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John Waldo Green (October 10, 1908 – May 15, 1989) was an American songwriter, composer, musical arranger, conductor and pianist. He was given the nickname "Beulah" by colleague Conrad Salinger. His most famous song was one of his earliest, "Body and Soul". Green won four Academy Awards
Academy Awards
for his film scores and a fifth for producing a short musical film,[1] and he was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame
Songwriters Hall of Fame
in 1972.[2][3]

Contents

1 Early years 2 Career

2.1 Carnegie Hall and Astoria Studios 2.2 London, radio, and recordings 2.3 Piano, film, and MGM

3 Notable works

3.1 Musical director 3.2 Conductor 3.3 Accreditations

4 Personal life 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

Early years[edit] John Waldo Green was born in New York City, the son of musical parents Vivian Isidor Green (June 29, 1885 – January 3, 1940)[4][5] and Irina Etelka Jellenik (April 12, 1885 – November 15, 1947),[6] a.k.a. Irma (or Erma) Etelka Jellenik. Vivian and Irina wed on December 16, 1907 in Manhattan.[7] John attended Horace Mann School
Horace Mann School
and the New York Military Academy, and was accepted by Harvard
Harvard
at the age of 15, entering the University in 1924. His musical tutors were Herman Wasserman, Ignace Hilsberg and Walter Spalding. Between semesters, bandleader Guy Lombardo
Guy Lombardo
heard Green's Gold Coast Orchestra and hired him to create dance arrangements for his nationally famous orchestra. His first song hit, Coquette (1928), was written for Lombardo (with Carmen Lombardo, Guy's brother, and lyricist Gus Kahn).[citation needed] John's father, Vivian, compelled him to take a job as a stockbroker. Disliking the job, and encouraged by his wife, the former Carol Faulk, John left Wall Street
Wall Street
to pursue a musical career.[citation needed] Career[edit]

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Green wrote a number of songs which have become jazz standards, including "Out of Nowhere" and "Body and Soul". He wrote the scores for various films and TV programs. His earliest songs appeared with the billing "John W. Green," a styling he reverted to in the 1960s. After that anyone addressing "Johnny" was put right with the statement, "You can call me John – or you can call me Maestro!" At the beginning of his musical career, he arranged for dance orchestras, most notably Jean Goldkette
Jean Goldkette
on NBC. He was accompanist/arranger to musicians such as James Melton, Libby Holman and Ethel Merman. It was while writing material for Gertrude Lawrence in 1930 that he composed "Body and Soul", the first recording of which was made by Jack Hylton
Jack Hylton
& His Orchestra eleven days before the song was copyrighted. Between 1930-33, Green was the arranger and conductor for Paramount Pictures and worked with such singers as Ethel Merman, Gertrude Lawrence and James Melton. He composed many of his hit standards during the 1930s, including Bing Crosby"s first number one hit recording, "Out of Nowhere" (1931, co-authored with Edward Heyman), "Rain Rain Go Away" (1932), "I Cover the Waterfront", "You're Mine You", "I Wanna Be Loved" (all 1933), "Easy Come Easy Go" and "Repeal The Blues" (both 1934). He also composed the theme for Max Fleischer's Betty Boop
Betty Boop
cartoons in 1932, with Edward Heyman
Edward Heyman
as lyricist. After 1933, Green had his own orchestra which he used to perform around the country. He also, until 1940, conducted orchestras for the Jack Benny
Jack Benny
and Philip Morris records and radio shows. Carnegie Hall and Astoria Studios[edit] Nathaniel Shilkret
Nathaniel Shilkret
and Paul Whiteman
Paul Whiteman
commissioned Green to write larger works for orchestra, such as "Night Club (Six Impressions for Orchestra with Three Pianos)", introduced by Whiteman on January 25, 1933 at Carnegie Hall. Green was at piano "one," and Roy Bargy and Ramona played the other two pianos. During the early 1930s, Green also wrote music for numerous films at Paramount's Astoria Studios, conducted in East Coast theatres, and toured vaudeville as musical director for Buddy Rogers. During his two and a half years at Paramount Astoria, he was able to learn more about film scoring from veterans Adolph Deutsch and Frank Tours. London, radio, and recordings[edit] Green spent much of 1933 in London, where he contributed songs to both Mr. Whittington, a musical comedy for Jack Buchanan
Jack Buchanan
at the London Hippodrome, and Big Business, the first musical comedy ever written for BBC Radio. On Green's return to the U.S.A. early in 1934, William S. Paley, president of the Columbia Broadcasting System
Columbia Broadcasting System
and an investor in New York's St. Regis Hotel, encouraged him to form what became known as Johnny Green, His Piano
Piano
and Orchestra. (Green added, "My arm didn't need much twisting.") The orchestra, based for a time at the St. Regis, featured Green's piano and arrangements, whose harmony and mood were among the most sophisticated of the day. It made dance records for the Columbia and Brunswick companies, although in the Depression even the most popular records sold only in small numbers. In 1935, Green starred on CBS's Socony Sketchbook, sponsored by Socony-Vacuum Oil Co. He lured the young California
California
singer Virginia Verrill to headline with him on the Friday evening broadcasts. His regular cast included his band singers Marjory Logan and Jimmy Farrell, essayist Christopher Morley, and stage/screen favorites the Four Eton Boys. A bigger venture yet in commercial radio was The Fred Astaire Hour (a.k.a. The Packard
Packard
Hour), sponsored by Packard
Packard
Motors over NBC
NBC
in 1936 and co-featuring tenor Allan Jones and the comedy of Charles Butterworth. Green's band also backed Astaire on a series of classic recording dates, in both New York and Hollywood, in 1935–1937. He also served as musical director for The Jell-O Program Starring Jack Benny
Jack Benny
during its 1935–1936 season on NBC. Piano, film, and MGM[edit] He continued conducting on radio and in theatres into the 1940s, also leading a dance band for the short-lived Royale Records label in 1939–1940, until he decided to move permanently to Hollywood
Hollywood
and work in the film business. Green particularly made an impression at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, where in the 1940s, along with orchestrator Conrad Salinger, he was one of the musicians most responsible for changing the overall sound of the MGM Symphony Orchestra, partially through the re-seating of some of the players. This is why the overall orchestral sound of MGM's musicals from the mid-1940s onward is different from the orchestral sound of those made from 1929 until about 1944. Green was the Music Director at MGM from 1949 to 1959. He produced numerous film scores, such as the one for Raintree County in 1957. On loan out to Universal, he composed the songs for the Deanna Durbin musical, "Something in the Wind", one of her last films before retiring. Nominated for an Oscar thirteen times, he won the award for the musical scores of Easter Parade, An American in Paris, West Side Story, and Oliver!, as well as for producing the short "The Merry Wives of Windsor Overture", which won in the Short Subjects (One-Reel) category in 1954. The short subject featured Green conducting the MGM Orchestra on-screen in the music from the opera of the same name by Otto Nicolai. After leaving MGM, Green guest-conducted with various orchestras, including the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Denver Symphony Orchestra, Philadelphia Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, and Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Orchestra. He also continued to compose the occasional score to films such as Twilight of Honor
Twilight of Honor
(1963), Johnny Tiger
Johnny Tiger
(1966) and Alvarez Kelly
Alvarez Kelly
(1966), and contributed the arrangements and musical direction for the critically acclaimed They Shoot Horses, Don't They? in 1969. He was also hired to create the televised Guinness
Guinness
advertisement known as the "World" ad campaign. He recruited a team which included set designer Grant Major and Oscar-nominated director of photography Wally Pfisher to complete the job. Notable works[edit] Musical director[edit] Johnny Green's credits as musical executive, arranger, conductor and composer are considerable, including such films as Raintree County, Bathing Beauty, Easy to Wed, Something in the Wind, Easter Parade (for which he won his first Academy Award), Summer Stock, An American in Paris (which won him his second Academy Award), Royal Wedding, High Society and West Side Story (another Academy Award
Academy Award
winner for him). Although Green was musical director on these films, the orchestrations were usually done by someone else - in the case of the MGM musicals, it was usually Conrad Salinger, and in the case of West Side Story, it was Sid Ramin and Irwin Kostal. Conductor[edit] As mentioned earlier, Green conducted the orchestra for such famous MGM musicals as An American in Paris, as well as for United Artists' 1961 film version of West Side Story. In 1965, Green conducted the music for that year's new adaptation of Rodgers and Hammerstein's only musical for television, Cinderella, starring Lesley Ann Warren, Walter Pidgeon, Ginger Rogers, and Stuart Damon. Johnny Green
Johnny Green
also adapted, orchestrated and conducted the music for the film Oliver! (1968), based on the hit musical play, and won an Academy Award
Academy Award
for his efforts. He also wrote much of the incidental music heard in the film, basing it on Lionel Bart's songs for the original show. His daughter, Kathe, dubbed Mark Lester's singing voice in the film. Accreditations[edit] Green was a respected board member of ASCAP. He was a chairman of the music branch of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, leading the orchestra through 17 of the Academy Award
Academy Award
telecasts, and a producer of television specials. Personal life[edit] He married three times, had a daughter with actress Betty Furness
Betty Furness
and two daughters with MGM "Glamazon" Bunny Waters, including actress and singer Kathe Green. Actress Liza Snyder is his granddaughter. It was during his first marriage to Carol Faulk that most of his hit standards were composed. Before the marriage ended in the mid-1930s, Carol Faulk remarked, "We didn't have children, we had songs."[citation needed] See also[edit]

Musical film Broadway theatre

References[edit]

^ " Academy Awards
Academy Awards
Database". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on February 8, 2009. Retrieved January 8, 2016.  ^ "John Green". Songwriters Hall of Fame. Retrieved January 8, 2016.  ^ Yarrow, Andrew L. (May 17, 1989). "John Green, 80, a Film Composer and Arranger
Arranger
Who Won 4 Oscars". The New York Times. Retrieved January 8, 2016.  ^ https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2WMC-9GH - Vivian Isidor Green (New York, New York City
New York City
Births, 1846-1909) ^ An obituary for Vivian Isidor Green appeared in The New York Sun, issue of Thursday, January 4, 1940, p. 19, under the title Vivian Green is Dead at 55 - Was Noted Realty Operator and Builder - see: http://fultonhistory.com/Newspaper%2018/New%20York%20NY%20Sun/New%20York%20NY%20Sun%201940/New%20York%20NY%20Sun%201940%20-%200106.pdf ^ https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2W5R-XPN - Irma Jellenik Green (New York, New York City
New York City
Municipal Deaths, 1795-1949) ^ https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F67Z-WML - Irina Etelka Jellenik (New York Marriages, 1686-1980)

External links[edit]

The Johnny Green
Johnny Green
Papers and Johnny Green
Johnny Green
Additional Papers are part of the Harvard
Harvard
Theatre Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard
Harvard
University. Johnny Green
Johnny Green
on IMDb

v t e

Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Original Score

1930s

Louis Silvers
Louis Silvers
(1934) Max Steiner
Max Steiner
(1935) Leo F. Forbstein
Leo F. Forbstein
(1936) Charles Previn
Charles Previn
(1937) Erich Wolfgang Korngold/Alfred Newman (1938) Herbert Stothart/Richard Hageman, W. Franke Harling, John Leipold, Leo Shuken (1939)

1940s

Leigh Harline, Paul J. Smith, Ned Washington/Alfred Newman (1940) Bernard Herrmann/ Frank Churchill and Oliver Wallace (1941) Max Steiner/ Ray Heindorf and Heinz Roemheld (1942) Alfred Newman/ Ray Heindorf (1943) Max Steiner/ Morris Stoloff and Carmen Dragon
Carmen Dragon
(1944) Miklós Rózsa/ Georgie Stoll (1945) Hugo Friedhofer/ Morris Stoloff (1946) Miklós Rózsa/Alfred Newman (1947) Brian Easdale/ Johnny Green
Johnny Green
and Roger Edens (1948) Aaron Copland/ Roger Edens and Lennie Hayton (1949)

1950s

Franz Waxman/ Adolph Deutsch and Roger Edens (1950) Franz Waxman/ Johnny Green
Johnny Green
and Saul Chaplin (1951) Dimitri Tiomkin/Alfred Newman (1952) Bronisław Kaper/Alfred Newman (1953) Dimitri Tiomkin/ Adolph Deutsch and Saul Chaplin (1954) Alfred Newman/Robert Russell Bennett, Jay Blackton and Adolph Deutsch (1955) Victor Young/Alfred Newman and Ken Darby (1956) Malcolm Arnold (1957) Dimitri Tiomkin/Andre Previn (1958) Miklós Rózsa/Andre Previn and Ken Darby (1959)

1960s

Ernest Gold/ Morris Stoloff and Harry Sukman (1960) Henry Mancini/Saul Chaplin, Johnny Green, Sid Ramin and Irwin Kostal (1961) Maurice Jarre/ Ray Heindorf (1962) John Addison/Andre Previn (1963) Richard M. Sherman
Richard M. Sherman
and Robert B. Sherman/Andre Previn (1964) Maurice Jarre/ Irwin Kostal (1965) John Barry/ Ken Thorne (1966) Elmer Bernstein/Alfred Newman and Ken Darby (1967) John Barry/ Johnny Green
Johnny Green
(1968) Burt Bacharach/ Lennie Hayton and Lionel Newman (1969)

1970s

Francis Lai/ The Beatles
The Beatles
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr) (1970) Michel Legrand/ John Williams
John Williams
(1971) Charlie Chaplin, Raymond Rasch and Larry Russell/ Ralph Burns
Ralph Burns
(1972) Marvin Hamlisch/ Marvin Hamlisch
Marvin Hamlisch
(1973) Nino Rota
Nino Rota
and Carmine Coppola/ Nelson Riddle
Nelson Riddle
(1974) John Williams/ Leonard Rosenman
Leonard Rosenman
(1975) Jerry Goldsmith/ Leonard Rosenman
Leonard Rosenman
(1976) John Williams/ Jonathan Tunick (1977) Giorgio Moroder/ Joe Renzetti (1978) Georges Delerue/ Ralph Burns
Ralph Burns
(1979)

1980s

Michael Gore (1980) Vangelis
Vangelis
(1981) John Williams/ Henry Mancini
Henry Mancini
and Leslie Bricusse (1982) Bill Conti/Michel Legrand, Alan and Marilyn Bergman (1983) Maurice Jarre/Prince (1984) John Barry (1985) Herbie Hancock
Herbie Hancock
(1986) Ryuichi Sakamoto, David Byrne
David Byrne
and Cong Su (1987) Dave Grusin
Dave Grusin
(1988) Alan Menken
Alan Menken
(1989)

1990s

John Barry (1990) Alan Menken
Alan Menken
(1991) Alan Menken
Alan Menken
(1992) John Williams
John Williams
(1993) Hans Zimmer
Hans Zimmer
(1994) Luis Enríquez Bacalov/ Alan Menken
Alan Menken
and Stephen Schwartz (1995) Gabriel Yared/ Rachel Portman (1996) James Horner/ Anne Dudley
Anne Dudley
(1997) Nicola Piovani/ Stephen Warbeck (1998) John Corigliano (1999)

2000s

Tan Dun
Tan Dun
(2000) Howard Shore
Howard Shore
(2001) Elliot Goldenthal
Elliot Goldenthal
(2002) Howard Shore
Howard Shore
(2003) Jan A. P. Kaczmarek
Jan A. P. Kaczmarek
(2004) Gustavo Santaolalla
Gustavo Santaolalla
(2005) Gustavo Santaolalla
Gustavo Santaolalla
(2006) Dario Marianelli (2007) A. R. Rahman
A. R. Rahman
(2008) Michael Giacchino
Michael Giacchino
(2009)

2010s

Trent Reznor
Trent Reznor
and Atticus Ross
Atticus Ross
(2010) Ludovic Bource
Ludovic Bource
(2011) Mychael Danna (2012) Steven Price (2013) Alexandre Desplat
Alexandre Desplat
(2014) Ennio Morricone
Ennio Morricone
(2015) Justin Hurwitz
Justin Hurwitz
(2016) Alexandre Desplat
Alexandre Desplat
(2017)

v t e

Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score

1940s

Life with Father – Max Steiner
Max Steiner
(1947) The Red Shoes – Brian Easdale (1948) The Inspector General – Johnny Green
Johnny Green
(1949)

1950s

Sunset Boulevard – Franz Waxman (1950) September Affair
September Affair
Victor Young
Victor Young
(1951) High Noon
High Noon
Dimitri Tiomkin
Dimitri Tiomkin
(1952) On the Beach – Ernest Gold (1959)

1960s

The Alamo – Dimitri Tiomkin
Dimitri Tiomkin
(1960) The Guns of Navarone – Dimitri Tiomkin
Dimitri Tiomkin
(1961) To Kill a Mockingbird – Elmer Bernstein
Elmer Bernstein
(1962) (1963) The Fall of the Roman Empire – Dimitri Tiomkin
Dimitri Tiomkin
(1964) Doctor Zhivago – Maurice Jarre
Maurice Jarre
(1965) Hawaii – Elmer Bernstein
Elmer Bernstein
(1966) Camelot – Frederick Loewe (1967) The Shoes of the Fisherman Alex North (1968) Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
Burt Bacharach
Burt Bacharach
(1969)

1970s

Love Story – Francis Lai (1970) Shaft – Isaac Hayes
Isaac Hayes
(1971) The Godfather
The Godfather
Nino Rota
Nino Rota
(1972) Jonathan Livingston Seagull – Neil Diamond
Neil Diamond
(1973) The Little Prince – Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe (1974) Jaws – John Williams
John Williams
(1975) A Star is Born – Kenneth Ascher, Paul Williams (1976) Star Wars – John Williams
John Williams
(1977) Midnight Express – Giorgio Moroder
Giorgio Moroder
(1978) Apocalypse Now
Apocalypse Now
– Carmine Coppola, Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
(1979)

1980s

The Stunt Man
The Stunt Man
Dominic Frontiere (1980) (1981) E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial
E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial
John Williams
John Williams
(1982) Flashdance
Flashdance
Giorgio Moroder
Giorgio Moroder
(1983) A Passage to India – Maurice Jarre
Maurice Jarre
(1984) Out of Africa – John Barry (1985) The Mission – Ennio Morricone
Ennio Morricone
(1986) The Last Emperor
The Last Emperor
– David Byrne, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Cong Su (1987) Gorillas in the Mist
Gorillas in the Mist
Maurice Jarre
Maurice Jarre
(1988) The Little Mermaid – Alan Menken
Alan Menken
(1989)

1990s

The Sheltering Sky – Richard Horowitz, Ryuichi Sakamoto
Ryuichi Sakamoto
(1990) Beauty and the Beast – Alan Menken
Alan Menken
(1991) Aladdin – Alan Menken
Alan Menken
(1992) Heaven & Earth – Kitarō
Kitarō
(1993) The Lion King
The Lion King
Hans Zimmer
Hans Zimmer
(1994) A Walk in the Clouds
A Walk in the Clouds
Maurice Jarre
Maurice Jarre
(1995) The English Patient – Gabriel Yared (1996) Titanic – James Horner
James Horner
(1997) The Truman Show – Burkhard Dallwitz, Philip Glass
Philip Glass
(1998) 1900 – Ennio Morricone
Ennio Morricone
(1999)

2000s

Gladiator – Lisa Gerrard, Hans Zimmer
Hans Zimmer
(2000) Moulin Rouge! – Craig Armstrong (2001) Frida
Frida
Elliot Goldenthal
Elliot Goldenthal
(2002) The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King – Howard Shore
Howard Shore
(2003) The Aviator – Howard Shore
Howard Shore
(2004) Memoirs of a Geisha – John Williams
John Williams
(2005) The Painted Veil – Alexandre Desplat
Alexandre Desplat
(2006) Atonement – Dario Marianelli (2007) Slumdog Millionaire
Slumdog Millionaire
A. R. Rahman
A. R. Rahman
(2008) Up – Michael Giacchino
Michael Giacchino
(2009)

2010s

The Social Network
The Social Network
– Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross
Atticus Ross
(2010) The Artist – Ludovic Bource
Ludovic Bource
(2011) Life of Pi – Mychael Danna (2012) All Is Lost Alex Ebert
Alex Ebert
(2013) The Theory of Everything – Jóhann Jóhannsson
Jóhann Jóhannsson
(2014) The Hateful Eight
The Hateful Eight
Ennio Morricone
Ennio Morricone
(2015) La La Land – Justin Hurwitz
Justin Hurwitz
(2016) The Shape of Water
The Shape of Water
- Alexandre Desplat
Alexandre Desplat
(2017)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 76502811 LCCN: no98058042 ISNI: 0000 0001 1675 5641 GND: 134265823 SUDOC: 059086491 BNF: cb138267582 (data) MusicBrainz: f84eb94a-1953-4955-94bc-e9385c4e43f8 BNE: XX1083717 SN

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