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The Info List - Jerry West


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As player:

NBA champion (1972) NBA Finals MVP (1969) 14× NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
(1961–1974) NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game MVP (1972) 10× All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
(1962–1967, 1970–1973) 2× All-NBA Second Team
All-NBA Second Team
(1968, 1969) 4× NBA All-Defensive First Team
NBA All-Defensive First Team
(1970–1973) NBA All-Defensive Second Team
NBA All-Defensive Second Team
(1969) NBA scoring champion (1970) NBA assists leader (1972) NBA 35th Anniversary Team NBA 50th Anniversary Team No. 44 retired by Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player (1959) 2× Consensus first-team All-American (1959, 1960) Third-team All-American – AP, UPI (1958) 2× SoCon Player of the Year (1959, 1960)

As executive:

NBA champion (1980, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1988, 2000, 2015, 2017) 2× NBA Executive of the Year (1995, 2004)

Career statistics

Points 25,192 (27.0 ppg)

Rebounds 5,366 (5.8 rpg)

Assists 6,238 (6.7 apg)

Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame as player

College Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Inducted in 2006

Medals

Men's basketball

Representing  United States

Olympic Games

1960 Rome Team competition

Pan American Games

1959 Chicago Team competition

Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938) is an American retired basketball player who played professionally for the Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
of the National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
(NBA). His nicknames included Mr. Clutch, for his ability to make a big play in a clutch situation, such as his famous buzzer-beating 60-foot shot that tied Game 3 of the 1970 NBA Finals against the New York Knicks; The Logo, in reference to his silhouette being incorporated into the NBA logo; Mr. Outside, in reference to his perimeter play with the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers; and Zeke from Cabin Creek, for the creek near his birthplace of Chelyan, West Virginia. West played the small forward position early in his career, and he was a standout at East Bank High School and at West Virginia University, where he led the Mountaineers to the 1959 NCAA championship game. He earned the NCAA
NCAA
Final Four Most Outstanding Player honor despite the loss. He then embarked on a 14-year career with the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers, and was the co-captain of the 1960 U.S. Olympic gold medal team, a squad that was inducted as a unit into the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame in 2010. West's NBA career was highly successful. Playing the guard position, he was voted 12 times into the All-NBA
All-NBA
First and Second Teams, was elected into the NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Team 14 times, and was chosen as the All-Star MVP in 1972, the same year that he won the only title of his career. West holds the NBA record for the highest points per game average in a playoff series with 46.3. He was also a member of the first five NBA All-Defensive Teams (one second, followed by four firsts), which were introduced when he was 32 years old. Having played in nine NBA Finals, he is also the only player in NBA history to be named Finals MVP despite being on the losing team (1969). West was inducted into the Naismith Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame in 1980 and voted as one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA history
50 Greatest Players in NBA history
in 1996. After his playing career ended, West took over as head coach of the Lakers for three years. He led Los Angeles
Los Angeles
into the playoffs each year and earned a Western Conference Finals berth once. Working as a player-scout for three years, West was named general manager of the Lakers prior to the 1982–83 NBA season. Under his reign, Los Angeles won six championship rings. In 2002, West became general manager of the Memphis Grizzlies
Memphis Grizzlies
and helped the franchise win their first-ever playoff berths. For his contributions, West won the NBA Executive of the Year Award twice, once as a Lakers manager (1995) and then as a Grizzlies manager (2004). West's son, Jonnie, played college basketball for West Virginia.

Contents

1 Early life

1.1 East Bank High School

2 College career 3 Professional career

3.1 Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers

3.1.1 Mr. Inside and Mr. Outside 3.1.2 Leader of the Lakers 3.1.3 Arrival of Wilt Chamberlain 3.1.4 Late success and twilight years

3.2 Coaching and executive career

4 NBA career statistics

4.1 Regular season 4.2 Playoffs

5 Head coaching record 6 Player profile 7 Legacy 8 Personal life 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External links

Early life Jerry Alan West was born into a poor household in Chelyan, West Virginia.[3] He was the fifth of six children of Cecil Sue West, a housewife, and Howard Stewart West, a coal mine electrician.[4] West was previously an aggressive child in his youth, until his brother's death at the Korean War
Korean War
aged 21 turned him into a shy and introverted boy when Jerry was 12/13.[3][5] He was so small, frail, and weak that he needed lots of vitamin injections from his doctor and was kept apart from children's sports, to prevent him from getting seriously injured.[3] Growing up, West spent his days hunting and fishing, but his main activity was shooting at a basketball hoop that a neighbor had nailed to his storage shed. West spent days shooting baskets from every possible angle, ignoring mud and snow in the backyard, as well as his mother's whippings when he came home hours late for dinner; he played so often that the NBA acknowledged it as "obsessive".[3] East Bank High School West attended East Bank High School in East Bank, West Virginia
East Bank, West Virginia
from 1952 to 1956. During his first year, he was benched by his coach Duke Shaver due to his lack of height. Shaver emphasized the importance of conditioning and defense, which were lessons that the teenager appreciated.[6] West soon became the captain of the freshman team, and during the summer of 1953 he grew to 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m).[3] West eventually became the team's starting small forward, and he quickly established himself as one of the finest West Virginia high school players of his generation. He was named All-State from 1953–56, then All-American in 1956 when he was West Virginia Player of the Year, becoming the state's first high-school player to score more than 900 points in a season, with an average of 32.2 points per game. West's mid-range jump shot became his trademark and he often used it to score while under pressure from opposing defense.[3] West led East Bank to a state championship on March 24 that year, prompting East Bank High School to change its name to "West Bank High School" every year on March 24 in honor of their basketball prodigy. This practice remained in effect until the school closed in 1999.[7] College career

West from The Monticola, 1959

West graduated from East Bank High School in 1956, and more than 60 universities showed interest in him. He eventually chose to stay in his home state and attend West Virginia University
West Virginia University
(WVU), located in Morgantown.[8] In his freshman year (1956–57), West was a member of the WVU freshman squad that achieved a perfect record of 17 wins without a loss over the course of the season;[8] other team members included Jay Jacobs and Willie Akers.[9] In his first varsity year under head coach Fred Schaus, West scored 17.8 points per game and averaged 11.1 rebounds; he also started in all 28 games while shooting 49.6% from the field and 73.2% from the free throw line.[10] These performances earned him a multitude of honors, among them an All-American Third Team call-up; First Team All-Southern Conference; Southern Conference
Southern Conference
Tournament Most Valuable Player Award and First Team honors; Chuck Taylor–Converse Second-team All-American honors; and Associated Press
Associated Press
and United Press International
United Press International
Third-team All-American honors.[11] The Mountaineers went 26–2 that year, ending the season with a loss to Manhattan College
Manhattan College
in post-season tournament play.[12] During his junior year (1958–59), West scored 26.6 points per game and grabbed 12.3 rebounds per game.[10] He tied the NCAA five-game tournament record of 160 points (32.0 points per game) and led all scorers and rebounders in every West Virginia game, including getting 28 points and 11 rebounds in a 71–70 loss to California in the final. West was named Most Outstanding Player of that year's Final Four.[7] Further awards were All-American, Southern Conference
Southern Conference
Tournament MVP and Southern Conference
Southern Conference
Player of the Year and Athlete of the Year.[11] He was also named to be a member of the U.S. Pan American Games
Pan American Games
basketball team that won the gold medal.[3] West demonstrated his tenacity for the game in a match against the Kentucky Wildcats. He broke his nose during an incident in the game, but he continued to play despite intense pain and having to breathe through his mouth. He scored 19 points in the second-half, leading WVU to an upset victory.[7] In his final collegiate season (1959–60) West enjoyed several career highs, such as scoring 29.3 points per game, a 134 season-assists, 16.5 rebounds per game, and a shooting average of 50.4% from the field, 76.6% from the free throw line.[10] He was honored again with several awards: a call-up to the All-American selection, and being voted Southern Conference
Southern Conference
MVP.[11] West's best performance was a game against Virginia, in which he grabbed 16 rebounds and scored 40 points. Moreover, during that final year, he had 30 double-doubles and fifteen 30-point games.[13] In his collegiate career, West totaled 2,309 points and 1,240 rebounds. He averaged 24.8 points per game and 13.3 rebounds.[10] As of 2011, West holds 12 WVU all-time records.[14] West and Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
co-captained the U.S. men's basketball team that won the gold medal at the 1960 Summer Olympics.[3] Professional career Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers Mr. Inside and Mr. Outside

Jerry West
Jerry West
(with the ball) in 1971.

West made himself available for the 1960 NBA draft, and he was drafted with the second overall pick by the Minneapolis Lakers, shortly before the team relocated to Los Angeles. West became the first draft pick ever of the relocated franchise.[15] His college coach was also hired to coach the Lakers. He played West as a guard, in contrast to West's college days as a forward.[3] The Lakers were captained by Hall-of-Fame forward Elgin Baylor, who was complemented by centers Jim Krebs and Ray Felix; forwards Rudy LaRusso and Tom Hawkins; and guards Rod Hundley
Rod Hundley
(from West Virginia, like West), Frank Selvy, and Bobby Leonard.[16] This team perennially had strong forwards and guards, but was constantly weak at center, giving them a disadvantage against the Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
with their Hall-of-Fame center, Bill Russell.[17] Initially, West felt odd in his new environment. He was a loner. His high-pitched voice earned him the nickname "Tweety Bird", and he spoke with such a thick Appalachian accent that his teammates also referred to him as "Zeke from Cabin Creek" (his nickname acknowledged his country roots, and his accent was so thick that he squeaked his nickname sheepishly – "Zeek fr'm Cab'n Creek").[18] However, West soon impressed his colleagues with his defensive hustle, with his vertical jump—he could reach up 16 inches above the rim when he went up—and with his work ethic, spending countless extra hours working on his game.[18] On the floor, West scored 17.6 points, grabbed 7.7 rebounds and gave 4.2 assists per game. West won Schaus's trust and, alternating with Hundley, Selvy, and Leonard, played 35 minutes per game and established himself as the Lakers' second scoring option.[10] The NBA commented that the Lakers now had a potent one-two-punch—with "Mr. Inside" (the low-post scorer, Baylor) and "Mr. Outside" (the long-distance shooter, West).[3] These performances soon earned West his first of fourteen NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game call-ups.[10] West helped the Lakers improve from their previous 25-win season to 36 wins as they reached the 1961 NBA Playoffs. They needed all five games to put away the Detroit Pistons; but then lost to the St. Louis Hawks in seven games, losing the final game 105–103.[19] In West's second NBA season, the Lakers could only make limited use of Baylor, who was called up by the U.S. Army Reserves
U.S. Army Reserves
and could play only 48 games.[18] However, West seamlessly took over the role of team leader and established himself as the main Lakers scorer, averaging 30.8 points, 7.9 rebounds and 5.4 assists per game, winning All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
honors.[10] West became known especially for hitting important late-game shots, and Lakers' announcer Chick Hearn named him "Mr. Clutch" a handle which stuck with West for his entire career.[18] The Lakers won 54 regular season games and secured a first-round bye in the 1962 NBA Playoffs. They beat the Pistons four games to two to advance to the 1962 NBA Finals against the Boston Celtics. The teams split the first two games, and at the end of Game 3 in Los Angeles, West tied the game at 115. The Celtics' Sam Jones inbounded the ball at half-court with three seconds left. West stole the ball, raced upcourt, and converted a running layup as the buzzer sounded.[20] The Celtics tied the series in Game 6 at three games apiece, and the teams headed to Boston for Game 7. For most of the game, the Lakers trailed, but West and Frank Selvy hit several clutch baskets and tied the game at 100. Selvy then missed an open 8-foot shot which would have won the Lakers their first title. Baylor's tip-in attempt was thwarted by Sam Jones.[20] In overtime, Jones scored several clutch baskets to ensure a 110–107 win for the Celtics. The 1962 NBA finals would serve as the beginning of the greatest rivalry in NBA history[20] In the 1962–63 NBA season, Baylor was back full-time. West averaged 27.8 points, 7.0 rebounds and 5.6 assists and was again NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
and All-NBA
All-NBA
First-Team;[10] however, he played in only 55 regular season games, missing the last seven weeks due to a hamstring injury.[17] Again, the Lakers reached the finals, and again, they battled the Celtics. With West not yet in shape, Baylor and the Lakers fell back 3–2; then they succumbed in Game 6 in front of their home crowd with a 112–109 loss. As the game ended, veteran Celtics playmaker Bob Cousy
Bob Cousy
threw the ball high into the rafters of the L.A. Sports Arena.[21] In the following 1963–64 NBA season, West became the Lakers' scoring leader for the first time. His 28.7 points per game eclipsed the 25.4 by Baylor, who stated that he suffered from knee problems.[22] The Lakers struggled during the entire season, winning only 42 games, and were beaten by the Hawks in five games during the first round of the 1964 NBA Playoffs.[23] Leader of the Lakers

The Forum was the home of the Lakers from 1967 until 1999.

In the following 1964–65 NBA season, West averaged 31.0 points (at the time, a career-high), only surpassed by perennial scoring champion Wilt Chamberlain.[10] After ending the regular season with 49 wins, L.A. played the Baltimore Bullets in the first round of the 1965 NBA Playoffs, but then team captain Baylor suffered a career-threatening knee injury.[22] West spectacularly took over Baylor's leader role, as he scored 49 points and willed the shocked Lakers to the win. In Game 2, Baltimore was unable to stop the Lakers guard, who scored 52 points, nearly half of L.A.'s total, in the 118–115 win. The Bullets took their two home games, despite West scoring 44 and 48 points respectively, but in the decisive Game 5 in L.A., the guard helped beat the Bullets with 42 points in a close 117–115 win. West averaged 46.3 points per game, a figure that is still an NBA record.[24] However, in the 1965 NBA Finals, the Celtics easily beat the short-handed Lakers, 4–1. In Game 1, which Boston easily won, defensive Celtics guard K. C. Jones
K. C. Jones
kept West to only 26 points, and in Game 2, West scored 45 points, but Boston still won 129–123.[25] In Game 3, West scored 49 points, and L.A. finally won a game, but in Games 4 and 5, the Lakers were beaten by double digits; in the last quarter of Game 5, West missed 14 of 15 shots and could not prevent yet another Celtics win.[25] Still, the Lakers guard finished the playoffs with 40.6 points per game.[17] In the 1965–66 NBA season, West averaged a career-best 31.3 points, along with 7.1 rebounds and 6.1 assists per game. He made an NBA record 840 free throws, and earned yet another pair of All-Star Team and All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
nominations.[10] Winning 45 games, the Lakers beat the St. Louis Hawks
St. Louis Hawks
in a close seven-game series, and yet again met the Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
in the 1966 NBA Finals. West was assisted by Baylor, who was a self-estimated "75 percent" of his pre-injury self,[26] The two long-standing rivals split the first six games, with West's usual scoring dominance countered by Celtics forward John Havlicek, whose size and speed created serious mismatch problems for the Lakers.[26] In Game 7, West and Baylor shot a combined three of 18 in the first half, and the Lakers fell far behind; L.A. willed themselves back to a close 95–93 with four seconds left, but the Celtics ran the clock out and the Lakers were denied yet again.[26] The 1966–67 NBA season saw West playing only 66 regular-season games due to injury;[17] his averages fell slightly to 28.0 points, 5.9 rebounds and 6.8 assists per game.[10] The Lakers had a disappointing season, winning only 36 games and getting swept by the San Francisco Warriors
San Francisco Warriors
in the first round of the 1967 NBA Playoffs.[27] Veteran coach Fred Schaus
Fred Schaus
retired, and Butch Van Breda Kolff took over; under his reign, the Lakers won 52 games in the 1967–68 NBA season in their first season in The Forum.[28] The 52 wins were accumulated despite West playing only 51 regular season games due to injury[17] and scoring 26.3 points, the lowest average since his rookie year: after being a First-Teamer for six times en bloc, he only made the All-NBA
All-NBA
Second Team.[10] In the 1968 NBA Playoffs, the Lakers beat the Chicago Bulls
Chicago Bulls
and the Warriors to set up yet another Lakers-Celtics NBA Finals; it was considered a match of size versus speed, as the Lakers had nobody to counter Celtics coach/center Bill Russell
Bill Russell
or forward John Havlicek close to the basket, but the Celtics in return had difficulties guarding prolific L.A. outside shooters Baylor, West and fellow guard Gail Goodrich.[29] In Game 1, West only hit seven of 24 shots, and the Lakers lost 107–101, but L.A. evened out the series at two games each. But West, who had scored 38 points in a Game 4 win, had sprained his ankle and did not play at full strength the rest of the series.[29] In Game 5, an injured West scored 35 points, but Boston won by three points. In Game 6, Havlicek shredded the Lakers with 40 points, and after yet another Finals loss to Boston, West commented that the Lakers lost two games they should have won: "We gave them the first game, and we gave them the fifth. But I take nothing from them… They're all that way on the Celtics, and you can't teach it."[29] Arrival of Wilt Chamberlain

West's No. 44 jersey (upper left) was retired in 1983 and hangs in the rafters of the Staples Center.

On July 9, 1968, the Lakers made a trade that brought reigning NBA Most Valuable Player Wilt Chamberlain
Wilt Chamberlain
of the Philadelphia 76ers
Philadelphia 76ers
to Los Angeles at the beginning of the 1968–69 NBA season. To get the center, the Lakers traded West's backcourt partner Archie Clark, starting center Darrall Imhoff
Darrall Imhoff
and backup forward Jerry Chambers
Jerry Chambers
to Philadelphia.[30] Coach Van Breda Kolff was concerned about the drain at the guard positions after losing Clark, and especially after losing Goodrich in the expansion draft to the Phoenix Suns. He only had diminutive, defensively weak Johnny Egan left next to West.[30] While West himself got on well with the new recruit, Chamberlain often argued with team captain Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
and had a poor relationship with Van Breda Kolff. Van Breda Kolff pejoratively called Chamberlain "The Load", and later complained that Chamberlain was egotistical, never respected him, too often slacked off in practice and focused too much on his own statistics.[31] In return, the center blasted Van Breda Kolff as "the dumbest and worst coach ever".[31] There was an altercation in which Chamberlain was about to punch Van Breda Kolff before Baylor had intervened.[32] West was clearly disturbed by locker room tension; used to playing in teams with good chemistry, his quality of play became erratic, and he posted a career-low 25.9 points. However, he made the Second Team of the inaugural All-Defensive Team.[32] In the 1969 NBA Playoffs, the 55-win Lakers defeated the Atlanta Hawks and the San Francisco Warriors, setting up the sixth finals series versus Boston in eight years. Prior to Game 1, West privately complained to Bill Russell
Bill Russell
of exhaustion, but then the Lakers guard scored 53 points on Boston in a close two-point win.[33] L.A. also took Game 2, with West scoring 41 points.[34] In Game 3, Russell opted to double-team West, and the guard's exhaustion began to show: West twice asked to be subbed for longer periods, and both times the Lakers fell back by double digits and finally lost by six points.[33] Game 4 saw Celtics guard Sam Jones hit an off-balance buzzer beater to tie the series,[34] but in Game 5, the Lakers struck back and won by 13 points; however, they suffered a major blow when West – who scored 39 points and by far led all players in scoring during the entire series – lunged for a meaningless late-game ball and seriously pulled his hamstring: it was immediately visible that the injury would not heal until the end of the series.[33] A limping West scored 26 points in Game 6, but the Celtics won 99–90 with a strong Bill Russell, who held Chamberlain to only eight points in the entire game.[34] In Game 7, Lakers owner Jack Kent Cooke
Jack Kent Cooke
had put up thousands of balloons in the rafters of the Forum in Los Angeles. This display of arrogance motivated the Celtics and angered West.[30] The Lakers trailed the entire game and were behind 91-76 after 3 quarters, but powered by a limping West, the Lakers closed the gap to 103-102 with two minutes to go and had the ball. But West committed costly turnovers and L.A. lost the game 108–106 despite a triple-double of 42 points, 13 rebounds and 12 assists from West, who became the only winner of the Bill Russell NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award
Bill Russell NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award
from the losing team.[34] After the loss, West was seen as the ultimate tragic hero: after the game, Bill Russell
Bill Russell
held his hand, and John Havlicek said: "I love you, Jerry".[33] In the 1969–70 NBA season
1969–70 NBA season
under new coach Joe Mullaney, the Lakers' season began with a shock when Wilt Chamberlain
Wilt Chamberlain
seriously injured his knee and missed practically the whole regular season.[35] As after Baylor's injury years before, West stepped into the void, leading the NBA in scoring average with 31.2 points per game, and averaging 4.6 rebounds and 7.5 assists per game, earning him his first of four All-Defensive First Team vote and another All-NBA
All-NBA
First Team berth after two Second Team years.[10] The Lakers won 46 games, and in the 1970 NBA Playoffs, they narrowly beat the Phoenix Suns
Phoenix Suns
in seven games and swept the Hawks in four, setting up the first NBA Finals between the Lakers and the rugged New York Knicks, led by Hall-of-Famers, such as Willis Reed, Dave DeBusschere, Bill Bradley, and Walt Frazier.[36] L.A. and N.Y. split the first two games, with both games respectively decided by centers Reed and the still-hobbling Chamberlain.[36] In Game 3, DeBusschere hit a mid-range jump shot with three seconds left to put the Knicks ahead 102–100, and the Lakers had no time-outs left. Chamberlain inbounded the ball to West, who raced past Walt Frazier
Walt Frazier
and threw up a 60-foot shot. Frazier later commented: "The man's crazy. He looks determined. He thinks it's really going in!"[3] West incredibly connected, and this basket was later called one of the greatest moments ever by the NBA.[37] As the three-point line had not been introduced yet, the shot just tied the game. In overtime, West however sprained his left hand and missed all five of his shots, and the Knicks won 111-108.[7] In Game 4, the guard scored 37 points and 18 assists, and the Lakers won.[38] However, more frustration awaited West in Game 5, when Reed pulled his thigh muscle and seemed out for the series; instead of capitalising on a double-digit lead and reeling off an easy win, the Lakers committed 19 second half turnovers, and the two main scorers Chamberlain and West shot the ball only three and two times, respectively, in the entire second half and lost 107-100 in what was called one of the greatest comebacks in NBA Finals history.[36][38] After Chamberlain scored 45 points and West 31 points plus 13 assists in a series-equalising 135-113 Lakers win, the Lakers seemed favorites prior to Game 7. However, West had also injured his right hand and received several manual injections,[36] and Reed famously hobbled up court prior to Game 7: the Knicks center scored the first four points, and inspired his team to one of the most famous playoff upsets of all time.[39] With his injured hands, West still hit nine of his 19 shots, but was outplayed by Walt Frazier, who scored 36 points and 19 assists and was credited with several crucial steals on Lakers guard Dick Garrett.[36][38] In the 1970–71 NBA season, the Lakers resigned Gail Goodrich, who came back from the Phoenix Suns
Phoenix Suns
after playing for L.A. until 1968. At age 32, West averaged 26.9 points, 4.6 rebounds and 9.5 assists,[10] and helped the Lakers win 46 games and make the 1971 NBA Playoffs. After losing Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
to an Achilles tendon rupture that effectively ended his career, West himself injured his knee and was out for the season; the short-handed Lakers lost the Western Conference Finals in five games to the championship-bound Milwaukee Bucks. The Milwaukee Bucks
Milwaukee Bucks
featured freshly crowned Most Valuable Player Lew Alcindor (later known as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar) and veteran Hall-of-Fame guard Oscar Robertson.[40] Late success and twilight years

West in 1972

Prior to the 1971–72 NBA season, West was smarting from his frequent injuries and losses and considered retirement.[3] The Lakers hired former Celtics star guard and future Hall-of-Fame coach Bill Sharman as head coach. Although injured captain Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
ended his career, the Lakers had a season for the ages. The team was powered by Sharman's emphasis on tough defense and fast break offense, and L.A. embarked on an unprecedented 33 game win streak, en route to a then-record 69 wins in the regular season.[41] West himself contributed with 25.8 points and led the league with a career-high 9.7 assists per game. He was named All-Star, All-NBA and All-Defense First Teamer and voted 1972 All-Star Game MVP.[10] In the post-season, the Lakers defeated the Chicago Bulls
Chicago Bulls
in a four-game sweep,[42] then went on to face the Milwaukee Bucks, and defeated them in six games. In the 1972 NBA Finals, the Lakers again met the New York Knicks. Although West suffered a terrible shooting slump during Games 1 and 2, the Lakers tied the series at one win each, and in Game 3, he scored 21 points and helped L.A. win Game 3. In this game, he now had scored 4,002 playoff points, which set an all-time NBA record.[43] After winning Game 4 due to a superb outing from Wilt Chamberlain, West scored 23 points in Game 5, and he won the game and their first-ever NBA title.[43] West conceded that he had played a terrible series, and credited the team for the success. Years later he said "I played terrible basketball in the Finals, and we won… It was particularly frustrating because I was playing so poorly that the team overcame me. Maybe that's what a team is all about."[41] Having vanquished this long-time bane, West entered his 13th NBA year. In the 1972–73 NBA season, the main scoring role was taken by Goodrich, and West was now a playmaker instead of a scorer. However, West averaged 22.8 points, but also averaged 8.8 assists per game, and again was a First Teamer in the All-Star, All-NBA, and All-Defense Teams.[10] The Lakers won 60 games and reached the 1973 NBA Finals against the New York Knicks. In Game 1 West scored 24 points before fouling out with three minutes left and L.A. won Game 1 with 115–112.[44] However, the Knicks took Games 2 and 3, and West strained both of his hamstrings: in Game 4, the shorthanded Lakers were no match for New York, and in Game 5, the valiant, but injured West and Hairston had miserable games, and despite Chamberlain scoring 23 points and grabbing 21 rebounds, the Lakers lost 102–93 and the series.[45][46] The 1973–74 NBA season was to be West's last as a player. Now 36 years old, the veteran guard averaged 20.3 points, 3.7 rebounds and 6.6 assists per game.[10] In two newly introduced statistics, steals and blocks, he was credited with 2.6 steals and 0.7 blocks per game. Despite playing only 31 games due to a strained groin,[3] West was still regarded as an elite guard, earning another callup into his final All-Star Game.[10] Without Chamberlain, who had ended his NBA career, the Lakers won 47 games and lost in five games to the Milwaukee Bucks. After this loss, West retired due to contract disagreements with Cooke, and filed a suit for unpaid back wages.[47] West wanted to re-negotiate his contract and keep playing, however he said Cooke "basically told my agent to go to hell. I felt I was deceived. When you feel that you’re deceived you don’t want any part of the organization that deceived you. I could’ve played another very good year. Every athlete says that. But I could’ve, and I knew I could’ve. But I could never have played for the Lakers again, and I wasn’t going to play for anybody else."[48] At the time of his departure, West had scored more points than any Laker in NBA history.[17] Coaching and executive career

In the summer of 1996, West traded for shooting guard Kobe Bryant, and signed then free agent Shaquille O'Neal.

Lakers owner Jack Kent Cooke
Jack Kent Cooke
was known for having a keen eye identifying leadership and teaching qualities (he also gave Hall of Famers Sparky Anderson
Sparky Anderson
and Joe Gibbs
Joe Gibbs
their first managerial/head coaching positions),[49] and asked West to coach and participate in player personnel decisions.[50] In the 1976–77 season, West became coach of the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers. In three years, he led the Lakers and star center Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
to a 145–101 record, making the playoffs in all 3 seasons and reaching the Western Conference Finals once in 1977.[51] After his coaching stint, he worked as a scout for three years before becoming general manager of the Lakers prior to the 1982–83 season. NBA.com credits West in creating the great 1980s Lakers dynasty, which brought five championship rings (1980, 1982, 1985, 1987 and 1988) to Los Angeles.[3] After a slump in the early 1990s, West rebuilt the team of coach Del Harris around center Vlade Divac, forward Cedric Ceballos, and guard Nick Van Exel, which won 48 games, and went to the Western Conference Semifinals; for turning the team around, West received his first Executive of the Year Award.[52] By trading Vlade Divac for Kobe Bryant, signing free agent center Shaquille O'Neal, and signing six-time NBA champion Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
as a coach, West laid down the fundaments of the Lakers three-peat which saw L.A. win three NBA titles from 2000 to 2002.[3]

In 1999, West signed six-time NBA champion coach Phil Jackson.

In 2002, West became general manager of the Memphis Grizzlies. He explained his decision with the desire for exploring something new: "After being a part of the Lakers success for so many years, I have always wondered how it would be to build a winning franchise that has not experienced much success. I want to help make a difference."[53] West's Memphis stint was not as spectacular as his Los Angeles
Los Angeles
stint, but he turned a franchise which was about to be sold into a reliable playoffs team, practically making no trades but getting the maximum from the players he had available (e.g. Pau Gasol, James Posey
James Posey
and Jason Williams) and signing coach Hubie Brown, who became Coach of the Year in 2004.[54] West himself won his second NBA Executive of the Year Award in the same year.[52] At age 69, West retired as a Grizzlies general manager in 2007 and turned over managing duties to Chris Wallace, from Buckhannon, West Virginia.[54] On May 19, 2011, West joined the Golden State Warriors
Golden State Warriors
as an executive board member, reporting directly to new owners Joe Lacob and Peter Guber.[55][56] This role also came with an undisclosed minority ownership stake in the team.[57] In 2015, the Warriors won their first championship in 40 years; the championship was the seventh earned by West while serving as a team executive. He earned his eighth in the 2016-2017 season. On June 14, 2017, West announced that he would go to the Los Angeles Clippers as an executive board member.[58][59] NBA career statistics

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

† Denotes season in which West won an NBA championship

* Led the league

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1960–61 L.A. Lakers 79 – 35.4 .419 – .666 7.7 4.2 – – 17.6

1961–62 L.A. Lakers 75 – 41.2 .445 – .769 7.9 5.4 – – 30.8

1962–63 L.A. Lakers 55 – 39.3 .461 – .778 7.0 5.6 – – 27.1

1963–64 L.A. Lakers 72 – 40.4 .484 – .832 6.0 5.6 – – 28.7

1964–65 L.A. Lakers 74 – 41.4 .497 – .821 6.0 4.9 – – 31.0

1965–66 L.A. Lakers 79 – 40.7 .473 – .860 7.1 6.1 – – 31.3

1966–67 L.A. Lakers 66 – 40.5 .464 – .878 5.9 6.8 – – 28.7

1967–68 L.A. Lakers 51 – 37.6 .514 – .811 5.8 6.1 – – 26.3

1968–69 L.A. Lakers 61 – 39.2 .471 – .821 4.3 6.9 – – 25.9

1969–70 L.A. Lakers 74 – 42.0 .497 – .824 4.6 7.5 – – 31.2*

1970–71 L.A. Lakers 69 – 41.2 .494 – .832 4.6 9.5 – – 26.9

1971–72† L.A. Lakers 77 – 38.6 .477 – .814 4.2 9.7* – – 25.8

1972–73 L.A. Lakers 69 – 35.7 .479 – .805 4.2 8.8 – – 22.8

1973–74 L.A. Lakers 31 – 31.2 .447 – .833 3.7 6.6 2.6 0.7 20.3

Career 932 – 39.2 .474 – .814 5.8 6.7 2.6 0.7 27.0

All-Star 12 11 28.4 .453 – .720 3.9 4.6 – – 13.3

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1961 L.A. Lakers 12 – 38.4 .490 – .726 8.7 5.3 – – 22.9

1962 L.A. Lakers 13 – 42.8 .465 – .807 6.8 4.4 – – 31.5

1963 L.A. Lakers 13 – 41.4 .503 – .740 8.2 4.7 – – 27.8

1964 L.A. Lakers 5 – 41.2 .496 – .792 7.2 3.4 – – 31.2

1965 L.A. Lakers 11 – 42.7 .442 – .890 5.7 5.3 – – 40.6*

1966 L.A. Lakers 14 – 44.2 .518 – .872 6.3 5.6 – – 34.2*

1967 L.A. Lakers 1 – 1.0 – – – 1.0 0.0 – – 0.0

1968 L.A. Lakers 15 – 41.5 .527 – .781 5.4 5.5 – – 30.8*

1969 L.A. Lakers 18 – 42.1 .463 – .804 3.9 7.5 – – 30.9*

1970 L.A. Lakers 18 – 46.1 .469 – .802 3.7 8.4* – – 31.2

1972† L.A. Lakers 15 – 40.5 .376 – .830 4.9 8.9* – – 22.9

1973 L.A. Lakers 17 – 37.5 .449 – .780 4.5 7.8* – – 23.6

1974 L.A. Lakers 1 – 14.0 .222 – – 2.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 4.0

Career 153 – 41.3 .469 – .805 5.6 6.3 0.0 0.0 29.1

Head coaching record

Legend

Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss %

Post season PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss %

Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result

Los Angeles 1976–77 82 53 29 .646 1st in Pacific 17 9 8 .529 Lost in Conf. Finals

Los Angeles 1977–78 82 45 37 .549 4th in Pacific 3 1 2 .333 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Los Angeles 1978–79 82 47 35 .573 3rd in Pacific 8 3 5 .375 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Career

246 145 101 .589

22 8 14 .364

Player profile West was an all-around combo guard who could take the playmaking roles of a point guard and score like a shooting guard, while being equally strong on offense and on defense.[3] He had a jump shot with a release the NBA lauded as "lightning quick", and was known for making baskets late in the game, earning him the nickname "Mr. Clutch".[3] Having played forward early in his career, West was also a capable rebounder, and gifted with long arms, quick hands and strong defensive instincts, West was also once described as one of the best ball hawks, man-to-man defenders and shot blockers among NBA guards:[18] when the All-Defensive Teams were introduced in 1969, West made every one of them until his career ended in 1974.[10] "He stole more than anybody, although they didn't keep records on it then", said Sharman.[60] However, contemporaries were most impressed by West's work ethic, obsessively practicing and shooting and rarely being satisfied with himself.[18] West's all-round game and attitude is maybe best expressed in his statistically most spectacular game: he once was credited with 44 points (16 of 17 shots from the field, 12 of 12 free throw attempts) with 12 rebounds, 12 assists, and (unofficially counted) 10 blocked shots, thus scoring a non-official ultra-rare quadruple double.[3] Instead of being proud, West merely commented: "Defensively, from a team standpoint, I didn't feel I played very well. Very rarely was I satisfied with how I played."[3] Legacy

West in 2010

West ended his playing career with 14 All-Star, 12 All-NBA
All-NBA
Team and five All-Defensive Team selections, and scored 25,192 points, 6,238 assists and 5,366 rebounds in 932 games, translating to an average of 27.0 points, 6.7 assists and 5.8 rebounds per game.[10] Among retired players, only Michael Jordan, Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
and Wilt Chamberlain
Wilt Chamberlain
surpass his 27.0 points per game average.[3] He led the Lakers in scoring in seven seasons,[15] only Jordan had a higher career scoring average in the playoffs (33.5 versus 29.1).[61] In 1979, West was elected into the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame, and the Lakers retired his No. 44 jersey in 1983.[15] In March 2008, ESPN
ESPN
voted West the third greatest shooting guard of all time.[62] As a coach, West led the Lakers into three consecutive playoff campaigns, and then went on to win seven NBA championships as a general manager, building the 1980s Lakers dynasty under coach Pat Riley
Pat Riley
and players Magic Johnson, Kareem-Abdul-Jabbar and James Worthy
James Worthy
and the 2000s under coach Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
and players Shaquille O'Neal
Shaquille O'Neal
and Kobe Bryant.[3] In the summer of 2000, the city of Morgantown, West Virginia, and West Virginia Governor Cecil Underwood, dedicated the road outside of the West Virginia University
West Virginia University
Coliseum, " Jerry West
Jerry West
Boulevard". The same road is shared on the south end of Morgantown with Don Knotts Boulevard, in honor of another WVU alumnus.[63] Also, on November 26, 2005, his number 44 became the first basketball number to be retired by West Virginia University
West Virginia University
and on February 17, 2007, a bronze statue of him was honored outside of the WVU Coliseum.[64] On February 17, 2011, a Jerry West
Jerry West
statue was unveiled outside Staples Center
Staples Center
at the Star Plaza in Los Angeles, California.[65] Finally, the NBA logo itself is modelled after West's silhouette.[66] Personal life

West interviewed on ESPN
ESPN
Los Angeles

West married his college sweetheart Martha Jane Kane in April 1960 in Morgantown;[67] they divorced in 1976.[7] They have three sons, David, Mark and Michael.[53] Jerry married his current wife Karen in 1978. They have two sons, Ryan and Jonnie.[7][53] Jonnie played guard for West's college team, the West Virginia Mountaineers.[68] As a person, West was often described as an introverted and nervous character, but who also drew highest praise for his uncompromising work ethic. Regarding his shyness, WVU roommate Jody Gardner testified that West never dated in his entire freshman year, and Lakers coach Fred Schaus
Fred Schaus
once recalled a two-week period when his guard never said a word.[69] Apart from being shy, West was always restless: Schaus described him as a "bundle of nerves", Celtics contemporary Bob Cousy as "always on the move", and fellow Laker and Mountaineer Rod Hundley testified that during bar visits, West would quickly squirm and demand to go elsewhere before everybody else had settled.[70] His first wife Martha Kane recalled that her husband often had difficulties opening up to her. After a big loss, the Wests would drive home and she would try to console him, but West would say "get out" at the home porch and drive away—an experience that "killed" her as a wife.[71] Early in his career, West's West Virginian roots made him target for some mild jeering. He spoke with a high pitched voice that became even shriller when he became excited, so that Lakers captain Elgin Baylor dubbed West "Tweety Bird".[18] His Appalachian accent was so thick that one coach interrupted him and asked him to speak English.[18] Baylor once commented: "Rumors are safe with you, Tweety Bird. You pass them on, but nobody can understand you."[69] West was also regarded for his extreme mental toughness and his exemplary work ethic. The NBA described West as "obsessive perfectionism, unabashed confidence, and an uncompromising will to win… a level of intensity so high it could melt lead".[3] Lakers broadcaster Chick Hearn
Chick Hearn
once said: "He took a loss harder than any player I've ever known. He would sit by himself and stare into space. A loss just ripped his guts out."[3] Even before his sole championship in 1972, the Lakers held a " Jerry West
Jerry West
Night", and eleven-time NBA champion and perennial rival Bill Russell
Bill Russell
appeared and said: "Jerry, you are, in every sense of the word, truly a champion… If I could have one wish granted, it would be that you would always be happy."[72] In 2011, West and bestselling author Jonathan Coleman wrote a memoir entitled West by West: My Charmed, Tormented Life. The book has had tremendous critical acclaim and became an instant New York Times bestseller. During an interview on HBO's Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel, West revealed that as a child he was the victim of physical abuse from his father and has suffered from depression ever since.[73][74] See also

National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
portal

List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career scoring leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career assists leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career free throw scoring leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career playoff scoring leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career playoff assists leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
career playoff free throw scoring leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
annual scoring leaders List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
players with most points in a game List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
players with most assists in a game List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
players with most steals in a game List of National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
single-game playoff scoring leaders List of NCAA
NCAA
Division I men's basketball players with 2000 points and 1000 rebounds

Notes

^ " Jerry West
Jerry West
Reveals His Actual Height". Retrieved 3 April 2018.  ^ West has stated that he is actually 6 feet 4.5 inches (1.943 m).[1] ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w " Jerry West
Jerry West
Bio". NBA.com. Retrieved January 15, 2011.  ^ " Jerry West
Jerry West
– Born In Cheylan, West Virginia". sports.jrank.org. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ " Jerry West
Jerry West
on considering suicide". Graham Besinger. Retrieved 14 December 2017.  ^ Ramen, Fred (2002). Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Famers: Jerry West. Rosen Publishing Group. p. 12. ISBN 978-0-8239-3482-9.  ^ a b c d e f Kiger, Fred W. (November 19, 2003). "More info on Jerry West". ESPN
ESPN
Classic. Retrieved January 15, 2011.  ^ a b Carter, Bob. "The also-ran was also a champion". ESPN.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ Poe, Shelly. "Willie Akers". http://www.wvusports.com, The Official Athletic Site of West Virginia University. Archived from the original on February 9, 2013. Retrieved October 8, 2012.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t " Jerry West
Jerry West
Statistics". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ a b c "Jerry West". WVU Stats. Archived from the original on November 22, 2007. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ " Jerry West
Jerry West
1958". WVU Stats. Archived from the original on October 2, 2011. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ " Jerry West
Jerry West
1960". WVU Stats. Archived from the original on October 2, 2011. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ "WVU Alumni: Jerry West
Jerry West
('60 BS)". West Virginia University
West Virginia University
Alumni Association. Archived from the original on May 31, 2010. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ a b c "Lakers Retired numbers". NBA.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ "1960-61 Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
Roster and Statistics". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ a b c d e f "LAKERS: Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
History". NBA.com. Retrieved September 23, 2008.  ^ a b c d e f g h Taylor, 163–167 ^ "1961 NBA Playoffs
NBA Playoffs
Summary". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ a b c "Celtics, Lakers work OT to start Rivalry". NBA.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ "Cousy retires as Six-Time champion". NBA.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ a b " Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
Bio". NBA.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ "1963-64 Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ "West averages 46.3 PPG". NBA.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ a b "Celtics Win Seventh Straight Finals". NBA.com. Retrieved January 15, 2011.  ^ a b c "Red Lights Cigar to close coaching career". NBA.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ "1966–67 Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ "1967–68 Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 30, 2008.  ^ a b c "Boston is alive and well". NBA.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ a b c Cherry, 216–222. ^ a b Cherry, 213–215 ^ a b Cherry, 323–326. ^ a b c d Cherry, 336–353. ^ a b c d "West's heroics can't deprive Russell of 11th title". NBA.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ Cherry, 227 ^ a b c d e "Gutsy Reed Rallies Knicks in Game 7". NBA.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ "Mr. Clutch Sinks a 60-Footer". NBA.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ a b c Cherry, 231–239 ^ " Willis Reed
Willis Reed
Bio". NBA.com. Retrieved January 27, 2008.  ^ "1971 NBA Season Summary". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 27, 2008.  ^ a b "Laker's Legendary Season Leads To Elusive Title". NBA.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ " Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1971-72 Game Log and Scores". Databasebasketball.com. February 17, 2007. Archived from the original on March 14, 2006. Retrieved January 27, 2008.  ^ a b Cherry, 266–270. ^ "Knicks Win One For the Aged". NBA.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ Cherry, 291. ^ "1973 NBA Season Summary". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 26, 2008.  ^ Lazenby 2005, 156–158 ^ Lazenby 2005, 156 ^ "Owning Up to the Truth: Cooke Was the Best". Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2016.  ^ " Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
– Owners, GM, Coaches". Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers. Retrieved January 15, 2016.  ^ "1976–77 Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
Statistics". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ a b "NBA Awards: Executive of the Year". The Sports Network. Archived from the original on May 25, 2011. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ a b c " Memphis Grizzlies
Memphis Grizzlies
Announce the Hiring of Jerry West
Jerry West
as Franchise's New President of Basketball
Basketball
Operations". NBA.com. April 30, 2002. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ a b Walker, Teresa M. (April 17, 2007). " Jerry West
Jerry West
Leaving As Grizzlies Exec". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ " Jerry West
Jerry West
set to join Warriors front office, according to multiple NBA sources". San Jose Mercury News. Retrieved January 15, 2016.  ^ "WARRIORS: Jerry West
Jerry West
Bio". NBA.com. Retrieved January 15, 2016.  ^ Fox Sports. "NBA". FOX Sports. Retrieved January 15, 2016. [permanent dead link] ^ Turner, Broderick (June 14, 2017). "Looking for a new challenge, iconic executive Jerry West
Jerry West
will join Clippers". Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times. Retrieved June 15, 2017.  ^ Turner, Broderick (June 15, 2017). " Jerry West
Jerry West
explains his move to the Clippers". Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times. Retrieved June 15, 2017.  ^ Lazenby 2005, p.141 ^ Career Playoff Leaders and Records for Points Per Game, basketball-reference.com, Retrieved September 25, 2008 ^ " Special
Special
Dime: Greatest Shooting Guards Ever". ESPN. March 11, 2008. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ "WVU legend has a Morgantown street named in his honor". WVU Today. August 15, 2000. Retrieved September 23, 2008.  ^ " Jerry West
Jerry West
Statue Erected". Lester Sculpture. February 8, 2008. Archived from the original on May 15, 2008. Retrieved September 23, 2008.  ^ Kamenetsky, Andy (February 18, 2011). "Lakers unveil Jerry West statue". ESPN. Retrieved July 4, 2011.  ^ Crowe, Jerry (April 27, 2010). "That iconic NBA silhouette can be traced back to him". Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times. Retrieved June 5, 2011.  ^ "West marries". Milwaukee Sentinel. Associated Press. April 11, 1960. p. 3, part 2.  ^ "Jonnie West Statistics". ESPN. Retrieved September 23, 2008.  ^ a b Deford, Frank (February 7, 1972). "A teddy bear's picnic (Page 2)". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on December 9, 2008. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ Deford, Frank (February 7, 1972). "A teddy bear's picnic (Page 4)". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on January 2, 2013. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ Deford, Frank (February 7, 1972). "A teddy bear's picnic (Page 5)". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on December 3, 2012. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ Deford, Frank (February 7, 1972). "A teddy bear's picnic (Page 1)". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on January 2, 2013. Retrieved September 22, 2008.  ^ " Jerry West
Jerry West
reveals lifelong depression". ESPN
ESPN
Los Angeles. ESPN. Associated Press. October 15, 2011.  ^ Smith, Gary. " Basketball
Basketball
was the easy part". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved April 7, 2012. 

References

Cherry, Robert (2004). Wilt: Larger than Life. Chicago: Triumph Books. ISBN 1-57243-672-7.  Lazenby, Roland (2005). The Show: The Inside Story of the Spectacular Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
In The Words of Those Who Lived It. McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-143034-2.  Lazenby, Roland (2010). Jerry West: The Life and Legend of a Basketball
Basketball
Icon. Random House. p. 422. ISBN 978-0-345-51083-9.  Libby, Bill; West, Jerry (1969). Mr. Clutch. The Jerry West
Jerry West
story. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-604710-6.  Taylor, John (2005). The Rivalry: Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain, and the Golden Age of Basketball. New York City: Random House. ISBN 1-4000-6114-8. 

External links

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Jerry West—coaching tenures, championships, awards, and honors

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head coaches

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1959 NCAA
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1960 NCAA
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Darrall Imhoff Jerry Lucas Oscar Robertson Tom Stith Jerry West

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Terry Dischinger Tony Jackson Roger Kaiser Lee Shaffer Len Wilkens

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Basketball
Player of the Year

1952: Groat 1953: Selvy 1954: Selvy 1955: Floyd 1956: Floyd 1957: Hundley 1958: Flora 1959: West 1960: West 1961: Je. Cohen 1962: Thorn 1963: Hetzel 1964: Hetzel 1965: Hetzel 1966: Snyder 1967: Moates 1968: Williams 1969: Maloy 1970: Maloy 1971: Gregory & Jasper 1972: Hunt 1973: Stewart 1974: Mayes 1975: Mayes 1976: McKeever 1977: Carter 1978: Carter 1979: Moore 1980: Moore 1981: Payton 1982: White 1983: Mikell 1984: Truesdale 1985: Truesdale 1986: Elmore 1987: Elmore 1988: Henderson 1989: Taft 1990: Jennings & Taft 1991: Jennings 1992: Boyd & Nelson 1993: T. Brooks 1994: Copeland & King 1995: King 1996: McCollum 1997: Taylor 1998: Phillips & Vincent 1999: Webber 2000: Patterson 2001: Lumpkin 2002: Childress & Conley 2003: Wheless 2004: Wadood 2005: Winters 2006: Nesbitt 2007: Hines 2008: Curry 2009: Curry 2010: Dahlman & Sims 2011: Goudelock 2012: D. Brooks & Ja. Cohen 2013: Ja. Cohen 2014: D. Brooks 2015: Cochran 2016: Croone 2017: Sibley 2018: Bradford & Magee

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1960 NBA Draft

Territorial pick

Oscar Robertson

First round

Oscar Robertson Jerry West Darrall Imhoff Jackie Moreland Lee Shaffer Lenny Wilkens Al Bunge Satch Sanders

Second round

Jay Arnette Dave Budd Kelly Coleman Ron Johnson Wilbur Trosch Frank Radovich Bill Kennedy Leroy Wright

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NBA season scoring leaders

1947: Fulks 1948: Zaslofsky 1949: Mikan 1950: Mikan 1951: Mikan 1952: Arizin 1953: Johnston 1954: Johnston 1955: Johnston 1956: Pettit 1957: Arizin 1958: Yardley 1959: Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Chamberlain 1962: Chamberlain 1963: Chamberlain 1964: Chamberlain 1965: Chamberlain 1966: Chamberlain 1967: Barry 1968: Bing 1969: Hayes 1970: West 1971: Alcindor 1972: Abdul-Jabbar 1973: Archibald 1974: McAdoo 1975: McAdoo 1976: McAdoo 1977: Maravich 1978: Gervin 1979: Gervin 1980: Gervin 1981: Dantley 1982: Gervin 1983: English 1984: Dantley 1985: King 1986: Wilkins 1987: Jordan 1988: Jordan 1989: Jordan 1990: Jordan 1991: Jordan 1992: Jordan 1993: Jordan 1994: Robinson 1995: O'Neal 1996: Jordan 1997: Jordan 1998: Jordan 1999: Iverson 2000: O'Neal 2001: Iverson 2002: Iverson 2003: McGrady 2004: McGrady 2005: Iverson 2006: Bryant 2007: Bryant 2008: James 2009: Wade 2010: Durant 2011: Durant 2012: Durant 2013: Anthony 2014: Durant 2015: Westbrook 2016: Curry 2017: Westbrook

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NBA season assists leaders

1947: Calverley 1948: Dallmar 1949: Davies 1950: McGuire 1951: Phillip 1952: Phillip 1953: Cousy 1954: Cousy 1955: Cousy 1956: Cousy 1957: Cousy 1958: Cousy 1959: Cousy 1960: Cousy 1961: Robertson 1962: Robertson 1963: Rodgers 1964: Robertson 1965: Robertson 1966: Robertson 1967: Rodgers 1968: Chamberlain 1969: Robertson 1970: Wilkens 1971: Van Lier 1972: West 1973: Archibald 1974: DiGregorio 1975: Porter 1976: Watts 1977: Buse 1978: Porter 1979: Porter 1980: Richardson 1981: Porter 1982: Moore 1983: Johnson 1984: Johnson 1985: Thomas 1986: Johnson 1987: Johnson 1988: Stockton 1989: Stockton 1990: Stockton 1991: Stockton 1992: Stockton 1993: Stockton 1994: Stockton 1995: Stockton 1996: Stockton 1997: Jackson 1998: Strickland 1999: Kidd 2000: Kidd 2001: Kidd 2002: Miller 2003: Kidd 2004: Kidd 2005: Nash 2006: Nash 2007: Nash 2008: Paul 2009: Paul 2010: Nash 2011: Nash 2012: Rondo 2013: Rondo 2014: Paul 2015: Paul 2016: Rondo 2017: Harden

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Bill Russell
Bill Russell
NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award

1969: West 1970: Reed 1971: Alcindor 1972: Chamberlain 1973: Reed 1974: Havlicek 1975: Barry 1976: White 1977: Walton 1978: Unseld 1979: D. Johnson 1980: E. Johnson 1981: Maxwell 1982: E. Johnson 1983: Malone 1984: Bird 1985: Abdul-Jabbar 1986: Bird 1987: E. Johnson 1988: Worthy 1989: Dumars 1990: Thomas 1991: Jordan 1992: Jordan 1993: Jordan 1994: Olajuwon 1995: Olajuwon 1996: Jordan 1997: Jordan 1998: Jordan 1999: Duncan 2000: O'Neal 2001: O'Neal 2002: O'Neal 2003: Duncan 2004: Billups 2005: Duncan 2006: Wade 2007: Parker 2008: Pierce 2009: Bryant 2010: Bryant 2011: Nowitzki 2012: James 2013: James 2014: Leonard 2015: Iguodala 2016: James 2017: Durant

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NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game Most Valuable Player Award

1951: Macauley 1952: Arizin 1953: Mikan 1954: Cousy 1955: Sharman 1956: Pettit 1957: Cousy 1958: Pettit 1959: Baylor & Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Pettit 1963: Russell 1964: Robertson 1965: Lucas 1966: A. Smith 1967: Barry 1968: Greer 1969: Robertson 1970: Reed 1971: Wilkens 1972: West 1973: Cowens 1974: Lanier 1975: Frazier 1976: Bing 1977: Erving 1978: R. Smith 1979: Thompson 1980: Gervin 1981: Archibald 1982: Bird 1983: Erving 1984: Thomas 1985: Sampson 1986: Thomas 1987: Chambers 1988: Jordan 1989: Malone 1990: Johnson 1991: Barkley 1992: Johnson 1993: Stockton & Malone 1994: Pippen 1995: Richmond 1996: Jordan 1997: Rice 1998: Jordan 1999: No game played 2000: O'Neal & Duncan 2001: Iverson 2002: Bryant 2003: Garnett 2004: O'Neal 2005: Iverson 2006: James 2007: Bryant 2008: James 2009: Bryant & O'Neal 2010: Wade 2011: Bryant 2012: Durant 2013: Paul 2014: Irving 2015: Westbrook 2016: Westbrook 2017: Davis

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NBA Executive of the Year Award

1973: Axelson 1974: Donovan 1975: Vertlieb 1976: J. Colangelo 1977: Patterson 1978: Drossos 1979: Ferry 1980: Auerbach 1981: J. Colangelo 1982: Ferry 1983: Volchok 1984: Layden 1985: Boryla 1986: Kasten 1987: Kasten 1988: Krause 1989: J. Colangelo 1990: Bass 1991: Buckwalter 1992: Embry 1993: J. Colangelo 1994: Whitsitt 1995: West 1996: Krause 1997: Bass 1998: Embry 1999: Petrie 2000: Gabriel 2001: Petrie 2002: Thorn 2003: Dumars 2004: West 2005: B. Colangelo 2006: Baylor 2007: B. Colangelo 2008: Ainge 2009: Warkentien 2010: Hammond 2011: Forman & Riley 2012: Bird 2013: Ujiri 2014: Buford 2015: Myers 2016: Buford 2017: Myers

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Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Class of 1980

Players

Jerry Lucas Oscar Robertson Jerry West

Coaches

Everett Shelton

Contributors

Les Harrison

Referees

Dallas Shirley

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Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States Olympic Team 1992 United States Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

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NBA 35th Anniversary Team

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Elgin Baylor Wilt Chamberlain Bob Cousy Julius Erving John Havlicek George Mikan Bob Pettit Oscar Robertson Bill Russell Jerry West

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National Basketball
Basketball
Association's 50 Greatest Players in NBA History

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Nate Archibald Paul Arizin Charles Barkley Rick Barry Elgin Baylor Dave Bing Larry Bird Wilt Chamberlain Bob Cousy Dave Cowens Billy Cunningham Dave DeBusschere Clyde Drexler Julius Erving Patrick Ewing Walt Frazier George Gervin Hal Greer John Havlicek Elvin Hayes Magic Johnson Sam Jones Michael Jordan Jerry Lucas Karl Malone Moses Malone Pete Maravich Kevin McHale George Mikan Earl Monroe Hakeem Olajuwon Shaquille O'Neal Robert Parish Bob Pettit Scottie Pippen Willis Reed Oscar Robertson David Robinson Bill Russell Dolph Schayes Bill Sharman John Stockton Isiah Thomas Nate Thurmond Wes Unseld Bill Walton Jerry West Lenny Wilkens James Worthy

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Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers

Founded in 1947 Played in Minneapolis (1947–1960) Based in Los Angeles, California

Franchise

Franchise Team history All-time roster Draft history Seasons Records Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Minneapolis Auditorium Minneapolis Armory Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Memorial Sports Arena The Forum Staples Center

G League affiliate

South Bay Lakers

Administration

Jeanie, Jim, and Johnny Buss (majority owners) Anschutz Entertainment Group
Anschutz Entertainment Group
(minority owner) Ed Roski Jr. (minority owner) Patrick Soon-Shiong (minority owner) Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
(President of Basketball
Basketball
Operations) Rob Pelinka
Rob Pelinka
(General manager) Luke Walton
Luke Walton
(Head coach)

Retired numbers

8 13 22 24 25 32 33 34 42 44 52 Chick Hearn
Chick Hearn
(Microphone)

Minneapolis Lakers
Minneapolis Lakers
Hall of Famers Mikan Mikkelsen Martin Lovellette Pollard Coach Kundla

NBA Championships (16)

1949 1950 1952 1953 1954 1972 1980 1982 1985 1987 1988 2000 2001 2002 2009 2010

Western Conference Championships (31)

1949 1950 1952 1953 1954 1959 1962 1963 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1972 1973 1980 1982 1983 1984 1985 1987 1988 1989 1991 2000 2001 2002 2004 2008 2009 2010

Rivalries

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Clippers San Antonio Spurs Boston Celtics Detroit Pistons

Culture and lore

Jack Kent Cooke Jerry Buss Showtime Chick Hearn Shaq–Kobe feud Lawrence Tanter Jack Nicholson "I Love L.A." Laker Girls Laker Band Dancing Barry Celtics/Lakers: Best of Enemies

Media

TV Spectrum SportsNet (Los Angeles) Radio 710 ESPN
ESPN
Radio 1330 ESPN
ESPN
Deportes Announcers Bill Macdonald Stu Lantz John Ireland Mychal Thompson

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Memphis Grizzlies

Founded in 1995 Played in Vancouver (1995–2001) Based in Memphis, Tennessee

Franchise

Franchise History Expansion Draft All-time roster Head coaches Draft history Records Seasons Current season

Arenas

General Motors Place Pyramid Arena FedExForum

General managers

Jackson Knight West Wallace

G League affiliate

Memphis Hustle

Administration

Owners Memphis Basketball, LLC (Robert J. Pera, Chairman and Controlling Owner, Steven Kaplan, Daniel E. Straus) General Manager, Basketball
Basketball
Operations Chris Wallace Head coach David Fizdale

Culture and lore

Vancouver Grizzlies

relocation to Memphis

Naismith Cup Orca Bay Sports & Entertainment Grit and Grind Growl Towel "You Dropped a Bomb on Me" (The Gap Band song) Rick Trotter

Media

TV Fox Sports Tennessee Fox Sports Southeast Radio Radio Network WRBO-FM Announcers Pete Pranica Brevin Knight Sean Tuohy Eric Hasseltine Hank McDowell Elliot Perry

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 110466565 LCCN: n50003367 MusicBrainz: 3330d5d9-b366-41cd

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