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Darrell Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
(born February 25, 1958) is an American basketball associate head coach for the New York Knicks
New York Knicks
of the National Basketball
Basketball
Association (NBA). A former player, he won four NBA championships while playing power forward for the Los Angeles Lakers and two NBA championships as Assistant Coach of the Los Angeles Lakers. Rambis was a key member of the Showtime[1] era Lakers and was extremely popular[2] for his hard-nosed blue collar play.[3] With his trademark black horned rim glasses, Rambis complemented the flashy Hollywood style of the Showtime era Lakers.[4] Rambis played college basketball for the Santa Clara Broncos. As a senior in 1980, he was named the player of the year in the West Coast Conference (WCC). Rambis was selected by the Knicks in the third round of the 1980 NBA draft, but began his career in Greece with AEK Athens. He joined the Lakers and won four championships during their Showtime era. He also played for the Charlotte Hornets, Phoenix Suns, and Sacramento Kings. Rambis became a coach, and has served as head coach for the Lakers and Minnesota Timberwolves
Minnesota Timberwolves
and the Knicks.

Contents

1 Biography 2 Playing career 3 Coaching career

3.1 Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
(1994–2009) 3.2 Minnesota Timberwolves
Minnesota Timberwolves
(2009–2011) 3.3 Return to the Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
(2013–2014) 3.4 New York Knicks
New York Knicks
(2014–2016)

4 Outside basketball 5 Head coaching record 6 References 7 External links

Biography[edit] Rambis was born in Terre Haute, Indiana.[5] His family moved to Cupertino, California
Cupertino, California
in his preschool years; his number is retired at Cupertino High School. He graduated from Santa Clara University, where he played from 1976 to 1980, becoming its second leading rebounder and all-time leading scorer with 1,736 points. During his Santa Clara years he was awarded the WCC Freshman of the Year and Conference Player of the Year as a senior. His jersey #34 was retired on December 29, 2008.[6] Playing career[edit] Rambis was drafted by the New York Knicks
New York Knicks
as the 58th pick in the 1980 NBA draft, but he was subsequently waived by the Knicks. He played in Greece in the Greek League for the club AEK Athens, under the name Kyriakos Rambidis.[7] Being of Greek descent,[8] he also acquired Greek citizenship.[7] AEK won the Greek Cup in 1981. He was re-signed by the Knicks in 1981 but never played a game for them.[9] His success as an NBA player started when he was signed as a free agent by the Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
in 1981. Rambis spent most of his 14 seasons in the NBA with the Lakers, winning championships in 1982, 1985, 1987, and 1988 as part of their Showtime teams. Rambis also played for the Charlotte Hornets, Phoenix Suns, and Sacramento Kings before returning to the Lakers in 1993. During his playing days, Rambis was a favorite among the Lakers fans because of his status as an overachieving underdog and ultimate team-player. Known for his defensive and rebounding skills, he was remembered in Los Angeles for his all-out effort and willingness to do the "dirty work" that many players do not embrace. Rambis usually wore a thick moustache and thick-rimmed black glasses, prompting Lakers announcer Chick Hearn
Chick Hearn
to nickname him "Superman" (in reference to the character's alter ego, Clark Kent). He finally retired with the Lakers in 1995 after 14 years in the NBA. Coaching career[edit] Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
(1994–2009)[edit] Rambis began working as a special assistant coach for the Lakers in 1994, but eventually returned to the active playing roster. He was waived at the beginning of the 1995–96 season, and resumed his role as an assistant.[10] He served as head coach of the Lakers during the 1999 "lockout season" after coach Del Harris was fired. He achieved moderate success, registering a 24–13 record in the regular season before being swept by the San Antonio Spurs
San Antonio Spurs
in the 1999 Western Conference Semifinals. When Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
was hired as head coach, Rambis served as the Lakers' assistant general manager. He later became an assistant coach under Jackson between 2001 and 2004, helping the Lakers reach the 2002 and the 2004 NBA Finals, with Los Angeles winning a title in the former series. He was hired again as an assistant in 2005, along with former player Brian Shaw,[11] helping the Lakers to another pair of finals in 2008 and 2009. The Lakers won in the latter attempt. Minnesota Timberwolves
Minnesota Timberwolves
(2009–2011)[edit] In 2007, Rambis interviewed for the Sacramento Kings' coaching job. He was a finalist again in 2009 to coach the Kings, and after serious discussions, he was offered the job, but he wanted more than a two-year contract and more money than was offered, so he turned down the job. On August 8, 2009, Rambis was announced as the new head coach for the Minnesota Timberwolves, agreeing to a contract believed to be for 4 years and worth $8 million. Rambis succeeded Kevin McHale, infamous for taking him down in Game 4 of the 1984 NBA Finals. On July 12, 2011, Rambis was fired as coach of the Minnesota Timberwolves after compiling a 32–132 record in two seasons with the team.[12] Return to the Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
(2013–2014)[edit] On July 29, 2013, the Lakers announced they had re-hired Rambis as an assistant coach.[13] New York Knicks
New York Knicks
(2014–2016)[edit] On July 7, 2014, the Knicks announced they had hired Rambis to be the assistant head coach of the team under head coach Derek Fisher.[14] On February 8, 2016, Rambis was named the interim head coach after Fisher was fired.[15] After going 9-19 under Rambis, and finishing the season 32-50 overall, the Knicks decided to hire Jeff Hornacek
Jeff Hornacek
as the team's new head coach, replacing Rambis. Outside basketball[edit] Rambis also had a recurring role as Coach Cleary in the family drama 7th Heaven. He also guest-starred in season one of Sweet Valley High in episode thirteen "Club X" as a friend of Elizabeth and in an episode of the Commish as a basketball player. Rambis made a cameo guest appearance in season 8 of the hit show Married... with Children,[citation needed] and also appeared in the 'Going Places' episode (as himself) of It's Garry Shandling's Show. Rambis also made a cameo appearance in an episode of Malcolm & Eddie. Rambis is also mentioned in the songs "Blao!" by rapper Hot Karl, "Mayor" by Pac Div, and "Kurt Rambis" by Sean Price. In "Blao!", the line states "I'm wearing the goggles that Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
used to sport." The song was featured on NBA Live 2003. In "Mayor", the line states "your boy hustle hard like Rambis for the Lakers." "Kurt Rambis" by Sean Price, is titled after him and briefly mentions him in the tracks. Head coaching record[edit]

Legend

Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss %

Post season PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss %

Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result

L.A. Lakers 1998–99 37 24 13 .649 2nd in Pacific 8 3 5 .375 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Minnesota 2009–10 82 15 67 .183 5th in Northwest — — — — Missed Playoffs

Minnesota 2010–11 82 17 65 .207 5th in Northwest — — — — Missed Playoffs

New York 2015–16 28 9 19 .321 3rd in Atlantic — — — — Missed Playoffs

Career

229 65 164 .284

8 3 5 .375

References[edit]

^ "Showtime (basketball)".. 2018-01-02.  ^ "Laker role player Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
travels bizarre route to NBA". Christian Science Monitor. 1983-05-13. ISSN 0882-7729. Retrieved 2018-01-17.  ^ "Blue-collar worker takes over the Lakers Lubbock Online Lubbock Avalanche-Journal". lubbockonline.com. Retrieved 2018-01-17.  ^ "Laker role player Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
travels bizarre route to NBA". Christian Science Monitor. 1983-05-13. ISSN 0882-7729. Retrieved 2018-01-17.  ^ Resolution honoring Kurt Rambis ^ Rambis 7th Bronco to have jersey retired. ^ a b GreekGateway.com The rise and fall of Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
as head coach of the Minnesota Timberwolves. ^ CSMonitor.com Laker role player Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
travels bizarre route to NBA. ^ Beck, Howard (January 26, 2010). "Rambis, a Champion With the Lakers, Was Briefly a Knick". The New York Times. The New York Times. Retrieved July 17, 2016.  ^ NBA : West: Lakers Out of the Mourning Derby ^ http://www.nba.com/lakers/news/coaches_050217.html ^ Wolves Fire Kurt Rambis ^ "Rambis, Davis hired to assist Lakers' D'Antoni". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. July 29, 2013. Retrieved July 29, 2013.  ^ "Knicks Name Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
Associate Head Coach". New York Knicks.  ^ "Knicks Relieve Fisher Of Coaching Duties". New York Knicks. February 8, 2016. Retrieved February 8, 2016. 

External links[edit]

National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
portal

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Kurt Rambis.

Career statistics and player information from Basketball-Reference.com Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
on IMDb

v t e

New York Knicks
New York Knicks
current roster

0 Williams 00 Kanter 1 Mudiay 2 Kornet (TW) 3 Hardaway 4 Hicks (TW) 5 Lee 6 Porziņģis 8 Beasley 9 O'Quinn 11 Ntilikina 13 Noah 21 Dotson 23 Burke 31 Baker 42 Thomas 55 Jack

Head coach: Hornacek Assistant coaches: Rambis Eisley Gaines Sichting

Links to related articles

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
head coaches

John Kundla (1948–1958) George Mikan
George Mikan
(1958) John Kundla (1958–1959) John Castellani (1959–1960) Jim Pollard
Jim Pollard
(1960) Fred Schaus
Fred Schaus
(1960–1967) Butch van Breda Kolff (1967–1969) Joe Mullaney (1969–1971) Bill Sharman
Bill Sharman
(1971–1976) Jerry West
Jerry West
(1976–1979) Jack McKinney (1979) Paul Westhead (1979–1981) Pat Riley
Pat Riley
(1981–1990) Mike Dunleavy (1990–1992) Randy Pfund (1992–1994) Bill Bertka # (1994) Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
# (1994) Del Harris (1994–1999) Bill Bertka # (1999) Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
# (1999) Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
(1999–2004) Rudy Tomjanovich
Rudy Tomjanovich
(2004–2005) Frank Hamblen
Frank Hamblen
# (2005) Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
(2005–2011) Mike Brown (2011–2012) Bernie Bickerstaff
Bernie Bickerstaff
# (2012) Mike D'Antoni
Mike D'Antoni
(2012–2014) Byron Scott
Byron Scott
(2014–2016) Luke Walton
Luke Walton
(2016– )

(#) denotes interim head coach.

v t e

Minnesota Timberwolves
Minnesota Timberwolves
head coaches

Bill Musselman (1989–1991) Jimmy Rodgers (1991–1993) Sidney Lowe
Sidney Lowe
(1993–1994) Bill Blair (1994–1995) Flip Saunders
Flip Saunders
(1995–2005) Kevin McHale # (2005) Dwane Casey
Dwane Casey
(2005–2007) Randy Wittman
Randy Wittman
(2007–2008) Kevin McHale # (2008–2009) Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
(2009–2011) Rick Adelman
Rick Adelman
(2011–2014) Flip Saunders
Flip Saunders
(2014–2015) Sam Mitchell # (2015–2016) Tom Thibodeau
Tom Thibodeau
(2016–)

(#) denotes interim head coach.

v t e

New York Knicks
New York Knicks
head coaches

Neil Cohalan (1946–1947) Joe Lapchick
Joe Lapchick
(1947–1956) Vince Boryla
Vince Boryla
(1956–1958) Andrew Levane (1958–1959) Carl Braun (1959–1961) Eddie Donovan (1961–1965) Harry Gallatin
Harry Gallatin
(1965) Dick McGuire (1965–1967) Red Holzman
Red Holzman
(1967–1977) Willis Reed
Willis Reed
(1977–1978) Red Holzman
Red Holzman
(1978–1982) Hubie Brown
Hubie Brown
(1982–1986) Bob Hill
Bob Hill
(1986–1987) Rick Pitino
Rick Pitino
(1987–1989) Stu Jackson
Stu Jackson
(1989–1990) John MacLeod (1990–1991) Pat Riley
Pat Riley
(1991–1995) Don Nelson
Don Nelson
(1995–1996) Jeff Van Gundy
Jeff Van Gundy
(1996–2001) Don Chaney
Don Chaney
(2001–2004) Herb Williams
Herb Williams
# (2004) Lenny Wilkens
Lenny Wilkens
(2004–2005) Herb Williams
Herb Williams
# (2005) Larry Brown (2005–2006) Isiah Thomas
Isiah Thomas
(2006–2008) Mike D'Antoni
Mike D'Antoni
(2008–2012) Mike Woodson
Mike Woodson
(2012–2014) Derek Fisher
Derek Fisher
(2014–2016) Kurt Rambis
Kurt Rambis
# (2016) Jeff Hornacek
Jeff Hornacek
(2016– )

(#) denotes interim head coach.

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1981–82 NBA champions

5 Jordan 8 Brewer 10 Nixon 11 McAdoo 21 Cooper 31 Rambis 32 M. Johnson (Finals MVP) 33 Abdul-Jabbar 34 C. Johnson 40 McGee 52 Wilkes 54 Landsberger

Head coach Riley

Assistant coaches Bertka Thibault

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1984–85 NBA champions

4 Scott 11 McAdoo 12 Lester 21 Cooper 25 Kupchak 31 Rambis 32 Johnson 33 Abdul-Jabbar (Finals MVP) 35 Spriggs 40 McGee 42 Worthy 43 Nevitt

Head coach Riley

Assistant coaches Bertka Wohl

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1986–87 NBA champions

1 Matthews 4 Scott 21 Cooper 24 Branch 31 Rambis 32 Johnson (Finals MVP) 33 Abdul-Jabbar 42 Worthy 43 M. Thompson 45 Green 52 Smrek 55 B. Thompson

Head coach Riley

Assistant coaches Bertka Pfund

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1987–88 NBA champions

1 Matthews 3 Lamp 4 Scott 19 Campbell 20 Wagner 21 Cooper 31 Rambis 32 Johnson 33 Abdul-Jabbar 42 Worthy (Finals MVP) 43 M. Thompson 45 Green 52 Smrek 55 B. Thompson

Head coach Riley

Assistant coaches Bertka Pfund

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
2001–02 NBA champions

2 Fisher 3 George 5 Horry 6 McCoy 8 Bryant 10 Hunter 14 Medvedenko 17 Fox 20 Shaw 23 Richmond 34 O'Neal (Finals MVP) 35 Madsen 52 Walker

Head coach Jackson

Assistant coaches Winter Hamblen Cleamons Rambis

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
2008–09 NBA champions

2 Fisher 3 Ariza 4 Walton 5 Farmar 6 Morrison 7 Odom 9 Sun 12 Brown 16 Gasol 17 Bynum 18 Vujačić 21 Powell 24 Bryant (Finals MVP) 28 Mbenga

Head coach Jackson

Assistant coaches Hamblen Rambis Shaw Abdul-Jabbar Hodges Cleamons

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

West Coast Conference Men's Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1953: Sears 1954: None selected 1955: Sears 1956: Russell 1957: Farmer 1958: Farmer & Wright 1959: Doss & Wright 1960: Grote 1961: Meschery 1962: Dinnel & Gray 1963: Gray 1964: Johnson 1965: Johnson 1966: Swagerty 1967: Swagerty 1968: Adelman 1969: Awtrey 1970: Awtrey 1971: Gianelli 1972: Stewart 1973: Averitt 1974: Oleynick 1975: Sobers 1976: Leite 1977: Cartwright 1978: Cartwright 1979: Cartwright 1980: Rambis 1981: Dailey 1982: Dailey 1983: Phillips & Suttle 1984: Stockton 1985: Polee 1986: Polee 1987: Thompson 1988: Middlebrooks 1989: Gathers 1990: Kimble 1991: Christie 1992: Christie 1993: D. Jones 1994: Brown 1995: Nash 1996: Nash 1997: Garnett 1998: Hendrix 1999: Schraeder 2000: K. Jones 2001: Calvary 2002: Dickau 2003: Stepp 2004: Stepp 2005: Turiaf 2006: Morrison 2007: Denison & Raivio 2008: Pargo 2009: Bryant 2010: Bouldin 2011: McConnell 2012: Dellavedova 2013: Olynyk 2014: Haws 2015: Pangos 2016: Collinsworth 2017: Williams-Goss 2018: Landale

v t e

1980 NBA draft

First round

Joe Barry Carroll Darrell Griffith Kevin McHale Kelvin Ransey James Ray Mike O'Koren Mike Gminski Andrew Toney Michael Brooks Ronnie Lester Kiki Vandeweghe Mike Woodson Rickey Brown Wes Matthews Reggie Johnson Charles Whitney Larry Drew Don Collins John Duren Bill Hanzlik Monti Davis Chad Kinch Carl Nicks

Second round

Larry Smith Jeff Ruland Sam Worthen John Stroud Craig Shelton Louis Orr Kenny Natt Wayne Robinson David Lawrence Bruce Collins Roosevelt Bouie Rick Mahorn DeWayne Scales Butch Carter Terry Stotts Michael Wiley Dick Miller Jawann Oldham Kimberly Belton Billy Williams Clyde Austin Brad Branson Arnette Hallman

Authority control

MusicBrainz: 4c0a0667-cdac-459e

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