HOME
The Info List - King Creole





King Creole
King Creole
is a 1958 American musical drama film directed by Michael Curtiz and starring Elvis
Elvis
Presley, Carolyn Jones, and Walter Matthau. Produced by Hal B. Wallis
Hal B. Wallis
and based on the 1952 novel A Stone for Danny Fisher by Harold Robbins, the film is about a nineteen-year-old who gets mixed up with crooks and involved with two women. Presley later indicated that of all the characters he portrayed throughout his acting career, the role of Danny Fisher in King Creole was his favorite. To make the film, Presley was granted a 60-day deferment from January to March 1958 for beginning his military service. Location shooting in New Orleans
New Orleans
was delayed several times by crowds of fans attracted by the stars, particularly Presley. The film was released by Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures
on July 2, 1958, to both critical and commercial success. The critics were unanimous in their praise of Presley's performance. King Creole
King Creole
peaked at number five on the Variety box office earnings charts. The soundtrack song "Hard Headed Woman" reached number one on the Billboard pop singles chart, number two on the R&B chart, and was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), while the soundtrack album peaked at number two on the Billboard album chart.

Contents

1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Reception 5 Home media 6 Soundtrack 7 See also 8 References 9 External links

Plot[edit] Nineteen-year-old high school student Danny Fisher (Elvis) works before and after school to support his surviving family: his father (Dean Jagger) and sister Mimi (Jan Shepard). After Danny's mother died, his grieving father lost his job as a pharmacist, and moved his impoverished family to the French Quarter
French Quarter
in New Orleans.

Danny protects Ronnie from one of Maxie Field's customers

At work one morning, Danny rescues Ronnie (Jones) from her abusive date. After a taxi ride to Danny's high school, Ronnie kisses him. Danny responds to witnessing schoolmates' teasing by kissing Ronnie back and then punching one of them in the face when he makes a teasing remark. Danny's reaction summons him to the principal's office; where Miss Pearson (Helene Hatch), his teacher, tells Principal Evans (Raymond Bailey) that Danny will not graduate because of his poor attitude. Mr. Evans is sympathetic, but powerless to help; so Danny decides to drop out of school to find work, against the wishes of his father, who tries to convince Danny to stay in school. When Danny leaves the school grounds, three young men lure him into an alley. Their leader, Shark (Vic Morrow), wants revenge for Danny hitting the teasing student at school, who turned out to be his brother. Danny defends himself so well that it impresses Shark, so Shark invites Danny to join his gang. Shark then has Danny to help the gang shoplift at a five-and-dime by singing "Lover Doll" to distract the customers and staff.

Nellie confesses to Danny that she is willing to see him again

Only Nellie (Dolores Hart), who works the snack bar, notices Danny's complicity in the theft, but she does not turn him in. Danny then invites Nellie to a fictitious party in a hotel room; finding nobody else there, Nellie starts crying in fear and leaves after admitting that she still wants to see Danny again, but not under those conditions. Later that night, Danny meets Ronnie again at The Blue Shade nightclub, where Danny is now employed. At first, she pretends not to know him, as she is accompanied by her boyfriend and the club's owner, Maxie Fields, aka "The Pig" (Matthau). When Maxie does not believe her, she claims she heard Danny sing once. Maxie insists that Danny prove he can sing. His rendition of "Trouble" impresses Charlie LeGrand (Paul Stewart), the honest owner of the King Creole
King Creole
nightclub, the only nightspot in the area not owned by Maxie; impressed, LeGrand offers Danny a job as a singer at his club. Meanwhile, Mr. Fisher finds employment as a pharmacist in a local drug store; but his boss, Mr. Primont (Gavin Gordon)—who reluctantly hired Mr. Fisher after his boss made him do so—constantly demeans Mr. Fisher obviously out of retaliation, much to Danny's embarrassment. That situation makes it easier for Danny to go against his father's wishes and accept Charlie's job offer. Danny does; and when he becomes a hit at the King Creole, Maxie tries to hire him. Danny declines his offer out of loyalty to Charlie. Shark, now working for Maxie, suggests to Danny they beat up Primont to help his father. One night when Mr. Fisher leaves the store dressed in Primont's hat and coat (lent due to a rainstorm), Shark recognizes him, but decides to mug him anyway, as that would be even better for Maxie's purposes. Danny's father is so badly injured that he needs expensive surgery; so Maxie pays for a specialist to perform it. Maxie later blackmails Danny into signing with him by threatening to tell his father about his involvement in the mugging, and then does it anyway. Outraged, Danny pummels Maxie for the betrayal and helps Ronnie escape him. Maxie sends his henchmen after Danny. Shark and another gang member trap him in an alley. Danny knocks out one of his pursuers. Then Shark stabs Danny, but kills himself in the struggle. Ronnie then finds a profusely bleeding Danny and takes him to her house on a bayou to recover. She asks him to forget her sordid past and pretend to love her. Danny replies that it would not be difficult and kisses her. Maxie drives up, accompanied by Dummy (Jack Grinnage), a member of Danny's former gang. Maxie fatally shoots Ronnie. Dummy, who had been befriended by Danny, grapples with Maxie; the gun goes off, killing its owner. Danny returns to the King Creole. He sings the lines "Let's think of the future, forget the past, you're not my first love, but you're my last" to Nellie in the audience. Mr Fisher also shows up to listen to his son sing. Cast[edit]

Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
as Danny Fisher Carolyn Jones
Carolyn Jones
as Ronnie, Maxie's mistress Walter Matthau
Walter Matthau
as Maxie Fields, the local gangster Dolores Hart
Dolores Hart
as Nellie, a five-and-dime employee who falls for Danny Dean Jagger
Dean Jagger
as Mr. Fisher, Danny's father Liliane Montevecchi
Liliane Montevecchi
as Forty Nina, a stripper at the King Creole nightclub Vic Morrow
Vic Morrow
as Shark, Maxie's lead thug Paul Stewart as Charlie LeGrand, owner of the King Creole Jan Shepard
Jan Shepard
as Mimi Fisher,[1] Danny's sister Brian G. Hutton as Sal, a member of Shark's gang.[2] Jack Grinnage as Dummy, a mute member of Shark's gang.[1] Dick Winslow as Eddie Burton Raymond Bailey
Raymond Bailey
as Mr. Evans, the school principal Gavin Gordon as Mr. Primont, drug store manager and Mr. Fisher's overbearing boss

Production[edit] Hal Wallis acquired the rights to A Stone for Danny Fisher
A Stone for Danny Fisher
in February 1955 for $25,000,[3] with the intention of giving the lead role of a New York boxer to either James Dean
James Dean
or Ben Gazzara. The role was originally written for Dean, but the project was cancelled after his death in 1955.[4] In January 1957, following the success of an off-Broadway stage version of the story, Presley was suggested as a possible replacement.[5] After negotiations were completed, the character of Fisher was changed from a boxer to a singer and the location was moved from New York to New Orleans.[6] Wallis selected Michael Curtiz, a noted director of the Hollywood studio system whose works included The Adventures of Robin Hood, Yankee Doodle Dandy
Yankee Doodle Dandy
and Casablanca.[7] Curtiz decided to shoot the film in black and white for dramatic ambiance and to give the streets a film noir appearance. He also selected an experienced cast to support Presley, including Walther Matthau and Carolyn Jones, as well as Dolores Hart, Presley's co-star in the 1957 film Loving You.[8] Curtiz instructed a "taken aback" Presley to lose fifteen pounds and shave his sideburns for the role, both of which Presley did.[9] On December 20, 1957, a month before filming was due to begin, Presley received his draft notice.[10] Presley and Paramount had to request special permission to defer Presley's enlistment to allow him to finish the film. Both pointed out to the draft board that a delay in filming would cost them a large sum of money invested in the pre-production of the film. On December 27, Presley received a 60-day deferment.[11][12] Filming took place between January 20 and March 10, 1958, mostly at Paramount Studios in Los Angeles, California,[5] and on location in the French Quarter
French Quarter
in New Orleans, Louisiana, while the scene of the bayou was filmed at Lake Pontchartrain.[13] During filming, Presley was constantly moved to avoid the crowds of fans who came to see him on location, which delayed the film-making. Wallis had rented a house for Presley's privacy, and a second one after one of his assistants noticed that the back of the houses in the block led to the back of the houses on the adjacent street. To escape from the crowds, Presley would climb to the roof of one house and cross over onto the roof of the other.[14][15] After a fan discovered his path, he resided on the tenth floor of the Beverly Wilshire Hotel, which was rented for the whole cast.[10] Before filming began, Curtiz was convinced that Presley would be a "conceited boy", but after a few weeks of working together, he described Presley as a "lovely boy" who would go on to be a "wonderful actor".[9] Presley, after seeing an early copy of the finished film, thanked Curtiz for giving him the opportunity to show his potential as an actor; he would later cite Danny Fisher as his favorite role of his acting career. Fourteen days after the completion of King Creole, Presley was officially inducted into the U.S. Army.[5] Reception[edit]

Advertisement in Modern Screen
Modern Screen
(Aug 1958)

The film was first shown at Loew's State Theater in New York City[1] on July 2, 1958.[16] During the opening week, it ranked number five in box office earnings on the Variety national survey.[17] Billboard wrote: " Elvis
Elvis
Presley's new film shapes up as a box-office winner. It's got plenty of action and characterisation and the star gives his best acting performance to date ... (the) Incidents and characters of the original novel are distorted, but the plot stands up well and the dialog is salty and emotion-packed. As Danny, Presley exhibits improved histrionics and provides many moving and tense moments. Carolyn Jones
Carolyn Jones
is a knockout as a fallen thrush who would like to love him; their aborted romance gives the pic its finest scenes."[18] Variety declared that the film "Shows the young star [Presley] as a better than fair actor".[19] The New York Times
The New York Times
also gave a favorable review: "Mr. Curtiz and his players have got it snugly draped around Mr. Presley's shoulders. And there it stays, until a limp melodramatic home stretch, even with eight or so of those twitching, gyrating musical interludes. ... These also perfectly typify the Bourbon Street honky-tonks that Mr. Curtiz and his fine photographer, Russ Harlan, have beguilingly drenched with atmosphere. Matching, or balancing, the tunes are at least seven characterizations that supply the real backbone and tell the story of the picture. ... for Mr. Presley, in his third screen attempt, it's a pleasure to find him up to a little more than Bourbon Street shoutin' and wigglin'. Acting is his assignment in this shrewdly upholstered showcase, and he does it, so help us over a picket fence."[20] The Spectator, however, criticized the relationship of Presley's character with his love interests: "The girls in his (Michael Curtiz's) latest film, King Creole, are both played by good, serious actresses: Carolyn Jones
Carolyn Jones
.. and Dolores Hart, ... both are shown to be hungrily, desperately, unpridefully in love with him (Presley's character). They have no existence, except in him; do nothing but wait for him; hope for nothing but a little rough affection ... Instead of being kissed, they beg for kisses, which Mr. Presley sulkily and reluctantly hands out now and then, with the air of a small, fastidious boy being press to eat marshmallow and, though he feels a bit sick not quite knowing how to get out of it ... (it) really seems to suggest this is a god come down among us for a spell; and when tender and infinitely patient in spite of the long past of infidelity, nonchalance, and what looks to an observer like plain indifference from him, her lips poised for the kiss that doesn't come ... As the most extreme example of a contemporary idol, Mr. Presley is pretty fascinating, and, though you may be put off at first by his pale, puffy, bruised looking babyish face, by the weary cherubic decadence you might imagine in Nero, and the excessive greasiness of his excessively long, spiky locks, his films, however bad (and King Creole is pretty low on his list), are well worth taking a look at."[21] About Presley's performance, Down Beat
Down Beat
wrote: "Let it be noted that Elvis
Elvis
Presley's latest, King Creole, is his best picture thus far--comparatively speaking, of course. Maybe about 10 more films (and as many drama coaches) from now Elvis
Elvis
might begin to get an inkling of what acting's all about."[22] TV-Radio Mirror magazine praised Presley's acting over his past roles: " Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
does his strongest acting job so far. Two years ago, Presley on the screen was a laughing stock. But nobody is laughing now".[23] Meanwhile, The Monthly Film Bulletin criticized the violence depicted in the film and rated the movie a III, denoting poor, stating, "This entangled series of cliches, each with more unlikely motivation than the last, provides the most unattractive Presley vehicle so far. His numbers only offer intermittent relief from the calculated violence and viciousness, and he can do little to balance the disagreeable movie".[24] Commonweal lamented the lack of punishment to the main character for his actions, but praised the director for his influence on Presley: "No doubt adults won't be moved much by "King Creole" one way or the other, but unfortunately teenage audiences may be taken in, especially since Danny is supposed to be a sympathetic character and at the end goes unpunished by the police for his crimes ... It must be said in favor of Director Michael Curtiz
Michael Curtiz
that he does succeed in getting Presley to act every now and then, but the cards are stacked in such an obvious manner against Danny that even Montgomery Clift couldn't have handled the role with conviction."[25] Catholic World
Catholic World
commented: "Playing a part— an underprivileged youth who, on and off, displays some dignity and honest aspirations — that requires some histrionic effort, Presley shows signs that he is getting the hang of acting. The picture itself, however, after a promising enough beginning turns into a lurid melodramatic hash composed in about equal part of juvenile delinquency, gangsterism and sex. These may be legitimate dramatic subjects but the script gives them an illegitimate viewpoint and leaves muddled moral issues dangling."[26] The Florence Times wrote of Presley: "the fellow isn't a bad actor. Of course, he's nothing at all sensational and the Academy Award isn't in danger, but there are Hollywood habitues who've gotten by for years with less ability. In fact, given the normal amount of the more painstaking type of direction, it is entirely possible that Mr. Wiggle-hips could develop into a really competent actor. As long, however, as he can continue to attract audiences in present proportions there's little need in worrying with drama schools."[27] Allrovi
Allrovi
rated the movie with four stars out of five, stating: "The film's highlight is a brief exchange of fisticuffs between Elvis
Elvis
and Walter Matthau. Together with Jailhouse Rock, King Creole
King Creole
is one of the best filmed examples of the untamed, pre-army Elvis
Elvis
Presley".[28] Home media[edit] The film was released on VHS
VHS
by Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures
in 1986.[29] In 2000, it was re-released in DVD with remastered sound and image, featuring the original theatrical trailer.[30] Soundtrack[edit] Main article: King Creole
King Creole
(album) See also[edit]

List of American films of 1958

References[edit]

Notes

^ a b c Reid, John Howard, More Movie Musicals, p. 95 . ^ Craddock, Jim, Videohound's Golden Movie Retriever, p. 451 . ^ Dick, Bernard, Hal Wallis, producer to the stars, p. 162  ^ Jagger, Dan, Elvis
Elvis
Presley, p. 20 . ^ a b c Victor, Adam, The Elvis
Elvis
Encyclopedia, p. 286 . ^ Doll, Susan, Elvis
Elvis
for Dummies, p. 110 . ^ Guralnick, Jorgensen p. 286. ^ Dick, Bernard, Hal Wallis, producer to the stars, p. 163 . ^ a b Guralnick, Peter (1994). Last Train to Memphis. p. 450.  ^ a b Guralnick, Jorgensen p. 116 ^ Jeansonne, Glenn; Luhrssen, David; Sokolovic, Dan, Elvis
Elvis
Presley, Reluctant Rebel, p. 147 . ^ Doll, Susan, Elvis
Elvis
for Dummies, p. 95 . ^ Widmer, Mary Lou, New Orleans
New Orleans
in the Fifities, p. 126 . ^ Doll, Susan (1994); pp.61, 62 ^ Wallis, Hal B; Higham, Charles; p.150 ^ Landers, Steve, The Life of Elvis
Elvis
Aaron Presley, p. 1957 . ^ Jagger, Dan, Elvis
Elvis
Presley, Silver Screen Icon, p. 21 . ^ Bob Bernstein (May 26, 1958). " Elvis
Elvis
Acts, Songs Are Solid in King Creole". Billboard. Prometheus Global. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved June 20, 2011.  ^ Victor, Adam, The Elvis
Elvis
Encyclopedia, p. 287 . ^ Howard Thompson (July 4, 1958). "Actor With Guitar". The New York Times. Retrieved June 20, 2011.  ^ The Spectator; p.307 ^ Down Beat, p.44 ^ Kirchberg, Elvis
Elvis
Presley, Richard Nixon, and the American dream, p. 59 . ^ Caine, Andrew James, Interpreting Rock Movies, p. 65 . ^ Commonweal; p.424 ^ "Movie Reviews". Catholic World. Paulist Fathers. 187: 384. 1958.  ^ "'King Creole' has Elvis, little Else...But He's Quite Sufficient". The Florence Times. 99 (105). July 14, 1958. p. 11. Retrieved November 7, 2011.  ^ Erickson, Hal. "King Creole". AllRovi. Rovi. Archived from the original on July 20, 2012. Retrieved June 20, 2011.  ^ Complete Video Directory. Book
Book
1. Bowker. 2002. ISBN 978-0-8352-4478-7.  ^ " King Creole
King Creole
DVD (2000)". Allrovie. Rovi. Archived from the original on July 20, 2012. Retrieved June 20, 2011. 

Bibliography

Adam, Victor (2008). The Elvis
Elvis
Encyclopedia. Overlook Duckworth. ISBN 978-0-7156-3816-3.  Caine, Andrew James (2004). Interpreting Rock Movies: The Pop Film and its Critics in Britain. Manchester University Press. ISBN 978-0-7190-6538-5.  Craddock, Jim (2005). Videohound's Golden Movie Retriever. Thomson/Gale. ISBN 978-0-7876-7470-0.  Dick, Bernard (2004). Hal Wallis: producer to the stars. University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 978-0-8131-2317-2.  Doll, Susan (1994). Elvis, Rock 'N' Roll Legend. Publications International. ISBN 978-0-7853-0871-3.  Doll, Susan (2009). Elvis
Elvis
for Dummies. For Dummies. ISBN 978-0-470-47202-6.  Guralnick, Peter; Jorgensen Ernst (1999). Elvis
Elvis
day by day. Ballantine Books. ISBN 978-0-345-42089-3.  Jagger, Dan (2002). Elvis
Elvis
Presley: Silver Screen Icon: A Collection of Movie Posters. The Overmountain Press. ISBN 978-1-57072-232-5.  Jeansonne, Glenn; Luhrssen, David; Sokolovic, Dan (2011). Elvis Presley, Reluctant Rebel: His Life and Our Times. ABC-Clio. ISBN 978-0-313-35904-0.  Jorgenson, Ernst (1998). Elvis
Elvis
Presley: A Life In Music. St. Martin's Press. ISBN 978-0-312-18572-5.  Kirchberg, Connie; Hendrickx, Marc (1999). Elvis
Elvis
Presley, Richard Nixon, and the American dream. McFarland. ISBN 978-0-7864-0716-3.  Landers, Steve (2000). The Life Of Elvis
Elvis
Aaron Presley Elvis
Elvis
Facts For Elvis
Elvis
Fans. Lulu Press. ISBN 978-1-4357-3905-5.  Reid, John Howard (2006). More Movie Musicals. Lulu Press. ISBN 978-1-4116-7342-7.  Wallis, Hal B.; Higham, Charles (1980). Starmaker: The Autobiography of Hal Wallis. Macmillan Pub. Co. ISBN 978-0-02-623170-1.  Widmer, Mary Lou (2004). New Orleans
New Orleans
in the Fifties. Pelican Publishing. ISBN 978-1-58980-268-1.  The Films and Career of Elvis
Elvis
Presley. Citadel Press. 1983. ISBN 978-0-8065-0889-4.  Hartung, Phillip (August 1, 1958). "King Creole". Commonweal. Commonweal Pub. Corp. 68.  "Screen Scene". Down Beat. Maher Publications. 25. 1958.  "Movie Reviews: King Creole". The Spectator. 201. September 5, 1958. 

External links[edit]

King Creole
King Creole
on IMDb King Creole
King Creole
at the TCM Movie Database King Creole
King Creole
at AllMovie

v t e

Elvis
Elvis
Presley

Albums discography Singles discography Filmography

Studio albums

Elvis
Elvis
Presley Elvis Peace in the Valley (EP) Elvis' Christmas Album For LP Fans Only A Date with Elvis Elvis
Elvis
Is Back! His Hand in Mine Something for Everybody Pot Luck Elvis
Elvis
for Everyone! How Great Thou Art From Elvis
Elvis
in Memphis From Memphis to Vegas / From Vegas to Memphis Elvis
Elvis
Country (I'm 10,000 Years Old) Love Letters from Elvis Elvis
Elvis
sings The Wonderful World of Christmas Elvis
Elvis
Now He Touched Me Elvis Raised on Rock / For Ol' Times Sake Good Times Promised Land Today From Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
Boulevard, Memphis, Tennessee Moody Blue

Live albums

On Stage As Recorded at Madison Square Garden Aloha from Hawaii Via Satellite Elvis
Elvis
Recorded Live on Stage in Memphis Having Fun with Elvis
Elvis
on Stage Elvis
Elvis
in Concert An Afternoon in the Garden

Soundtrack albums and EPs

Love Me Tender (EP) Loving You Jailhouse Rock (EP) King Creole G.I. Blues Flaming Star (EP) Blue Hawaii Follow That Dream (EP) Kid Galahad (EP) Girls! Girls! Girls! It Happened at the World's Fair Fun in Acapulco Kissin' Cousins Viva Las Vegas (EP) Roustabout Girl Happy Tickle Me (EP) Harum Scarum Frankie and Johnny Paradise Hawaiian Style Spinout Easy Come, Easy Go (EP) Double Trouble Clambake Speedway Elvis That's the Way It Is Viva Elvis

Compilation albums

Elvis' Golden Records 50,000,000 Elvis
Elvis
Fans Can't Be Wrong Elvis' Golden Records Volume 3 Elvis' Gold Records Volume 4 Elvis
Elvis
Sings Flaming Star Let's Be Friends Almost in Love C'mon Everybody I Got Lucky Elvis: A Legendary Performer Volume 1 Elvis' 40 Greatest Pure Gold Elvis: A Legendary Performer Volume 2 The Sun Sessions Welcome to My World Mahalo from Elvis Elvis: A Legendary Performer Volume 3 Greatest Hits Volume 1 Elvis' Gold Records Volume 5 Amazing Grace: His Greatest Sacred Performances Command Performances: The Essential 60s Masters II Elvis
Elvis
56 Tiger Man Memories: The '68 Comeback Special Sunrise Suspicious Minds: The Memphis 1969 Anthology ELV1S: 30 #1 Hits 2nd to None Elvis
Elvis
at Sun Hitstory Elvis
Elvis
Inspirational Elvis
Elvis
Rock Elvis
Elvis
Christmas The Essential Elvis
Elvis
Presley Christmas Duets If I Can Dream Way Down in the Jungle Room The Wonder of You The 50 Greatest Hits

Box sets

Worldwide 50 Gold Award Hits Vol. 1 The King of Rock 'n' Roll: The Complete 50's Masters From Nashville to Memphis: The Essential '60s Masters Walk a Mile in My Shoes: The Essential '70s Masters Peace in the Valley: The Complete Gospel Recordings Live in Las Vegas Today, Tomorrow, and Forever Elvis
Elvis
the King The Complete '68 Comeback Special The Complete Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
Masters

Bootlegs

Elvis' Greatest Shit

Feature films

Love Me Tender Loving You Jailhouse Rock King Creole G.I. Blues Flaming Star Wild in the Country Blue Hawaii Follow That Dream Kid Galahad Girls! Girls! Girls! It Happened at the World's Fair Fun in Acapulco Kissin' Cousins Viva Las Vegas Roustabout Girl Happy Tickle Me Harum Scarum Frankie and Johnny Paradise, Hawaiian Style Spinout Easy Come, Easy Go Double Trouble Clambake Stay Away, Joe Speedway Live a Little, Love a Little Charro! The Trouble with Girls Change of Habit

Biographical films

Elvis
Elvis
(1979 film) Elvis
Elvis
(1990 series) Elvis
Elvis
Meets Nixon Elvis
Elvis
(2005 miniseries) Elvis
Elvis
& Nixon

Documentaries

The Pied Piper of Cleveland Elvis: That's the Way It Is Elvis
Elvis
on Tour This Is Elvis The New Gladiators

TV specials

The Frank Sinatra Timex Show: Welcome Home Elvis Singer Presents...ELVIS Aloha from Hawaii Via Satellite Elvis
Elvis
in Concert

Stage shows based on Elvis

Cooking with Elvis All Shook Up Elvis. The Musical Elvis: The Concert Viva Elvis

Top 10 singles

"Heartbreak Hotel" "I Want You, I Need You, I Love You" "Don't Be Cruel" "Hound Dog" "Love Me Tender" "Love Me" "Too Much" "All Shook Up" "(Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear" "Jailhouse Rock" "Don't" "Wear My Ring Around Your Neck" "Hard Headed Woman" "One Night" "I Got Stung" "(Now and Then There's) A Fool Such as I" "I Need Your Love Tonight" "A Big Hunk o' Love" "Stuck on You" "It's Now or Never" "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" "Surrender" "I Feel So Bad" "(Marie's the Name) His Latest Flame" "Little Sister" "Can't Help Falling in Love" "Good Luck Charm" "She's Not You" "Return to Sender" "(You're The) Devil in Disguise" "Bossa Nova Baby" "Crying in the Chapel" "In the Ghetto" "Suspicious Minds" "Don't Cry Daddy" "The Wonder of You" "Burning Love"

Related people

Sam Phillips The Blue Moon Boys The Jordanaires The Imperials The Sweet Inspirations TCB Band J. D. Sumner Stephen H. Sholes June Juanico Memphis Mafia Colonel Tom Parker George C. Nichopoulos Lisa Marie Presley Priscilla Presley Judy Spreckels Linda Thompson Ginger Alden Larry Geller

Related

Graceland Audubon Street House Cultural depictions Cultural impact Personal relationships Impersonators Elvis
Elvis
and Gladys Elvis
Elvis
and Me Elvis: What Happened? Elvis-A-Rama Museum Hit singles Sun recordings Million Dollar Quartet List of Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
songs Songs about Elvis Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
Enterprises Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
Lake " Elvis
Elvis
has left the building" Elvis
Elvis
Radio FBI files on Elvis
Elvis
Presley Army career Eight Elvises Triple Elvis Elvis
Elvis
Presley's Pink Cadillac Elvis
Elvis
Presley's guitars Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
Forever stamp Elvis
Elvis
sightings

Book Category Portal

v t e

Films directed by Michael Curtiz

1910s

The Last Bohemian Today and Tomorrow Captive Souls My Husband's Getting Married The Exile The Borrowed Babies The Princess in a Nightrobe Prisoner of the Night Bánk Bán Golddigger One Who Is Loved By Two Seven of Spades The Strength of the Fatherland The Karthauzer The Black Rainbow The Wolf The Medic Mr. Doctor Master Zoard The Red Samson The Last Dawn Spring in Winter Tartar Invasion Secret of St. Job Forest Nobody's Son The Charlatan A Penny's History The Fishing Bell Earth's Man The Colonel Peace's Road Jean the Tenant The Merry Widow Magic Waltz A skorpió I. The Devil Lulu Lu, the Coquette Júdás The Ugly Boy Alraune 99 The Sunflower Woman Liliom (unfinished) The Lady with the Black Gloves

1920s

Boccaccio The Star of Damascus The Scourge of God Mrs. Tutti Frutti Good and Evil Mrs. Dane's Confession Labyrinth of Horror Sodom and Gomorrah Young Medardus Avalanche Nameless A Deadly Game General Babka Harun al Raschid The Moon of Israel Red Heels Cab No. 13 The Golden Butterfly The Third Degree A Million Bid The Desired Woman Good Time Charley Tenderloin Noah's Ark Glad Rag Doll Madonna of Avenue A The Gamblers Hearts in Exile

1930s

Mammy Under a Texas Moon The Matrimonial Bed Bright Lights A Soldier's Plaything River's End Demon of the Sea God's Gift to Women The Mad Genius The Woman from Monte Carlo Alias the Doctor The Strange Love of Molly Louvain Doctor X The Cabin in the Cotton 20,000 Years in Sing Sing Mystery of the Wax Museum The Keyhole Private Detective 62 Goodbye Again The Kennel Murder Case Female Mandalay Jimmy the Gent The Key British Agent The Case of the Curious Bride Black Fury Front Page Woman Little Big Shot Captain Blood The Walking Dead The Charge of the Light Brigade Stolen Holiday Mountain Justice Kid Galahad The Perfect Specimen Gold Is Where You Find It The Adventures of Robin Hood
The Adventures of Robin Hood
(with William Keighley) Four's a Crowd Four Daughters Angels with Dirty Faces Dodge City Daughters Courageous The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex Four Wives

1940s

Virginia City The Sea Hawk Santa Fe Trail The Sea Wolf Dive Bomber Captains of the Clouds Yankee Doodle Dandy Casablanca Mission to Moscow This Is the Army Passage to Marseille Janie Roughly Speaking Mildred Pierce Night and Day Life with Father The Unsuspected Romance on the High Seas My Dream Is Yours
My Dream Is Yours
(with Friz Freleng) Flamingo Road The Lady Takes a Sailor

1950s

Young Man with a Horn Bright Leaf The Breaking Point Force of Arms Jim Thorpe – All-American I'll See You in My Dreams The Story of Will Rogers The Jazz Singer Trouble Along the Way The Boy from Oklahoma The Egyptian White Christmas We're No Angels The Scarlet Hour The Vagabond King The Best Things in Life Are Free The Helen Morgan Story The Proud Rebel King Creole The Hangman The Man in the Net

1960s

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn A Breath of Scandal Francis of Assisi The Comancheros

Short films

Jön az öcsém (1919) Sons of Liberty (1939)

Productions

Bright L

.