HOME
The Info List - LGV Rhin-Rhône


--- Advertisement ---



The LGV Rhin- Rhône
Rhône
(Ligne à Grande Vitesse) is a high-speed railway line, the first in France to be presented as an inter-regional route rather than a link from the provinces to Paris,[1] though it actually is used by some trains to/from Paris. The first phase of the eastern branch opened on 11 December 2011. Construction of its second phase was expected to start in 2014 but has unclear funding at this stage. If completed, LGV Rhin- Rhône
Rhône
would have three branches:

The Eastern branch, 190 km (120 mi) from Genlis, near Dijon to Lutterbach, near Mulhouse, of which 140 km (87 mi) have been built The Western branch, crossing Dijon, joining the LGV Sud-Est
LGV Sud-Est
near Montbard
Montbard
and making the line a connection between Dijon
Dijon
and Paris The Southern branch, from Dijon
Dijon
to Lyon

The construction of the latter two branches and of the second phase of the Eastern branch is currently unfunded.

Map of France showing LGVs. LGV Rhin- Rhône
Rhône
is shown in shades of blue, south-east of Paris.

Running north-south, the Southern branch line would help connect Germany, the north of Switzerland, and eastern France on the one hand with the valleys of the Saône, Rhône, the Mediterranean arc and finally Catalonia
Catalonia
on the other. The east-west Eastern and Western branches lines would help connect on the one hand London, Brussels, Lille
Lille
and Île-de-France
Île-de-France
(i.e., Paris and surroundings) with Burgundy, Franche-Comté, south Alsace, southern Baden, and Switzerland
Switzerland
on the other. A connection will be built at Perrigny, south of Dijon, to serve TGV and freight trains. Auxon station will be connected to Besançon-Viotte station by a railway line which could be also used for commuter trains. It is projected that 12 million passengers per year will use the LGV Rhine- Rhône
Rhône
service.[2]

Contents

1 Eastern branch

1.1 Finance 1.2 Construction 1.3 Journey times

2 See also 3 References 4 External links

Eastern branch[edit] The first phase of the eastern branch runs 140 km (87 mi) of the 190 km planned length, connecting Villers-les-Pots
Villers-les-Pots
(east of Dijon) to Petit-Croix
Petit-Croix
(southeast of Belfort), was officially opened by President Nicolas Sarkozy
Nicolas Sarkozy
on 8 September 2011,[3] with passenger services starting on 11 December 2011.[4] The eastern branch is used by TGV
TGV
trains operated by SNCF, the French national railway company. It will become a key link in both the North-South and East-West transport corridors. The line carries regional, national, and intra-European traffic. Mulhouse
Mulhouse
provides connection to Basel, Switzerland, and then to southwestern Germany and northwestern Switzerland. Finance[edit] The financing agreement for the first phase of the eastern branch was signed on 28 February 2006. The estimated cost of the first section of the eastern branch is 2.312 billion euros, shared between many organisations.[5] The largest contributors of funds are the Government of France (€751 million), the maintainer of the French rail network RFF (€642 million) and the European Union
European Union
(€200 million).[3] Significant funding also came from the three regions of France that the line travels through: Franche-Comté
Franche-Comté
(€316 million), Alsace
Alsace
(€206 million) and Burgundy
Burgundy
(€131 million). A further €66 million was funded by the Government of Switzerland.[3] Construction[edit] Preparatory works began in 2005, and construction officially started on 3 July 2006 with a ceremony in Les Magny, Haute-Saône. Actual construction of the first section started north of Besançon
Besançon
on 7 August 2006. Réseau Ferré de France
Réseau Ferré de France
appointed French engineering and consulting companies Setec and Egis to build the line. The construction of the Eastern branch was divided into two sections :

The first section is 140 km (87 mi) long, running from Villers-les-Pots, Côte-d'Or
Côte-d'Or
(east of Dijon) to Petit-Croix, Territoire de Belfort
Belfort
(east of Belfort). This section opened for service on 11 December 2011.[6] The second section, for which construction was initially planned to begin in 2014 but is not funded yet, would add 50 km (31 mi) length to the line. This section would complete the eastern branch from Villers-les-Pots
Villers-les-Pots
to Dijon, Côte-d'Or, with 15 km (9.3 mi) in the west, and from Petit-Croix
Petit-Croix
to Mulhouse, Haut-Rhin, with 35 km (22 mi) in the east.

Journey times[edit] Upon completion of the first section of the eastern branch, best journey time are:[7]

from to before after

Dijon Strasbourg 3h25 2h00

Dijon Frankfurt 6h30 3h40

Besançon Marseille 4h15 4h00

Belfort- Montbéliard
Montbéliard
TGV Paris 3h25 from Belfort 3h40 from Montbéliard 2h25

Strasbourg Lyon 4h45 3h35

See also[edit]

High-speed rail TGV

References[edit]

^ Murray Hughes (5 September 2007). "Inter-regional TGV
TGV
line will have an international impact". Railway Gazette International.  ^ Railway Gazette, Presidential opening for LGV Rhin-Rhône, 8 september 2011. ^ a b c "Presidential opening for LGV Rhin-Rhône". Railway Gazette International. 8 September 2011.  ^ "LGV Rhin- Rhône
Rhône
opens". Railway Gazette International. 12 December 2011.  ^ Ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development, Transport and Housing, Le financement de l'infrastructure, consulted 28 December 2007 ^ "Inauguration of the TGV
TGV
Rhine-Rhone high speed line". UIC eNews Nr 254. International Union of Railways. 9 September 2011.  ^ "Présentation de la LGV Rhin-Rhône". Ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development, Transport and Housing. 1 June 2007. Retrieved 29 November 2011. 

External links[edit]

Ligne à Grande Vitesse Rhin-Rhône Association Trans-Europe TGV
TGV
Rhin- Rhône
Rhône
Méditerranée RFF Inter-regional TGV
TGV
line will have an international impact Murray Hughes, Railway Gazette International

v t e

Train à Grande Vitesse

Lines in service

LGV Atlantique LGV Bretagne-Pays de la Loire LGV Est LGV Interconnexion Est LGV Méditerranée LGV Nord LGV Rhin- Rhône
Rhône
(Eastern branch) LGV Rhône-Alpes LGV Sud-Est LGV Sud Europe Atlantique LGV Perpignan–Barcelona

Line under construction

LGV Nîmes–Montpellier

Planned or projected lines

LGV Bordeaux–Spain LGV Bordeaux–Toulouse LGV Interconnexion Sud LGV Montpellier–Perpignan LGV Normandie LGV Picardie LGV POCL LGV Poitiers–Limoges LGV Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur LGV Rhin- Rhône
Rhône
(Western and Southern branches) LGV Toulouse–Narbonne LGV Lyon–Turin

Canceled projects

LGV des Titans

Rolling stock

TGV
TGV
2N2 TGV
TGV
Atlantique TGV
TGV
Duplex TGV
TGV
PBKA TGV
TGV
POS TGV
TGV
Réseau/PBA TGV
TGV
Sud-Est TGV
TGV
TMST

International services

Artésia Elipsos Eurostar TGV
TGV
Lyria Thalys

Associated high-speed lines

High Speed 1 HSL 1 HSL 2 HSL 3 Cologne-Aachen HSL 4 HSL-Zuid Madrid-Barcelona

Export trainsets

Acela AVE Class 100 KTX-I

Other

Development of the TGV TGV
TGV
accidents TGV
TGV
services TGV
TGV
stations TGV
TGV
track construction Transmission Voie-Machine

v t e

High-speed railway
High-speed railway
lines

An asterisk indicates overlap with conventional services.

Africa

None

Asia

China

Beijing–Shanghai Beijing–Shijiazhuang–Wuhan–Guangzhou–Shenzhen Beijing–Tianjin Bengbu–Hefei–Fuzhou Changchun–Jilin Chengdu–Dujiangyan Dalian–Harbin–Qiqihar Guangzhou–Zhuhai Guiyang–Guangzhou Guiyang–Kaiyang Hainan Eastern Ring Hengyang–Liuzhou Jilin–Hunchun Jinan–Qingdao–Rongcheng* Jiujiang–Nanchang–Fuzhou* Lanzhou–Zhongchuan Airport Liuzhou–Nanning* Nanjing–Anqing Nanjing–Hangzhou–Ningbo–Taizhou–Wenzhou–Fuzhou–Xiamen–Shenzhen Nanjing–Hefei–Wuhan* Nanning–Guangzhou Nanning–Kunming Panjin–Yingkou Shanghai–Hangzhou–Changsha–Guiyang Shanghai–Nanjing Shenyang–Dandong Suining–Chongqing* Taiyuan–Shijiazhuang Taiyuan–Xi'an Tianjin–Baoding Tianjin–Qinhuangdao–Shenyang* Wuhan–Xianning Wuhan–Xiaogan Xuzhou–Lanzhou Zhengzhou–Jiaozuo Zhengzhou–Kaifeng Zhengzhou–Xi'an–Baoji–Lanzhou–Urumqi Zhengzhou–Xuzhou

Japan

Hokkaido Shinkansen Hokuriku Shinkansen Jōetsu Shinkansen Kyushu Shinkansen San'yō Shinkansen Tōhoku Shinkansen Tōkaidō Shinkansen

South Korea

Gyeongbu HSR Honam HSR Suseo HSR

Taiwan

Taiwan HSR

Turkey

Ankara–Pendik Polatlı–Konya

Uzbekistan

Tashkent–Samarkand Samarkand–Bukhara

Europe

Belgium

HSL 1 HSL 2 HSL 3 HSL 4

Finland

Kerava-Lahti* St. Petersburg-Helsinki*

France

LGV Atlantique LGV Bretagne-Pays de la Loire LGV Est LGV Interconnexion Est LGV Méditerranée LGV Nord LGV Rhin-Rhône LGV Rhône-Alpes LGV Sud-Est LGV Sud Europe Atlantique LGV Perpignan–Barcelona*

Germany

Cologne–Düren Cologne–Frankfurt Erfurt–Leipzig/Halle Hanover–Würzburg Mannheim–Stuttgart Nuremberg–Ingolstadt Rastatt–Offenburg Wolfsburg–Berlin

Italy

Bologna–Florence Florence–Rome Milan–Bologna Milan–Verona Naples–Salerno Rome–Naples Turin–Milan

Netherlands

HSL-Zuid

Norway

Gardermoen Line

Poland

Grodzisk–Zawiercie

Russia

Moscow–St.Petersburg* St. Petersburg-Helsinki*

Spain

Atlantic Axis Barcelona–Perpignan* Madrid–Barcelona Madrid–León Madrid–Malaga Madrid–Seville Madrid–Toledo Madrid–Levante

Sweden

Botniabanan

United Kingdom

High Speed 1

North America

United States

Northeast Corridor*

Oceania

None

South

.