HOME
The Info List - Joseph Sargent





Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
(born Giuseppe Danielle Sorgente; July 22, 1925 – December 22, 2014) was an American film director. Though he directed many television movies, his best known feature-length works were arguably the theatrical releases: Burt Reynolds
Burt Reynolds
action movie White Lightning, Gregory Peck
Gregory Peck
biopic MacArthur, and horror anthology Nightmares. His most popular feature film was subway thriller The Taking of Pelham One Two Three. Sargent won four Emmy Awards over his career. He is the father of anime dubbing voice actress Lia Sargent.

Contents

1 Life and career 2 Awards 3 Filmography 4 References 5 External links

Life and career[edit] Sargent was born as Giuseppe Danielle Sorgente in Jersey City, New Jersey, the son of Italians Maria (née Noviello) and Domenico Sorgente.[1][2] Sargent began his career as an actor, appearing in numerous films and television programs. He appeared in an uncredited role as a soldier in the film From Here to Eternity (1953) where he also meet his first wife Mary Carver on the set. In the mid 1950s Sargent switched to directing; over the next 15 years his directing credits would include episodes of television series Lassie, The Invaders, The Man from U.N.C.L.E." and Star Trek. In 1969, he directed his first feature, science fiction thriller Colossus: The Forbin Project, and in 1972 The Man, starring James Earl Jones, which was begun as a television movie. He alternated between television movies and feature films during the 1970s. Sargent's directorial work from this period includes; The Taking of Pelham One Two Three, the TV movies Hustling with Lee Remick and Jill Clayburgh
Jill Clayburgh
and Tribes with Jan-Michael Vincent and Darren McGavin, as well as international award-winning ABC film The Night That Panicked America. In 1974, he won his first Directors Guild of America Award for The Marcus-Nelson Murders (1973), which was the TV movie pilot for the Kojak
Kojak
series. In the 1980s, Sargent directed mini-series Manions of America, which featured Pierce Brosnan, and Space. In 1987 he directed Jaws: The Revenge, the third sequel to Steven Spielberg's 1975 classic. The film received entirely negative reviews. Roger Ebert
Roger Ebert
called his directing of the climactic sequence "incompetent,"[3] and he was nominated for Worst Director in the 1987 Golden Raspberry Awards.[4] He concentrated on TV movies after Jaws: The Revenge, including The Karen Carpenter Story, The Long Island Incident, Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment and the 2007 remake of Sally Field
Sally Field
docudrama Sybil. Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
and his wife Carolyn Nelson Sargent laid the groundwork for Deaf West Theatre.[5] Sargent spent time as the Senior Filmmaker-in-Residence for the Directing program at the American Film Institute
American Film Institute
Conservatory in Los Angeles. Sargent died of complications from heart disease at his home in Malibu, California, on December 22, 2014. He was 89.[6] Awards[edit] Sargent was nominated for several Emmy awards. He won four. His first nomination came for his direction of TV movie Tribes (1970). His second nomination, for Kojak
Kojak
pilot The Marcus-Nelson Murders (1973), resulted in his first Emmy win. He also won Emmys for Love Is Never Silent (1985), Caroline? (1990) and Miss Rose White (1992). Sargent was also nominated for Amber Waves (1980), A Lesson Before Dying (1999), Something the Lord Made (2004) and Warm Springs (2005), in which Kenneth Branagh
Kenneth Branagh
played president Franklin D. Roosevelt. Early in his career, he won a Directors Guild of America
Directors Guild of America
award for the Kojak
Kojak
pilot. Sargent was nominated for eight DGA awards for television movies, more than any other director in this category. In 2005 he won the DGA Outstanding Directorial Achievement award for Something the LORD Made, and another the following year for Warm Springs. Filmography[edit]

Year Film Director Producer Actor Notes

1953 From Here to Eternity

N

1967 Tobruk

N

1968 The Hell with Heroes

N

1970 Colossus: The Forbin Project

N

1972 The Man

N

1973 White Lightning

N

1974 The Taking of Pelham One Two Three

N

1975 The Night That Panicked America

N

N

1977 MacArthur

N

1981 Manions of America

N

1983 Nightmares

N

1985 Love Is Never Silent

N

1985 Space

N

Emmy Award, Outstanding Film Sound Mixing for a Limited Series or a Special Emmy Award
Emmy Award
nominee, Outstanding Limited Series Artios Award nominee, Best Casting for TV Miniseries

1987 Jaws: The Revenge

N

N

Nominated—Razzie Award for Worst Picture Nominated—Razzie Award for Worst Director

1989 The Karen Carpenter Story

N

1998 Mandela and de Klerk

N

The Long Island Incident

N

1999 A Lesson Before Dying

N

2004 Something the Lord Made

N

Directors Guild of America
Directors Guild of America
Award for Outstanding Directing in a Television Film

2005 Warm Springs

N

2007 Sybil

N

2008 Sweet Nothing in My Ear

N

References[edit]

^ BRUCE BENNETT. "New York's Greatest Starring Roles". nysun.com.  ^ " Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
Biography (1925-)". filmreference.com.  ^ Ebert, Roger. " Jaws
Jaws
the Revenge". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved September 18, 2006.  ^ "1987 Archive". Razzies.com. Retrieved December 11, 2006.  ^ "The Deaf West Theatre". DeafWest.org. Retrieved January 21, 2010.  ^ Dave McNary. "Emmy-Winning Director Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
Dies at 89". Variety. 

External links[edit]

Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
on IMDb Biography at Hollywood.com at Archive.is
Archive.is
(archived 2013-01-25) Includes details of awards. Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
interview video at the Archive of American Television

v t e

Films directed by Joseph Sargent

One Spy Too Many
One Spy Too Many
(1966) The Spy in the Green Hat
The Spy in the Green Hat
(1967) The Hell with Heroes
The Hell with Heroes
(1968) Colossus: The Forbin Project (1970) Tribes (1970) Maybe I'll Come Home in the Spring (1971) The Man (1972) White Lightning (1973) The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974) Friendly Persuasion (1975) The Night That Panicked America
The Night That Panicked America
(1975) MacArthur (1977) Goldengirl
Goldengirl
(1979) Coast to Coast (1980) Nightmares (1983) Memorial Day (1983) Choices of the Heart (1983) Terrible Joe Moran
Terrible Joe Moran
(1984) Jaws: The Revenge (1987) The Karen Carpenter Story
The Karen Carpenter Story
(1989) Day One (1989) The Incident (1990) Never Forget (1991) Miss Rose White (1992) Somebody's Daughter
Somebody's Daughter
(1992) Skylark (1993) Abraham (1993) World War II: When Lions Roared (1994) My Antonia (1995) Mandela and de Klerk
Mandela and de Klerk
(1997) Miss Evers' Boys
Miss Evers' Boys
(1997) The Long Island Incident (1998) Crime and Punishment
Crime and Punishment
(1998) A Lesson Before Dying (1999) For Love or Country: The Arturo Sandoval Story (2000) Bojangles (2001) Out of the Ashes (2003) Something the Lord Made (2004) Warm Springs (2005) Sybil (2007) Sweet Nothing in My Ear
Sweet Nothing in My Ear
(2008)

Awards for Joseph Sargent

v t e

Directors Guild of America
Directors Guild of America
Award for Outstanding Directing – Miniseries or TV Film

1971-2000

Buzz Kulik for Brian's Song
Brian's Song
(1971) Lamont Johnson for That Certain Summer
That Certain Summer
(1972) Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
for The Marcus-Nelson Murders (1973) John Korty for The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman (1974) Sam O'Steen
Sam O'Steen
for Queen of the Stardust Ballroom
Queen of the Stardust Ballroom
(1975) Marvin J. Chomsky for Inside the Third Reich (1982) Edward Zwick
Edward Zwick
for Special Bulletin
Special Bulletin
(1983) Daniel Petrie
Daniel Petrie
for The Dollmaker (1984) John Erman for An Early Frost (1985) Lee Grant
Lee Grant
for Nobody's Child (1986) Jud Taylor for Foxfire (1987) Lamont Johnson for Lincoln (1988) Dan Curtis for War and Remembrance: "Parts VIII-XII: The Final Chapter" (1989) Roger Young for Murder in Mississippi
Murder in Mississippi
(1990) Stephen Gyllenhaal
Stephen Gyllenhaal
for Paris Trout (1991) Ron Lagomarsino for Picket Fences: "Pilot" (1992) Michael Ritchie for The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) Rod Holcomb for ER: "Pilot" (1994) Mick Jackson for Indictment: The McMartin Trial (1995) Betty Thomas
Betty Thomas
for The Late Shift (1996) John Herzfeld for Don King: Only in America (1997) Michael Cristofer
Michael Cristofer
for Gia
Gia
(1998) Mick Jackson for Tuesdays with Morrie (1999) Jeff Bleckner for The Beach Boys: An American Family (2000)

2001-present

Frank Pierson
Frank Pierson
for Conspiracy (2001) Mick Jackson for Live from Baghdad (2002) Mike Nichols
Mike Nichols
for Angels in America (2003) Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
for Something the Lord Made (2004) George C. Wolfe
George C. Wolfe
for Lackawanna Blues (2005) Walter Hill for Broken Trail
Broken Trail
(2006) Yves Simoneau for Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (2007) Jay Roach
Jay Roach
for Recount (2008) Ross Katz
Ross Katz
for Taking Chance
Taking Chance
(2009) Mick Jackson for Temple Grandin (2010) Jon Cassar
Jon Cassar
for The Kennedys (2011) Jay Roach
Jay Roach
for Game Change (2012) Steven Soderbergh
Steven Soderbergh
for Behind the Candelabra
Behind the Candelabra
(2013) Lisa Cholodenko for Olive Kitteridge (2014) Dee Rees
Dee Rees
for Bessie (2015) Steven Zaillian for The Night Of: "The Beach" (2016) Jean-Marc Vallée
Jean-Marc Vallée
for Big Little Lies (2017)

v t e

Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series

Jack Smight for "Eddie" (1959) Robert Mulligan
Robert Mulligan
for The Moon and Sixpence (1960) George Schaefer for Macbeth (1961) Franklin J. Schaffner
Franklin J. Schaffner
(1962) Stuart Rosenberg for "The Madman" (1963) Tom Gries for "Who Do You Kill?" (1964) Paul Bogart for "The 700 Year Old Gang" (1965) Sydney Pollack
Sydney Pollack
for "The Game" (1966) Alex Segal for Death of a Salesman (1967) Lee H. Katzin (1968) David Greene for "The People Next Door" (1969) Paul Bogart for "Shadow Game" (1970) Daryl Duke
Daryl Duke
for "The Day the Lion Died" / Fielder Cook for "The Price" (1971) Alexander Singer for "The Invasion of Kevin Ireland" (1972) Jerry Thorpe for "An Eye for an Eye" / Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
for "The Marcus-Nelson Murders" (1973) John Korty for The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman / Robert Butler for "Part III" (1974) Bill Bain for "A Sudden Storm" (1975) David Greene for Episode 8 (Rich Man, Poor Man) (1976) David Greene for Roots ("Part 1") (1977) Marvin J. Chomsky for Holocaust (1978) Jackie Cooper
Jackie Cooper
for "Pilot" (The White Shadow) (1979) Roger Young for "Cop" (1980) Robert Butler for "Hill Street Station"(1981) Harry Harris for "To Soar and Never Falter" (1982) Jeff Bleckner for "Life in the Minors" (1983) Corey Allen for "Goodbye, Mr. Scripps" (1984) Karen Arthur for "Heat" (1985) Georg Stanford Brown
Georg Stanford Brown
for "Parting Shots" (1986) Gregory Hoblit for "Pilot" (L.A. Law) (1987) Mark Tinker for "Weigh In, Way Out" (1988) Robert Altman
Robert Altman
for "The Boiler Room" (1989) Thomas Carter for "Promises to Keep" / Scott Winant for "The Go-Between" (1990) Thomas Carter for "In Confidence" (1991) Eric Laneuville
Eric Laneuville
for "All God's Children" (1992) Barry Levinson
Barry Levinson
for "Gone for Goode" (1993) Daniel Sackheim for "Tempest in a C-Cup" (1994) Mimi Leder
Mimi Leder
for "Love's Labor Lost" (1995) Jeremy Kagan for "Leave of Absence" (1996) Mark Tinker for "Where's 'Swaldo?" (1997) Mark Tinker for "Pilot" (Brooklyn South) / Paris Barclay
Paris Barclay
for "Brain Salad Surgery" (1998) Paris Barclay
Paris Barclay
for "Hearts and Souls" (1999) Thomas Schlamme for "Pilot" (The West Wing) (2000) Thomas Schlamme for "In the Shadow of Two Gunmen: Part I" & "Part II" (2001) Alan Ball for "Pilot" (Six Feet Under) (2002) Christopher Misiano for "Twenty Five" (2003) Walter Hill for "Deadwood" (2004) J. J. Abrams
J. J. Abrams
for "Pilot" (Lost) (2005) Jon Cassar
Jon Cassar
for "Day 5: 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m." (2006) Alan Taylor for "Kennedy and Heidi" (2007) Greg Yaitanes for "House's Head" (2008) Rod Holcomb for "And in the End..." (2009) Steve Shill for "The Getaway" (2010) Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
for "Boardwalk Empire" (2011) Tim Van Patten for "To the Lost" (2012) David Fincher
David Fincher
for "Chapter 1" (2013) Cary Joji Fukunaga for "Who Goes There" (2014) David Nutter
David Nutter
for "Mother's Mercy" (2015) Miguel Sapochnik
Miguel Sapochnik
for "Battle of the Bastards" (2016) Reed Morano for "Offred" (2017)

v t e

Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special

Fielder Cook (1971) Tom Gries (1972) Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
(1973) John Korty (1974) George Cukor
George Cukor
(1975) Daniel Petrie
Daniel Petrie
(1976) Daniel Petrie
Daniel Petrie
(1977) David Lowell Rich (1978) David Greene (1979) Marvin J. Chomsky (1980) James Goldstone (1981) Marvin J. Chomsky (1982) John Erman (1983) Jeff Bleckner (1984) Lamont Johnson (1985) Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
(1986) Glenn A. Jordan (1987) Lamont Johnson (1988) Simon Wincer (1989) Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
(1990) Brian Gibson (1991) Joseph Sargent
Joseph Sargent
(1992) James Steven Sadwith (1993) John Frankenheimer
John Frankenheimer
(1994) John Frankenheimer
John Frankenheimer
(1995) John Frankenheimer
John Frankenheimer
(1996) Andrei Konchalovsky
Andrei Konchalovsky
(1997) John Frankenheimer
John Frankenheimer
(1998) Allan Arkush (1999) Charles S. Dutton
Charles S. Dutton
(2000) Mike Nichols
Mike Nichols
(2001) David Frankel, Tom Hanks, David Leland, Richard Loncraine, David Nutter, Phil Alden Robinson, Mikael Salomon and Tony To
Tony To
(2002) Steven Schachter (2003) Mike Nichols
Mike Nichols
(2004) Stephen Hopkins (2005) Tom Hooper
Tom Hooper
(2006) Philip Martin (2007) Jay Roach
Jay Roach
(2008) Dearbhla Walsh (2009) Mick Jackson (2010) Brian Percival
Brian Percival
(2011) Jay Roach
Jay Roach
(2012) Steven Soderbergh
Steven Soderbergh
(2013) Colin Bucksey (2014) Lisa Cholodenko (2015) Susanne Bier
Susanne Bier
(2016) Jean-Marc Vallée
Jean-Marc Vallée
(2017)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 205742 LCCN: no93022574 ISNI: 0000 0000 7823 3577 GND: 119180995 SUDOC: 132299593 BNF: cb139872241 (data) SN

.