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Julian Alexander Kitchener-Fellowes, Baron Fellowes of West Stafford, DL (born 17 August 1949) is an English actor, novelist, film director and screenwriter, and a Conservative peer of the House of Lords. Fellowes is primarily known as the author of several Sunday Times best-seller novels; for the screenplay for the film Gosford Park, which won the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Original Screenplay in 2002; and as the creator, writer and executive producer of the multiple award-winning ITV series Downton Abbey
Downton Abbey
(2010–2015).

Contents

1 Early life and education 2 Career

2.1 Television 2.2 Films 2.3 Novels 2.4 Theatre 2.5 Writing credits 2.6 Parliament 2.7 Fellowes' other interests 2.8 Controversy

3 Family

3.1 Arms

4 Styles and titles 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External links

Early life and education[edit] Fellowes was born in Cairo, Egypt, the youngest son of Peregrine Edward Launcelot Fellowes, and his British wife, Olwen Mary (née Stuart-Jones).[1] His father was a diplomat and Arabist
Arabist
who campaigned to have Haile Selassie, Emperor of Ethiopia, restored to his throne during World War II.[1] Fellowes has three older brothers: Nicholas Peregrine James, wordsmith David Andrew, and playwright Roderick Oliver.[2] The siblings' childhood home was at Wetherby Place, South Kensington,[3] and afterwards at Chiddingly, East Sussex, where Fellowes lived from August 1959 until November 1988, and where his parents are buried. The house in Chiddingly, which had been owned by the whodunit writer Clifford Kitchin, was within easy reach of London where his father, who had been a diplomat, worked for Shell. Fellowes has described his father as one "of that last generation of men who lived in a pat of butter without knowing it. My mother put him on a train on Monday mornings and drove up to London in the afternoon. At the flat she'd be waiting in a snappy little cocktail dress with a delicious dinner and drink. Lovely, really." A decided influence to arise from this place was the friendship that developed with another family in the village, the Kingsleys. David Kingsley was head of British Lion Films, the company responsible for many Peter Sellers
Peter Sellers
comedies. Sometimes "glamorous figures" would visit the Kingsleys' house. Fellowes said that he thinks he "learnt from David Kingsley that you could actually make a living in the film business".[4] Fellowes was educated at several private schools in Britain including Wetherby School, St Philip's School, and Ampleforth College, which his father had preferred over Eton. He read English Literature at Magdalene College, Cambridge, where he was a member of Footlights. He studied further at the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art in London.[citation needed] Career[edit] Television[edit] Fellowes moved to Los Angeles
Los Angeles
in 1981 and played a number of small roles on television for the next two years, including a role "Tales of the Unexpected". He believed that his breakthrough had come when he was considered to replace Hervé Villechaize
Hervé Villechaize
as the butler on the television series Fantasy Island, but the role went to actor Christopher Hewett instead.[5] He was unable to get an audition for the Disney film Baby: Secret of the Lost Legend (1985) in Los Angeles, but was offered the role when he was visiting England. When he asked the film's director why he was not able to get an interview in Los Angeles, he was told that they felt the best actors were in Britain.[6] After this, Fellowes decided to move back to England to further his career, and in 1991, he played Neville Marsham in Danny Boyle's For the Greater Good. Other notable acting roles included the role of Claud Seabrook in the acclaimed 1996 BBC
BBC
drama serial Our Friends in the North and the 2nd Duke of Richmond in the BBC
BBC
drama serial Aristocrats. He portrayed George IV as the Prince Regent for the second time (the first was in the film The Scarlet Pimpernel (1982)) in the 1996 adaptation of Bernard Cornwell's novel Sharpe's Regiment, and Major Dunnett in Sharpe's Rifles. He also played the part of "Kilwillie" on Monarch of the Glen. He appeared as the leader of "The Hullabaloos" in the television adaptation of Arthur Ransome's Coot Club, called "Swallows and Amazons Forever!" Aside from acting, he launched a new series on BBC
BBC
One in 2004, Julian Fellowes Investigates: A Most Mysterious Murder, which he wrote and introduced onscreen. He was the presenter of Never Mind the Full Stops, a panel-based game show broadcast on BBC
BBC
Four from 2006 to 2007. He created the hugely successful and critically acclaimed period drama Downton Abbey
Downton Abbey
for ITV1
ITV1
in 2010.[7] He wrote a new Titanic miniseries that was shown on ITV1
ITV1
in March–April 2012.[8] In April 2015, The Hollywood Reporter
The Hollywood Reporter
reported that Fellowes was at work on a new period drama series for NBC television, to be set in late 19th-century New York City, entitled The Gilded Age.[9] In an interview with The Mail on Sunday, Fellowes suggested that a younger version of Maggie Smith's Dowager Countess character from his Downton Abbey drama might appear in the new series, saying: "Robert Crawley would be in his early teens, Cora would be a child. A young Violet [the Dowager Countess] could make an appearance."[9] As the title suggests, the series would be set during the time of America's so-called Gilded Age
Gilded Age
– the industrial boom era in the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries – and portray the upper echelons of New York's high society during that period.[9] Production and writing for The Gilded Age
Gilded Age
was updated in January 2016 indicating that filming would start at the end of 2016. As reported in RadioTimes: "NBC's The Gilded Age
Gilded Age
is set to start shooting later this year, Fellowes tells RadioTimes.com. Asked whether he'd written the script yet, Fellowes replied, 'No I haven't, no. I'm doing that this year', before adding: 'And then hopefully shooting at the end of the year.'"[10] In April 2016, it was announced that Fellowes would be the producer of The Gilded Age
Gilded Age
when it was reported that Fellowes is "about to begin writing The Gilded Age
Gilded Age
for NBC, a sort of American Downton about fortunes made and lost in late 19th century New York, which he will also produce."[11] On 4 June 2016, Fellowes was asked by The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times, "Where does The Gilded Age
Gilded Age
stand?" Fellowes replied,

It stands really with me up to my neck in research, and I’m clearing the decks, so that when I start Gilded Age, I'm only doing Gilded Age. These people were extraordinary. You can see why they frightened the old guard, because they saw no boundaries. They wanted to build a palace, they built a palace. They wanted to buy a yacht, they bought a yacht. The old guard in New York weren’t like that at all, and suddenly this whirlwind of couture descended on their heads. The newcomers redesigned being rich. They created a rich culture that we still have — people who are rich today are generally rich in a way that was established in America in the 1880s, ’90s, 1900s. It was different from Europe. Something like Newport would never have happened in any other country, where you have huge palaces, and then about 20 yards away, another huge palace, and 20 yards beyond that another huge palace. In England right up to the 1930s, when people made money, they would buy an estate of 5,000 acres and they’d have to look after Nanny. The Americans of the 1880s and ’90s didn’t want too much of that.[12]

In August 2016, Fellowes indicated that his plans for The Gilded Age would not overlap substantially with the characters in Downton Abbey since most of them would have been children in those earlier "prequel" decades. Writing for Creative Screenwriting, Sam Roads quoted Fellowes as stating: "Someone asked if you (referring to Fellowes) would see any of the Downton characters (in The Gilded Age), but most of them would be children. They said that Violet wouldn't be a child, and I replied that 'Yes, I suppose you see a younger Violet'... It might be fun, but I doubt at the beginning, because I want it to be a new show with new people."[13] Fellowes has written an adaptation of Trollope's Doctor Thorne.[14] The ITV adaptation aired on 6 March 2016.[15] Films[edit] Fellowes wrote the script for Gosford Park, which won the Oscar for Best Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen in 2002.[16] In late 2005, Fellowes made his directorial début with the film Separate Lies, for which he won the award for Best Directorial Début from the National Board of Review.[17] In 2009, Momentum Pictures
Momentum Pictures
and Sony Pictures released The Young Victoria, starring Emily Blunt, for which Fellowes wrote the original screenplay. Other screenwriting credits include Vanity Fair, The Tourist and From Time to Time, which he also directed, and which won Best Picture at the Chicago Children's Film Festival, the Youth Jury Award at the Seattle International Film Festival, Best Picture at the Fiuggi Family Festival in Rome, and the Young Jury Award at Cinemagic in Belfast. His greatest commercial success was The Tourist, which grossed US$278 million worldwide, and for which he co-wrote the screenplay with Christopher McQuarrie
Christopher McQuarrie
and Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck.[18] Other films in which Fellowes has appeared include Full Circle (1977), Priest of Love
Priest of Love
(1981), The Scarlet Pimpernel (1982), Damage (1992), Shadowlands (1993), Jane Eyre (1996), Tomorrow Never Dies
Tomorrow Never Dies
(1997), Regeneration (1997) and Place Vendôme (1998). He has continued his acting career while writing. He unsuccessfully auditioned for the role of Master of Lake-town
Master of Lake-town
in the 2012–2014 The Hobbit series.[16] Fellowes and other workers on Downton Abbey
Downton Abbey
indicated in April 2016 an openness to consider possibilities for a feature film production of the television series, which ended with its sixth season in 2015.[19] Novels[edit] Fellowes' novel Snobs was published in 2004. It focuses on the social nuances of the upper class and concerns the marriage of an upper middle-class girl to a peer. Snobs was a Sunday Times
Sunday Times
best-seller. In 2009 his novel Past Imperfect was published. Another Sunday Times best-seller, it deals with the débutante season of 1968, comparing the world then to the world of 2008. He also wrote, under the pseudonym Rebecca Greville, several romantic novels in the 1970s.[20] A period novel, Belgravia began broadcast, in 11 weekly episodes, from April 2016 and is available, via an app, in audio and text format.[21] Theatre[edit] As an actor, Fellowes has appeared in several West End productions, including Samuel Taylor's A Touch of Spring, Alan Ayckbourn's Joking Apart and a revival of Noël Coward's Present Laughter. He appeared at the National Theatre in The Futurists, written by Dusty Hughes. As a writer, he penned the script to the West End musical Mary Poppins, produced by Sir Cameron Mackintosh
Cameron Mackintosh
and Disney, which opened on Broadway in December 2006. He wrote the book for the musical School of Rock which opened at The Winter Garden on Broadway in December 2015. In May 2016 he was nominated for a Tony.[22] Writing credits[edit]

List of television, film and theatre credits

Title Year Medium Notes

Gosford Park 2001 Film Winner of the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Original Screenplay

Mary Poppins 2004 Theatre Adapted from the novels by P. L. Travers
P. L. Travers
and the 1964 film directed by Robert Stevenson; screenplay by Bill Walsh and Don DaGradi

Vanity Fair 2004 Film Screenplay based on the novel by William Makepeace Thackeray

Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
Investigates 2004 Television Writer and creator; also actor

Piccadilly Jim 2004 Film Screenplay based on the novel by P.G. Wodehouse

Separate Lies 2005 Film Screenplay based on the novel by Nigel Balchin; also director

The Young Victoria 2009 Film Original screenplay

From Time to Time 2009 Film Written by Fellowes, based on the novel by Lucy M. Boston; also director

The Tourist 2010 Film Screenplay polish

Downton Abbey 2010–15 (Series One to Six) Television Creator, executive producer and writer (co-written episodes four and six of Season One with Shelagh Stephenson and Tina Pepler respectively)

Titanic 2012 Television Writer of the four-part ITV1
ITV1
produced miniseries

Romeo and Juliet 2013 Film Screenplay; adapted from the play by William Shakespeare

Crooked House 2013 Film Script; adaptation of the novel by Agatha Christie

Gypsy 2013 Film Screenplay and script; remake of the classic musical starring Ethel Merman

School of Rock 2015 Theatre Book; adapted from the 2003 film of the same name by Mike White. Music by Andrew Lloyd Webber, Lyrics by Glenn Slater

Doctor Thorne 2016 Television Script; dramatization of the Anthony Trollope novel

Half a Sixpence 2016 Theatre Book; A new version based on H. G. Welles' novel Kipps with original musical by David Heneker and Beverly Cross. New music and lyrics by George Stiles and Anthony Drewe, co-created by Cameron Mackintosh; at Chichester Festival Theatre

The Wind in the Willows 2016 Theatre Book; adapted from the novel of the same name by Kenneth Grahame. Music and lyrics by George Stiles and Anthony Drewe. Opening in Plymouth, Salford and Southampton prior to the West End.

The Gilded Age 2017 Television Script; NBC serial set in New York as prequel to Downton Abbey

Crooked House 2017 Film Screenplay

Parliament[edit] On 13 January 2011, Fellowes was elevated to the peerage, being created Baron Fellowes of West Stafford, of West Stafford
West Stafford
in the County of Dorset,[23] and on the same day was introduced in the House of Lords,[24] where he sits on the Conservative Benches.[25] Fellowes' other interests[edit] Fellowes is Chairman of the RNIB appeal for Talking Books. He is a Vice-President of the Weldmar Hospicecare Trust[26] and Patron of a number of charities: the south-west branch of Age UK, Changing Faces, Living Paintings, the Rainbow Trust Children's Charity, Breast Cancer Haven and the Nursing Memorial Appeal. He also supports other causes, including charities concerned with the care of those suffering from Alzheimer's disease. He recently opened the Dorset
Dorset
office of the south-west adoption charity, Families for Children. Fellowes sits on the Appeal Council for the National Memorial Arboretum and is a Patron of Moviola, an initiative aimed at facilitating rural cinema screenings in the West Country.[27] He also sits on the Arts and Media Honours Committee. Controversy[edit] In March 1981, Fellowes wrote to The Times
The Times
newspaper in indignation at the MP Geoffrey Dickens' taunting of his fellow parliamentarians about the identity of a paedophile whose name he was about to reveal. In the version of the letter that was published in The Times, Fellowes said: "The feeblest student of human nature must surely be aware of how slight the connexion between pornography and practices need be. To flirt with fetishes is hardly rare in the best circles [...] now he has to have his life, public and private, more thoroughly smashed than if he had murdered his kinsman in broad daylight."[28] The man in question turned out to be Sir Peter Hayman, who had been arrested for possessing a large amount of paedophile pornography. Fellowes maintained that his letter was not intended as a defence of Hayman, who was a stranger to him, so much as an attack on Dickens' "enjoyment" of the power granted by parliamentary privilege.[29] Family[edit] On 28 April 1990, Fellowes married Emma Joy Kitchener LVO (2000) (born 1963) a Lady-in-Waiting
Lady-in-Waiting
to HRH
HRH
Princess Michael of Kent. She is also a great-grandniece of Herbert, 1st Earl
Earl
Kitchener.[30] He proposed to her only 20 minutes after meeting her at a party, "having spent 19 minutes getting up the nerve". On 15 October 1998 the Fellowes family changed its surname from Fellowes to Kitchener-Fellowes.[31][32][33] Lord Fellowes publicly expressed his dissatisfaction that the proposals to change the rules of royal succession were not extended to hereditary peerages, which had they been would have allowed his wife to succeed her uncle as The Countess Kitchener in her own right. As he put it "I find it ridiculous that, in 2011, a perfectly sentient adult woman has no rights of inheritance whatsoever when it comes to a hereditary title."[34] Instead, the title became extinct on her uncle's death because there were no male heirs. On 9 May 2012, The Queen issued a Royal Warrant of Precedence granting Lady Emma Fellowes the same rank and style as the daughter of an Earl, as would have been due to her if her late father had survived his brother and therefore succeeded to the earldom.[35] Lord Fellowes and his wife have one son, the Honourable Peregrine Charles Morant Kitchener-Fellowes (born 1991).[32] Fellowes was appointed a Deputy Lieutenant of Dorset
Dorset
in 2009.[36] He is also Lord of the manor
Lord of the manor
of Tattershall
Tattershall
in Lincolnshire[37] and President
President
of the Society of Dorset
Dorset
Men. Their main family home is in Dorset.[38] His wife, now Lady Fellowes, was story editor for Downton Abbey
Downton Abbey
and works with charities, including the Nursing Memorial Appeal.[33] Arms[edit] This box:

view talk edit

Coat of arms of Julian Fellowes

Coronet Coronet
Coronet
of a Baron Crest A Lion's Head erased Or the Erasure fimbriated Gules gorged with a Collar dancettée Pean crowned with a Mural Coronet
Coronet
with three Crenelations manifest Or masoned Sable. Escutcheon Azure a Fess dancettée Erminois between three Lions’ Heads erased Or each charged on the neck with a Covered Cup Gules. Supporters Dexter: a Camel Or langued Gules plain gorged and with Bridal trappings and line pendent reflexed over the back Azure. Sinister: a Tortoise Azure langued Gules the shell Or. Motto Post Proelia Praemia (After battle comes reward)[39]

Styles and titles[edit]

Julian Fellowes, Esq. (1949–1998) Julian Kitchener-Fellowes, Esq. (1998–2009) Julian Kitchener-Fellowes, Esq., DL (2009–2011) The Lord Fellowes of West Stafford, DL (2011–present)

See also[edit]

List of accolades received by Gosford Park List of accolades received by The Young Victoria List of awards and nominations received by Downton Abbey Burke's Landed Gentry
Burke's Landed Gentry
1965 edn, FELLOWES-GORDON of Knochespoch

References[edit]

^ a b Segrave, Elisa (30 April 1999). "Obituary: Peregrine Fellowes". The Independent. Retrieved 23 January 2013.  ^ Walker, Tim (9 May 2013). " Downton Abbey
Downton Abbey
Creator's Brother Comes Out Fighting with New Play". The Daily Telegraph.  ^ (18 December 2011). " Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
Baron Fellowes of West Stafford". BBC
BBC
Radio 4; retrieved 27 August 2013. ^ "Time and place: Not quite Gosford Park
Gosford Park
- Julian Fellowes". Louisejohncox.com. Retrieved 26 October 2016.  ^ Witchel, Alex (8 September 2011). "Behind the Scenes With the Creator of 'Downton Abbey'". The New York Times Magazine. Retrieved 14 September 2011.  ^ " Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
Interview". YouTube. Emmy TV Legends. Retrieved 3 May 2015.  ^ Downton Abbey, Itv.com; accessed 13 June 2015. ^ Starr, Michael (22 March 2011). "Titanic Coming to TV". New York Post.  ^ a b c Alex Ritman - "Downton Abbey's Dowager Countess May Appear in Julian Fellowes' New NBC Drama; 'The Gilded Age' could feature a younger version of the character, said Fellowes", The Hollywood Reporter, April 6, 2015. Retrieved 2015-10-10 ^ "Julian Fellowes' NBC period drama The Gilded Age
Gilded Age
will start filming this year", RadioTimes.com, 21 January 2016. ^ Profile, Telegraph.co.uk, 10 April 2016. ^ Interview with Julian Fellowes, Latimes.com, June 4, 2016. ^ Sam Roads. Interview with Julian Fellowes, CreativeScreenwriting.com, 11 August 2016. ^ Mulvihill, Mike. "From Doctor Thorne
Doctor Thorne
and The Secret Agent to Maigret and SS-GB, get ready for these TV scorchers". Dailymail.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-10-21.  ^ " Doctor Thorne
Doctor Thorne
review: Fellowes and Trollope is a happy marriage". Telegraph Online. Retrieved 8 March 2016.  ^ a b Gilbert, Matthew (5 January 2013). " Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
and 'Downton Abbey'". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 5 January 2013.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 21 January 2013. Retrieved 2012-12-19.  ^ "The Tourist". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 20 August 2013.  ^ Elizabeth Grice (2016-04-10). "Downton creator Julian Fellowes: 'Why the personal attacks hurt so much'". Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-10-21.  ^ " Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
profile". BFI Screenonline. Retrieved 17 January 2013.  ^ "The Telegraph Belgravia". Retrieved 17 April 2016.  ^ "Andrew Lloyd Webber's School of Rock
School of Rock
Will Shake Up Broadway Next Fall". Playbill. 18 December 2014. Retrieved 29 December 2014.  ^ "No. 59672". The London Gazette. 17 January 2011. p. 615.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 15 July 2012. Retrieved 2012-02-07.  ^ Sweney, Mark (19 November 2010). " Downton Abbey
Downton Abbey
creator Julian Fellowes to become Tory peer". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 19 November 2010.  ^ "Weldmar Hospicecare Trust - Caring for Dorset". Weld-hospice.org.uk. Retrieved 2016-10-21.  ^ "Moviola News and Events". Moviola. Retrieved 5 July 2010.  ^ The Times
The Times
letter quoted, DS Forums, 09-03-2013. ^ "Daily Mail". dailymail.co.uk. Retrieved 9 July 2014.  ^ Mosley, Charles (ed.) (2003). Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 107th edn. London: Burke's Peerage & Gentry Ltd. p. 2207 (KITCHENER OF KHARTOUM AND OF BROOME, E). ISBN 0-9711966-2-1.  ^ "No. 55307". The London Gazette. 10 November 1998. p. 12197.  ^ a b Lynn, Barber (28 November 2004). "Jolly good Fellowes". The Observer. London, UK. Retrieved 20 July 2010.  ^ a b Fellowes, Julian (December 2012). "The Most Happy Fellowes". Vanity Fair. Retrieved 9 November 2012.  ^ Singh, Anita. "Julian Fellowes: inheritance laws denying my wife a title are outrageous". Telegraph. Retrieved 2016-10-21.  ^ "London Gazette". 23 May 2012. p. 9975.  ^ "No. 58757". The London Gazette. 7 July 2008. p. 10149.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 12 December 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-10.  ^ Savill, Richard (2002-08-30). "Writer buys his own Gosford Park". Telegraph. Retrieved 2016-10-21.  ^ Zhong, Raymond (3 February 2013). "The Anti-Snobbery of 'Downton Abbey'". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 3 May 2015. 

Further reading[edit]

Kamp, David (December 2012). "The most happy Fellowes". Vanity Fair. 628: 130–37, 196–97. Retrieved 9 October 2015. 

External links[edit]

Lord Fellowes of West Stafford
West Stafford
profile, parliament.uk; accessed 12 May 2015. Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
on IMDb Interview with Bella Stander, Bookreporter.com Author Interview Podcast with Paula Shackleton, BookBuffet.com The Case of Charles Bravo Julian Fellowes' BAFTA Screenwriters' Lecture

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Works by Julian Fellowes

Films

Gosford Park
Gosford Park
(2001) Vanity Fair (2004) Piccadilly Jim
Piccadilly Jim
(2004) Separate Lies
Separate Lies
(2005) From Time to Time (2009) The Young Victoria
The Young Victoria
(2009) The Tourist (2010) Romeo & Juliet (2013)

TV series

Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
Investigates: A Most Mysterious Murder (2004–2005) Downton Abbey
Downton Abbey
(2010–2015) Titanic (2012) Doctor Thorne
Doctor Thorne
(2016) The Gilded Age
Gilded Age
(TBD)

Stage

Mary Poppins (2004) School of Rock
School of Rock
(2015) Half a Sixpence
Half a Sixpence
(2016) The Wind in the Willows
The Wind in the Willows
(2016)

Awards for Julian, Lord Fellowes

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Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Original Screenplay

1940–1960

Preston Sturges
Preston Sturges
(1940) Herman J. Mankiewicz
Herman J. Mankiewicz
and Orson Welles
Orson Welles
(1941) Michael Kanin
Michael Kanin
and Ring Lardner Jr.
Ring Lardner Jr.
(1942) Norman Krasna (1943) Lamar Trotti (1944) Richard Schweizer (1945) Muriel Box and Sydney Box (1946) Sidney Sheldon (1947) No award (1948) Robert Pirosh (1949) Charles Brackett, D. M. Marshman Jr. and Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1950) Alan Jay Lerner
Alan Jay Lerner
(1951) T. E. B. Clarke (1952) Charles Brackett, Richard L. Breen and Walter Reisch (1953) Budd Schulberg
Budd Schulberg
(1954) Sonya Levien and William Ludwig (1955) Albert Lamorisse
Albert Lamorisse
(1956) George Wells (1957) Nathan E. Douglas and Harold Jacob Smith (1958) Clarence Greene, Maurice Richlin, Russell Rouse and Stanley Shapiro (1959) I. A. L. Diamond and Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1960)

1961–1980

William Inge
William Inge
(1961) Ennio de Concini, Pietro Germi, and Alfredo Giannetti (1962) James Webb (1963) Peter Stone and Frank Tarloff (1964) Frederic Raphael (1965) Claude Lelouch
Claude Lelouch
and Pierre Uytterhoeven (1966) William Rose (1967) Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
(1968) William Goldman
William Goldman
(1969) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Edmund H. North (1970) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1971) Jeremy Larner (1972) David S. Ward
David S. Ward
(1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Frank Pierson
Frank Pierson
(1975) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Robert C. Jones, Waldo Salt, and Nancy Dowd (1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980)

1981–2000

Colin Welland (1981) John Briley (1982) Horton Foote (1983) Robert Benton (1984) William Kelley, Pamela Wallace and Earl
Earl
W. Wallace (1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley
(1987) Ronald Bass and Barry Morrow (1988) Tom Schulman (1989) Bruce Joel Rubin (1990) Callie Khouri
Callie Khouri
(1991) Neil Jordan
Neil Jordan
(1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
and Roger Avary
Roger Avary
(1994) Christopher McQuarrie
Christopher McQuarrie
(1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (1996) Ben Affleck
Ben Affleck
and Matt Damon
Matt Damon
(1997) Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Cameron Crowe
Cameron Crowe
(2000)

2001–present

Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Pedro Almodóvar
Pedro Almodóvar
(2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Pierre Bismuth, Michel Gondry
Michel Gondry
and Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2004) Paul Haggis
Paul Haggis
and Bobby Moresco (2005) Michael Arndt
Michael Arndt
(2006) Diablo Cody
Diablo Cody
(2007) Dustin Lance Black
Dustin Lance Black
(2008) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2009) David Seidler (2010) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2011) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
(2012) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2013) Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris Jr., and Armando Bo (2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2016) Jordan Peele
Jordan Peele
(2017)

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Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special

Michael Mann
Michael Mann
and Patrick Nolan (1979) David Chase
David Chase
(1980) Arthur Miller
Arthur Miller
(1981) Barry Morrow (1982) Marshall Herskovitz
Marshall Herskovitz
and Edward Zwick
Edward Zwick
(1983) William Hanley (1984) Vickie Patik (1985) Ron Cowen, Daniel Lipman, Sherman Yellen and David Butler (1986) Kenneth Blackwell, Tennyson Flowers and Richard Friedenberg (1987) William Hanley (1988) Ron Hutchison, Abby Mann and Robin Vote (1989) Terrence McNally
Terrence McNally
(1990) Andrew Davies (1991) Joshua Brand and John Falsey (1992) Jane Anderson (1993) Bob Randall (1994) Alison Cross (1995) Simon Moore (1996) Horton Foote (1997) Kario Salem (1998) Ann Peacock (1999) David Mills and David Simon
David Simon
(2000) Loring Mandel (2001) Larry Ramin and Hugh Whitemore (2002) William H. Macy
William H. Macy
and Steven Schachter (2003) Tony Kushner
Tony Kushner
(2004) Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely (2005) Richard Curtis
Richard Curtis
(2006) Frank Deasy (2007) Kirk Ellis (2008) Andrew Davies (2009) Adam Mazer (2010) Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2011) Danny Strong
Danny Strong
(2012) Abi Morgan (2013) Steven Moffat
Steven Moffat
(2014) Jane Anderson (2015) D.V. DeVincentis (2016) Charlie Brooker
Charlie Brooker
(2017)

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International Emmy Founders Award

Jim Henson
Jim Henson
(1980) Shaun Sutton / Roone Arledge (1981) Michael Landon
Michael Landon
(1982) Herbert Brodkin (1983) David L. Wolper (1984) David Attenborough
David Attenborough
(1985) Donald L. Taffner (1986) Jacques Cousteau
Jacques Cousteau
(1987) Goar Mestre (1988) Paul Fox (1989) Joan Ganz Cooney
Joan Ganz Cooney
(1990) Adrian Cowell (1991) Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
(1992) Richard Dunn (1993) Film on Four (1994) Don Hewitt
Don Hewitt
(1995) Reg Grundy
Reg Grundy
(1996) Jac Venza
Jac Venza
(1997) Robert Halmi Sr. (1998) Hisashi Hieda
Hisashi Hieda
(1999) John Hendricks (2000) Pierre Lescure
Pierre Lescure
(2001) Howard Stringer
Howard Stringer
(2002) HBO
HBO
(2003) MTV International
MTV International
(2004) Oprah Winfrey
Oprah Winfrey
(2005) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(2006) Al Gore
Al Gore
(2007) Dick Wolf
Dick Wolf
(2008) David Frost
David Frost
(2009) Simon Cowell
Simon Cowell
(2010) Nigel Lythgoe
Nigel Lythgoe
(2011) Ryan Murphy / Norman Lear
Norman Lear
/ Alan Alda
Alan Alda
(2012) J. J. Abrams
J. J. Abrams
(2013) Matthew Weiner
Matthew Weiner
(2014) Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2015) Shonda Rhimes
Shonda Rhimes
(2016)

v t e

National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Screenplay

1967–2000

David Newman and Robert Benton (1967) John Cassavetes
John Cassavetes
(1968) Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
and Larry Tucker (1969) Éric Rohmer
Éric Rohmer
(1970) Penelope Gilliatt (1971) Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
(1972) George Lucas, Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck (1973) Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
(1974) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
and Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1975) Alain Tanner
Alain Tanner
and John Berger
John Berger
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
(1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980) John Guare
John Guare
(1981) Murray Schisgal and Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
(1982) Bill Forsyth
Bill Forsyth
(1983) Lowell Ganz, Babaloo Mandel and Bruce Jay Friedman (1984) Albert Brooks
Albert Brooks
and Monica Johnson (1985) Hanif Kureishi
Hanif Kureishi
(1986) John Boorman
John Boorman
(1987) Ron Shelton (1988) Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
and Daniel Yost (1989) Charles Burnett (1990) David Cronenberg
David Cronenberg
(1991) David Webb Peoples (1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
and Roger Avary
Roger Avary
(1994) Amy Heckerling (1995) Albert Brooks
Albert Brooks
and Monica Johnson (1996) Curtis Hanson
Curtis Hanson
and Brian Helgeland (1997) Scott Frank (1998) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(1999) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2000)

2001–present

Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Ronald Harwood (2002) Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini
Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini
(2003) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2004) Noah Baumbach
Noah Baumbach
(2005) Peter Morgan (2006) Tamara Jenkins
Tamara Jenkins
(2007) Mike Leigh
Mike Leigh
(2008) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (2009) Aaron Sorkin
Aaron Sorkin
(2010) Asghar Farhadi
Asghar Farhadi
(2011) Tony Kushner
Tony Kushner
(2012) Richard Linklater, Ethan Hawke, and Julie Delpy
Julie Delpy
(2013) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
(2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2016) Greta Gerwig
Greta Gerwig
(2017)

v t e

Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay

Original Drama (1969–1983, retired)

William Goldman
William Goldman
(1969) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Edmund H. North (1970) Penelope Gilliatt (1971) Jeremy Larner (1972) Steve Shagan (1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Frank Pierson
Frank Pierson
(1975) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1976) Arthur Laurents
Arthur Laurents
(1977) Nancy Dowd, Robert C. Jones and Waldo Salt (1978) Mike Gray, T. S. Cook and James Bridges (1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
and Trevor Griffiths (1981) Melissa Mathison
Melissa Mathison
(1982) Horton Foote (1983)

Original Comedy (1969–1983, retired)

Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
and Larry Tucker (1969) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(1970) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1971) Peter Bogdanovich, Buck Henry, David Newman and Robert Benton (1972) Melvin Frank and Jack Rose (1973) Mel Brooks, Norman Steinberg, Andrew Bergman, Richard Pryor
Richard Pryor
and Alan Uger (1974) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
and Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1975) Bill Lancaster
Bill Lancaster
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
and Sheldon Keller (1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Nancy Meyers, Harvey Miller and Charles Shyer
Charles Shyer
(1980) Steve Gordon (1981) Don McGuire, Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
and Murray Schisgal (1982) Lawrence Kasdan
Lawrence Kasdan
and Barbara Benedek (1983)

Original Screenplay (1984–present)

Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1984) William Kelley and Earl
Earl
W. Wallace (1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley
(1987) Ron Shelton (1988) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1989) Barry Levinson
Barry Levinson
(1990) Callie Khouri
Callie Khouri
(1991) Neil Jordan
Neil Jordan
(1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Richard Curtis
Richard Curtis
(1994) Randall Wallace (1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (1996) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
and Mark Andrus (1997) Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2000) Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Michael Moore
Michael Moore
(2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2004) Paul Haggis
Paul Haggis
and Bobby Moresco (2005) Michael Arndt
Michael Arndt
(2006) Diablo Cody
Diablo Cody
(2007) Dustin Lance Black
Dustin Lance Black
(2008) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2009) Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan
(2010) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2011) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2012) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2013) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
and Hugo Guinness (2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Barry Jenkins
Barry Jenkins
and Tarell Alvin McCraney
Tarell Alvin McCraney
(2016) Jordan Peele
Jordan Peele
(2017)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 71602452 LCCN: nb2001013552 ISNI: 0000 0000 7825 0318 GND: 132029669 SELIBR: 275954 SUDOC: 070438528 BNF: cb141767988 (data) BIBSYS: 3004067 BNE: XX1543

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