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John W. Harbaugh (born September 23, 1962) is an American football coach who has been the head coach of the Baltimore Ravens
Baltimore Ravens
of the National Football League
National Football League
(NFL) since 2008.[1] Previously, he coached the defensive backs for the Philadelphia Eagles[2] and served as the Eagles special teams coach for nine years. Harbaugh and his younger brother, former San Francisco 49ers
San Francisco 49ers
and now University of Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh, are the first pair of brothers in NFL history to serve as head coaches. Jack Harbaugh, Jim and John's father, served 45 years as a college defensive coach, an assistant coach, and a running backs coach.[3] John and the Ravens beat his brother, Jim, and the 49ers at Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XLVII in New Orleans
New Orleans
on February 3, 2013 by a score of 34-31. He has led the Ravens to 95 wins (including playoffs) since his tenure began in 2008, fourth most in the NFL over that span, and has surpassed Brian Billick
Brian Billick
for the most wins by a head coach in Baltimore Ravens franchise history. His 10 playoff wins are the second most by any head coach in the NFL since 2008. Outside winning Super Bowl XLVII, Harbaugh has guided the Ravens to two AFC North division championships and three AFC Championship
AFC Championship
appearances.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Coaching career

2.1 College 2.2 Philadelphia Eagles
Philadelphia Eagles
assistant 2.3 Baltimore Ravens
Baltimore Ravens
head coach 2.4 NFL head coaching record

3 Coaching tree 4 Personal life 5 References 6 External links

Early life[edit] Harbaugh was born in Toledo, Ohio, to Jacqueline M. "Jackie" (née Cipiti) and Jack Avon Harbaugh.[4] His mother is of half-Sicilian and half-Polish descent, and his father has Irish and German ancestry.[4] Harbaugh graduated from Pioneer High School in Ann Arbor, Michigan, during which time father Jack was an assistant under Bo Schembechler at the nearby University of Michigan. Harbaugh attended college at Miami University, where he graduated in 1984.[5] Coaching career[edit]

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College[edit]

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (December 2014)

Harbaugh worked as an assistant at Western Michigan (1984–1987), Pitt (1987), Morehead State (1988), Cincinnati (1989–1996), and Indiana (1997). Philadelphia Eagles
Philadelphia Eagles
assistant[edit] He was first hired in the NFL in 1998 by the Philadelphia Eagles' then head coach Ray Rhodes, and was one of four assistant coaches retained by new head coach Andy Reid
Andy Reid
in 1999. As such, he is in the Sid Gillman coaching tree. In 2004, he was mentioned as a possible candidate to replace Gary Darnell as the head football coach at Western Michigan, where he had earned a master's degree and was an assistant football coach from 1984–1987. In 2007, after serving as Eagles' special-teams coach for nine years, he became their defensive-backs coach. This fulfilled his request to head coach Reid and improved his chances of landing a head coaching job, since executives at that time viewed special teams coaches as unqualified to move up to head coach. Baltimore Ravens
Baltimore Ravens
head coach[edit] On January 19, 2008, he became the head coach of the Baltimore Ravens after the team's first choice Dallas Cowboys
Dallas Cowboys
offensive coordinator Jason Garrett
Jason Garrett
turned down the offer.[citation needed] He was not considered one of the favorites for the job until he was interviewed.[citation needed] He impressed team owner Steve Bisciotti and Vice President of Player Personnel/General Manager Ozzie Newsome. New England Patriots
New England Patriots
head coach Bill Belichick
Bill Belichick
also recommended Harbaugh to Bisciotti by phone during the interview process.[6] This helped Harbaugh to make the unusual leap from NFL position coach to head coach without previously serving as an offensive or defensive coordinator. On January 23, 2008, Harbaugh hired longtime NFL offensive coach (and former head coach) Cam Cameron
Cam Cameron
as offensive coordinator. (Cameron had previously hired Harbaugh as an assistant at Indiana.) Cameron was also quarterbacks coach for John's brother, Jim, during their time at Michigan. On September 7, 2008, in his debut as a head coach, John and his Ravens beat the Cincinnati Bengals. In his first season as a head coach, Harbaugh guided the Ravens to an 11–5 regular season record, good enough to qualify them for the playoffs as a wild card team. In the playoffs, he led the team to upset victories over the Miami Dolphins
Miami Dolphins
and Tennessee Titans
Tennessee Titans
before losing to the Pittsburgh Steelers
Pittsburgh Steelers
in the AFC Championship
AFC Championship
Game.

Harbaugh at 2009 Ravens training camp.

On January 26, 2009, he named Greg Mattison
Greg Mattison
the new defensive coordinator for the Ravens, replacing Rex Ryan
Rex Ryan
who had left to take his first head coaching job (with the New York Jets). Mattison had served as linebacker coach and defensive coordinator for Harbaugh's father, Jack, at Western Michigan University
Western Michigan University
from 1981–86, when Harbaugh was a graduate assistant and assistant coach for his father. In his second season as Ravens' head coach, he once again led the team to the playoffs with a 9–7 record during the regular season and improved his playoff record to 3–1 with an upset victory over the New England Patriots
New England Patriots
in the AFC wild card round on January 10, 2010 before losing in the AFC divisional game to the Indianapolis Colts. He once again took the Ravens to the playoffs in 2010, beating the Kansas City Chiefs in the wild card round on January 9, 2011, before losing to the Pittsburgh Steelers
Pittsburgh Steelers
in the divisional round 31–24 on January 15 after starting the second half with a 14-point lead. Harbaugh signed a three-year extension on February 14, 2011 that kept him under contract through 2014. The Ravens finished 2011 12–4, winning the AFC North division and sweeping the Steelers home and away before losing the AFC Championship
AFC Championship
Game to the New England Patriots after Lee Evans had a potential late game-winning pass knocked out of his hands by Patriots defensive back Sterling Moore and kicker Billy Cundiff flubbed a potential game-tying field goal. Neither Evans nor Cundiff made the 53-man 2012 roster. John faced his younger brother Jim in Week 12 (2011) on Thanksgiving Day when John's Ravens beat Jim's San Francisco 49ers
San Francisco 49ers
16–6. The 2012 Baltimore Ravens
Baltimore Ravens
again met the Patriots in the AFC championship game (on January 20, 2013), got their revenge with a 28–13 victory (coming from behind with a 13–7 second half), and was the first time Tom Brady
Tom Brady
and Bill Belicheck lost a home game after leading at halftime, giving John the opportunity to face brother Jim and the 49ers in Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XLVII on February 3, 2013.[7] Many have pegged Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XLVII as the "Harbowl". The Ravens were victorious, defeating the 49ers 34–31. Following the victory, John gave his entire staff replica Lombardi trophies to commemorate the victory.[8] In 2012, Harbaugh was awarded the third-highest honor within the Department of the Army Civilian Awards, the Outstanding Civilian Service Award, for substantial contributions to the U.S. Army community while serving as the Baltimore Ravens
Baltimore Ravens
Coach. He was selected to be inducted into Miami (Ohio) "Cradle of Coaches" in 2013.[5] On September 5, 2013, an hour before the Ravens played in the NFL regular season's opening game, it was reported that Harbaugh had signed a four-year contract extension in a deal that was reached "months ago."[9] Harbaugh is the only head coach in NFL history to win a playoff game in each of his first five seasons, according to NFL Network.[citation needed] In each of Harbaugh's first four seasons and again in 2014, every AFC Champion defeated the Ravens in the playoffs (although only the 2008 Pittsburgh Steelers
Pittsburgh Steelers
and 2014 New England Patriots
New England Patriots
were able to actually win the Super Bowl).[citation needed] In the 2014 AFC Wild Card round of the NFL playoffs, Harbaugh's Ravens beat the Pittsburgh Steelers
Pittsburgh Steelers
in Heinz Field in a dominant 30–17 victory, which was the Ravens' first playoff victory against the Steelers in the history of the franchise. However, the next week, the Ravens lost 31–35 in the AFC Divisional round to the New England Patriots after the Ravens were unable to hold two separate 14-point leads. After the game, Harbaugh complained about the Patriots' uncommon but legal tactics of declaring receivers eligible and ineligible, saying "It was clearly deception."[10] In 2015, Harbaugh had his first losing season with the Ravens. The Ravens lost many close games and key players like Joe Flacco, Justin Forsett, Steve Smith Sr., Eugene Monroe, and Terrell Suggs
Terrell Suggs
all suffered season ending injuries. They finished third in the AFC North with a 5–11 record. Harbaugh signed a one-year contract extension, keeping him under contract through the 2019 season on August 28, 2017.[11] NFL head coaching record[edit]

Team Year Regular season Postseason

Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result

BAL 2008 11 5 0 .688 2nd in AFC North 2 1 .667 Lost to Pittsburgh Steelers
Pittsburgh Steelers
in AFC Championship
AFC Championship
Game

BAL 2009 9 7 0 .563 2nd in AFC North 1 1 .500 Lost to Indianapolis Colts
Indianapolis Colts
in AFC Divisional Game

BAL 2010 12 4 0 .750 2nd in AFC North 1 1 .500 Lost to Pittsburgh Steelers
Pittsburgh Steelers
in AFC Divisional Game

BAL 2011 12 4 0 .750 1st in AFC North 1 1 .500 Lost to New England Patriots
New England Patriots
in AFC Championship
AFC Championship
Game

BAL 2012 10 6 0 .625 1st in AFC North 4 0 1.000 Won Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XLVII

BAL 2013 8 8 0 .500 3rd in AFC North — — — —

BAL 2014 10 6 0 .625 3rd in AFC North 1 1 .500 Lost to New England Patriots
New England Patriots
in AFC Divisional Game

BAL 2015 5 11 0 .313 3rd in AFC North — — — —

BAL 2016 8 8 0 .500 2nd in AFC North — — — —

BAL 2017 9 7 0 .563 2nd in AFC North — — — —

Total 94 66 0 .588

10 5 .667

Coaching tree[edit] NFL head coaches under whom Harbaugh has served:

Coach Team Year(s)

Ray Rhodes Philadelphia Eagles 1998

Andy Reid Philadelphia Eagles 1999–2007

Assistant coaches under Harbaugh who have become NFL head coaches:

Coach Team Year(s)

Rex Ryan New York Jets, Buffalo Bills 2009–2016

Hue Jackson Oakland Raiders, Cleveland Browns 2011, 2016–present

Chuck Pagano Indianapolis Colts 2012–2017

Jim Caldwell Detroit Lions 2014–2017

Gary Kubiak Denver Broncos 2015–2016

Mike Pettine Cleveland Browns 2014–2015

Personal life[edit] Harbaugh is a devout Roman Catholic.[12][13] He is married to Ingrid Harbaugh, and they have one daughter.[14] Harbaugh's younger brother, Jim, a former NFL quarterback and head coach, is the current head football coach of the Michigan Wolverines. Their father, Jack, is a former head football coach at Western Michigan University and Western Kentucky University. John's sister, Joani, is married to Tom Crean, former head men's basketball coach at Indiana University.[15] References[edit]

^ "Coaches". baltimoreravens.com. Retrieved 8 January 2011.  ^ "Harbaugh's therapy for ailing Eagles coach Johnson: Talk
Talk
ball". USA Today. 21 May 2009. Retrieved 8 January 2011.  ^ Ken Murray (January 7, 2011). " Jim Harbaugh
Jim Harbaugh
joins Ravens' John Harbaugh to form first pair of NFL head coaching brothers". Baltimore Sun.  ^ a b "Ancestry of John and Jim Harbaugh". Freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com. Retrieved 2013-01-27.  ^ a b url=http://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/8992398/john-harbaugh-baltimore-ravens-inducted-miami-ohio-cradle-coaches%7Cwebsite=ESPN.comdate=February 26, 2013 ^ Battista, Judy (January 21, 2013). "Harbaughs Set to Meet Biggest Fan: Each Other". The New York Times. Retrieved December 12, 2014.  ^ Hanzus, Dan (2013-01-20). "Ravens roll by Patriots to advance to Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XLVII". National Football League. Retrieved 2013-01-20.  ^ " John Harbaugh
John Harbaugh
gives Lombardi replicas to staff", NFL.com; accessed September 7, 2014. ^ Zrebiec, Jeff (September 5, 2013). "Ravens reward head coach John Harbaugh with contract extension". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 6 September 2013.  ^ "John Harbaugh: Pats' substitutions deceptive". nfl.com. Retrieved 16 January 2017.  ^ Orr, Conor (August 28, 2017). " John Harbaugh
John Harbaugh
receives one-year contract extension". NFL.com. Retrieved September 7, 2017.  ^ "Catholics in the Super Bowl". Faithworks. January 31, 2013. Archived from the original on December 25, 2013. Retrieved January 12, 2014.  ^ Trent Beattie (May 7, 2014). "Super Bowl-Winning Coach Makes the Most of Each Moment". Retrieved June 23, 2014.  ^ ""Ravens Head Coach John Harbaugh
John Harbaugh
finds winning combination," ''The Catholic Review'' (Archdiocese of Baltimore), November 14, 2008". Catholicreview.org. November 20, 2012. Retrieved January 27, 2013.  ^ " John Harbaugh
John Harbaugh
riled up brother-in-law Tom Crean by wearing a Michigan State hat". 30 March 2014. 

External links[edit]

Baltimore Ravens
Baltimore Ravens
profile Stats at Pro-Football Reference

v t e

Current head coaches of the National Football League

American Football Conference

AFC East AFC North AFC South AFC West

Sean McDermott
Sean McDermott
(Buffalo Bills) Adam Gase (Miami Dolphins) Bill Belichick
Bill Belichick
(New England Patriots) Todd Bowles (New York Jets)

John Harbaugh
John Harbaugh
(Baltimore Ravens) Marvin Lewis
Marvin Lewis
(Cincinnati Bengals) Hue Jackson
Hue Jackson
(Cleveland Browns) Mike Tomlin
Mike Tomlin
(Pittsburgh Steelers)

Bill O'Brien (Houston Texans) Frank Reich (Indianapolis Colts) Doug Marrone
Doug Marrone
(Jacksonville Jaguars) Mike Vrabel
Mike Vrabel
(Tennessee Titans)

Vance Joseph (Denver Broncos) Andy Reid
Andy Reid
(Kansas City Chiefs) Anthony Lynn
Anthony Lynn
(Los Angeles Chargers) Jon Gruden
Jon Gruden
(Oakland Raiders)

National Football Conference

NFC East NFC North NFC South NFC West

Jason Garrett
Jason Garrett
(Dallas Cowboys) Pat Shurmur
Pat Shurmur
(New York Giants) Doug Pederson
Doug Pederson
(Philadelphia Eagles) Jay Gruden
Jay Gruden
(Washington Redskins)

Matt Nagy (Chicago Bears) Matt Patricia (Detroit Lions) Mike McCarthy (Green Bay Packers) Mike Zimmer
Mike Zimmer
(Minnesota Vikings)

Dan Quinn (Atlanta Falcons) Ron Rivera
Ron Rivera
(Carolina Panthers) Sean Payton
Sean Payton
( New Orleans
New Orleans
Saints) Dirk Koetter
Dirk Koetter
(Tampa Bay Buccaneers)

Steve Wilks (Arizona Cardinals) Sean McVay
Sean McVay
(Los Angeles Rams) Kyle Shanahan
Kyle Shanahan
(San Francisco 49ers) Pete Carroll
Pete Carroll
(Seattle Seahawks)

v t e

Baltimore Ravens
Baltimore Ravens
head coaches

Ted Marchibroda
Ted Marchibroda
(1996–1998) Brian Billick
Brian Billick
(1999–2007) John Harbaugh
John Harbaugh
(2008– )

v t e

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Baltimore Ravens
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Joe Flacco
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