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The Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
U.S. Open Cup, commonly known as the U.S. Open Cup (USOC), is a knock-out cup competition in American soccer. It is the oldest ongoing national soccer competition in the U.S.[1] The 103rd edition, held in 2016, was contested by 91 clubs from the three professional leagues sanctioned by the United States
United States
Soccer Federation: Major League Soccer
Major League Soccer
(MLS), the North American Soccer League (NASL) and the United Soccer League
United Soccer League
(USL), and also amateur clubs in the earlier rounds of the tournament after qualifying through their leagues. The overall champion earns a total of $250,000 in prize money, while the runner-up receives $60,000, and the furthest-advancing team from each lower division league receives $15,000.[2] In addition, the tournament winner qualifies for the group stage of the CONCACAF
CONCACAF
Champions League.[3] The competition was first held during the 1913–14 season as the National Challenge Cup, with Brooklyn Field Club
Brooklyn Field Club
winning a trophy donated by Thomas Dewar
Thomas Dewar
for the promotion of American soccer.[4] It was renamed and then dedicated to MLS owner Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
by the United States Soccer Federation in 1999. Major League Soccer
Major League Soccer
teams have dominated the competition since MLS began play in 1996. No lower division team has won the U.S. Open Cup since the Rochester Rhinos
Rochester Rhinos
in 1999 or reached the U.S. Open Cup final since the Charleston Battery
Charleston Battery
in 2008. The most recent champions of the competition, Sporting Kansas
Kansas
City, won their fourth title after defeating the New York Red Bulls
New York Red Bulls
2–1 in the 2017 final.[5]

Contents

1 Format

1.1 Qualification

2 History 3 Hosting 4 Champions

4.1 Champions by number of titles 4.2 Champions by State 4.3 MLS Honors 4.4 U.S. Open Cup winners

5 Player records

5.1 Career goals 5.2 Season scoring leaders

6 References 7 External links

Format[edit] The competition is a single-elimination tournament that has been contested by 80 teams since the 2014 edition. This pool consists of the 38 American clubs in the three professional leagues, which are Major League Soccer, the North American Soccer League, and the United Soccer League (formerly USL PRO), as well as 42 amateur teams from the Premier Development League, National Premier Soccer League, the United States Adult Soccer Association, and US Club Soccer.[6] The first three rounds, consisting of amateur and lower-league teams, are played during consecutive weekdays in May with amateur teams advancing to face USL and NASL clubs in geographical pairings in the third round. The winner of each match progresses to the next round and the loser is eliminated from the tournament. MLS clubs enter play in the fourth round, matched geographically with the winners of the third round to play on a date in June that is determined by the home side specifically selected for non-interference with league games. After the fourth round, no new teams are introduced, leading to a quarterfinal round in July, a semifinal round in August, and a final match to determine the champion in September. Every match, including the final, is a one-legged tie that lasts 90 minutes plus any additional stoppage time. If no clear winner has been determined after 90 minutes of normal time, 30 minutes of extra time is played. If the score is still level after extra time then the winner is decided by a penalty shoot-out.[6] Qualification[edit] Through the 2011 edition, eight teams from each level of the American Soccer Pyramid took part in the competition proper, with each league narrowing its delegation separately in the spring before the competition officially began in the summer. In some cases, additional teams played in qualifying rounds to gain entry. One example was found with MLS clubs, as only the top six from the previous regular season received automatic bids, while the bottom U.S.-based MLS teams faced each other to qualify for the remaining two MLS slots. Beginning in 2012, the competition was expanded from its previous 40 teams to 64, with the qualifying process radically changed. The National Premier Soccer League
National Premier Soccer League
received six places, plus the possibility of a seventh in a playoff against a team from the amateur US Club Soccer
US Club Soccer
setup. Nine clubs from the USASA earned places, as did 16 USL Premier Development League
Premier Development League
teams. Each of these organizations has its own qualifying process to determine its entrants. These 32 teams competed in the first round of the Cup, with the winners meeting all 16 USL Pro and NASL teams in the second round. The 16 U.S.-based MLS teams entered in the third round. In 2013 the competition was expanded to 68 teams. All U.S. based Division I, II and III teams participated in the tournament proper: 16 from Major League Soccer, six from the North American Soccer League and 12 from USL PRO. The remaining 34 spots in the tournament field were filled by amateur teams from the Adult Council category–16 from the Premier Development League, eight from U.S. Adult Soccer Association regional qualifying, eight from the National Premier Soccer League, one from US Club Soccer
US Club Soccer
and one from the United States Specialty Sports Association. The process for determining the site for the Open Cup tournament semifinals and final was changed in 2013. In past years, the sites for the final three matches of the tournament had been determined through a sealed-bid process, but in 2013 the hosts of those games were determined by a coin flip. Home teams throughout the entire tournament were determined by random selection.[2] Since 2008, the champion of the U.S. Open Cup has earned the right to play in the CONCACAF
CONCACAF
Champions League. The first team to represent the U.S. as Open Cup champion was 2007's winner, New England Revolution.[3] Starting in 2016, lower-division professional clubs owned by higher-division professional clubs are no longer eligible to participate in the U.S. Open Cup. This serves to remove the MLS reserve clubs in USL from the 2016 competition, after issues of clubs holding back players from their USL sides in 2015 in order to keep them eligible to play for the parent MLS club. Players are only allowed to play for one club in any US Open Cup season.[7] Amateur clubs remain eligible to enter even if they are owned by professional clubs. Initially, "hybrid affiliate" clubs—i.e., lower-division professional clubs that are staffed but not owned by higher-division clubs—also remained eligible, but those clubs were also banned effective with the 2016 competition. This last change was proposed by the Houston Dynamo, which were the senior club to Rio Grande Valley FC Toros in the first such arrangement in the U.S. game.[8] History[edit] Main article: History of the U.S. Open Cup

The Sir Thomas Dewar
Thomas Dewar
Cup

The competition dates back to 1913-14, when it was known as the National Challenge Cup. In 1999, U.S. Soccer honored patron, Lamar Hunt, by changing the official title of the tournament to the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup. The winners of the tournament were awarded the Dewar Cup, donated by Sir Thomas Dewar
Thomas Dewar
for the promotion of soccer in the United States
United States
in 1912, until it was retired due to poor condition in 1979. It was brought back into use by the United States
United States
Adult Soccer Association in 1997, but is now back on permanent display at the National Soccer Hall of Fame
National Soccer Hall of Fame
in Oneonta, New York, and the recent winners of the tournament have been awarded a new, different trophy. Despite this, the name of each winning club is still added to the base of the original Dewar Cup.

Trophy awarded to the Rochester Rhinos
Rochester Rhinos
in 1999

The National Challenge Cup was the first truly national cup competition in the United States, as previous cups had been effectively relegated to regional status by the difficulties in coordination and travel caused by the size of the United States
United States
in the early 1900s. While U.S. Soccer had initially administered the competition, in 1985 they handed over management to the USASA. In 1995, U.S. Soccer resumed its administration of the competition.[9] Maccabi Los Angeles
Maccabi Los Angeles
of California
California
and Bethlehem Steel of Pennsylvania have both won the cup a record five times, while Greek American AA
Greek American AA
of New York and Seattle Sounders FC are tied for the record for most consecutive cup victories at three. Most of these records are likely to fall over time, now that Major League Soccer
Major League Soccer
offers a fully professional league, and its teams typically dominate the competition. The old NASL did not participate in the Open Cup.[10] Since MLS' debut in 1996, MLS clubs have won the cup in all but one of those years. The Rochester Rhinos
Rochester Rhinos
of the 2nd division A-League were surprise winners in 1999, defeating four MLS clubs, including the Colorado Rapids
Colorado Rapids
2–0 in the championship match. The first professional team to win in the modern era were the Richmond Kickers of the USISL (the predecessor to the A-League, later known as the USL First Division, USL Pro, and now as the United Soccer League) in 1995, one year before the start of MLS. D.C. United
D.C. United
were the first MLS team to win in 1996. Hosting[edit] U.S. Soccer uses a simple coin toss to decide which team hosts each match all the way through the final.[11] Up until the 2011 U.S. Open Cup, U.S. Soccer had used sealed bids to award home matches,[12] which resulted in certain clubs outbidding other teams. From 2007 to 2011, MLS side D.C. United
D.C. United
hosted 17 straight matches including two finals, and from 2008–2010 MLS side Seattle Sounders FC hosted 11 of 14 matches in its three championship seasons.[citation needed] Champions[edit] Champions by number of titles[edit]

Titles Teams

5 Bethlehem Steel, Maccabi Los Angeles

4 Chicago Fire, Fall River Marksmen, Greek American AA, Philadelphia Ukrainians, Seattle Sounders FC, Sporting Kansas
Kansas
City

3 D.C. United, New York Pancyprian-Freedoms, Stix, Baer and Fuller F.C.

2 Brooklyn Hispano, Brooklyn Italians, Elizabeth S.C., FC Dallas, Greek-American A.C., Harmarville Hurricanes, Los Angeles Galaxy, Los Angeles Kickers, New York Americans, St. Louis Kutis, St. Louis Simpkins-Ford, Sparta

1 Baltimore, Ben Millers, Brookhattan, Brooklyn Field Club, Brooklyn St. Mary's Celtic, Chicago Viking, Columbus Crew, Eagles, Eintracht, España, Falcons, Fall River Rovers, Gallatin, German Hungarian S.C., Krete, Hota, McIlvaine Canvasbacks, C.D. Mexico, Morgan-Strasser, New Bedford Whalers, New England Revolution, New York Hakoah, New York Hungaria, New York Nationals, New York Ukrainians, Paterson F.C., Pawtucket, Ponta Delgada, Richmond Kickers, Robins Dry Dock, Rochester Rhinos, St. Louis Busch Seniors, Uhrik Truckers, San Francisco I.A.C., San Jose Oaks, St. Louis Scullin Steel, St. Petersburg Kickers, Shawsheen Indians

Champions by State[edit]

State Titles Teams

New York

26

Greek American AA
Greek American AA
(4), New York Pancyprian-Freedoms
New York Pancyprian-Freedoms
(3), Brooklyn Hispano (2), Brooklyn Italians
Brooklyn Italians
(2), New York Americans (2), Brookhattan, Brooklyn Field Club, Brooklyn St. Mary's Celtic, Eintracht, German Hungarian S.C., Krete, Hota, New York Hakoah, New York Hungaria, New York Nationals, New York Ukrainians, Robins Dry Dock, Rochester Rhinos

California

15

Maccabi Los Angeles
Maccabi Los Angeles
(5), Greek-American A.C. (2), Los Angeles Galaxy (2), Los Angeles Kickers (2), McIlvaine Canvasbacks, C.D. Mexico, San Francisco I.A.C., San Jose Oaks

Pennsylvania

14

Bethlehem Steel (5), Philadelphia Ukrainians
Philadelphia Ukrainians
(4), Harmarville Hurricanes (2), Gallatin, Morgan-Strasser, Uhrik Truckers

Missouri

12

Stix, Baer and Fuller (3), St. Louis Kutis (2), St. Louis Simpkins-Ford (2), Ben Millers, St. Louis Busch Seniors, Kansas
Kansas
City Wizards,[N 1] St. Louis Scullin Steel

Illinois

9

Chicago Fire (4), Sparta (2), Chicago Viking, Eagles, Falcons

Massachusetts

9

Fall River Marksmen
Fall River Marksmen
(4), Fall River Rovers, New Bedford Whalers, New England Revolution, Ponta Delgada, Shawsheen Indians

Washington

4

Seattle Sounders FC (4)

Washington, D.C.

4

D.C. United
D.C. United
(3), España

Kansas

3

Sporting Kansas
Kansas
City[N 1] (3)

New Jersey

3

Elizabeth S.C. (2), Paterson F.C.

Texas

2

FC Dallas
FC Dallas
(2)

Rhode Island

1

Pawtucket

Maryland

1

Baltimore

Ohio

1

Columbus Crew

Florida

1

St. Petersburg Kickers

Virginia

1

Richmond Kickers

^ a b The club, now known as Sporting Kansas
Kansas
City, was based in Kansas City, Missouri
Missouri
when it won its first U.S. Open Cup title in 2004. The club did not move to its current home of Kansas
Kansas
City, Kansas
Kansas
until 2007.

MLS Honors[edit]

Team Wins Runners-up Years won Years runner-up

Chicago Fire 4 2 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006 2004, 2011

Seattle Sounders FC 4 1 2009, 2010, 2011, 2014 2012

Sporting Kansas
Kansas
City 4 0 2004, 2012, 2015, 2017

D.C. United 3 2 1996, 2008, 2013 1997, 2009

FC Dallas 2 2 1997, 2016 2005, 2007

LA Galaxy 2 2 2001, 2005 2002, 2006

Columbus Crew
Columbus Crew
SC 1 2 2002 1998, 2010

New England Revolution 1 2 2007 2001, 2016

New York Red Bulls 0 2

2003, 2017

Philadelphia Union 0 2

2014, 2015

Colorado Rapids 0 1

1999

Miami Fusion
Miami Fusion
F.C. 0 1

2000

Real Salt Lake 0 1

2013

U.S. Open Cup winners[edit] Main article: List of U.S. Open Cup finals Player records[edit] Career goals[edit] The following is a table of the leading career goal scorers in the U.S Open Cup during the modern professional era (1995–present).[13]

Rank Player Goals Ref

1 Sébastien Le Toux 16 [14]

2 Kenny Cooper 13 [14]

2 Jaime Moreno 13 [15]

2 David Bulow 13 [16]

2 Johnny Menyongar 13 [15]

Season scoring leaders[edit]

Season Player Team Goals Ref

2010 Paulo Jr. Nate Jaqua Miami FC Seattle Sounders FC 5 [17]

2011 David Bulow Richmond Kickers 6 [18]

2012 Brian Shriver Carolina Railhawks 5 [19]

2013 Dwayne De Rosario Frédéric Piquionne D.C. United Portland Timbers 5 [20]

2014 Kenny Cooper Seattle Sounders FC 6 [21]

2015 Dom Dwyer Krisztián Németh Sporting Kansas
Kansas
City 5 [22]

2016 David Accam Edwin Borboa Chicago Fire La Máquina 5 [23]

2017 Djiby Fall Stefano Pinho Bradley Wright-Phillips FC Cincinnati Miami FC New York Red Bulls 4 [24]

References[edit]

^ Parker, Graham (October 1, 2013). "The US Open Cup: A quiet century of soccer history". Al Jazeera America. Retrieved September 19, 2014.  ^ a b "100th Edition of Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
U.S. Open Cup Includes Increased Number of Teams and Prize Money". USsoccer.com. Chicago, Illinois: United States
United States
Soccer Federation. March 5, 2013. Retrieved October 1, 2013.  ^ a b "Qualifying Format Unveiled for 2008-09 CONCACAF
CONCACAF
Champions League" (Press release). New York City: Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football. May 14, 2008. Retrieved September 19, 2014.  ^ "100 Moments: The First U.S. Open Cup Winner". USsoccer.com. Chicago, Illinois: United States
United States
Soccer Federation. May 16, 2013.  ^ "Sporting KC Defeat NY Red Bulls 2-1, Win 2017 U.S. Open Cup Crown". USsoccer.com. Chicago: United States
United States
Soccer Federation. September 21, 2017. Retrieved September 23, 2017.  ^ a b "2014 Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
U.S. Open Cup Kicks Off May 7". USsoccer.com. Chicago, Illinois: United States
United States
Soccer Federation. May 24, 2014. Retrieved September 19, 2014.  ^ Halaka, Josh (November 4, 2015). "MLS-owned USL teams not allowed in 2016 U.S. Open Cup, per USSF policy change". thecup.us. Retrieved November 6, 2015.  ^ "U.S. Open Cup Committee Adds New Adjustment To Policy Regarding Team Eligibility" (Press release). United States
United States
Soccer Federation. March 29, 2016.  ^ "USASA". USASA. Retrieved July 22, 2012.  ^ Westervelt, Ted (May 13, 2013). "U.S. Open Cup 1958–1987". The New York Times. Goal, The New York Times Soccer Blog. Retrieved April 29, 2014.  ^ Jonathan Tannenwald (March 5, 2013). "U.S. Open Cup updates format, increases prize money for 2013 edition". philly.com. Retrieved April 25, 2014.  ^ Brian Straus (October 5, 2011). "U.S. Open Cup could be revamped for '12 – SOCCER – Sporting News". Aol.sportingnews.com. Retrieved July 22, 2012.  ^ "2014 US Open Cup Round 5: Sebastien Le Toux’s historic brace leads Philadelphia Union
Philadelphia Union
past New York Cosmos, 2-1 (video)", The Cup, June 25, 2014. ^ a b "US Open Cup: Title more important to Philadelphia Union's Sebastien Le Toux than scoring record", MLS Soccer, September 15, 2014. ^ a b " Philadelphia Union
Philadelphia Union
Reaches Semifinals of U.S. Open Cup", U.S. Soccer, July 8, 2014. ^ " Philadelphia Union
Philadelphia Union
Reaches Semifinals of U.S. Open Cup", U.S. Soccer, July 8, 2014. (The Richmond Kickers
Richmond Kickers
claimed in a 2013 press release that Bulow has scored 14 goals. See "Kickers Face United In Open Cup" Archived September 16, 2014, at Archive.is) ^ "2010 Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
US Open Cup goalscoring leaders". ^ "2011 Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
US Open Cup goalscoring leaders". ^ "2012 Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
US Open Cup goalscoring leaders". ^ "2013 Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
US Open Cup goalscoring leaders". ^ "2014 Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
US Open Cup goalscoring leaders". ^ Hakala, Josh. "2015 Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
US Open Cup statistical leaders: Goals, assists, points". thecup.us. Retrieved October 5, 2015.  ^ Hakala, Josh. "2016 Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
US Open Cup statistical leaders: Goals, assists, points". thecup.us. Retrieved June 27, 2017.  ^ Hakala, Josh. "2017 Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
US Open Cup statistical leaders TheCup.us - Full Coverage of US Open Cup Soccer". thecup.us. Retrieved September 21, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Official website TheCup.us List of Open Cup finals at RSSSF

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Lamar Hunt
Lamar Hunt
U.S. Open Cup

Qualification

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Seasons

1913–14 1914–15 1915–16 1916–17 1917–18 1918–19 1919–20 1920–21 1921–22 1922–23 1923–24 1924–25 1925–26 1927 1928 1928–29 1929–30 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Finals

1998 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

History Winners Winning head coaches

v t e

Soccer in the United States

U.S. Soccer Federation USASA USCS League system History Hall of Fame Awards Clubs Champions Venues (stadiums by capacity SSS) Women's soccer in the United States

Men's national teams

Senior (results players) U23 U20 U18 U17 Futsal Beach soccer Paralympic Cerebral palsy

Women's national teams

Senior U23 U20 U18 U17

Men's outdoor leagues

Professional

MLS

Playoffs MLS Cup

USL NASL

Soccer Bowl

Proposed: NISA USL Division III

Amateur/Semi-pro

NPSL PDL APSL CSL EPLWA GCPL SFSFL SoCal UPSL USLPA

Women's outdoor leagues

Professional

NWSL

NWSL Shield Playoffs

Amateur/Semi-pro

WPSL UWS

Men's indoor leagues

MASL M2 PASL WISL

Men's futsal leagues

PFL MLF

Men's Cup competitions

US Open Cup National Amateur Cup Hank Steinbrecher Cup

Women's Cup competitions

SheBelieves Cup Tournament of Nations Women's Open

Men's college soccer

NCAA Championships (Division I, Division II, Division III) NAIA Championship

Women's college soccer

NCAA Championships (Division I, Division II, Division III) NAIA Championship

Youth soccer

Leagues: AYSO NFHS USYSA U.S. Development Academy Super Y-League Competitions: US Youth Soccer National Championships Jefferson Cup

Defunct men's outdoor leagues

AFA (1884–1924) American Cup (1885–1924) ALPF (1894) NAFL (1895–98) AAFA Cup (1912–13) ASL (1921–33) ASL (1933–83) NASFL (1946–47) USA (1967) NPSL (1967) NASL (1968–84) USL (1984–85) LSSA (1987–92) ASL (1988–89) WSA (1989) USL 2nd (1990–2010) A-League (1995–2004) USL 1st (2005–10) D2 Pro League (2010) PLA (2015—2017)

Defunct women's outdoor leagues

W-League (1995–2015) WUSA (2000–03) WPS (2007–12) WPSL Elite (2012–13)

Defunct men's indoor leagues

NASL (1975–76, 1979–84) MISL (1978–92) NPSL (1984–2001) CISL (1993–97) EISL (1997–98) WISL (1998–2001) MISL (2001–08) AISL (2003–08) XSL (2008–09) MISL (2008–14)

v t e

National association football cups of North America, Central America, and the Caribbean (CONCACAF)

North America

Canada Mexico United States

Central America

Costa Rica El Salvador Guatemala (defunct) Honduras Nicaragua (defunct) Panama

Caribbean

Antigua and Barbuda Aruba Bahamas Barbados Bermuda Bonaire Cayman Islands Dominica Dominican Republic Grenada Guadeloupe French Guiana Guyana Haïti Jamaica Martinique Puerto Rico Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Suriname T

.