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Joseph William Namath
Namath
(/ˈneɪmɪθ/; born May 31, 1943), nicknamed "Broadway Joe",[1] is a former American football
American football
quarterback and actor. He played college football for the University of Alabama under coach Paul "Bear" Bryant from 1962 to 1964, and professional football in the American Football League
American Football League
(AFL) and National Football League (NFL) during the 1960s and 1970s. Namath
Namath
was an AFL icon and played for that league's New York Jets
New York Jets
for most of his professional football career. He finished his career with the Los Angeles Rams. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame
Pro Football Hall of Fame
in 1985. Statistics belie Namath's enduring influence on the game of professional football. He retired after playing 143 games over 13 years in the AFL and NFL, including playoffs. Due mainly to chronic injuries that undermined his career at its peak, his overall record is 68 wins, 71 losses, and four ties, 64–64–4 in 132 starts, and 4–7 in relief. He completed 1,886 passes for 27,663 yards, threw 173 touchdowns, and had 220 interceptions.[2] He played for three division champions (the 1968 and 1969 AFL East Champion Jets and the 1977 NFC West Champion Rams), earned one league championship (1968 AFL Championship), and one Super Bowl
Super Bowl
victory ( Super Bowl
Super Bowl
III). In 1999, he was ranked number 96 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Football Players, the only player on the list to have spent a majority of his career with the Jets. In his 1975 autobiography, Alabama head coach Bryant called Namath
Namath
the most natural athlete he had ever coached.[citation needed] Namath
Namath
is known for boldly guaranteeing a Jets' victory over Don Shula's NFL Baltimore Colts
Baltimore Colts
in Super Bowl
Super Bowl
III (1969), then making good on his prediction with a 16–7 upset (the win remains the Jets' only NFL championship). Already a celebrity, he was now established as a sports icon. He subsequently parlayed his notoriety into success with endorsement deals and as a nightclub owner, talk show host, pioneering advertising spokesman, theater, motion picture, television actor, and sports broadcaster. He remained a highly recognizable figure in the media and sports worlds nearly half a century after his brashness cemented his identity in the public mind.[3]

Contents

1 Early life 2 College football
College football
career

2.1 Statistics

3 Professional football career

3.1 Super Bowl
Super Bowl
III 3.2 Bachelors III 3.3 Monday Night Football's inaugural game 3.4 Later career with the Jets 3.5 Los Angeles Rams

4 Acting career 5 Personal life 6 Legacy

6.1 Media and advertising icon 6.2 Biographies

7 See also 8 Books 9 References 10 External links

Early life[edit]

Gwynne Gilford
Gwynne Gilford
and Namath
Namath
on The Waverly Wonders
The Waverly Wonders
in 1978

Namath
Namath
was born and raised in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania
Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania
(30 miles (50 km) northwest of Pittsburgh), and grew up in its Lower End neighborhood.[4] He is the son of Catholic parents, Rose (née Juhász) and János "John" Andrew Namath, a steelworker.[5] His parents were of Hungarian descent. His Hungarian-born grandfather, András "Andrew" Németh, known as "A.J." to his family and friends, came to Ellis Island
Ellis Island
on the steamer Pannonia in 1911,[6] and worked in the coal and steel industries of the greater Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
area. While growing up, Namath
Namath
was close to both of his parents, who eventually divorced. Following his parents' divorce, he lived with his mother. He was the youngest of four sons, with an older adopted sister.[7] Namath
Namath
excelled in all sports at Beaver Falls High School
Beaver Falls High School
and was a standout quarterback in football, guard in basketball, and outfielder in baseball. In an age when dunks were uncommon in high school basketball, Namath
Namath
regularly dunked in games. Coached by Larry Bruno at Beaver Falls, Namath's football team won the WPIAL Class AA championship with a 9–0 record in 1960.[8] Coach Bruno later presented Namath
Namath
to the Pro Football Hall of Fame
Pro Football Hall of Fame
in Canton.[9] Upon graduation from high school in 1961, he received offers from several Major League Baseball
Baseball
teams, including the Yankees, Indians, Reds, Pirates, and Phillies,[10] but football prevailed. Namath
Namath
told interviewers that he wanted to sign with the Pirates and play baseball like his idol, Roberto Clemente, but elected to play football because his mother wanted him to get a college education.[11] He graduated from college at age 64 in 2007, after he returned to the University of Alabama about forty years after he left early in order to pursue a career in professional football. He successfully finished a 30-hour external program bachelor of arts degree in interdisciplinary studies.[12][13] Namath
Namath
had many offers from Division I college football programs, including Penn State, Ohio State, Alabama, and Notre Dame, but initially decided upon the University of Maryland after being heavily recruited by Maryland assistant coach Roland Arrigoni. He was rejected by Maryland because his college-board scores were just below the school's requirements. After ample recruiting by Bryant, Namath accepted a full scholarship to attend Alabama. Bryant stated his decision to recruit Namath
Namath
was "the best coaching decision I ever made."[citation needed] College football
College football
career[edit] Between 1962 and 1964, Namath
Namath
quarterbacked the Alabama Crimson Tide program under Bryant and his offensive coordinator, Howard Schnellenberger. A year after being suspended for the final two games of the season,[14] Namath
Namath
led the Tide to a national championship in 1964. During his time at the University of Alabama, Namath
Namath
led the team to a 29–4 record over three seasons.[citation needed] Bryant called Namath
Namath
"the greatest athlete I ever coached".[15] When Namath
Namath
was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame
Pro Football Hall of Fame
in 1985, he broke down during his induction speech upon mentioning Bryant, who died from a heart attack in 1983.[citation needed] Namath's time at Alabama was a culture shock for him, as he had grown up in a neighborhood in Pennsylvania that was predominantly black. (He was the only white starter on his high school basketball team.)[7] He attended college at the height of the civil rights movement (1955–1968) in the Southern United States.[citation needed] Namath
Namath
was eleventh in the balloting for the 1964 Heisman Trophy, which was won by quarterback John Huarte of Notre Dame.[16][17] Statistics[edit]

Season Passing Rushing

Comp Att Yards Comp% TD INT Carries Yards

1962 76 146 1192 52.1 13 8 70 321

1963 63 128 765 49.2 7 7 76 201

1964 64 100 756 64.0 5 4 44 133

Career total 203 374 2713 54.3 25 19 190 655

Professional football career[edit]

This section of a biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (November 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Joe Theismann
Joe Theismann
and Namath
Namath
at the NFL Kickoff Live concert in 2003

Despite suffering a nagging knee injury in the fourth game of his senior year at Alabama, Namath
Namath
limped through the undefeated regular season to the Orange Bowl. He was a first-round draft selection by both the NFL and the upstart AFL. The two competing leagues were at the height of their bidding war, and held their respective drafts on the same day: November 28, 1964. The cartilage damage to Namath's right knee later designated him class 4-F for the military draft, a deferment from service during the Vietnam War.[18][19][20] The St. Louis Cardinals selected Namath
Namath
12th overall in the NFL Draft, while the Jets selected him with the first overall pick of the AFL draft.[21] When meeting with executives of the Cardinals, Namath's salary request was $200,000 and a new Lincoln Continental. While initially appalled at Namath's requests, the Cardinals told Namath they would agree to his requests, but only if he would sign before the Orange Bowl, which would've made Namath
Namath
ineligible to play in the game.[22] The day after the Orange Bowl, Namath
Namath
elected to sign with the Jets, which were under the direction of owner Sonny Werblin, for a salary of US$427,000 over three years (a pro football record at the time).[7][23][24] Offensive tackle Sherman Plunkett came up with the nickname "Broadway Joe" in 1965,[7] following Namath's appearance on the cover of Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
in July.[25] In Namath's rookie season the 1965 Jets were winless in their first six games with him splitting time with second-year quarterback Mike Taliaferro.[18] With Namath
Namath
starting full-time they won five of the last eight of a fourteen-game season and Namath
Namath
was named the AFL Rookie of the year.[26] He became the first professional quarterback to pass for 4,000 yards in a season when he threw for 4,007 yards in (1967), a record broken by Dan Fouts
Dan Fouts
in a 16-game season in 1979 (4,082).[27] Although Namath
Namath
was plagued with knee injuries through much of his career and underwent four pioneering knee operations by Dr. James A. Nicholas, he was an AFL All-Star in 1965, 1967, 1968, and 1969. On some occasions, Namath
Namath
had to have his knee drained at halftime so he could finish a game. Later in life, long after he left football, he underwent knee replacement surgery on both legs. In the 1968 AFL title game, Namath
Namath
threw three touchdown passes to lead New York to a 27–23 win over the defending AFL champion
AFL champion
Oakland Raiders. His performance in the 1968 season earned him the Hickok Belt as top professional athlete of the year. He was an AFC-NFC Pro Bowler in 1972, is a member of the Jets' and the American Football League's All-Time Team, and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1985.[citation needed] Super Bowl
Super Bowl
III[edit]

Namath
Namath
running a play for the Jets in Super Bowl
Super Bowl
III

The high point of Namath's career was his performance in the Jets' 16–7 win over the Baltimore Colts
Baltimore Colts
in Super Bowl
Super Bowl
III in January 1969, shortly before the AFL–NFL merger. The first two interleague championship games had resulted in blowout victories for the NFL's Green Bay Packers, and sports writers from NFL cities insisted the AFL would take several more years to be truly competitive. The 1968 Colts were touted as "the greatest football team in history", and former NFL star and Atlanta Falcons
Atlanta Falcons
head coach Norm Van Brocklin
Norm Van Brocklin
ridiculed the AFL before the game, saying "This will be Namath's first professional football game."[citation needed] Three days before the game, Namath was tired of addressing the issue in the press, and he responded to a heckler at a sports banquet in Miami with the line: "We're going to win the game. I guarantee it."[citation needed] Namath
Namath
backed up his boast, which became legendary.[28] The Colts' vaunted defense (highlighted by Bubba Smith) was unable to contain either the Jets' running or passing game, while the ineffective offense gave up four interceptions to the Jets. Namath
Namath
was the Super Bowl MVP, completing eight passes to George Sauer alone for 133 yards. The win made him the first quarterback to start and win a national championship game in college, a major professional league championship, and in a Super Bowl. The Jets' win gave the AFL instant legitimacy even to skeptics. When he was asked by reporters after the game whether the Colts' defense was the "toughest he had ever faced", Namath
Namath
responded, "That would be the Buffalo Bills' defense." The AFL-worst Bills had intercepted Namath
Namath
five times, three for touchdowns, in their only win in 1968 in late September. Bachelors III[edit] After the Super Bowl
Super Bowl
victory, Namath
Namath
opened a popular Upper East Side nightclub called Bachelors III, which not only drew big names in sports, entertainment, and politics, but organized crime. To protect the league's reputation, NFL Commissioner
NFL Commissioner
Pete Rozelle
Pete Rozelle
ordered Namath to divest himself of his interest in the venture. Namath
Namath
refused, apparently retiring from football during a teary news conference, but he eventually recanted and agreed to sell the tavern. He reported to the Jets in time for the 1969–70 season.[29] Namath
Namath
again threatened to retire before the 1970 and 1971 seasons; New York stated in 1971 that "his retirement act had become shallow and predictable". The magazine wrote that Namath
Namath
did not want to attend training camp because of the risk of injury, but could not afford to retire permanently because of poor investments.[29]. Monday Night Football's inaugural game[edit] The head of ABC's televised sports, Roone Arledge, made sure that Monday Night Football's inaugural game on September 21, 1970 featured Namath. The Jets met the Cleveland Browns
Cleveland Browns
in Cleveland Municipal Stadium in front of both a record crowd of 85,703 and a huge television audience. The Jets set a team record for penalties and lost on a late Namath
Namath
interception.[citation needed] Later career with the Jets[edit] After not missing a single game because of injury in his first five years in the league, Namath
Namath
played in just 28 of 58 possible games between 1970 and 1973 because of various injuries. After winning division championships in 1968 and 1969, the Jets struggled to records of 4–10, 6–8, 7–7, and 4–10. His most memorable moment in those four seasons came on September 24, 1972, when he and his boyhood idol Johnny Unitas
Johnny Unitas
combined for 872 passing yards in Baltimore. Namath threw for 496 yards and six touchdowns and Unitas 376 yards and three in a 44–34 New York victory over the Colts, its first against Baltimore since Super Bowl
Super Bowl
III. The game is considered by many NFL experts to be the finest display of passing in a single game in league history.[30] The Chicago Winds of the World Football League
World Football League
famously made a large overture to Namath
Namath
prior to the start of the 1975 season. They designed their uniforms identically to that of the Jets and offered Namath
Namath
$600,000 a year for three years, $100,000 for the next 17, a $500,000 signing bonus, and the eventual arrangement for him to revive the WFL's Charlotte Hornets franchise in New York as the new team's owner. The WFL's television provider, TVS Television Network, insisted on the Winds signing Namath
Namath
to continue broadcasts; Namath, in turn, requested a percentage of the league's television revenue. The league refused, and Namath
Namath
stayed with the Jets. The Winds folded five weeks into the 1975 WFL season. Without a national television contract, the struggling WFL collapsed altogether a month later.[31] Los Angeles Rams[edit] In the twilight of his career, Namath
Namath
was waived by the Jets to facilitate a move to the Los Angeles Rams
Los Angeles Rams
when a trade could not be worked out. Signing on May 12, 1977, Namath
Namath
hoped to revitalize his career, but knee injuries, a bad hamstring, and the general ravages of thirteen years as a quarterback in professional football had taken their toll. After playing well in a 2–1 start, Namath
Namath
took a beating in a one-point loss on a cold, windy, and rainy Monday Night Football game against the Chicago Bears, throwing four interceptions and having a fifth nullified by a penalty.[32] He was benched as a starter for the rest of the season and retired at its end.[citation needed] Acting career[edit]

Flip Wilson
Flip Wilson
and Namath
Namath
in 1972 on The Flip Wilson
Flip Wilson
Show

Building on his brief success as a host on 1969's The Joe Namath
Namath
Show, Namath
Namath
transitioned into an acting career. Appearing on stage, starring in several movies, including C.C. and Company
C.C. and Company
with Ann-Margret
Ann-Margret
and William Smith in 1970, and in a brief 1978 television series, The Waverly Wonders, he guest-starred on numerous television shows, often as himself, including The Love Boat, Married... with Children, Here's Lucy, The Brady Bunch, The Flip Wilson
Flip Wilson
Show, Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In, The Dean Martin Show, The Simpsons, The A-Team, ALF, Kate & Allie, and The John Larroquette Show.[33] Namath
Namath
appeared in summer stock productions of Damn Yankees, Fiddler on the Roof, and Lil' Abner, and finally legitimized his "Broadway Joe" nickname as a cast replacement in a New York revival of The Caine Mutiny Court Martial.[citation needed] He guest hosted The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson several times and also served as a color commentator on NFL broadcasts, including the 1985 season of Monday Night Football. He currently hosts The Competitive Edge,[34] In September 2012, Namath
Namath
was honored by the Ride of Fame
Ride of Fame
and a double-decker tour bus was dedicated to him in New York City.[35] He appeared as himself in the 2013 sports film Underdogs and the 2015 comedy film The Wedding Ringer. Personal life[edit] While taking a voice class in 1983, Namath
Namath
met Deborah Mays (who later changed her first name to May and then changed it again to Tatiana), an aspiring actress; he was 41 and she was 22. They married in 1984, with Namath
Namath
claiming, "She caught my last pass." The longtime bachelor became a dedicated family man when the couple had two children, Jessica (b. 1986) and Olivia (b.1991).[36] The couple divorced in 2000,[36] with the children living in Florida with their father.[37] In May 2007, sixteen-year-old Olivia gave birth to her first child, a daughter, Natalia.[37] On December 20, 2003, Namath
Namath
garnered unfavorable publicity after he consumed too much alcohol during a day that was dedicated to the Jets' announcement of their All-Time team. During live ESPN
ESPN
coverage of the team's game, Namath
Namath
was asked about then-Jets quarterback Chad Pennington and his thoughts on the difficulties of that year's team. Namath
Namath
expressed confidence in Pennington, but then stated to interviewer Suzy Kolber, "I want to kiss you. I couldn't care less about the team struggling."[38] He subsequently apologized, and several weeks later entered into an outpatient alcoholism treatment program. Namath
Namath
chronicled the episode, including his battle with liquor, in his book, Namath.[39] In July 2015, Namath
Namath
joined the search for two boys who went missing during a fishing trip off the coast of Florida, and offered a $100,000 reward for the safe return of the boys.[40] The boat was found six days later, and the search has been suspended, with the two boys presumed dead.[41] Legacy[edit] Media and advertising icon[edit]

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Namath's nickname "Broadway Joe" was given to him by Sherman Plunkett, a Jets teammate. "Joe Willie Namath" was Namath's moniker based on his full given name and was popularized by sportscaster Howard Cosell. On the field, Namath
Namath
stood out from other AFL and NFL players in low-cut white shoes rather than traditional black high-tops. He originated the fad of wearing a full-length fur coat on the sidelines (since banned by the NFL), which requires all players, coaches, athletic trainers, et al., to wear league-approved team apparel.[citation needed] Namath
Namath
also appeared in television advertisements both during and after his playing career, most notably for Ovaltine
Ovaltine
milk flavoring,[42] Noxzema
Noxzema
shaving cream (in which he was shaved by a then-unknown Farrah Fawcett),[43] and Hanes
Hanes
Beautymist pantyhose. All of these commercials contributed to his becoming a pop-culture icon. He has appeared in advertising as recently as 2014, in a DirectTV commercial starring the Manning brothers making stew with one's mother.[citation needed] Namath
Namath
continues to serve as an unofficial spokesman and goodwill ambassador for the Jets.[44] In 2011, Namath
Namath
was representing Topps and promoting a " Super Bowl
Super Bowl
Legends" contest, appearing on its behalf on the Late Show with David Letterman.[45] On June 2, 2013, Namath
Namath
was the guest speaker at the Pro Football Hall of Fame, unveiling the Canton, Ohio
Canton, Ohio
museum's $27 million expansion and renovation plan.[citation needed] Biographies[edit] In November 2006, the biography Namath
Namath
by Mark Kriegel
Mark Kriegel
appeared, reaching the New York Times extended bestseller list (number 23). In conjunction with its release, Namath
Namath
was interviewed for the November 19, 2006, edition of CBS' 60 Minutes.[citation needed] A recent documentary about Namath's hometown of Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania, includes a segment on Namath
Namath
and why the city has celebrated its ties to him. In 2009, 40 years after winning Super Bowl
Super Bowl
III, he presented the Vince Lombardi Trophy
Vince Lombardi Trophy
to the Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
Steelers who won Super Bowl XLIII. NFL Productions also produced a two-hour long television biography in its A Football Life series.[3] See also[edit]

List of NFL quarterbacks who have passed for 400 or more yards in a game List of American Football League
American Football League
players Gunslinger Namath: From Beaver Falls to Broadway

Books[edit]

Namath, Joe Willie; Schaap, Richard (1970). I Can't Wait Until Tomorrow...'Cause I Get Better Looking Every Day. Signet. ASIN B00005W4MN.  Kriegel, Mark (2004). Namath: A Biography. New York: Penguin Books. ISBN 0-670-03329-4.  Namath, Joe (2006). Namath. New York: Rugged Land Books. ISBN 1-59071-081-9. 

References[edit]

^ Switz, Larry. "Joe Namath: Biography". ESPN. Archived from the original on 2008-03-28. Retrieved 2008-09-23.  ^ "Joe Namath: Biography". Pro football Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2009-01-25.  ^ a b A Football Life: Profiles the most important and influential figures in the history of the National Football League ^ " ESPN
ESPN
Classic – Namath
Namath
was lovable rogue". Espn.go.com. Retrieved 2014-03-05.  ^ "Joe Namath". Pabook.libraries.psu.edu. Archived from the original on 2014-08-12. Retrieved 2014-03-05.  ^ Mark Kriegel, Mark (2005), Namath: A Biography, Penguin, p. 1, ISBN 1101221429  ^ a b c d "Playboy's Candid Conversation With The Superswinger QB, Joe Namath". Playboy. December 1969.  ^ Rich Vetock. "index.htm". Pawrsl.com. Retrieved 2017-06-16.  ^ "Larry Bruno, former Beaver Falls coach, dies". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. December 24, 2010.  ^ Cannizzaro, Mark (2011). New York Jets:The Complete Illustrated History. MVP Books. p. 24. ISBN 978-0-7603-4063-9.  ^ DiRoma, Frank Joseph (April 2, 2007). "Namath, Joseph William ("Broadway Joe")". Pennsylvania Center for the Book. Archived from the original on June 26, 2015. Retrieved May 27, 2015. But Namath declined, and opted for college at his mother's request.  ^ "Football Great Joe Namath
Namath
Earns College Degree 42 Years Later". Fox News. December 15, 2007. Retrieved May 27, 2015.  ^ "Football great Joe Namath
Namath
earns college degree 42 years later". FOX News. 2007-12-15. Retrieved 2008-09-02.  ^ DiRoma, Frank Joseph. "Joe Namath". Retrieved 2008-09-02.  ^ Schwartz, Joe. " Namath
Namath
was lovable rogue". ESPN. Retrieved 2008-09-02.  ^ "Huarte wins Heisman gridiron trophy". Chicago Tribune. Associated Press. November 25, 1964. p. 1.  ^ "John Huarte". Heisman Trophy. 1964. Retrieved January 25, 2017.  ^ a b Smits, Ted (June 19, 1966). "Namath's a pro, but pins dubious". Eugene Register-Guard. p. 2B.  ^ Daley, Arthur (December 10, 1965). "Army made sure before declaring Namath
Namath
unfit". Milwaukee Journal. (New York Times). p. 2, final.  ^ "Army defends Joe Namath
Namath
stand". Ottawa Citizen. Associated Press. December 8, 1965. p. 19.  ^ NFL 2001 Record and Fact Book, Workman Publishing Co, New York, ISBN 0-7611-2480-2, p. 397 ^ Marvez, Alex. "Joe Namath
Namath
almost a Cardinal? 50 years later, the NFL-AFL draft wars that birthed a league". Fox Sports.com.  ^ "Jets make Namath
Namath
richest pro rookie". St. Petersburg Times. Associated Press. January 3, 1965. p. 3C.  ^ Namath, Joe Willie; Schaap, Dick (November 26, 1969). "Jets' president makes Joe a '$400,000 quarterback'". Chicago Tribune. (book excerpt). p. 7, section 3.  ^ Boyle, Robert H. (July 19, 1965). "Show-biz Sonny and his quest for stars". Sports Illustrated: 66.  ^ " Namath
Namath
says rookie award 'real nice'". Free Lance Star. Fredericksburg. Associated Press. December 17, 1965. p. 11.  ^ Greenberg, Chris (28 December 2011). " Drew Brees
Drew Brees
Passes Dan Marino: Saints QB Joins Marino, Joe Namath, Dan Fouts
Dan Fouts
In Holding NFL Record". Huffington Post. Retrieved 27 May 2015.  ^ Zinser, Lynn (May 25, 2012). "Pregame Talk
Talk
Is Cheap, but This Vow Resonates". The New York Times. p. B10. Archived from the original on May 25, 2012.  ^ a b Axthelm, Pete (1971-07-19). "The Third Annual Permanent Retirement of Joe Namath". New York. p. 71. Retrieved January 6, 2015.  ^ Kreigel, Mark. Namath: A Biography. New York: Viking, 2004, p. 346 ^ Johnson, William Oscar. The Day the Money Ran Out. Sports Illustrated, 1975-12-01. ^ Williams, Joe (2013-05-31). "Long after retiring from Bears, Predators coach's love of Chicago remains strong". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved 2013-05-31.  ^ "Joe Namath
Namath
Biography (1943-)". Filmreference.com. Retrieved 2017-06-16.  ^ "The Competitive Edge with Joe Namath". Competitiveedgetv.com. Retrieved 2014-03-05.  ^ " Ride of Fame
Ride of Fame
- Ride of Fame
Ride of Fame
at Pier 78- CitySightseeing". Facebook. 2012-09-12. Retrieved 2017-06-16.  ^ a b "Jilted Joe" People magazine, April 19, 1999 ^ a b "Joe Namath's teenaged daughter gives birth". Celebritybabies.people.com. 2012-03-22. Retrieved 2014-03-05.  ^ Griffith, Bill (December 23, 2003). " Namath
Namath
Incident Not Being Kissed Off". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 2010-04-24.  ^ Kriegel, Mark (2004). Namath: A Biography. New York: Viking. ISBN 0-670-03329-4.  ^ "NFL legend Joe Namath
Namath
aids search for boys, 14, missing off Florida". Fox News. July 26, 2015. Retrieved September 22, 2017.  ^ Hastings, Deborah (July 31, 2015). "U.S. Coast Guard to suspend search for missing Florida teens who vanished during fishing trip". New York Daily News. Retrieved September 22, 2017.  ^ "Celeb Ad Ovaltine
Ovaltine
Joe Namath". YouTube. 2013-03-28. Retrieved 2017-06-16.  ^ "Noxema with Farrah". YouTube. 1987-11-13. Retrieved 2017-06-16.  ^ Eskenazi, Gerald (August 28, 2003). "PRO FOOTBALL; Jets Turn a Gathering Into a Testaverde Rally". The New York Times.  ^ Mallozzi, Vincent M. (September 25, 2011). "30 Seconds With Joe Namath". The New York Times. Retrieved September 26, 2011. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Joe Namath.

Career statistics and player information from NFL.com • Pro-Football-Reference • Databasefootball.com Joe Namath
Namath
at the Pro Football Hall of Fame Joe Namath
Namath
on IMDb Joe Namath
Namath
article, Encyclopedia of Alabama

Links to related articles

Awards and achievements

Preceded by Matt Snell American Football League
American Football League
Rookie of the Year 1965 Succeeded by Bobby Burnett

Preceded by Daryle Lamonica American Football League
American Football League
MVP 1968–1969 with Daryle Lamonica (1969) League merged with NFL

v t e

Alabama Crimson Tide starting quarterbacks

Walker Burr Tutwiler Johnston Drennen Wyatt Ward T. Smith Hannon Peebles Moody Joplin Harsh Creen Hagan Lenoir Sewell Stephenson Bartlett Rosenfeld Gillis Hubert Barnes Brasfield McClintock Vines J. Tucker Campbell Howell R. Smith Riley Bradford Hughes DeShane McWhorter Gilmer Self Morrow Brown Avinger Salem Hobson Starr Walls B. Smith Jackson Trammell Namath Sloan Stabler Trimble Hunter Hayden Davis Todd Rutledge Shealy Jacobs Lewis Shula Sutton Dunn D. Smith Hollingsworth Woodson Barker Burgdorf Kitchens Phillips Zow Watts L. Tucker Croyle Pennington Avalos Guillon Wilson McElroy McCarron Sims Coker Bateman Barnett Hurts

v t e

New York Titans / Jets starting quarterbacks

Al Dorow (1960–1961) Dick Jamieson (1960) Johnny Green (1962) Lee Grosscup (1962) Butch Songin (1962) Dick Wood (1963–1964) Galen Hall
Galen Hall
(1963) Pete Liske (1964) Mike Taliaferro (1965) Joe Namath
Namath
(1965–1976) Al Woodall (1970–1971, 1973) Bob Davis (1971–1972) Bill Demory (1973) J. J. Jones (1975) Richard Todd (1976–1983) Matt Robinson (1977–1979) Marty Domres (1977) Pat Ryan (1984, 1986–1989) Ken O'Brien (1984–1992) David Norrie (1987) Tony Eason (1989) Kyle Mackey (1989) Browning Nagle (1992) Boomer Esiason
Boomer Esiason
(1993–1995) Jack Trudeau (1994) Bubby Brister (1995) Frank Reich (1996) Neil O'Donnell (1996–1997) Glenn Foley (1996–1998) Vinny Testaverde
Vinny Testaverde
(1998–2003, 2005) Ray Lucas (1999) Rick Mirer (1999) Chad Pennington
Chad Pennington
(2002–2007) Quincy Carter (2004) Brooks Bollinger
Brooks Bollinger
(2005) Kellen Clemens
Kellen Clemens
(2007, 2009) Brett Favre
Brett Favre
(2008) Mark Sanchez
Mark Sanchez
(2009–2012) Greg McElroy
Greg McElroy
(2012) Geno Smith
Geno Smith
(2013–2014, 2016) Michael Vick
Michael Vick
(2014) Ryan Fitzpatrick
Ryan Fitzpatrick
(2015–2016) Bryce Petty
Bryce Petty
(2016–present) Josh McCown
Josh McCown
(2017)

v t e

New York Jets
New York Jets
1965 AFL draft selections

Joe Namath Tom Nowatzke John Huarte Verlon Biggs Bob Schweickert Glenn Sasser Don Hoovler Archie Roberts Jim Harris Rick McCurdy Jimmy Sidle Frank Lambert Jim Gray John Berrington Sonny Utz Gary Plumlee Jim Burt Seth Cartwright Bob Lehman Bill Scott Charlie Browning Mitch Dudek Troy Allen

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Cleveland / St. Louis / Los Angeles Rams
Los Angeles Rams
starting quarterbacks

Bob Snyder (1937) Parker Hall (1939–1942) Jack Jacobs (1942) Albie Reisz (1944) Bob Waterfield
Bob Waterfield
(1945–1952) Jim Hardy
Jim Hardy
(1948) Norm Van Brocklin
Norm Van Brocklin
(1950–1957) Bill Wade
Bill Wade
(1954, 1956, 1958–1960) Frank Ryan (1959–1961) Buddy Humphrey (1960) Zeke Bratkowski
Zeke Bratkowski
(1961–1963) Roman Gabriel (1962–1972) Ron Miller (1962) Terry Baker (1963) Bill Munson (1964–1965) Pete Beathard (1972) John Hadl (1973–1974) James Harris (1974–1976) Ron Jaworski
Ron Jaworski
(1975–1976) Pat Haden
Pat Haden
(1976–1981) Joe Namath
Namath
(1977) Vince Ferragamo
Vince Ferragamo
(1979–1980, 1982–1984) Jeff Rutledge (1979) Dan Pastorini
Dan Pastorini
(1981) Bert Jones (1982) Jeff Kemp (1984–1985) Dieter Brock (1985) Steve Bartkowski (1986) Steve Dils (1986–1987) Jim Everett
Jim Everett
(1986–1993) T. J. Rubley (1993) Chris Miller (1994–1995) Chris Chandler
Chris Chandler
(1994, 2004) Mark Rypien
Mark Rypien
(1995) Tony Banks (1996–1998) Steve Walsh (1996) Steve Bono
Steve Bono
(1998) Kurt Warner
Kurt Warner
(1999–2003) Trent Green
Trent Green
(2000, 2008) Marc Bulger
Marc Bulger
(2002–2009) Jamie Martin (2002, 2005) Scott Covington (2002) Ryan Fitzpatrick
Ryan Fitzpatrick
(2005) Gus Frerotte
Gus Frerotte
(2007) Brock Berlin (2007) Kyle Boller
Kyle Boller
(2009) Keith Null (2009) Sam Bradford
Sam Bradford
(2010–2013) A. J. Feeley
A. J. Feeley
(2011) Kellen Clemens
Kellen Clemens
(2011, 2013) Shaun Hill
Shaun Hill
(2014) Austin Davis
Austin Davis
(2014) Nick Foles
Nick Foles
(2015) Case Keenum
Case Keenum
(2015–2016) Jared Goff
Jared Goff
(2016–present) Sean Mannion (2017)

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1964 Alabama Crimson Tide football—AP & UPI national champions

12 Joe Namath 36 Jackie Sherrill Mickey Andrews Steve Bowman Paul Crane Cecil Dowdy Leslie Kelley Ray Ogden Ray Perkins David Ray Steve Sloan Tommy Tolleson Wayne Trimble

Head coach Bear Bryant

Assistant coaches Ken Donahue Ken Meyer Mal Moore Hayden Riley Howard Schnellenberger Jimmy Sharpe Gene Stallings Richard Williamson

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New York Jets
New York Jets
Super Bowl
Super Bowl
III champions

11 Jim Turner 12 Joe Namath
Namath
(MVP) 13 Don Maynard 15 Babe Parilli 22 Jim Hudson 23 Bill Rademacher 24 Johnny Sample 26 Jim Richards 29 Bake Turner 30 Mark Smolinski 31 Bill Mathis 32 Emerson Boozer 33 Curley Johnson 34 Lee White 41 Matt Snell 42 Randy Beverly 43 John Dockery 45 Earl Christy 46 Bill Baird 47 Mike D'Amato 48 Cornell Gordon 50 Carl McAdams 51 Ralph Baker 52 John Schmitt 56 Paul Crane 60 Larry Grantham 61 Bob Talamini 62 Al Atkinson 63 John Neidert 66 Randy Rasmussen 67 Dave Herman 68 Michael Stromberg 70 Karl Henke 71 Sam Walton 72 Paul Rochester 74 Jeff Richardson 75 Winston Hill 80 John Elliott 81 Gerry Philbin 83 George Sauer 85 Steve Thompson 86 Verlon Biggs 87 Pete Lammons

Head coach: Weeb Ewbank

Coaches: Walt Michaels Clive Rush Buddy Ryan Joe Spencer

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1965 NFL draft first-round selections

Tucker Frederickson Ken Willard Dick Butkus Gale Sayers Craig Morton Steve DeLong Donny Anderson Jack Snow Clancy Williams Larry Elkins Tom Nowatzke Joe Namath George Donnelly Mike Curtis

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St. Louis Cardinals 1965 NFL draft selections

Joe Namath Dave Simmons Ray Ogden Johnny Roland Bob Bonds Glen Ray Hines Frank Roy John Meyer Jimmy Heidel Chuck Drulis Bud French Glen Sasser Steve Murphy Mike Alford Harlan Lane Carl Silvestri Mike Melinkovich Ed McQuarters Roy Shivers Tony Giacobazzi

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Chicago / St. Louis / Phoenix / Arizona Cardinals
Arizona Cardinals
first-round draft picks

Lawrence Buivid Robbins Aldrich Cafego Kimbrough Lach Dobbs Harder Trippi Jones Coulter Spavital Fischer Groom Matson Olszewski McHan Boydston Childress Tubbs Hill Crow Stacy Izo Rice Echols Goode Stovall Brumm Kortas Namath McAdams Williams Lane Wehrli Stegent Thompson Moore Butz Cain Gray Dawson Pisarkiewicz Little Greene Anderson Greer Junior Sharpe Smith Duncan Nunn Bell Stouffer Harvey Hill Wolf Swann Hearst Dye Miller Rice Knight Wadsworth Boston Shelton Jones Davis Bryant Johnson Pace Fitzgerald Rolle Leinart Brown Rodgers-Cromartie Wells Williams Peterson Floyd Cooper Bucannon Humphries Nkemdiche Reddick

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New York Titans / Jets first-round draft picks

Brown Stephens Stovall Snell Namath Nowatzke Yearby Seiler White Foley Tannen Riggins Barkum Taylor Owens Barzilauskas Todd Powell Ward Lyons L. Jones McNeil Crable O'Brien Carter Faurot Toon Haight Vick Cadigan Lageman Bl. Thomas Mitchell M. Jones Glenn Brady Douglas Johnson Farrior Ellis Abraham Pennington Becht Moss Br. Thomas Robertson Vilma Ferguson Mangold Revis Gholston Keller Sanchez Wilson Wilkerson Coples Milliner Richardson Pryor Williams Lee Adams

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Number one AFL Draft picks

1961: Gaiters 1962: Gabriel 1963: Buchanan 1964: Concannon 1965: Namath 1966: Grabowski 1967: Griese (#4 Common Draft) 1968: Johnson (#2 Common Draft) 1969: Simpson (#1 Common Draft)

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AFL season passing yards leaders

1960: Tripucka 1961: Blanda 1962: Tripucka 1963: Blanda 1964: Parilli 1965: Hadl 1966: Namath 1967: Namath 1968: Hadl 1969: Lamonica

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Super Bowl
Super Bowl
MVP Award

I: Starr II: Starr III: Namath IV: Dawson V: Howley VI: Staubach VII: Scott VIII: Csonka IX: Harris X: Swann XI: Biletnikoff XII : Martin & White XIII: Bradshaw XIV: Bradshaw XV: Plunkett XVI: Montana XVII: Riggins XVIII: Allen XIX: Montana XX: Dent XXI: Simms XXII: Williams XXIII: Rice XXIV: Montana XXV: Anderson XXVI: Rypien XXVII: Aikman XXVIII: E. Smith XXIX: Young XXX: Brown XXXI: Howard XXXII: Davis XXXIII: Elway XXXIV: Warner XXXV: Lewis XXXVI: Brady XXXVII: Jackson XXXVIII: Brady XXXIX: Branch XL: Ward XLI: P. Manning XLII: E. Manning XLIII: Holmes XLIV: Brees XLV: Rodgers XLVI: E. Manning XLVII: Flacco XLVIII: M. Smith XLIX: Brady 50: Miller LI: Brady LII: Foles

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Super Bowl
Super Bowl
champion starting quarterbacks

I: Starr II: Starr III: Namath IV: Dawson V: Unitas VI: Staubach VII: Griese VIII: Griese IX: Bradshaw X: Bradshaw XI: Stabler XII: Staubach XIII: Bradshaw XIV: Bradshaw XV: Plunkett XVI: Montana XVII: Theismann XVIII: Plunkett XIX: Montana XX: McMahon XXI: Simms XXII: Williams XXIII: Montana XXIV: Montana XXV: Hostetler XXVI: Rypien XXVII: Aikman XXVIII: Aikman XXIX: Young XXX: Aikman XXXI: Favre XXXII: Elway XXXIII: Elway XXXIV: Warner XXXV: Dilfer XXXVI: Brady XXXVII: Johnson XXXVIII: Brady XXXIX: Brady XL: Roethlisberger XLI: P. Manning XLII: E. Manning XLIII: Roethlisberger XLIV: Brees XLV: Rodgers XLVI: E. Manning XLVII: Flacco XLVIII: Wilson XLIX: Brady 50: P. Manning LI: Brady LII: Foles

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Hickok Belt
Hickok Belt
winners

1950: Phil Rizzuto 1951: Allie Reynolds 1952: Rocky Marciano 1953: Ben Hogan 1954: Willie Mays 1955: Otto Graham 1956: Mickey Mantle 1957: Carmen Basilio 1958: Bob Turley 1959: Ingemar Johansson 1960: Arnold Palmer 1961: Roger Maris 1962: Maury Wills 1963: Sandy Koufax 1964: Jim Brown 1965: Sandy Koufax 1966: Frank Robinson 1967: Carl Yastrzemski 1968: Joe Namath 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: Brooks Robinson 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Steve Carlton 1973: O. J. Simpson 1974: Muhammad Ali 1975: Pete Rose 1976: Ken Stabler 1977–2011 not awarded 2012: LeBron James 2013: LeBron James 2014: Madison Bumgarner 2015: Stephen Curry 2016: Michael Phelps 2017: José Altuve

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NFL annual passing touchdowns leaders

1932: Herber 1933: Newman 1934: Herber 1935: Danowski 1936: Herber 1937: Masterson 1938: Monnett 1939: Filchock 1940: Baugh 1941: Isbell 1942: Isbell 1943: Luckman 1944: Filchock 1945: Luckman & Waterfield 1946: Luckman & Waterfield 1947: Baugh 1948: Thompson 1949: Lujack 1950: Ratterman 1951: Layne 1952: Finks & Graham 1953: Thomason 1954: Burk 1955: Rote & Tittle 1956: Rote 1957: Unitas 1958: Unitas 1959: Unitas 1960: Unitas 1961: Jurgensen 1962: Tittle 1963: Tittle 1964: Ryan 1965: Brodie 1966: Ryan 1967: Jurgensen 1968: Morrall 1969: Gabriel 1970: Brodie 1971: Hadl 1972: Kilmer & Namath 1973: Gabriel & Staubach 1974: Stabler 1975: Ferguson & Tarkenton 1976: Stabler 1977: Griese 1978: Bradshaw 1979: Grogan & Sipe 1980: Bartkowski 1981: Fouts 1982: Bradshaw, Fouts & Montana 1983: Dickey 1984: Marino 1985: Marino 1986: Marino 1987: Montana 1988: Everett 1989: Everett 1990: Moon 1991: Kelly 1992: Young 1993: Young 1994: Young 1995: Favre 1996: Favre 1997: Favre 1998: Young 1999: Warner 2000: Culpepper & Manning 2001: Warner 2002: Brady 2003: Favre 2004: Manning 2005: Palmer 2006: Manning 2007: Brady 2008: Brees & Rivers 2009: Brees 2010: Brady 2011: Brees 2012: Brees 2013: Manning 2014: Luck 2015: Brady 2016: Rodgers 2017: Wilson

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NFL annual passing yards leaders

1932: Herber 1933: Newman 1934: Herber 1935: Danowski 1936: Herber 1937: Baugh 1938: Parker 1939: O'Brien 1940: Baugh 1941: Isbell 1942: Isbell 1943: Luckman 1944: Comp 1945: Luckman 1946: Luckman 1947: Baugh 1948: Baugh 1949: Lujack 1950: Layne 1951: Layne 1952: Graham 1953: Graham 1954: Van Brocklin 1955: Finks 1956: Rote 1957: Unitas 1958: Wade 1959: Unitas 1960: Unitas 1961: Jurgensen 1962: Jurgensen 1963: Unitas 1964: Johnson 1965: Brodie 1966: Jurgensen 1967: Jurgensen 1968: Brodie 1969: Jurgensen 1970: Brodie 1971: Hadl 1972: Namath 1973: Gabriel 1974: Anderson 1975: Anderson 1976: Jones 1977: Ferguson 1978: Tarkenton 1979: Fouts 1980: Fouts 1981: Fouts 1982: Fouts 1983: Dickey 1984: Marino 1985: Marino 1986: Marino 1987: Lomax 1988: Marino 1989: Majkowski 1990: Moon 1991: Moon 1992: Marino 1993: Elway 1994: Bledsoe 1995: Favre 1996: Brunell 1997: George 1998: Favre 1999: Beuerlein 2000: Manning 2001: Warner 2002: Gannon 2003: Manning 2004: Culpepper 2005: Brady 2006: Brees 2007: Brady 2008: Brees 2009: Schaub 2010: Rivers 2011: Brees 2012: Brees 2013: Manning 2014: Brees & Roethlisberger 2015: Brees 2016: Brees 2017: Brady

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PFW/PFWA NFL Comeback Player of the Year Award

1972: Morrall 1973: Gabriel 1974: Namath 1975: Hampton 1976: Landry 1977: Morton 1978: Riggins 1979: Csonka 1980: Plunkett 1981: Anderson 1982: Alzado 1983: B. Johnson 1984: Stallworth 1985: No Selection 1986: Montana & Kramer 1987: White 1988: Bell 1989: Anderson 1990: Word 1991: McMahon 1992: Cunningham 1993: Allen 1994: Marino 1995: Harbaugh 1996: Bettis 1997: Brooks 1998: Flutie 1999: Young 2000: J. Johnson 2001: Hearst 2002: Maddox 2003: Kitna 2004: McGahee 2005: Smith 2006: Pennington 2007: Moss 2008: Pennington 2009: Brady 2010: Vick 2011: Stafford 2012: Peterson 2013: Rivers 2014: Gronkowski 2015: Berry 2016: Nelson 2017: Allen

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American Football League
American Football League
All-Time Team

Joe Namath Clem Daniels Paul Lowe Lance Alworth Cookie Gilchrist Don Maynard Fred Arbanas Jim Otto Ed Budde Billy Shaw Ron Mix Jim Tyrer George Blanda Nick Buoniconti Bobby Bell George Webster Johnny Robinson George Saimes Willie Brown Dave Grayson Houston Antwine Tom Sestak Jerry Mays Gerry Philbin Jerrel Wilson Weeb Ewbank

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New York Jets
New York Jets
retired numbers

12 Joe Namath 13 Don Maynard 28 Curtis Martin 73 Joe Klecko 90 Dennis Byrd

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New York Jets
New York Jets
Ring of Honor

2010

Weeb Ewbank Winston Hill Joe Klecko Curtis Martin Don Maynard Joe Namath

2011

Larry Grantham Freeman McNeil Gerry Philbin Al Toon

2012

Mark Gastineau Wesley Walker

2013

Marty Lyons

2014

Wayne Chrebet Leon Hess

2017

Kevin Mawae

‹ The template below ( New York Jets
New York Jets
Hall of Famers) is being considered for deletion. See templates for discussion to help reach a consensus. ›

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New York Jets
New York Jets
in the Pro Football Hall of Fame

1978: Weeb Ewbank 1985: Joe Namath 1987: Don Maynard 1992: John Riggins 2012: Curtis Martin 2013: Bill Parcells

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Pro Football Hall of Fame
Pro Football Hall of Fame
Class of 1985

Frank Gatski Joe Namath Pete Rozelle O. J. Simpson Roger Staubach

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Members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame

Quarterbacks

Pre-modern era

Baugh Clark Conzelman Driscoll Friedman Herber Luckman A. Parker

Modern era

Aikman Blanda Bradshaw L. Dawson Elway Favre Fouts Graham Griese Jurgensen J. Kelly Layne Marino Montana Moon Namath Stabler Starr Staubach Tarkenton Tittle Unitas Van Brocklin Warner Waterfield Young

Running backs

Pre-modern era

Battles Canadeo Dudley Grange Guyon Hinkle Lambeau Leemans McAfee McNally Nagurski Nevers Pollard Strong Thorpe Van Buren

Modern era

M. Allen Bettis J. Brown Campbell Csonka T. Davis Dickerson Dorsett Faulk Gifford Harris Hornung J. H. Johnson L. Kelly F. Little Martin Matson McElhenny Moore Motley Payton Perry Riggins B. Sanders Sayers Simpson E. Smith Jim Taylor T. Thomas Tomlinson Trippi Walker

Wide receivers / ends

Pre-modern era

Badgro Chamberlin Flaherty Halas Hewitt Hutson Millner

Modern era

Alworth Berry Biletnikoff T. Brown Carter Fears Harrison Hayes Hirsch Irvin Joiner Largent Lavelli Lofton Maynard McDonald Mitchell Monk Moss Owens Pihos Reed Rice Stallworth Swann C. Taylor Warfield

Tight ends

Casper Ditka Mackey Newsome C. Sanders Sharpe J. Smith Winslow

Offensive linemen

L. Allen B. Brown R. Brown Creekmur D. Dawson DeLamielleure Dierdorf Gatski Gregg Grimm Hannah Hickerson S. Jones W. Jones Kramer Langer L. Little Mack Matthews McCormack McDaniel Mix Munchak Muñoz Ogden Otto Pace J. Parker Ringo Roaf Shaw Shell Shields Slater St. Clair Stanfel Stephenson Tingelhoff Upshaw Webster Wright Yary Zimmerman

Pre-modern era two-way players

Edwards Fortmann Healey Hein Henry Hubbard Kiesling Kinard Lyman Michalske Musso Owen Stydahar Trafton Turner Wojciechowicz

Defensive linemen

Atkins Bethea Buchanan Culp W. Davis Dean Dent Doleman Donovan Eller Ford J. Greene Haley Hampton Humphrey D. Jones Jordan Kennedy Lilly Long Marchetti Nomellini Olsen Page Randle Robustelli Sapp Selmon B. Smith Stautner Strahan Ja. Taylor Weinmeister Ra. White Re. White Willis Youngblood

Linebackers

Bednarik Bo. Bell Brazile Brooks Buoniconti Butkus Carson Connor George K. Greene Ham Hanburger Hendricks Huff Jackson Lambert Lanier Lewis Nitschke Richter Robinson Schmidt Seau Singletary L. Taylor D. Thomas Tippett Urlacher Wilcox

Defensive backs

Adderley Barney Blount W. Brown Butler Christiansen Dawkins Easley Green Haynes Houston J. Johnson Krause Lane Lary LeBeau Lott Renfro D. Sanders E. Thomas Tunnell Wehrli Williams L. Wilson Wood Woodson

Placekickers and punters

Andersen Groza Guy Stenerud

Coaches

G. Allen P. Brown Chamberlin Conzelman Dungy Ewbank Flaherty Gibbs Gillman Grant Halas Lambeau Landry Levy Lombardi Madden Neale Noll Owen Parcells Shula Stram Walsh

Contributors

Beathard Be. Bell Bidwill Carr A. Davis DeBartolo Finks Halas Hunt J. Jones Lambeau T. Mara W. Mara Marshall Polian Ray Reeves A. Rooney D. Rooney Rozelle Sabol Schramm R. Wilson Wolf

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NFL quarterbacks with a perfect passer rating game

Ray Mallouf Sammy Baugh Len Dawson Y. A. Tittle Frank Ryan Sonny Jurgensen Joe Namath Johnny Unitas Don Meredith Craig Morton (2) Fran Tarkenton Daryle Lamonica Dick Shiner Bob Lee James Harris Ken Anderson Jim Hart Dan Fouts Scott Hunter Terry Bradshaw Steve Grogan Brian Sipe Bob Griese Vince Evans Dave Krieg (2) Steve Bartkowski Ken O'Brien (2) Steve Young Joe Montana Rich Gannon Bobby Hebert Mick Buck Drew Bledsoe Craig Erickson Chris Chandler Jeff Blake Kurt Warner
Kurt Warner
(3) Peyton Manning
Peyton Manning
(4) Doug Flutie Kerry Collins Chad Pennington Trent Green Ben Roethlisberger
Ben Roethlisberger
(3) Donovan McNabb Tom Brady
Tom Brady
(2) Eli Manning Drew Brees Robert Griffin III Nick Foles Alex Smith Geno Smith Marcus Mariota Ryan Tannehill Kirk Cousins

Names in bold are still active

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 87328275 LCCN: n50043718 ISNI: 0000 0000 6029 8815 GND: 17349918X BNE: XX1598

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