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Juan Sebastián Elcano[1] (sometimes misspelled del Cano;[1] c.1486–4 August 1526) was a Spanish explorer of Basque origin[2][3][4] who completed the first circumnavigation of the Earth. After Magellan's death in the Philippines, Elcano took command of nau Victoria from the Moluccas
Moluccas
to Sanlúcar de Barrameda
Sanlúcar de Barrameda
in Spain.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Military life 3 Merchant shipping 4 Voyage of circumnavigation

4.1 Honours

5 Loaísa expedition 6 Family life 7 See also 8 References 9 External links

Early life[edit] Elcano was born in around 1486 to Domingo Sebastián Elcano and Catalina del Puerto. He had three brothers: Domingo Elcano, a Catholic priest, Martín Pérez Elcano, and Antón Martín Elcano. Military life[edit] Elcano fought in the Italian Wars
Italian Wars
under the command of Gonzalo Fernández de Córdoba in Italy, and in 1509 he joined the Spanish expedition organized by Cardinal Francisco Jiménez de Cisneros against Algiers. Merchant shipping[edit] Elcano settled in Seville
Seville
and became a merchant ship captain. After breaking Spanish laws by surrendering a ship to Genoan bankers in repayment of a debt, he sought a pardon from the Spanish king Charles V, by signing on as a subordinate officer for the Magellan expedition to the East Indies. Voyage of circumnavigation[edit]

The Magellan expedition.

Nao Victoria, Elcano ship Replica in Punta Arenas

Elcano served as a naval commander of Charles V of Spain
Spain
and took part in the expedition to the Philippines. They set sail with five ships, Concepción, San Antonio, Santiago, Trinidad and Victoria with 241 men from Spain
Spain
in 1519. Elcano participated in a fierce mutiny against Magellan before the convoy discovered the passage through South America, the Strait of Magellan. He was spared by Magellan and after five months of hard labour in chains was made captain of the galleon.[5] Santiago was later destroyed in a storm. The fleet sailed across the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the eastern coast of Brazil
Brazil
and into Puerto San Julián in Argentina. Several days later they discovered a passage now known as the Strait of Magellan
Strait of Magellan
located in the southern tip of South America
South America
and sailed through the strait. The crew of San Antonio mutinied and returned to Spain. On 28 November 1520, three ships set sail for the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
and about 19 men died before they reached Guam
Guam
on 6 March 1521. Conflicts with the nearby island of Rota prevented Magellan and Elcano from resupplying their ships with food and water. They eventually gathered enough supplies and continued their journey to the Philippines
Philippines
and remained there for several weeks. Close relationships developed between the Spaniards and the islanders. They took part in converting the Cebuano tribes to Christianity and became involved in tribal warfare between rival Filipino groups in Mactan Island.

Route of the Spanish expedition through the Spice Islands. The red cross shows the location of Mactan Island
Mactan Island
in the Philippines
Philippines
where Magellan was killed in 1521.

On 27 April 1521, Magellan was killed and the Spaniards defeated by natives in the Battle of Mactan
Battle of Mactan
in the Philippines. The surviving members of the expedition could not decide who should succeed Magellan. The men finally voted on a joint command with the leadership divided between Duarte Barbosa
Duarte Barbosa
and João Serrão. Within four days these two were also dead. They were killed after being betrayed at a feast at the hands of Rajah Humabon. The mission was now teetering on disaster and João Lopes de Carvalho took command of the fleet and led it on a meandering journey through the Philippine archipelago. During the six-month listless journey after Magellan died, and before reaching the Moluccas, Elcano's stature grew as the men became disillusioned with the weak leadership of Carvalho. The two ships, Victoria and Trinidad finally reached their destination, the Moluccas, on 6 November. They rested and re-supplied in this haven, and filled their holds with the precious cargo of cloves and nutmeg. On 18 December, the ships were ready to leave. Trinidad sprang a leak, and was unable to be repaired. Carvalho stayed with the ship along with 52 others hoping to return later.[6] Victoria, commanded by Elcano along with 17 other European survivors of the 240 man expedition and 4 (survivors out of 13) Timorese Asians continued its westward voyage to Spain
Spain
crossing the Indian and Atlantic Ocean. They eventually reached Sanlúcar de Barrameda
Sanlúcar de Barrameda
on 6 September 1522.[7] Antonio Pigafetta, an Italian scholar, was a crew member of the Magellan and Elcano expedition. He wrote several documents about the events of the expedition. According to Pigafetta the voyage covered 14,460 leagues—about 81,449 kilometres (50,610 mi). Honours[edit] Elcano was awarded a coat of arms by Charles I of Spain, featuring a globe with the motto: Primus circumdedisti me (in Latin, "You went around me first"),[8] and an annual pension. Loaísa expedition[edit] In 1525, Elcano returned to sea, and became a member of the Loaísa expedition. He was appointed leader along with García Jofre de Loaísa as captains, who commanded seven ships and sent to claim the East Indies
Indies
for King Charles I of Spain. Both Elcano and Loaísa and many other sailors died of malnutrition in the Pacific Ocean, but the survivors reached their destination and a few of them managed to return to Spain. Family life[edit] Elcano never married but he had a son by María Hernández Dernialde named Domingo Elcano, whom he legitimized in his last will and testament.[citation needed] In 1572 to mark the 50th anniversary of the voyage King Philip II of Spain
Spain
awarded the male heirs of Elcano the hereditary title of Marques de Buglas at Negros island in the Philippines.[citation needed] The lineage still survives and the current Marquis is the 17th in line. He resides in Silay City, Negros Occidental.[citation needed] See also[edit]

Philippines
Philippines
portal New Spain
Spain
portal

History of the Philippines Spanish ship Juan Sebastián Elcano

References[edit]

^ a b Elcano y no Cano ^ Totoricagüena, Gloria Pilar (2005). Basque Diaspora: Migration And Transnational Identity. University of Nevada Press. p. 132. ISBN 9781877802454. Retrieved 8 March 2013.  ^ Facaros, Dana; Pauls, Michael (2 September 2008). Cadogan Guide Bilbao & the Basque Lands. New Holland Publishers. p. 177. ISBN 978-1-86011-400-7. Retrieved 7 January 2013.  ^ Salmoral, Manuel Lucena (1982). Historia general de España y América: hasta fines del siglo XVI. El descubrimiento y la fundación de los reinos ultramarinos. Ediciones Rialp. p. 324. ISBN 978-84-321-2102-9. Retrieved 7 January 2013.  ^ Murphy, Patrick J.; Coye, Ray W. (2013). Mutiny and Its Bounty: Leadership Lessons from the Age of Discovery. Yale University Press. ISBN 9780300170283.  ^ Humble, Richard (1978). The Seafarers—The Explorers. Alexandria, Virginia: Time-Life Books.  ^ Kattan-Ibarra, Juan (1995). Perspectivas Culturales de España. p. 71.  ^ Nobiliario de conquistadores de Indias. Madrid: Sociedad de Bibliófilos Españoles. 1892. p. 57. 

External links[edit]

Auñamendi Encyclopedia: Elcano, Juan Sebastián de (in Spanish) Last will and testament of Sebastian Elcano

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Christopher Columbus Pinzón brothers Ferdinand Magellan Juan Sebastián Elcano Juan de la Cosa Juan Ponce de León Miguel López de Legazpi Pedro Menéndez de Avilés Sebastián de Ocampo Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca Alonso de Ojeda Vasco Núñez de Balboa Alonso de Salazar Andrés de Urdaneta Antonio de Ulloa Ruy López de Villalobos Diego Columbus Alonso de Ercilla Nicolás de Ovando Juan de Ayala Sebastián Vizcaíno Juan Fernández Felipe González de Ahedo

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WorldCat Identities VIAF: 15563644 LCCN: n86011345 GND: 118681915 SUDOC: 234685565 BNE: XX979

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