Whitley Engineering Centre

Lagonda Lightning Lister Lotus McLaren

McLaren
McLaren
Technology Centre

SAIC Motor
SAIC Motor
UK

Eco Concept

Morgan Nissan
Nissan
UK Noble Radical Spyker Toyota UK Vauxhall

Ellesmere Port

Westfield Zenos

Kit cars Caterham Davrian GKD GTM JBA Motors Marc Nordon Racing Onyx Quantum Sylva Ultima Sports Westfield

Former

Alvis Ascari Austin Austin-Healey BMC BMH British Leyland Daimler Fenix MG Rover

MG

Longbridge plant

Morris Peel Engineering Riley Rootes Rover Company Rover Group Standard Sunbeam

Sunbeam Commercial Vehicles

Triumph Wolseley

Suppliers and consultancies

Current

Caparo Vehicle Technologies Cosworth Cummins UK Dunlop Tyres GKN

GKN
GKN
Driveline

Johnson Matthey Lotus Engineering MIRA Perkins Engines Pilkington Quaife Ricardo Tata Steel Europe Tickford TRL Unipart Wipac WMG Zytek

Former

Abbey Panels Dunlop Rubber Ferodo Gardner Hardy Spicer Henry Meadows Laycock Engineering Lucas Industries LucasVarity Tomkins White and Poppe

Dealerships

Arnold Clark Carcraft Ford Retail Group Group 1 Automotive Inchcape Jardine JCT600 Lookers Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz
Retail Group H.R. Owen Pendragon Perrys Robins & Day Stoneacre Sytner Vertu

Other services

The AA ATS Euromaster Autoglass Auto Windscreens British Car Auctions British Vehicle Rental and Leasing Association Green Flag Halfords
Halfords
Autocentre Halfords Kwik Fit LeasePlan Lex Autolease National Tyres and Autocare RAC We Buy Any Car

Government and regulatory bodies

Department for Transport Driver & Vehicle Licensing Agency Driving Standards Agency Vehicle Certification Agency Vehicle & Operator Services Agency

Related topics

AM Magazine Autocar Auto Trader Auto Express Buses Magazine Car Classic & Sports Car Coach & Bus Week Commercial Motor Evo Fast Car Motor Sport Octane Top Gear Magazine What Car? Fifth Gear Institute of Advanced Motorists Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders Top Gear

Category

v t e

British car industry – companies and marques

Marque 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s

Rolls-Royce

Rolls-Royce Limited Rolls-Royce Limited
Rolls-Royce Limited
& Bentley Rolls-Royce Motors Rolls-Royce Motors
Rolls-Royce Motors
(Vickers) BMW
BMW
& VW Group BMW

Bentley

Bentley Volkswagen Group

Armstrong Siddeley

Siddeley-Deasy Armstrong Whitworth Armstrong Siddeley Bristol Siddeley Rolls-Royce Limited Rolls-Royce plc

Aston Martin

Aston Martin Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Lagonda Ford PAG Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Lagonda

Lagonda

Lagonda

Jaguar

SS Cars Jaguar Jaguar & Daimler BMH BLMC
BLMC
/ British Leyland Jaguar & Daimler Ford (PAG) Tata

Daimler Daimler BSA BSA

Lanchester Lanchester

Rover

Rover Company Rover Company Rover Company Austin Rover Group & Land Rover Group
Rover Group
(BL plc) Rover Group
Rover Group
(BAe) Rover Group (BMW) MG Rover Group
Rover Group
(PVH)

Land Rover

Ford (PAG)

Alvis

Alvis BAE Systems

Standard

Standard Standard Triumph Leyland Motors British Motor Heritage

Triumph

Dawson Triumph BMW

Riley Riley Nuffield Organisation BMC BMH

MG

Morris Garages (MG) Rover Group (BMW) MG Rover Group
Rover Group
(PVH) SAIC & NAC SAIC

Morris

Morris Morris

Wolseley Wolseley

Austin

Austin Austin

Vanden Plas

Vanden Plas

Mini

BMW

Princess

BMC

BLMC
BLMC
/ British Leyland

Austin-Healey

Austin (BMC) & Donald Healey

Jensen

Jensen Motors Britcar Holdings Jensen Cars

Reliant

Reliant Reliant

Bond

Bond

AC

AC Cars
AC Cars
(several ownership & company name changes)

Argyll Argyll

Argyll

Bristol Cars

Bristol Cars

Caterham

Caterham

Crossley

Crossley

Dutton

Dutton

Dutton

Ginetta

Ginetta

Gordon-Keeble

Peerless & Warwick Gordon-Keeble

Jowett

Jowett Blackburn

Lea-Francis

Lea-Francis

Lotus

Lotus General Motors
General Motors
Europe Proton

McLaren

McLaren

Marcos

Marcos

Marcos

Marcos

Morgan

Morgan

Napier Napier

Turner

Turner

TVR

TVR

Westfield

Westfield Potenza Sports Cars

GTM

GTM

Vauxhall

Vauxhall Motors General Motors General Motors
General Motors
Europe Opel

Vulcan

Vulcan

Hillman

Hillman Humber Rootes Chrysler Europe
Chrysler Europe
(Chrysler) Peugeot
Peugeot
(PSA)

Humber Humber

Singer

Singer Rootes

Sunbeam Sunbeam S.T.D. Motors Rootes (as Sunbeam-Talbot) Rootes Rootes

Talbot

Talbot

Marque 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s

v t e

Selected Royal Warrant holders of the British Royal Family

By Appointment to HM The Queen

Abels Moving Services Ainsworths Angostura Limited AkzoNobel Autoglym Axminster Carpets Bendicks Bentley
Bentley
Motors Bollinger Britvic BT Burberry Cadbury Carphone Warehouse Castrol Charbonnel et Walker DAKS DHL Express Dorma Ede & Ravenscroft Fortnum & Mason Frank Smythson Gieves & Hawkes H. P. Bulmer Henry Poole & Co J. Barbour and Sons James Purdey and Sons Jaguar Cars John Lewis John Lobb Land Rover Louis Roederer Mappin & Webb Martini & Rossi Minky Molton Brown Moët & Chandon Nestlé Procter & Gamble UK Richer Sounds Roberts Radio Ryvita Schweppes Spode Steinway & Sons Tanqueray Twinings Unilever
Unilever
UK Vauxhall Motors Veuve Clicquot
Veuve Clicquot
Ponsardin Waitrose Weetabix Wilkin & Sons William Drake Wolsey Worcestershire Medal Service

By Appointment to HRH The Duke of Edinburgh

Boots Opticians DAKS Ede & Ravenscroft Frank Smythson Gieves & Hawkes Hatchards Holland & Holland J. Barbour and Sons James Purdey and Sons John Lobb Land Rover Lyle & Scott Penhaligon's Truefitt & Hill

By Appointment to HRH The Prince of Wales

Ainsworths Aston Martin Autoglym Bentley
Bentley
Motors Burberry Crabtree & Evelyn DAKS Ede & Ravenscroft Frank Smythson Gieves & Hawkes Holland & Holland J. Barbour and Sons Jaguar Cars James Purdey and Sons John Lobb Land Rover Laphroaig Linn Products Minky Penhaligon's Peter Jones Ritz Hotel Roberts Radio Shepherd Neame Taylors of Harrogate Turnbull & Asser Vauxhall Motors Waitrose Weetabix Winsor & Newton

Category

v t e

Ford Motor Company

Marques

Current

Ford Lincoln Troller

Discontinued

Continental Edsel Mercury Merkur Meteor Monarch FPV

Former

Aston Martin Daimler Jaguar Lagonda Land Rover Th!nk Volvo

Divisions and subsidiaries

Current

Automotive
Automotive
Components Holdings Chariot Ford of Argentina Ford Brasil
Ford Brasil
(Troller) Ford of Canada Ford of Europe
Ford of Europe
(Ford of Britain, Ford Germany, Ford Romania) Ford India Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
of New Zealand Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
Philippines Ford Motor Credit Company Ford Performance
Ford Performance
(Ford Team RS) Motorcraft Special
Special
Vehicle Team

Discontinued

Ford of Australia (FPV) Ford of Russia Ford SAF Lincoln-Mercury Premier Automotive
Automotive
Group Special
Special
Vehicle Operations

Former

Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Lagonda Cosworth Ford Aerospace Hertz Corporation Jaguar Cars Kwik-Fit Land Rover New Holland Agriculture Visteon Volvo Car Corporation

Joint ventures and shareholdings

Current

Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Lagonda
Lagonda
(8%) AutoAlliance International (50%) AutoAlliance Thailand Changan Ford Mazda (35%) Ford Lio Ho Ford Otosan
Ford Otosan
(41%) Ford Sollers
Ford Sollers
(50%) Ford Vietnam (60%) Getrag Ford Transmissions (50%) Jiangling Motors
Jiangling Motors
(49%)

Defunct

Autolatina Ford Union Matford Mazda Samcor

Facilities and products

Engines Factories Platforms Proving grounds Transmissions Vehicles

People

Designers Ford Family Henry Ford
Henry Ford
(Founder) William Clay Ford Jr.
William Clay Ford Jr.
(Executive Chairman) Jim Hackett (CEO) List of CEOs

Other

Big Three Dodge v. Ford Motor Co. Grimshaw v. Ford Motor Co. Fordlândia The Ford Show History Kinetic Design New Edge Pay on production United States Council for Automotive
Automotive
Research

Founded: June 16, 1903 Headquarters: Dearborn, Michigan

Commons

v t e

BMW

Current brands

BMW
BMW
(sub-brands: BMW
BMW
i and BMW
BMW
M) BMW
BMW
Motorrad Mini Rolls-Royce Zinoro

Previous brands

Automobilwerk Eisenach Bayerische Flugzeugwerke BMW
BMW
Marine Dixi Glas Husqvarna Motorcycles Otto Flugmaschinenfabrik Rapp Motorenwerke Rover Group1

Divisions and subsidiaries

BMW
BMW
Bank BMW
BMW
India BMW
BMW
Mexico BMW
BMW
Motorsport BMW
BMW
US Manufacturing Company Designworks

Joint ventures

BMW
BMW
Brilliance (Chinese automobile manufacturer) Here (mapping products)

Vehicles

BMW
BMW
automobiles BMW
BMW
motorcycles Mini Rolls-Royce Zinoro

Technologies

BMW
BMW
Assist ConnectedDrive iDrive Valvetronic VANOS xDrive

Motorsport

BMW
BMW
in motorsport BMW
BMW
in Formula One BMW
BMW
M1 Procar Championship Kumho BMW
BMW
Championship Team RMG Team Schnitzer Team RBM Team MTEK Team RLL Team Schubert

Buildings

BMW
BMW
Central Building BMW
BMW
Headquarters BMW
BMW
Museum BMW
BMW
Welt

Other

Alpina BMW
BMW
Art Car BMW
BMW
Car Club of America BMW
BMW
people History of BMW History of BMW
BMW
motorcycles Hofmeister kink

1 BMW
BMW
sold the Rover Group
Rover Group
in 2000, however BMW
BMW
retained the rights to the Mini, Riley and Triumph brands.

Category Commons

Authority control

GN

.