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Joe Cahill Irish: Seosamh Ó Cathail

Born (1920-05-19)19 May 1920 Belfast, Ireland

Died 23 July 2004(2004-07-23) (aged 84) Belfast, Northern Ireland

Allegiance Provisional Irish Republican Army

Unit Belfast
Belfast
Brigade

Commands held Chief of Staff

Conflict The Troubles[1]

Joe Cahill (Irish: Seosamh Ó Cathail;[2] 19 May 1920 – 23 July 2004) was a prominent figure in the Irish Republican movement in Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
and former chief of staff of the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA).[3] He joined a junior-republican movement, Na Fianna Eireann, in 1937 and the following year, joined the Irish Republican Army. In 1969, Cahill was a key figure in the founding of the Provisional Irish Republican Army. During his time in the Provisional IRA, Cahill helped import weapons and raise financial support. He served as the chief of staff in 1972, but was arrested the following year when a ship importing weapons was intercepted.[3] After his release, he continued to serve on the IRA Army Council and lead all financial dealings for Sinn Féin. In the 1990s, the IRA and Sinn Féin began to work on seeking peace. Cahill served on the council that called a cessation on 21 July 1996. Cahill attended several of the talks that finally led to the Good Friday Agreement
Good Friday Agreement
on 10 April 1998. Shortly after the agreement was made, Cahill resigned as treasurer of Sinn Féin. To honour his service, he was made honorary Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
Vice-President for life. Cahill served the Republican movement in Ireland his entire life, as one of the longest-serving political activists in Ireland of any political party.[4]

Contents

1 Background 2 Early paramilitary career 3 Founding the Provisional IRA 4 Provisional IRA activities 5 Peace process 6 Death 7 References 8 Bibliography

Background[edit] Cahill was born above his father's small printing shop at 60 Divis Street on 19 May 1920[3] in West Belfast. Cahill was the first child of eleven siblings born to Joseph and Josephine Cahill. Both of his parents supported Republicanism. His father was involved with the Irish National Volunteers and would print republican material at his print shop. Joseph Senior applied to be a part of the Irish Republican Army but was asked to remain in the print business as his way of assisting the Republican Movement. He was arrested in 1932 for printing illegal material, but was acquitted for his crimes. Cahill's childhood was marked by hardship and his family was very poor. Cahill's grandparents were neighbours of the Scottish-born Irish socialist and Easter Rising leader James Connolly, who co-founded the Irish Citizens Army.[3] Cahill was educated at St. Mary's Christian Brothers' School, then located on Barrack Street. At age 14 he left school to assist in the print shop. Soon after, he joined the Catholic Young Men's Society, which campaigned on social issues with a focus on eradicating moneylenders from working-class areas of Belfast, as they often charged usurious interest rates.[3] At the age of seventeen, Cahill then joined Na Fianna Eireann, a republican-orientated Scouting movement. Na Fianna Eireann was regarded as the "Junior Irish Republican Army". Early paramilitary career[edit] The following year, 1938, at the age of 18, Cahill joined the local Clonard-based 'C' Company of the Belfast
Belfast
Brigade of the Irish Republican Army. By 1942, Cahill was serving as second in command. That year, during an anniversary march by the IRA for the Easter Rising, Cahill got into a shootout with five other IRA men against four Royal Ulster Constabulary Officers.[4] Several men were wounded and Constable Patrick Murphy was killed.[5] Cahill and four of the other men spent time in prison in Belfast, where they were interrogated daily. Tom Williams, the sixth IRA man to be charged, spent time in the Royal Victorian Hospital due to his injuries. It was there that he made a statement taking full responsibility for killing Constable Patrick Murphy. All six men were found guilty and sentenced to death in August 1942. The men's legal team managed to suspend the execution date after the verdict. An appeal campaign began and 207,000 signatures were collected. The United States State Department and the Vatican also supported the campaign. As a result, the men's sentences were changed to life in prison, except for Tom Williams who was executed. The IRA declared a formal ceasefire in 1945. Afterwards, republican prisoners began to be released. Cahill, Perry, Oliver, Cordner and Simpson, who had all been sentenced to life in prison, became free men in October 1949. Following his release from prison, Cahill got a job at the Harland and Wolff shipyards in Belfast.[6] It was at the shipyards where he was said to have contracted the disease asbestosis, one of the causes of his death many years later. In 1953, Cahill had an accident on the job when he was hit on the head by scaffolding. He subsequently spent time recovering in a convalescent home. After he recovered, he travelled to Leixlip near Dublin
Dublin
to visit his aunt. It was there that he met Annie Magee. Joe and Annie were married on 2 April 1956 in St John's Church on the Falls Road in Belfast. Together they had had seven children.[6] Annie was said to be his best friend[3]. The IRA launched a new campaign in 1956. The IRA border campaign attacked ten targets in six counties, damaging bridges, courthouses and border roads.[5] By 1957, three RUC officers and seven republicans had been killed during the campaign. Cahill was arrested and interned in January 1957 with several other republicans. In the same year, Cahill's first son was born and was named Thomas, after Tom Williams. Cahill was released from internment in April 1961. Founding the Provisional IRA[edit] Following his release from prison, Cahill was disappointed at the direction of the IRA. They had given up armed struggle, and desired seats in elections. Failed campaigns led to the IRA becoming weak and disorganised. Cahill resigned from the IRA around 1962.[5] In August 1969, intense rioting broke out in Northern Ireland, the most violent being in Belfast. In the Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
riots of August 1969, Cahill, along with Billy McKee, tried to defend the Catholic Clonard area from attack, but was unable to prevent Bombay Street being burned by Ulster Protestant
Ulster Protestant
rioters. When he subsequently tried to organise the defence of the Ballymurphy area, he was initially chased away by its Catholic residents.The 1969 Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
riots displaced 1,800 families from their homes. It was a humiliation for the IRA and made evident that they could not protect their people. The slogan 'IRA: I Ran Away’ was painted on walls all over Belfast. The riots were said to be the beginning of “the Troubles” in Ireland[5] Later that year, Cahill was a key figure in founding the Provisional Irish Republican Army. Angry at the failure of the IRA (led in Belfast by Billy McMillen) to defend Catholic areas during the communal rioting, Cahill and McKee stated in September 1969 that they would no longer be taking orders from the IRA leadership in Dublin, or from McMillen. In December 1969, they declared their allegiance to the Provisional IRA, which had split away from the leadership. This action took 9 out of the 13 units of the IRA in Belfast
Belfast
into the Provisional IRA. The remnants of the pre-split IRA became known as the Official IRA. The Provisional IRA was created and an executive council of 12 men was elected. Of the executive members, seven, one of whom was Joe Cahill.[7] were elected to serve as the Provisional Army Council. Cahill also served as the second-in-command to Billy McKee, OC of the Belfast
Belfast
Battalion.[5] Provisional IRA activities[edit] In April 1971, after the arrest and imprisonment of Billy McKee, Cahill became the commander of the Provisional IRA Belfast
Belfast
Brigade. He held this post until the introduction of internment in August of that year. It was during this period that the Provisional IRA campaign got off the ground in the city. Cahill authorised the beginning of the IRA's bombing campaign as well as attacks on British troops and the RUC. He based himself in a house in Andersonstown
Andersonstown
and toured the city, co-ordinating IRA activity. The day after the British Army
British Army
mounted Operation Demetrius, designed to arrest the IRA's leaders, Cahill held a press conference in a school in Ballymurphy and stated that the operation had been a failure. He said, "we have lost one brigade officer, one battalion officer and the rest are volunteers, or as they say in the British Army, privates". To avoid the propaganda defeat that his capture would then have entailed, Cahill fled to the Republic of Ireland, temporarily relinquishing his command of the Belfast Brigade.[3] In March 1972, Cahill was part of an IRA delegation that held direct talks with the British Labour Party leader Harold Wilson.[3] However, although the IRA called a three-day ceasefire for the talks, no permanent end to violence was agreed upon. Upon his return to Ireland, Cahill was arrested in Dublin
Dublin
by Gardaí and charged with IRA membership. He went on hunger strike for twenty-three days and was subsequently released due to lack of evidence. In November 1972, Cahill became the IRA's chief of staff and held this position until his arrest the following year.[3] Cahill was then put in charge of importing arms for the IRA. He liaised with the NORAID
NORAID
group in America and with the Libyan dictatorship of Muammar al-Gaddafi
Muammar al-Gaddafi
to this end. In March 1973 he was arrested by the Irish Navy
Irish Navy
in Waterford, aboard the Claudia, a ship from Libya loaded with five tons of weapons. Cahill was sentenced to three years imprisonment by the Irish Special
Special
Criminal Court. Cahill stated at his trial that, "If I am guilty of any crime, it is that I did not succeed in getting the contents of the Claudia into the hands of the freedom fighters in this country".[3] Upon his release, Cahill again was put in charge of arms importation and to this end went to the United States. He was deported from the United States in 1984 for illegal entry (see Provisional IRA arms importation). He served on the IRA Army Council as late as the 1990s. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, he argued against proposals for Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
to stand in elections. However, in 1985, he spoke at the party's Ard Fheis in favour of republicans contesting elections and taking seats in the Dublin
Dublin
parliament, the Dáil.[3] Peace process[edit] In his later years as honorary life vice-president of Sinn Féin, Cahill was a strong supporter of Gerry Adams
Gerry Adams
and the Good Friday Agreement. In 1994, a controversial but central aspect of the IRA's ceasefire was the granting of a limited visa by then United States President Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
to Cahill, in the face of opposition by John Major's government,[8] for the purpose of trying to win support for the new Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
peace strategy from Irish American IRA supporters. In 1998 he stood in North Antrim in the elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly, but was unsuccessful[9] Death[edit] Cahill died at age 84 in Belfast. He had been diagnosed with asbestosis, which he probably developed while working at the Harland & Wolff shipyards in his twenties. He and several other former shipyard workers later sued the company for their exposure to the dangerous substances but only won minimal compensation. [clarification needed] An Irish republican flute band in Glasgow is named after Cahill.[10] References[edit]

^ "The most important campaigns ever fought by the British Army
British Army
and its fellow Services" (PDF). Wikileaks.org. Retrieved 24 January 2011. [permanent dead link] ^ Irish Republican Felons Association 1964–2004, p. 25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Anderson, Brendan, Joe Cahill: A Life in the IRA, Dublin
Dublin
2002, pp. 17–18, 61, 246–49, 279–80; ISBN 0862786746/ISBN 9780862786748 ^ a b Moloney, Ed (2004). The Secret History of the IRA. New York: W. W. Norton & Co.  ^ a b c d e Anderson, Brendan (2002). Joe Cahill: A Life in the IRA. Dublin: The O'Brien Press. p. 16. ISBN 0-86278-674-6.  ^ a b " Joe Cahill Laid to Rest". Irish America. XX: 10. October 2004.  ^ Ryder, Chris (25 July 2004). "Joe Cahill". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 26 April 2017.  ^ Sinn Féin: A hundred turbulent years, Brian Feeney, O'Brien Press; 2 edition (17 April 2002), ISBN 086278770X/ISBN 978-0862787707, p. 409 ^ Election results, ark.ac.uk. Retrieved 21 November 2014. ^ "Glasgow marchers honour Hunger Strikers". Anphoblacht.com. Retrieved 24 January 2011. 

Bibliography[edit]

Richard English, Armed Struggle – A History of the IRA, MacMillan, London 2003; ISBN 1-4050-0108-9 Ed Moloney, The Secret History of the IRA: Published by Allen Lane (2002), Hardcover: ISBN 071399665X/ISBN 9780713996654 Published Penguin Books Ltd (2003), Paperback: ISBN 014101041X/ISBN 9780141010410 Eamonn Mallie and Patrick Bishop, The Provisional IRA, Corgi, London 1988; ISBN 0-552-13337-X Brendan O'Brien, The Long War – The IRA and Sinn Féin. O'Brien Press, Dublin
Dublin
1995; ISBN 0-86278-359-3

Party political offices

Preceded by Noel Kavanagh? General Secretary of Sinn Féin with Walter Lynch (c.1970–1980) Cathleen Knowles (1980–1983) c.1970–1984? Succeeded by Tom Hartley?

Preceded by Dáithí Ó Conaill
Dáithí Ó Conaill
and Máire Drumm Vice-President of Sinn Féin with Dáithí Ó Conaill
Dáithí Ó Conaill
(1976–1978) Gerry Adams
Gerry Adams
(1978?) 1976–1978? Succeeded by Dáithí Ó Conaill
Dáithí Ó Conaill
and Gerry Adams

v t e

Sinn Féin

History

History of Sinn Féin

Abstentionism

Armalite and ballot box strategy Clann na hÉireann Cumann na nGaedheal (1900) Comhairle na dTeachtaí Éire Nua Election results Fianna Fáil Fine Gael Gaelic American German Plot Provisional IRA Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
Manifesto 1918 Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
MPs Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
(newspaper) Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
Printing & Publishing Company Republican News Republican Sinn Féin United Irishman Willie O'Dea affidavit incident Workers' Party of Ireland 32 County Sovereignty Movement

Leadership

Presidents

Edward Martyn (1905–08) John Sweetman (1908–11) Arthur Griffith
Arthur Griffith
(1911–17) Éamon de Valera
Éamon de Valera
(1917–26) John J. O'Kelly (Sceilg) (1926–31) Brian O'Higgins
Brian O'Higgins
(1931–33) Michael O'Flanagan (1933–35) Cathal Ó Murchadha (1935–37) Margaret Buckley (1937–50) Paddy McLogan (1950–52) Tomás Ó Dubhghaill (1952–54) Paddy McLogan (1954–62) Tomás Mac Giolla
Tomás Mac Giolla
(1962–70) Ruairí Ó Brádaigh
Ruairí Ó Brádaigh
(1970–83) Gerry Adams
Gerry Adams
(1983–2018) Mary Lou McDonald (2018–present)

Vice presidents

John Sweetman (1905–07) Arthur Griffith
Arthur Griffith
(1905–08; 1917–22) Bulmer Hobson
Bulmer Hobson
(1907–10) Jennie Wyse Power (1911–) Thomas Kelly (1911–) Fr. Michael O'Flanagan (1917–23) P. J. Ruttledge (1923–26) Mary MacSwiney John Madden John J. O'Kelly (1931-33) Margaret Buckley (1933–35; 1952–60) Liam Raul (1933-37) Tom Maguire
Tom Maguire
(1935-37) Seamus Mitchell Padraig de Paor Criostóir O'Neill Michael Traynor (1950–54; 1962) Tomás Ó Dubhghaill (1950–52; 1954–62) Tony Magan (1960–62) Rory O'Driscoll (1962–63) Larry Grogan (1962–69; 1970–71) Seán Caughey (1963–65) Joe Clarke (1966–72) Cathal Goulding (1969–70) Dáithí Ó Conaill
Dáithí Ó Conaill
(1971–78; 1978–83) Máire Drumm
Máire Drumm
(1972–76) Joe Cahill (1976–78) Gerry Adams
Gerry Adams
(1978–83) Phil Flynn (1983–85) John Joe McGirl (1985–88) Pat Doherty (1988–2009) Mary Lou McDonald (2009–2018) Michelle O'Neill
Michelle O'Neill
(2018–present)

Seanad leaders

Pearse Doherty (2007–10) David Cullinane
David Cullinane
(2011–16) Rose Conway-Walsh
Rose Conway-Walsh
(2016–)

Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
leaders

Gerry Adams
Gerry Adams
(1998–2007) Martin McGuinness
Martin McGuinness
(2007–17) Michelle O'Neill
Michelle O'Neill
(2017–)

Chairpersons

Seán MacManus (1984–90) Tom Hartley (1990–96) Mitchel McLaughlin
Mitchel McLaughlin
(1996–2005) Mary Lou McDonald (2005–09) Declan Kearney
Declan Kearney
(2009–)

General secretaries

Joe Cahill Cathleen Knowles Tom Hartley (1984–86) Joe Reilly (1986–88) Lucilita Bhreatnach (1988–2003) Mitchel McLaughlin
Mitchel McLaughlin
(2003–07) Rita O'Hare
Rita O'Hare
(2007–09) Dawn Doyle
Dawn Doyle
(2009–)

Directors of publicity

Seán Ó Brádaigh (1960–79) Danny Morrison (1979–90) Rita O'Hare
Rita O'Hare
(1990–98) Dawn Doyle
Dawn Doyle
(1998–2008) Rosaleen Doherty (2008–)

Party structures

Leader of Sinn Féin Ardfheis Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
Front Bench Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
Republican Youth An Phoblacht Friends of Sinn Féin

Presidential candidates

Martin McGuinness
Martin McGuinness
(2011)

Elected representatives

Dáil
Dáil
Éireann

Gerry Adams John Brady Pat Buckley Seán Crowe David Cullinane Pearse Doherty Dessie Ellis Martin Ferris Kathleen Funchion Martin Kenny Mary Lou McDonald Denise Mitchell Imelda Munster Carol Nolan Jonathan O'Brien Eoin Ó Broin Caoimhghín Ó Caoláin Donnchadh Ó Laoghaire Louise O'Reilly Aengus Ó Snodaigh Maurice Quinlivan Brian Stanley Peadar Tóibín

Seanad Éireann

Rose Conway-Walsh Máire Devine Paul Gavan Pádraig Mac Lochlainn Niall Ó Donnghaile Fintan Warfield

European Parliament

Martina Anderson Lynn Boylan Matt Carthy Liadh Ní Riada

Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
Assembly

Caoimhe Archibald Cathal Boylan Michaela Boyle Linda Dillon Jemma Dolan Sinéad Ennis Megan Fearon Órlaithí Flynn Colm Gildernew Declan Kearney Catherine Kelly Gerry Kelly Seán Lynch Alex Maskey Declan McAleer Raymond McCartney Fra McCann Philip McGuigan Ian Milne Karen Mullan Conor Murphy Carál Ní Chuilín John O'Dowd Máirtín Ó Muilleoir Michelle O'Neill Emma Rogan Pat Sheehan

House of Commons (Abstentionist)

Mickey Brady Michelle Gildernew Chris Hazzard Paul Maskey Elisha McCallion Barry McElduff Francie Molloy

Lists

List of current Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
elected representatives

Alliances

European United Left–Nordic Green Left

v t e

Irish Republican Army (1922–69)

General

Genealogy Irish Republican Army (1917–22) British Partition ( Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
& Southern Ireland) Anglo-Irish Treaty
Anglo-Irish Treaty
(in relation to the IRA) Irish Civil War
Irish Civil War
(Timeline & Executions) Munster Republic Comhairle na dTeachtaí Irish republican legitimism Abstentionism Collaboration with the Abwehr The Emergency Plan Kathleen Haughey arms crisis Officials-Provisionals split

Organisation

IRA Army Council IRA Northern Command

Attacks

Battle of Dublin Battle of Kilmallock Anti-Treaty Guerilla Campaign Christmas Raid Sabotage Campaign Northern Campaign Border Campaign

Chiefs of Staff

Liam Lynch (1922) Joe McKelvey (1922) Liam Lynch (1922–23) Frank Aiken
Frank Aiken
(1923–25) Andrew Cooney (1925–26) Moss Twomey (1926–36) Seán MacBride
Seán MacBride
(1936) Tom Barry (1936–37) Mick Fitzpatrick (1937-38) Seán Russell
Seán Russell
(1938-40) Stephen Hayes (1940–41) Pearse Kelly (1941) Seán Harrington (1941–42) Seán McCool (1942) Eoin McNamee (1942) Hugh McAteer (1942) Charlie Kerins (1942–44) Harry White (1944–45) Patrick Fleming (1945–47) Willie McGuinness (1947–48) Tony Magan (1948-57) Richard Burke (1957) Tony Magan (1957) Seán Cronin (1957–58) John Joe McGirl (1958) Ruairí Ó Brádaigh
Ruairí Ó Brádaigh
(1958-59) Seán Cronin (1959–60) Ruairí Ó Brádaigh
Ruairí Ó Brádaigh
(1960-62) Cathal Goulding (1962–69)

Personalities

Cathal Brugha Liam Mellows Robert Erskine Childers Michael Carolan Richard Barrett Hugh Corvin Ernie O'Malley Tom Maguire Paddy McLogan Seamus O'Donovan Frank Ryan Máirtín Ó Cadhain Brendan Behan Dominic Behan Tomás Ó Dubhghaill Seán South Fergal O'Hanlon Manus Canning Seán Mac Stíofáin Joe Cahill Joe McCann Liam Kelly Tom Hales Peadar O'Donnell Éamonn O'Doherty Billy McKee

Associates

Cumann na mBan Fianna Éireann Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
(1922–26 & 1938–69) Clan na Gael National Graves Association Comhairle na Poblachta (1929–31) Saor Éire (1931) Cumann Poblachta na hÉireann (1936–37) Córas na Poblachta Connolly Association (Communist Party of Great Britain) Wolfe Tone Societies Clann na hÉireann

Derivatives

Republican Congress Saor Uladh Provisional Irish Republican Army Official Irish Republican Army

v t e

Provisional Irish Republican Army

General

Anti-Treaty IRA Sinn Féin Republican News An Phoblacht The Green Book The Troubles
The Troubles
(Timeline) Haughey arms crisis Officials-Provisionals split Provisional IRA campaign Arms importation Disappeared Mountjoy Prison helicopter escape Blanket protest Dirty protest HM Prison Maze Anti H-Block 1981 Irish hunger strike Maze Prison escape Armalite and ballot box strategy Smithwick Tribunal Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
peace process North American arrests Barrack buster Good Friday Agreement

Organisation

IRA Army Council Internal Security Unit Active Service Unit (ASU) Provisional IRA Belfast
Belfast
Brigade Provisional IRA Derry Brigade Provisional IRA South Armagh Brigade Provisional IRA East Tyrone Brigade Provisional IRA Balcombe Street Gang ASU

Attacks

Insurgency, 1969–1977

Battle of St Matthew's 1970 RUC booby-trap bombing Scottish soldiers' killings Balmoral showroom bombing Abercorn bombing Donegall St bombing Battle at Springmartin Bloody Friday Claudy bombing Coleraine bombings M62 coach bombing Guildford pub bombings Brook's Club bomb attack British Airways bombing attempt Birmingham pub bombings Bayardo Bar attack Caterham Arms pub bombing London Hilton bombing Green Park tube station bombing Scott's Oyster Bar bombing Walton's Restaurant bombing Drummuckavall ambush Balcombe Street siege Kingsmill massacre

Long War, 1977–1988

1978 Lisnamuck shoot-out Jonesboro Gazelle downing La Mon restaurant bombing 1978 Crossmaglen Ambush Warrenpoint ambush Dunmurry train explosion Lough Foyle attacks Chelsea Barracks bombing Hyde Park and Regent's Park bombings Harrods bombing Woolwich barracks Brighton hotel bombing Ballygawley land mine attack Newry mortar attack Ballygawley attack The Birches attack JHQ Rheindahlen bombing (Germany)

Peace Process, 1988–1998

Corporals killings Lisburn van bombing 1988 Netherlands Attacks Inglis Barracks Ballygawley bus bombing Jonesborough ambush Deal barracks bombing Derryard attack Derrygorry Gazelle downing RFA Fort Victoria bombing Proxy bombings Downing St mortar attack Mullacreevie ambush Glenanne barracks bombing Teebane bombing Cloghoge attack 1992 Manchester bombing South Armagh sniper campaign Warrington bomb attacks Cullaville occupation Bishopsgate bombing Battle of Newry Road Shankill Road bombing Crossmaglen Lynx downing Drumcree conflict Docklands bombing 1996 Manchester bombing Osnabrück mortar attack Thiepval barracks bombing Coalisland attack July 1997 riots

Chiefs of Staff

Seán Mac Stíofáin (1969–72) Joe Cahill (1972–73) Seamus Twomey (1973) Éamonn O'Doherty (1973–74) Seamus Twomey (1974–77) Gerry Adams
Gerry Adams
(1977–78) Martin McGuinness
Martin McGuinness
(1978–82) Ivor Bell (1982–83) Kevin McKenna (1983–97) Thomas "Slab" Murphy (1997–2005)

Personalities (Volunteers)

Billy McKee Gerry Kelly Dolours Price Marian Price Roy Walsh John Joe McGirl Ruairí Ó Brádaigh Dáithí Ó Conaill George Harrison Billy Reid Michael Gaughan Pat Doherty Hugh Doherty Séanna Breathnach Proinsias MacAirt John Kelly Rose Dugdale John Francis Green Peter Cleary Kevin Coen Frank Stagg Kieran Nugent Francis Hughes Brendan Hughes Tommy McKearney Raymond McCartney Gerry McGeough Gerard Casey Thomas McMahon Eamon Collins Gerard Tuite Patrick Magee Bobby Sands Raymond McCreesh Joe McDonnell Martin Hurson Kieran Doherty Thomas McElwee Michael McKevitt Alex Maskey Fra McCann Owen Carron Paul Butler Dessie Ellis Angelo Fusco Breandán Mac Cionnaith Rita O'Hare Martin Meehan Arthur Morgan Danny Morrison Antoine Mac Giolla Bhrighde Kieran Fleming William Fleming Bernard Fox Paddy Quinn Laurence McKeown Pat McGeown Matt Devlin Pat Sheehan Siobhán O'Hanlon Jackie McMullan Patrick Joseph Kelly Larry Marley Jim Lynagh Pádraig McKearney Brendan McFarlane Charles Breslin Sean O'Callaghan Séamus McElwaine Gabriel Cleary Daniel McCann Seán Savage Mairéad Farrell Martin McCaughey Dessie Grew Fergal Caraher Patricia Black Malachy Carey Martin McGartland Joseph MacManus Paul Magee Pearse Jordan Thomas Begley Martin Doherty Ed O'Brien Diarmuid O'Neill Carál Ní Chuilín Ian Milne Conor Murphy Martina Anderson Jennifer McCann Liam Campbell Colin Duffy

Espionage & Supergrasses

Denis Donaldson Freddie Scappaticci (allegedly "Stakeknife") Martin McGartland Raymond Gilmour Kevin Fulton Joseph Fenton Eamon Collins

Associates

Cumann na mBan Fianna Éireann South Armagh Republican Action Force Direct Action Against Drugs NORAID Provisional Clan na Gael Friends of Sinn Féin Cairde na hÉireann Troops Out Movement

Derivatives

Continuity Irish Republican Army Real Irish Republican Army

Prominent killings

Michael Willetts Jean McConville Columba McVeigh Billy Fox Martin McBirney Steven Tibble Ross McWhirter Sammy Smyth Christopher Ewart-Biggs Jeffery Stanford Agate Robert Nairac Richard Sykes Gerard Evans Lord Mountbatten Baroness Brabourne Norman Stronge James Stronge Robert Bradford Lenny Murphy Kenneth Salvesen Anthony Berry Maurice Gibson Robert Seymour Heidi Hazell Joseph Fenton Nick Spanos Stephen Melrose Ian Gow Donald Kaberry Thomas Oliver Sammy Ward Tim Parry Jonathan Ball Ray Smallwoods Joe Bratty Raymond Elder Martin Cahill Jerry McCabe Andrew Kearney Eamon Collins Matthew Burns Robert McCartney (allegedly) James Curran Joseph Rafferty (allegedly) Paul Quinn

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 17164544 LCCN: nr2003008

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