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The Lašva
Lašva
Valley (Serbo-Croatian: Lašvanska dolina/Лашванска долина) is a 17 kilometers long valley in central Bosnia, defined geographically by the Lašva
Lašva
River's route. It is a tributary of the Bosna River. The Lašva
Lašva
River basin covers the territory of four municipalities: Travnik, Novi Travnik, Vitez
Vitez
and Busovača.[2]

Contents

1 History

1.1 Ancient times 1.2 Pre-Ottoman period 1.3 Ottoman Period 1.4 Post-Ottoman Period 1.5 Modern Day

2 Demographics 3 References 4 See also

History[edit]

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Ancient times[edit] The favorable geographical position of the Lašva
Lašva
Valley enabled the beginning of civilization along the Lašva
Lašva
River. However, due to the unprotected and open area numerous occupiers chose the mountainous regions to protect themselves. The earliest known remnants of civilized people were the Romans. Romans were adapt to the terrain and surrounding because of military might, which was of the utmost importance for survival. Due to the presence of the Lašva
Lašva
River many settlers began to exploit it for economic benefits. They began trading goods which traveled from Travnik
Travnik
to Vitez. In addition to the river, the mountainous regions offered mineral deposits which in turn attracted even more settlers. Remnants have been found belonging to the Romans in Turbe and Mosunj, where a settlement named Bistue is thought to have existed.[3] Pre-Ottoman period[edit] The name "Lašva" was first used as a regional term in the 13th century. Béla IV of Hungary
Béla IV of Hungary
first mentioned the area in his charter on 20 April 1244, which he issued to gain political favor from Pope Innocent IV by launching and winning the war against the Bosnian heretics, as he called them. In the charter there is a mention of three Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
churches existing in the Lašva
Lašva
Valley[citation needed], although only one can be confirmed by the gifting of the Bosnian Ban Matthew Ninoslaus in 1250. The Lašva
Lašva
Valley is thought of having its own seat of power before the arrival of the Franciscans
Franciscans
in the 13th century. Their subsequent establishing of Vukarija in 1340 was the first officially known seat of power in the valley. The Bosnian Vukarija had, according to the friar Bartolomej Polanski (1385/1390), monasteries in Kraljeva Sutjeska, Visoko, Lašva
Lašva
and Olovo. Therefore, the Lašva
Lašva
Valley was an occupied and developed region not unlike other parts of Bosnia. "Lašva" is only mentioned once in the 15th century by King Sigismund of Hungary on 5 September 1425. On that date the king rewarded his son the Paku estate in the county of Vuku
Vuku
for his loyalty to the king which he earned through battles against the Ottoman Empire. In the book "Roots and Life," translated from "Korijeni i Život," the advent of Ottoman expansion is mentioned. "The coming of the Ottomans and their military victories at Jajce
Jajce
in 1463 saw the putting out of fire in chimneys at age old houses and churches. With the arrival of the new oppressive and bloodthirsty masters from the East, people began to flee over the borders to the south and north, while others sought refuge in mountains led by the Franciscans." The last battle against Ottoman expansion in the Lašva
Lašva
Valley was lost on May 1463, when Mehmed the Conqueror
Mehmed the Conqueror
on his return from Jajce defeated the last Bosnian king Stephen Tomašević
Stephen Tomašević
at Milodraž in today's Brestovsko; located between Kiseljak
Kiseljak
and Busovača.[4] Ottoman Period[edit]

The Ahdname
Ahdname
issued by sultan Fatih Sultan
Sultan
Mehmet instituting religious freedom in Bosnia.

Upon the Ottoman conquest, the plaintiff of the Franciscans
Franciscans
Anđeo Zvizdović advised the Sultan
Sultan
to stop forcing the people of Bosnia
Bosnia
to flee because of religious persecution. Which, if continued, would lead to the eventual downfall of properties and infrastructures. The Sultan agreed and issued the Ahdname
Ahdname
of Milodraž in 1463 decreeing freedom of religion for the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
population. Due to the sheer size of the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
jurisdictional and government overseeing was not a possibility, since the capitol Istanbul
Istanbul
was long ways away. Bosnia
Bosnia
was used as a launching state for other wars, which consequently transformed the land into a military occupying region. Most of the peoples along with the Franciscans sought to distance themselves from the Ottoman settlements, many times living in impoverished conditions. New monasteries were not allowed to be built on the foundation of old ones and consequently only three remained at; Fojnica, Kreševo
Kreševo
and Kraljeva Sutjeska. At the dawn of Ottoman rule, the Lašva
Lašva
Valley began to be called "nahija Lašva," which was centered at Travnik. As a result, Travnik began to grow and emerge as an integral part of the Ottoman Empire's jurisdiction over the Lašva
Lašva
Valley and Bosnia.[4] Post-Ottoman Period[edit] The Lašva
Lašva
Valley, as well as Bosnia, was emancipated from Ottoman control in 1878 and entered a new phase in its history under Austro-Hungarian
Austro-Hungarian
rule. The area saw a reemerging of Catholic populations with overall improvements in infrastructures. The modernization of the Austro-Hungarian
Austro-Hungarian
rule transformed the Lašva Valley into a capable area worthy of competing against larger and more established regions. The 19th century also saw the materialization of South Slavic nationalism along with the idea of a united South Slavic state.[citation needed] Modern Day[edit] The region saw fierce fighting between the Croatian Defence Council and the Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
during the Croat-Bosniak War. Today the region is recovering from the war and has emerged as an economic powerhouse in Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina, with cities such as Vitez
Vitez
leading the way. Demographics[edit]

Municipality Nationality

Total

Muslims

%

Croats

%

Serbs

%

Other

%

Travnik

31,813

45.4

25,945

37.0

7,300

10.4

5,032

7.2

70,090

Novi Travnik

11,625

37.9

12,162

39.6

4,097

13.3

2,829

9.2

30,713

Vitez

11,514

41.3

12,675

45.5

1,501

5.4

2,169

7.8

27,859

Busovača

8,451

44.8

9,093

48.2

623

3.3

712

3.8

18,879

1991 census

Municipality Nationality

Total

Bosniaks

%

Croats

%

Serbs

%

Other

%

Travnik

35,648

66.7

15,102

28.2

644

1.2

2,092

3.9

53,482

Novi Travnik

12,067

50.6

11,002

46.2

367

1.5

396

1.7

23.832

Vitez

10,513

40.7

14.350

55.5

333

1.3

640

2.5

25,836

Busovača

8,681

48.5

8,873

49.5

205

1.1

151

0.8

17,910

2013 census

References[edit]

^ "Estimation total number of present population by age, sex and cantons and municipality, June 30, 2007". Federal Office of Statistics, Federation of Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina. Archived from the original on April 10, 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-03.  ^ 3 Pogodnost zemljišta Lašvanske doline za voćarsku proizvodnju ^ Vitez
Vitez
Web. Lasvanska Dolina i njena proslost. Retrieved August 8, 2008, from "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-07-21. Retrieved 2008-08-09.  ^ a b Vitez
Vitez
Web. August 8, 2008

See also[edit]

History of Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina Bosnian War Croat-Bosniak War Bosnian architecture Music of Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina Tourism in Bosnia
Bosnia
and Herzegovina Bosnia
Bosnia
and