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Labor Day
Labor Day
in the United States
United States
is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, laws and well-being of the country. It is the Monday of the long weekend known as Labor Day
Labor Day
Weekend and it is considered the unofficial end of summer in the United States. It is recognized as a federal holiday. Beginning in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, trade unionists proposed that a day be set aside to celebrate labor. "Labor Day" was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, which organized the first parade in New York City. In 1887, Oregon
Oregon
was the first state of the United States
United States
to make it an official public holiday. By the time it became an official federal holiday in 1894, thirty states in the United States
United States
officially celebrated Labor Day.[1] Canada's Labour Day
Labour Day
is also celebrated on the first Monday of September. More than 80 countries celebrate International Workers' Day on May 1 – the ancient European holiday of May Day – and several countries have chosen their own dates for Labour Day.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Origin 1.2 Legal recognition

2 Labor Day
Labor Day
vs. May Day 3 Unofficial end of summer 4 Labor Day
Labor Day
sales 5 Dates 6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 External links

History[edit] Origin[edit] Beginning in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, different groups of trade unionists chose a variety of days on which to celebrate labor. In the United States, a September holiday called Labor Day
Labor Day
was first proposed in the early 1880s. Alternate stories of the event's origination exist. According to one early history of Labor Day, the event originated in connection with a General Assembly of the Knights of Labor
Knights of Labor
convened in New York City
New York City
in September 1882.[2] In connection with this clandestine Knights assembly, a public parade of various labor organizations was held on September 5 under the auspices of the Central Labor Union (CLU) of New York.[2] Secretary of the CLU Matthew Maguire is credited for first proposing that a national Labor Day holiday subsequently be held on the first Monday of each September in the aftermath of this successful public demonstration.[3]

P.J. McGuire, Vice President of the American Federation of Labor, is frequently credited as the father of Labor Day
Labor Day
in the United States.

An alternative thesis is maintained that the idea of Labor Day
Labor Day
was the brainchild of Peter J. McGuire, a Vice President of the American Federation of Labor, who put forward the initial proposal in the spring of 1882.[1] According to McGuire, on May 8, 1882, he made a proposition to the fledgling Central Labor Union in New York City
New York City
that a day be set aside for a "general holiday for the laboring classes."[4] According to McGuire he further recommended that the event should begin with a street parade as a public demonstration of organized labor's solidarity and strength, with the march followed by a picnic, to which participating local unions could sell tickets as a fundraiser.[4] According to McGuire he suggested the first Monday in September as an ideal date for such a public celebration, owing to optimum weather and the date's place on the calendar, sitting midway between the Fourth of July
Fourth of July
and Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving
public holidays.[4] Labor Day
Labor Day
picnics and other public gatherings frequently featured speeches by prominent labor leaders. In 1909 the American Federation of Labor
American Federation of Labor
convention designated the Sunday preceding Labor Day
Labor Day
as "Labor Sunday," to be dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the Labor movement.[3] This secondary date failed to gain significant traction in popular culture. Legal recognition[edit] In 1887 Oregon
Oregon
became the first state of the United States
United States
to make Labor Day
Labor Day
an official public holiday. By the time it became an official federal holiday in 1894, thirty U.S. states
U.S. states
officially celebrated Labor Day.[1] All U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and the United States
United States
territories have subsequently made Labor Day
Labor Day
a statutory holiday. Labor Day
Labor Day
vs. May Day[edit] The date of May 1 (an ancient European folk holiday known as May Day) emerged in 1886 as an alternative holiday for the celebration of labor, later becoming known as International Workers' Day. The date had its origins at the 1885 convention of the American Federation of Labor, which passed a resolution calling for adoption of the eight hour day effective May 1, 1886.[5] While negotiation was envisioned for achievement of the shortened work day, use of the strike to enforce this demand was recognized, with May 1 advocated as a date for coordinated strike action.[5] The proximity of the date to the bloody Haymarket affair
Haymarket affair
of May 4, 1886, further accentuated May First's radical reputation. There was disagreement among labor unions at this time about when a holiday celebrating workers should be, with some advocating for continued emphasis of the September march-and-picnic date while others sought the designation of the more politically-charged date of May 1. Conservative Democratic President Grover Cleveland
Grover Cleveland
was one of those concerned that a labor holiday on May 1 would tend to become a commemoration of the Haymarket Affair and in 1887, he publicly supported the September Labor Day
Labor Day
holiday as a less inflammatory alternative.[6] The date was formally adopted as a United States federal holiday in 1894. Unofficial end of summer[edit] Labor Day
Labor Day
is called the "unofficial end of summer"[7] because it marks the end of the cultural summer season. Many take their two-week vacations during the two weeks ending Labor Day
Labor Day
weekend.[citation needed] Many fall activities, such as school and sports begin about this time. In the United States, many school districts resume classes around the Labor Day
Labor Day
holiday weekend (see First day of school). Most begin the week before, making Labor Day
Labor Day
weekend the first three-day weekend of the school calendar, while others return the Tuesday following Labor Day, allowing families one final getaway before the school year begins. Many districts across the Midwest are opting to begin school after Labor Day.[8] In the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Virginia, the amusement park industry has successfully lobbied for legislation requiring most school districts in the state to have their first day of school after Labor Day, in order to give families another weekend to visit amusement parks in the state. The relevant statute has been nicknamed the "Kings Dominion law" after one such park.[9] In Minnesota
Minnesota
the State Fair ends on Labor Day. Under state law public schools normally do not begin until after the holiday. Allowing time for school children to show 4-H
4-H
projects at the Fair has been given as one reason for this timing.[10] In U.S. sports, Labor Day
Labor Day
weekend marks the beginning of many fall sports. National Collegiate Athletic Association
National Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA) teams usually play their first games that weekend and the National Football League (NFL) traditionally play their kickoff game the Thursday following Labor Day. The Southern 500
Southern 500
NASCAR
NASCAR
auto race has been held on Labor Day weekend at Darlington Raceway
Darlington Raceway
in Darlington, South Carolina
Darlington, South Carolina
from 1950 to 2003 and since 2015. At Indianapolis Raceway Park, the National Hot Rod Association
National Hot Rod Association
hold their finals of the NHRA U.S. Nationals drag race that weekend. Labor Day
Labor Day
is the middle point between weeks one and two of the U.S. Open Tennis Championships held in Flushing Meadows, New York. In fashion, Labor Day
Labor Day
is (or was) considered the last day when it is acceptable to wear white[11] or seersucker.[12][13] Labor Day
Labor Day
sales[edit] To take advantage of large numbers of potential customers with time to shop, Labor Day
Labor Day
has become an important weekend for discounts and allowances by many retailers in the United States, especially for back-to-school sales. Some retailers claim it is one of the largest sale dates of the year, second only to the Christmas
Christmas
season's Black Friday.[14] Dates[edit]

Year Labor Day

1900 1928 1956 1984 2012 2040 2068 2096 September 3

1901 1929 1957 1985 2013 2041 2069 2097 September 2

1902 1930 1958 1986 2014 2042 2070 2098 September 1

1903 1931 1959 1987 2015 2043 2071 2099 September 7

1904 1932 1960 1988 2016 2044 2072 [nb 1] September 5

1905 1933 1961 1989 2017 2045 2073

September 4

1906 1934 1962 1990 2018 2046 2074

September 3

1907 1935 1963 1991 2019 2047 2075

September 2

1908 1936 1964 1992 2020 2048 2076

September 7

1909 1937 1965 1993 2021 2049 2077

September 6

1910 1938 1966 1994 2022 2050 2078

September 5

1911 1939 1967 1995 2023 2051 2079

September 4

1912 1940 1968 1996 2024 2052 2080

September 2

1913 1941 1969 1997 2025 2053 2081

September 1

1914 1942 1970 1998 2026 2054 2082

September 7

1915 1943 1971 1999 2027 2055 2083

September 6

1916 1944 1972 2000 2028 2056 2084

September 4

1917 1945 1973 2001 2029 2057 2085

September 3

1918 1946 1974 2002 2030 2058 2086

September 2

1919 1947 1975 2003 2031 2059 2087

September 1

1920 1948 1976 2004 2032 2060 2088 2100 September 6

1921 1949 1977 2005 2033 2061 2089 2101 September 5

1922 1950 1978 2006 2034 2062 2090 2102 September 4

1923 1951 1979 2007 2035 2063 2091 2103 September 3

1924 1952 1980 2008 2036 2064 2092 2104 September 1

1925 1953 1981 2009 2037 2065 2093 2105 September 7

1926 1954 1982 2010 2038 2066 2094 2106 September 6

1927 1955 1983 2011 2039 2067 2095 2107 September 5

See also[edit]

Labor history of the United States Labor unions in the United States United States
United States
labor law Workers' Memorial Day

Footnotes[edit]

^ The gap is caused by the fact that, under the Gregorian Calendar, the year 2100 is not a leap year, not being divisible by 400.

References[edit]

^ a b c The Bridgemen's magazine. International Association of Bridge. Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers. 1921. pp. 443–44. Archived from the original on October 9, 2013. Retrieved September 4, 2011.  ^ a b "Origin of Labor Day," Cincinnati Tribune, September 1, 1895, Special
Special
Labor Day
Labor Day
supplement, pg. 26. ^ a b " United States
United States
Department of Labor: The History of Labor Day". Archived from the original on September 25, 2017. Retrieved November 3, 2017.  ^ a b c P.J. McGuire, " Labor Day
Labor Day
— Its Birth and Significance," The Union Agent [Kentucky], vol. 3, no. 9 (Sept. 1898), pg. 1. ^ a b Philip S. Foner, May Day: A Short History of the International Workers' Holiday. New York: International Publishers, 1986; pg. 19. ^ "Knights of Labor". Progressive Historians. September 3, 2007. Archived from the original on September 30, 2007.  ^ " Labor Day
Labor Day
marks unofficial end of rainy summer". WBIR-TV10. September 2, 2013. Retrieved March 23, 2016. [permanent dead link] ^ Charles, C. M.; Senter, Gail W. (2008). Elementary classroom management. Pearson/Allyn and Bacon. p. 20. ISBN 978-0-205-51071-9. Archived from the original on January 7, 2014. Retrieved September 4, 2011.  ^ Freed, Benjamin (August 25, 2014). "" Kings Dominion
Kings Dominion
Law" Still Reigns in Virginia". Washingtonian. Archived from the original on September 13, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016.  ^ "Commonly asked questions". www.mpls.k12.mn.us. Archived from the original on September 4, 2017. Retrieved November 27, 2017.  ^ Laura FitzPatrick (September 8, 2009). "Why We Can't Wear White After Labor Day". Time Magazine. Archived from the original on March 3, 2011. Retrieved February 25, 2011.  ^ Bell, Johnathan (May 9, 2011). "An Introduction to Seersucker
Seersucker
for Men". Guy Style Guide. Archived from the original on April 19, 2012. Retrieved May 2, 2012.  ^ O'Brien, Glenn. "Daytime wedding after Labor Day: Is it OK to wear a light beige suit to a daytime wedding after Labor Day?". GQ. The Style Guy. Archived from the original on January 31, 2012. Retrieved May 2, 2012.  ^ " Labor Day
Labor Day
Intention Still Holds Meaning". Tri Parish Times. August 30, 2012. Retrieved August 31, 2012. 

Bibliography[edit]

Green, James (2007). Death In the Haymarket: A Story of Chicago, the First Labor Movement and the Bombing that Divided Gilded Age America. Anchor. ISBN 1-4000-3322-5. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Labor Day
Labor Day
in the United States.

History of Labor Day, History of Artists and Writers Unions, Rare Labor Related Comic Books Labor Day
Labor Day
is May 1: Today is a boss’s holiday. Jacobin. September 7, 2015. Today Belongs to Workers. Jacobin. September 5, 2016.  "Labor Day". New International Encyclopedia. 1905. 

v t e

Federal holidays in the United States

Current

New Year's Day Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. Washington's Birthday Memorial Day Independence Day Labor Day Columbus Day Veterans Day Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving
Day Christmas
Christmas
Day

Former

The Eighth (1828–1861) Victory Day (1948–1975)

Proposed

Flag Day (1950) Election Day (1993) Malcolm X Day
Malcolm X Day
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Cesar Chavez Day
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(36) The Eighth (LA, former federal)

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(week)

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Monday (religious)

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(MO)

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Father's Day (36)

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Virginia
Day (WV)

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Parents' Day
(36) Pioneer Day (UT)

July–August

Summer vacation

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Barack Obama Day
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Labor Day
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(36)

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(religious)

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(36)

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(religious)

November Native American Indian Heritage Month

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(federal)

Day after Thanksgiving
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Obama Day
(Perry County, AL)

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Varies (year round)

Eid al-Adha
Eid al-Adha
(religious) Eid al-Fitr
Eid al-Fitr
(religious) Ramadan
Ramadan
(religious, month)

Legend: (federal) = federal holidays, (state) = state holidays, (religious) = religious holidays, (week) = weeklong holidays, (month) = monthlong holidays, (36) = Title 36 Observances and Ceremonies Bold indicates major holidays commonly celebrated in the United States, which often represent the major celebrations of the month. See also: Lists of holidays, Hallmark holidays, public holidays in the United States, New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands.

v t e

Official holidays of the New York Stock Exchange

Whole days

New Year's Day Martin Luther King Jr. Day Washington's Birthday Good Friday Memorial Day Independence Day Labor Day Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving
Day Christmas
Christmas
Day

Partial days

Day before Independence Day Day after Thanksgi

.