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Lake Nokoué is a lake in the southern part of Benin. It is 20 km (12 mi) wide and 11 km (6.8 mi) long and covers an area of 4,900 ha (12,000 acres).[1] The lake is partly fed by the Ouémé River and the Sô River, both of which deposit sediments from throughout the region in the lake.[2]

The city of Cotonou sits on the southern border of the lake. Sections of the population of Cotonou have been displaced by coastal and lake flooding.[3] On the northern edge of the lake is the town of Ganvié.

Economy

Mennonite missionary in a dugout canoe, similar to the ones used by local artisanal fishermen

Because of its diverse wildlife, the lake provides an important source of food and economic activity for these towns.[3] Fishing is best when water is low between November and June.[1] Fishing is typically of 30 species of fish, with fish from the Cichlid, Clupeidae and Penaeidae families making 85% of the catch.[1] The fishery became more stressed during the 1990s, as more people began fishing on the lake.[1] Fishing is typically artisanal, with small crew dugout canoes catching small batches of fish.[1] The estimated fish production of the lake is 2 tonnes per hectare per year.[4]

The lake is also used for Acadja, a type of fish breeding facility.[1]

Hydrology

The lake, in large part, is a lagoon.[5] With the surrounding low-lying topography, the lake is expected to double in size and flood as the current global climate change gradually affects the sea level.[3] This development carries a risk of future salinisation, which will make the freshwater lake more brackish and potentially change its ecology.[3] Different sections of the lake currently alternate between freshwater and brackish ecosystems at an average depth of 1.5 m (4 ft 11 in).[1] Normal temperatures throughout the lake are between 27 and 29 °C (81 and 84 °F).[1]

The lake is a site of deposition of both pesticides and heavy metals from upstream industry and human habitation.[4][6] Though the pesticides are only present in fish at less than toxic levels,[4] the heavy metals in the waters can reach levels in fish both unhealthy for humans and the fish.[6]

The lake village of Ganvie on its northern shore

Geology

The floor of the lake is a mixture of sand, muddy-sand and mud layers.[1]

Ecology

Lake Nokoué has at least 78 species of fish.[5] A number of bird species exploit the wide variety of fish as food, as well as species of otter.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i ATTI – MAMA, CYRIAQUE. "CO-MANAGEMENT IN CONTINENTAL FISHING IN BENIN: THE CASE OF LAKE NOKOUE" (PDF). Proceedings of the International Workshop on Fisheries Co-management. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-11-16. Retrieved 2016-11-16.Cotonou sits on the southern border of the lake. Sections of the population of Cotonou have been displaced by coastal and lake flooding.[3] On the northern edge of the lake is the town of Ganvié.

    Because of its diverse wildlife, the lake provides an important source of food and economic activity for these towns.[3] Fishing is best when water is low between November and June.[1] Fishing is typically of 30 species of fish, with fish from the Cichlid, Clupeidae and Penaeidae families making 85% of the catch.[1] The fishery became more stressed during the 1990s, as more people began fishing on the lake.[1] Fishing is typically artisanal, with small crew dugout canoes catching small batches of fish.[1] The estimated fish production of the lake is 2 tonnes per hectare per year.[4]

    The lake is also used for Acadja, a type of fish breeding facility.[1]

    Hydrology

    The lake, in large part, is a lagoon.[5] With the surrounding low-lying topography, the lake is expected to double in size and flood as the current global climate change gradually affects the sea level.[3] This development carries a risk of future salinisation, which will make the freshwater lake more brackish and potentially change its ecology.[3] Different sections of the lake currently alternate between freshwater and brackish ecosystems at an average depth of 1.5 m (4 ft 11 in).[1] Normal temperatures throughout the lake are between 27 and 29 °C (81 and 84 °F).[1]

    The lake is a site of deposition of both pesticides and heavy metals from upstream industry and human habitation.[4][6] Though the pesticides are only present in fish at less than toxic levels,[4] the heavy metals in the waters can reach levels in fish both unhealthy for humans and the fish.[6]

    Acadja, a type of fish breeding facility.[1]

    The lake, in large part, is a lagoon.[5] With the surrounding low-lying topography, the lake is expected to double in size and flood as the current global climate change gradually affects the sea level.[3] This development carries a risk of future salinisation, which will make the freshwater lake more brackish and potentially change its ecology.[3] Different sections of the lake currently alternate between freshwater and brackish ecosystems at an average depth of 1.5 m (4 ft 11 in).[1] Normal temperatures throughout the lake are between 27 and 29 °C (81 and 84 °F).[1]

    The lake is a site of deposition of both pesticides and heavy metals from upstream industry and human habitation.[4][6] Though the

    The lake is a site of deposition of both pesticides and heavy metals from upstream industry and human habitation.[4][6] Though the pesticides are only present in fish at less than toxic levels,[4] the heavy metals in the waters can reach levels in fish both unhealthy for humans and the fish.[6]

    The floor of the lake is a mixture of sand, muddy-sand and mud layers.[1]

    Ecology

    Lake Nokoué has at least 78 species of fish.[5] A number of bird species exploit the wide variety of fish as food, as well as species of otter.[5]

    References

    Lake Nokoué has at least 78 species of fish.[5] A number of bird species exploit the wide variety of fish as food, as well as species of otter.[5]

    References