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The Info List - L Band


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The L band
L band
is the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) designation for the range of frequencies in the radio spectrum from 1 to 2 gigahertz (GHz).

Contents

1 Applications

1.1 Mobile service 1.2 Satellite navigation 1.3 Telecommunications use 1.4 Aircraft surveillance 1.5 Amateur radio 1.6 Digital Audio Broadcasting 1.7 Astronomy

2 References

Applications[edit] Mobile service[edit] In Europe, the Electronic Communications Committee (ECC) of the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) has harmonized part of the L-band (1452–1492 MHz), allowing individual countries to adopt this spectrum for terrestrial mobile/fixed communications networks supplemental downlink (MFCN SDL). By means of carrier aggregation, an LTE-Advanced
LTE-Advanced
or UMTS/ HSDPA
HSDPA
base station could use this spectrum to provide additional bandwidth for communications from the base station to the mobile device; i.e., in the downlink direction.[1] Satellite navigation[edit] The Global Positioning System
Global Positioning System
carriers are in the L band, centered at 1176.45 MHz (L5), 1227.60 MHz (L2), 1381.05 MHz (L3), and 1575.42 MHz (L1) frequencies.

The Galileo Navigation System
Galileo Navigation System
uses the L-band similarly to GPS. The GLONASS
GLONASS
System uses the L-band similarly to GPS.

Telecommunications use[edit] Mobile phones operate at 800–900 and 1700–2100 MHz. Iridium Communications satellite phones use frequencies between 1616 and 1626.5 MHz[2] to communicate with the satellites. Inmarsat
Inmarsat
and LightSquared
LightSquared
terminals use frequencies between 1525 and 1646.5 MHz. Thuraya
Thuraya
satellite phones use frequencies between 1525 and 1661 MHz. Aircraft surveillance[edit] The aircraft L-band ranges from 962–1213 MHz. Aircraft can use Automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast
Automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast
(ADS-B) equipment at 1090 MHz to communicate position information to the ground as well as between them for traffic information and avoidance. The 1090 MHz frequency (paired with 1030 MHz) is also used by Mode S transponders, which ADS-B augments when operated at this frequency. The TCAS system also utilizes the 1030/1090 MHz paired frequencies. ADS-B information can also be broadcast on the L band frequency of 978 MHz. DME and TACAN systems are also in this frequency band. Amateur radio[edit] The Radio
Radio
Regulations of the International Telecommunication Union allow amateur radio operations in the frequency range 1,240–1,300 MHz, and amateur satellite up-links are allowed in the range 1,260–1,270 MHz. This is known as the 23-centimeter band by radio amateurs and as the L-band by AMSAT. Digital Audio Broadcasting[edit] In the United States
United States
and overseas territories, the L band
L band
is held by the military for telemetry, thereby forcing digital radio to in-band on-channel (IBOC) solutions. Digital Audio Broadcasting
Digital Audio Broadcasting
(DAB) is typically done in the 1452–1492 MHz range in most of the world, but some countries also use VHF
VHF
and UHF
UHF
bands. WorldSpace satellite radio broadcasts in the 1467–1492 MHz L sub-band. Astronomy[edit] The band also contains the hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen (the hydrogen line, 1420 MHz), which is of great astronomical interest as a means of imaging the normally invisible neutral atomic hydrogen in interstellar space. Consequently, parts of the L-band are protected radio astronomy allocations worldwide. References[edit]

^ "Harmonised use of the band 1452–1492 MHz for MFCN SDL" (PDF). CEPT ECC. 2015-07-03. Retrieved 2015-07-17.  ^ http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/International/Orders/1995/da950131.txt

v t e

Radio spectrum
Radio spectrum
(ITU)

ELF 3 Hz/100 Mm 30 Hz/10 Mm

SLF 30 Hz/10 Mm 300 Hz/1 Mm

ULF 300 Hz/1 Mm 3 kHz/100 km

VLF 3 kHz/100 km 30 kHz/10 km

LF 30 kHz/10 km 300 kHz/1 km

MF 300 kHz/1 km 3 MHz/100 m

HF 3 MHz/100 m 30 MHz/10 m

VHF 30 MHz/10 m 300 MHz/1 m

UHF 300 MHz/1 m 3 GHz/100 mm

SHF 3 GHz/100 mm 30 GHz/10 mm

EHF 30 GHz/10 mm 300 GHz/1 mm

THF 300 GHz/1 mm 3 THz/0.1 mm

v t e

Electromagnetic spectrum

Gamma rays X-rays Ultraviolet Visible Infrared Terahertz radiation Microwave Radio

← higher frequencies       longer wavelengths →

Visible (optical)

Violet Blue Green Yellow Orange Red

Microwaves

W band V band Q band Ka band K band Ku band X band S band C band L band

Radio

EHF SHF UHF VHF HF MF LF VLF ULF SLF ELF

Wavelength
Wavelength
types

Microwave Shortwave Medium wave Longwave

v t e

Analog and digital audio broadcasting

Terrestrial

Radio
Radio
modulation

AM FM COFDM

Frequency
Frequency
allocations

LW (LF) MW (MF) SW (HF) VHF
VHF
(low / mid / high) L band
L band
(UHF)

Digital systems

CAM-D DAB/DAB+ DRM/DRM+ FMeXtra HD Radio CDR DVB-T2
DVB-T2
Lite

Satellite

Frequency
Frequency
allocations

C band Ku band L band S band

Digital systems

ADR DAB-S DVB-SH S-DMB SDR

Commercial radio providers

1worldspace Sirius XM Holdings SiriusXM Canada

Codecs

AAC AMR-WB+ HDC HE-AAC MPEG-1 Audio Layer II

Subcarrier signals

AMSS DirectBand PAD RDS/RBDS SCA/SCMO DARC

Related topics

Technical (audio)

Audio data compression Audio signal processing

Technical ( AM stereo
AM stereo
formats)

Belar C-QUAM Harris Kahn-Hazeltine Magnavox

Technical (emission)

AM broadcasting AM expanded band Cable radio Digital radio Error detection and correction FM broadcast band FM broadcasting Multipath propagation Shortwave relay station

Cultural

History of radio International broadcasting

Compariso

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