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Paleolithic

Lower Paleolithic Late Stone Age

Homo Control of fire Stone tools

Middle Paleolithic Middle Stone Age

Homo
Homo
neanderthalensis Homo
Homo
sapiens Recent African origin of modern humans

Upper Paleolithic Late Stone Age

Behavioral modernity, Atlatl, Origin of the domestic dog

Epipaleolithic Mesolithic

Microliths, Bow, Canoe

Natufian Khiamian Tahunian Heavy Neolithic Shepherd Neolithic Trihedral Neolithic Pre- Pottery
Pottery
Neolithic

Neolithic

Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution, Domestication

Pottery
Pottery
Neolithic

Pottery

↓ Chalcolithic

v t e

The Kebaran or Kebarian culture was an archaeological culture in the eastern Mediterranean
Mediterranean
area (c. 18,000 to 12,500 BP), named after its type site, Kebara Cave
Kebara Cave
south of Haifa. The Kebaran were a highly mobile nomadic population, composed of hunters and gatherers in the Levant
Levant
and Sinai areas who used microlithic tools. Overview[edit] The Kebaran is the last Upper Paleolithic
Upper Paleolithic
phase of the Levant
Levant
(Syria, Jordan, Lebanon
Lebanon
and Palestine). The Kebarans were characterized by small, geometric microliths, and were thought to lack the specialized grinders and pounders found in later Near Eastern
Near Eastern
cultures. The Kebaran is preceded by the Athlitian phase of the Antelian
Antelian
and followed by the proto-agrarian Natufian culture
Natufian culture
of the Epipalaeolithic. The appearance of the Kebarian culture, of microlithic type implies a significant rupture in the cultural continuity of Levantine Upper Paleolithic. The Kebaran culture, with its use of microliths, is associated with the use of the bow and arrow and the domestication of the dog.[1] The Kebaran is also characterised by the earliest collecting of wild cereals, known due to the uncovering of grain grinding tools. It was the first step towards the Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution. The Kebaran people are believed to have practiced dispersal to upland environments in the summer, and aggregation in caves and rockshelters near lowland lakes in the winter. This diversity of environments may be the reason for the variety of tools found in their toolkits. Situated in the Terminal Pleistocene, the Kebaran is classified as an Epipalaeolithic
Epipalaeolithic
society. They are generally thought to have been ancestral to the later Natufian culture
Natufian culture
that occupied much of the same range.[2] Notes[edit]

^ Dayan, Tamar (1994), "Early Domesticated Dogs of the Near East" (Journal of Archaeological Science Volume 21, Issue 5, September 1994, Pages 633–640) ^ Mellaart, James (1976), Neolithic
Neolithic
of the Near East (Macmillan Publishers)

References[edit]

M. H. Alimen and M. J. Steve, Historia Universal siglo XXI. Prehistoria. Siglo XXI Editores, 1970 (reviewed and corrected in 1994) (original German edition, 1966, titled Vorgeschichte). ISBN 84-323-0034-9 University of Edinburgh, Archaeology
Archaeology
1 Lectures, "From Foraging to Farming", 2008 [clarification needed]

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