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Jesse Albert Stone (November 16, 1901 – April 1, 1999)[1] was an American rhythm and blues musician and songwriter whose influence spanned a wide range of genres. He also used the pseudonyms Charles Calhoun and Chuck Calhoun. His best-known composition as Calhoun was "Shake, Rattle and Roll".[2]

Ahmet Ertegun once stated that "Jesse Stone did more to develop the basic rock 'n' roll sound than anybody else."[3][4]

Early life

Stone was born in Atchison, Kansas, United States,[2] and raised in Kansas. His grandparents were former slaves from Tennessee.[4]

Stone was influenced by a wide array of styles. He came from a musical family who put on minstrel shows, and performed with them by age of five.[4] He was part of a trained dog act at the age of four.[citation needed]

Career

By 1926, Stone had formed a group, the Blue Serenaders, and cut his first record, "Starvation Blues", for Okeh Records in 1927. For the next few years he worked as a pianist and arranger in Kansas City, recording with Julia Lee among others, and then in the 1930s organised a larger orchestra.[2]

Ahmet Ertegun once stated that "Jesse Stone did more to develop the basic rock 'n' roll sound than anybody else."[3][4]

Stone was born in Atchison, Kansas, United States,[2] and raised in Kansas. His grandparents were former slaves from Tennessee.[4]

Stone was influenced by a wide array of styles. He came from a musical family who put on minstrel shows, and performed with them by age of five.[4] He was part of a trained dog act at the age of four.[citation needed]

Career

By 1926, Stone had formed a group, the Blue Serenaders, and cut his first record, "Starvation Blues", for Okeh Records in 1927. For the next few years he worked as a pianist and arranger in Kansas City, recording with Julia Lee among others, and then in the 1930s organised a larger orchestra.[2]

New York in the 1930s and 1940s

Duke Ellington got Stone's orchestra booked at the Cotton Club in 1936, and Ellington put Stone up free of charge in his apartment for four months. Over the next few years Stone worked as a bandleader at the Apollo Theatre, and more widely in Harlem as a songwriter and arranger, with Chick Webb

Stone was influenced by a wide array of styles. He came from a musical family who put on minstrel shows, and performed with them by age of five.[4] He was part of a trained dog act at the age of four.[citation needed]

By 1926, Stone had formed a group, the Blue Serenaders, and cut his first record, "Starvation Blues", for Okeh Records in 1927. For the next few years he worked as a pianist and arranger in Kansas City, recording with Julia Lee among others, and then in the 1930s organised a larger orchestra.[2]

New York in the 1930s and 1940s

After lea

After leaving Randy Records, Stone relocated to New York and then Florida. In 1975, he married Evelyn McGee[4] (1922–1996), formerly of the International Sweethearts of Rhythm.[1]

Stone died "after a long illness" at age 97 in Altamonte Springs, Florida.[4]

Stone died "after a long illness" at age 97 in Altamonte Springs, Florida.[4]