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Jerry Ray Lucas (born March 30, 1940) is an American former basketball player and memory education expert. He was a nationally-awarded high school player, national college star at Ohio State, and 1960 gold medal Olympian and international player before starring as a professional player in the National Basketball
Basketball
Association (NBA). As a collegian, Lucas led the Ohio State
Ohio State
Buckeyes to the 1960 college national championship and three straight NCAA finals. He remains today the only three-time Big Ten Player of the Year, and was also twice named NCAA Player of the Year.[citation needed] As a professional, Lucas was named All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
three times, an NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
seven times, was 1964 NBA Rookie of the Year, and was named Most Valuable Player of the 1965 NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game among other honors and awards. He was inducted to the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame in 1980. After his basketball career ended in the mid-1970s, Lucas took to becoming a teacher and writer in the area of image-based memory education. His book written with Harry Lorayne, The Memory Book, was a national best-seller.[citation needed] Lucas has also conducted seminars demonstrating memory techniques, and has written 30 books and educational products and games for children.

Contents

1 Early life 2 High school 3 Ohio State
Ohio State
University 4 1960 Olympics 5 Professional basketball

5.1 Cleveland Pipers

6 NBA

6.1 Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Royals 6.2 San Francisco 6.3 New York

7 Personal life 8 NBA career statistics

8.1 Regular season 8.2 Playoffs

9 See also 10 References 11 External links

Early life[edit] Lucas was born in Middletown, Ohio, then a community of 30,000+ halfway between Dayton and Cincinnati. Middletown then called itself " The Basketball
Basketball
Capital of Ohio", based on the success of the basketball teams from the town's one high school. The Middies had already won five Ohio state high school championships, 1945–55, before Lucas played at Middletown High. Local support for the team was remarkably high in the early and mid-1950s. A tall youth hailing from a family of tall men, Lucas was greatly encouraged to take up the game at a young age, perhaps age 12. He was already six-feet tall by age 13.[1] Lucas had also begun to demonstrate an active mind at a young age. A fidgety boy on family car rides, Lucas began to develop mental games to occupy him perhaps as early as age nine. " I saw a sign at a gas station, and decided to rearrange the letters of each word into alphabetical order ". The word 'price' would become 'c-e-i-p-r'. These and other mental exercises began to help develop his intelligence at a young age. In addition to strong local support for Middletown High basketball, the city was also home to remarkable summer outdoor basketball scene at Sunset Park. Previous Middletown players who had gone on to play at the college level recruited other college players to play there in the summer. By the time Lucas was age 15, Sunset Park was one of the best summer basketball scenes in the region between Dayton and Cincinnati. By then, Lucas had grown to 6'7" and had the opportunity to scrimmage against college players, advancing his game greatly. Lucas was, in fact, outplaying good college big men before he had played his first game for Middletown High. During this time, his eyesight was tested and found to be "at least 20-10", according to Lucas. His remarkable eye sight allowed him to practice shooting where the ball would graze one side of the basket's rim or another. A game of HORSE with Lucas then included shots where the ball only hits the front of the rim or another area rather than simply going in as a made shot. His eyesight also played into another part of the game, rebounding. Lucas observed shots, their arc and speed, and watched where missed shots caromed to and why. Being able to predict if shots would miss and where missed shots would go would eventually make Lucas one of the greatest rebounders in the history of the game. These things, his shooting drills and rebound watching, were the product of his active, inventive thinking at a young age, applied to the game of basketball. High school[edit] Lucas started play at Middletown as a sophomore in the 1955–56 season. Then still just 15 years old, he became a star by making 60% of his shots, though others on the Middies took as many or more shots for the team. Most of the made shots were offensive rebounds, well-timed tip-ins of missed shots, and free throws. He became a statewide star in the 1956 state final four held in Cleveland. Lucas wore #13 at Middletown and was often compared to Wilt Chamberlain
Wilt Chamberlain
as a high school talent. The 1956 Middletown team went undefeated and was named co-national high school champion, along with Indianapolis Crispus Attucks, which were led by star Oscar Robertson. The 1956–57 team also went undefeated and won the Ohio state title, and were named national champions alone. By then, Lucas had set several all-time Ohio high school records for scoring and shooting accuracy. Records for rebounding then were not well-kept. Lucas entered his senior year as the top-rated high school player in the country. His teams had never lost a game, going back to junior high. In the 32-minute games of the era, Lucas averaged over a point per minute, despite often sitting out some minutes of play. When Middletown lost to an undefeated Columbus North team, 63-62, in the 1958 state playoffs, his high school career ended with Middletown having gone 76-1 during his years there. The 76-straight high school wins are still an Ohio high school record. Lucas was named Ohio state high school player of the year all three years. He was also named USBWA national high school player of the year twice. Only two other prep players, Lew Alcindor ( Kareem Abdul-Jabbar ) and LeBron James
LeBron James
have won that award twice, all-time. Four games against Hamilton High were held at Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Gardens arena. Performances there made him a star in that city. The NBA Cincinnati Royals, relocated to the city in 1957, named Lucas a territorial draft pick after his senior year in 1958. Other five-digit crowds for high school games at Cleveland Public Hall and St. John's Arena helped turn Lucas into a rare degree of high-interest high school player during his Middletown years. He still remains today on nearly every short list of the greatest high school players ever to play in the United States. In 2000, Lucas was named Greater Cincinnati
Cincinnati
high school Player Of The Century by the Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Enquirer newspaper. Ohio State
Ohio State
University[edit] Lucas was the subject of considerable recruiting interest while at Middletown, to such a degree that measures were taken to protect the privacy of Lucas and his family. He received 160 college scholarships, some of them for both basketball and track. He had won the Ohio state discus title as a Middletown senior. Fred Taylor was not yet the varsity coach at Ohio State
Ohio State
when he recruited Lucas. After Lucas agreed to a scholastic scholarship there, Taylor was promoted from freshman coach to varsity coach. When he announced for Ohio State, Lucas was on a tour of Ohio-Indiana high school all-stars games. Ohio all-star teammates from that tour would follow him to Ohio State, among them John Havlicek, Bob Knight
Bob Knight
and Mel Nowell. [2] Lucas had been an A-student and had made education his priority. The first person to see some of his learning and memory systems were Havlicek and Knight. When Buckeyes football coach Woody Hayes found what kind of student Lucas was, he asked the freshman to tutor varsity Buckeye players in their college subjects. Lucas was still the subject of considerable interest as a college freshman, in an era when freshmen were ineligible for varsity college play. Thousands would often pour into St. John Arena to see Lucas play in preliminaries. Lucas was named to some 1959–60 pre-season All-American teams before ever playing a game at Ohio State. Lucas, Nowell, then Havlicek all started for the 1959–60 team, which also included Larry Siegfried and Joe Roberts. Ohio State
Ohio State
was the highest-scoring, best shooting team in the country that season. The Buckeyes averaged 90 points per game as a fast-break team. Lucas would rebound shots, and throw outlet passes to Ohio State
Ohio State
players scoring at the other end. Lucas scored 26 points per game, averaged 16 rebounds per game and set a college record by making 63% of his shots. The Buckeyes overwhelmed California, 75-55, at the Cow Palace
Cow Palace
in San Francisco to win the 1960 NCAA title. All five starters from this team were later drafted into the NBA, which was then a small nine-team league. In 1960–61, Ohio State
Ohio State
ran a winning streak of 32 games all the way to the NCAA Final. In one game against Kentucky, Lucas became the only college player to date to record a ' 30-30 ' in a NCAA tournament game ( 33 points, 30 rebounds ). For the final, the Buckeyes had to wait for the Consolation Game to conclude first. That game went to four overtimes. The championship game also went into overtime, with the University of Cincinnati Bearcats upsetting the #1 ranked Ohio State
Ohio State
Buckeyes by a score of 70-65. By the time the 1961–62 season had started, the 6' 8 230-pound Lucas had played basketball nearly non-stop for two years, 1959–60 season-1960 Olympics-1960–61 season-1961 AAU tour of the Soviet Union. So, health was an issue when he returned from Russia weighing just 200 pounds. His sore knees were also an issue throughout his basketball career. But Lucas and the Buckeyes again made it to the NCAA final, their third straight. Lucas was badly injured against Wake Forest in the semifinal. But he opted to play in the 1962 final anyway, believing it was his last game ever. During his college career, he had stated repeatedly that he would never turn pro. In his final college game, he moved poorly and Cincinnati
Cincinnati
again topped Ohio State. Lucas was All-American First Team all three years at Ohio State. His #11 was later the second number ever retired by the college in any sport. He is still widely considered the greatest player to ever play in the Big Ten today. The team went 78-6 during his years. Gaining strong national exposure during these years, Lucas was named 1961 Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year. He was the first to ever win the award in basketball. Lucas is still widely regarded today as one of the greatest college players of all-time. Lucas received his Bachelor of Business Administration degree in three years, and was in post-graduate studies as a senior. His grades were A in all but a few classes. As an all-time college student-athlete, Lucas may still be one of the very best ever. 1960 Olympics[edit] In 1960, Lucas was also named to the U.S. Olympic team for the Rome Games that year. He had a mediocre trials, due to fatigue from the NCAA final and the high altitude of the Trials in Denver. But Lucas easily led all Trials players in rebounding. Initially named to the U.S. team as a reserve forward, Lucas asked Olympic coach Pete Newell to try him at his natural center spot. Despite the fact that two 6'11" centers, Walter Bellamy and Darrall Imhoff, were present, Lucas got time at center and emerged as the regular starter for the U.S. team. The Americans ranked well ahead of most other countries in 1960, and could have won by far more than the 40 points per game that they averaged. The biggest game was played against the Soviet Union in September at the palazetto dello sport in Rome, which the Americans won. Lucas scored 25 points in the gold medal final against Brazil to tie teammate Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
for the team lead in scoring, 136 points apiece for the Olympics over eight games. Despite the physical play near the basket during those Games, Lucas received just six free throws total over all eight games, but shot 80% from the floor to be a top scorer. Afterward, Coach Newell, whose California team had just lost to Ohio State
Ohio State
and Lucas in the 1960 NCAA final, called Lucas " the greatest player I ever coached, and the most unselfish ". The U.S. team also included future pro stars Robertson, Bellamy, Imhoff, Jerry West, Terry Dischinger, Adrian Smith and Bob Boozer. Lucas's international play also includes being named to a team of AAU ( Amateur Athletic Union )stars that toured the Soviet Union in mid-1961. That team played games in Moscow, Leningrad and Kiev, with Lucas starring at center, and went undefeated. The coach of the team was John McLendon. That team was one of the first to play basketball in the Soviet Union. In 1964, He also was part of a team of NBA players that played behind the Iron Curtain. Poland, Rumania and Yugoslavia were included in that tour. He netted 36 points against Poland, the high game for all players on that tour. So, in addition to his Olympic performance in Rome, Lucas was an international player of some significance. Professional basketball[edit] Cleveland Pipers[edit] "I never had any special desire to be a professional basketball player", Lucas later said about his pro career. In 1962, Lucas, long a territorial draft selection of the NBA Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Royals, turned down their latest offer. The deal would have made him the second-highest paid player on the Royals after Oscar Robertson. He was still in post-graduate studies at Ohio State
Ohio State
at this time. But he was also drafted by a pro team in another league. George Steinbrenner, then the owner of the newly formed American Basketball
Basketball
League's Cleveland Pipers, interested the young star with a combination managerial-player contract unlike any in sports. Lucas, in fact, received ownership stock in the team as part of the deal. The NBA then made overtures to have the ABL Cleveland team, with Lucas, jump leagues that Summer. When that deal was approved by Steinbrenner, the NBA Royals protested and admission fees were added to the Cleveland deal. Unable to make all the considerable payments, Steinbrenner's team collapsed and folded. By then, Lucas had signed a business deal with Cleveland advertiser Howard Marks, and spoke often of having an NBA franchise for Cleveland. Because of this contract, he missed the 1962–63 NBA season. When the Marks expansion deal was denied by the NBA, Lucas was released from that contract. He decided he wanted to play pro basketball after all, and the Royals retained his rights. NBA[edit] Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Royals[edit]

Jerry Lucas
Jerry Lucas
in 1965

In August, 1963, Lucas signed with Warren Hensel, who was then in process of becoming owner of the NBA's Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Royals. The locally-well known Middletown and Ohio State
Ohio State
star quickly surged ticket sales for the team. The Royals had previously declined in ticket sales the last two seasons before his signing. The 1963–64 Royals also included three NBA All-Stars in Oscar Robertson, Wayne Embry and Jack Twyman. Lucas was moved to forward his first pro season, and initially struggled at that position to some degree. But he improved over the course of games played, and the Royals soon had the second-best record in the NBA that season. His role on the team would be chiefly rebounding and other support play. In 1963–64, Lucas recorded four 30-rebound games, including a 40-rebound game on February 29, 1964. Lucas is still today the only NBA forward with a 40-rebound game. He also led the league in field goal percentage as a rookie. In the 1964 NBA playoffs, Lucas was injured when a Philadelphia player collided with him from behind. He gamely tried to play through the injury, appearing in all ten playoff games. But the Royals and Lucas never recovered, losing to Boston in the Eastern final. In his second season, Lucas was asked to shoot and score more as the team's top ticket draw. In 1964–65 and 1965–66, he enjoyed his best seasons in Cincinnati, with the Royals posting the second or third-best record in the league each season. As one of the NBA's top shooters in accuracy, Lucas posted two seasons of over 21 points per game as the team's #2 scorer. He also averaged over 20 rebounds per game both seasons. In 1965–66, Lucas averaged 21.1 rebounds over 79 games, with 1668 rebounds total on the season. Those are both still all-time rebounding marks for NBA forwards. In addition to his scoring, rebounding and shooting, Lucas made a name for himself as a big minutes man. In a sport where a regulation NBA game is 48 minutes, Lucas routinely played 43–44 minutes per game at two positions, starting forward, then backup center. Knee pain was still a big concern, and after the 1965–66 season, he nearly retired. But he found a prescription anti-inflammatory that allowed him to continue as a player. In the 1964–65 playoffs, Lucas averaged 23.3 points, 21 rebounds and 48.8 minutes over four games against Philadelphia. Game One had gone to overtime, so he was able to average past 48 minutes for the series. In the 1965–66 playoffs, he averaged 21.4 points, 20.2 rebounds and 46.2 minutes over the best-of-five series. He had again been injured in the 1966 playoffs, undercut from behind by a teammate, but still toughed through big minutes of play. He was named Most Valuable Player of the 1965 NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game in St. Louis, having scored 26 points. In the 1966 All-Star Game held in Cincinnati, he collected a team-high 19 rebounds for the East. In the Fall of 1966, the Royals announced the move of nine or more home games to Cleveland, where the team hoped to use Lucas, the former would-be ABL Piper, as a popular crowd draw. He was recovering now as a heavier player who weighed 240-250 pounds, but still was a starting East All-Star. With the team declining now, and with his own health concerns, Lucas focused more on off-court business. As a cutting edge corporate athlete, he sought endorsements. He also studied investment opportunities and tax shelters. By 1968, Lucas was worth over a million dollars, most of it built on off-court investments. There were only two or three other millionaire players in the NBA at that time. His most famous investment was his growing fast food chain, Jerry Lucas Beef N Shakes. Lucas also created a number of children's games during this period, starting his own toys and games company. He published a book on the many magic card tricks he often performed himself. Healthier in 1967–68, he bounced back to post season averages of 21.5 points per game, 52% shooting, 19 rebounds, and 44.1 minutes over all 82 games. He was second in the league to Chamberlain in rebounds and minutes played. He had topped third-place Bill Russell of Boston by more than 100 rebounds on the season as just the second player ever to out-rebound Russell over a full season. He was First Team All-NBA again, but the Royals missed the playoffs on the last day of the season. Over 308 games, 1964–68, Lucas averaged 20.5 points and 19.8 rebounds. The league commonly used ' team rebounds ' as a stat then when it wasn't clear who had collected some missed shots. It's possible that Lucas had the 64 remaining rebounds needed over four seasons to average 20 rebounds over those seasons. The only other NBA player to be '20-20' as often then was Chamberlain. The 1968–69 season saw the Royals briefly in first place, but playing some 15 home games outside Cincinnati, which increased their traveling. When Lucas sank 55% of his shots on the season, it was then the third-best shooting mark over a full season in league history. The 1960s were an uptempo NBA decade, where teams often scored 115 points per game and shooting percentages were often lower as a result. He also averaged 18–18 in points and rebounds that season, and four assists per game. In 1968, the American economy tightened, and Lucas saw his lines of credit for his investments close. Overextended on several fronts, his portfolio of investments collapsed. An embarrassed Lucas was soon forced to declare bankruptcy. His popularity among players, some of whom had lost their investments with him, declined greatly. San Francisco[edit] In 1969, Bob Cousy
Bob Cousy
took over as coach of the Royals, who had again missed the playoffs in the tougher East Division. Wanting more of a running team, Cousy did not favor Lucas, now a heavier, slower player. But Lucas had a no-trade clause in his contract, and could steer his transfer to a chosen team. He chose San Francisco. In 1969–70, he suffered a broken hand, and went through a tough season. He bounced back to form in 1970–71, bringing himself back into playing shape at 230 pounds. Lucas averaged 19.2 points per game on 50% shooting, 15.8 rebounds and 3.7 assists. He was fifth in the league in rebounding in an NBA that now had 17 teams. Playing with Nate Thurmond, Clyde Lee, Jeff Mullins and Ron Williams, the .500 Warriors made the 1971 playoffs before losing to a powerful Milwaukee team that later won the 1971 NBA title. New York[edit] By this point, Lucas was widely rated as one of the most accurate shooters and top rebounders in league history. The Warriors, needing a small scoring forward, dealt Lucas to the New York Knickerbockers, who needed a big man to backup their starting big men, Willis Reed
Willis Reed
and Dave DeBusschere. In exchange, the Warriors received star small forward Cazzie Russell. Knicks coach Red Holzman
Red Holzman
had been a longtime Lucas fan. Early in the 1971–72 season, the injury-prone Reed went down for the season. Lucas, not a starting center since college, was pressed into service at that spot. He would be the smallest center in the league, and many were skeptical that Lucas and the Knicks would do well in this arrangement. But in perhaps his best pro season, the 31-year-old Lucas starred. He led the Knicks in rebounds and shooting accuracy, and was second on the team in both scoring and assists only to Walt Frazier
Walt Frazier
on the club. His outside shooting, which often extended past today's three point line, bewildered and changed defenses, as opponents were forced to send their big man 20 feet from the basket to guard Lucas. Lucas shot 51.2% from the floor that season, with many coming on what today would be three-point shots. He was also an outstanding passing center, just as he had been in college. The team was fourth in the NBA in defense with Lucas at center The 48-34 Knicks upset both Baltimore and Boston to make the 1972 NBA finals against Los Angeles. Lucas played very well, averaging 20.8 points on 50% shooting, 9.8 rebounds, 6.2 assists and 46.6 minutes in the series against the Lakers and Chamberlain. When Game Four went to overtime, he played all 53 minutes. But New York lost the series. During this time, Lucas gained some press for a magic trick, ' The Phone Book '. In it, he memorized about 50 pages of the Manhattan White Pages, each page with columns of names and listed phone numbers. After other demonstrations, a party held by writer Dick Schaap and teammate Bill Bradley
Bill Bradley
saw the trick tested by world chess champion Bobby Fischer, who was reportedly astounded. In 1972–73, Reed, the New York team captain and star, returned. Lucas was sent to the bench for the first time in his career. But, to keep Reed healthy for the playoffs, he still played often. In averaging ten points and seven rebounds, he also averaged 4.5 assists. The team made the NBA finals again, and this time New York won. The win gave Lucas the distinction of playing on a champion at every level of the game, high school-college-Olympics-NBA (a feat that would be accomplished by two other players, Quinn Buckner and Magic Johnson). He was the first such American player ever. In 1973–74, the Knicks made a run to repeat as champions, but lost to Boston in the Eastern final. He had played far less and was physically declining in his final and 11th pro season. Lucas retired from the NBA with the fourth-highest career rebounding average, 15.6, in league history. At retirement, he was fifth all-time in total career rebounds, with 12,942 total, but players with longer careers have since pushed him further down that list. He is also eighth all-time in minutes played per game, despite being a reserve the last two years of his pro career. In 1980, he was inducted into the Springfield Basketball
Basketball
Hall Of Fame with Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
and Jerry West, all in their first year of eligibility. At the All-Star Game in Cleveland in 1997, he was introduced as one of The 50 Greatest NBA Players, wearing New York Knicks
New York Knicks
colors. Personal life[edit] Lucas, who first married at age 20, has been married three times and has four children. His wife since 1989, Cheri Wulff Lucas, is a noted dog behaviorist. His son, J.J., also played college basketball. Lucas still makes occasional appearances related to basketball at all levels of the game. He lives in central Ohio and remains close to the Ohio State
Ohio State
basketball program. He has also been often seen at celebrity golf tournaments. NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

† Denotes season in which Lucas won an NBA championship

* Led the league

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1963–64 Cincinnati 79 – 41.4 .527* – .779 17.4 2.6 – – 17.7

1964–65 Cincinnati 66 – 43.4 .498 – .814 20.0 2.4 – – 21.4

1965–66 Cincinnati 79 – 44.5 .453 – .787 21.1 2.7 – – 21.5

1966–67 Cincinnati 81 – 43.9 .459 – .791 19.1 3.3 – – 17.8

1967–68 Cincinnati 82 – 44.1 .519 – .778 19.0 3.3 – – 21.5

1968–69 Cincinnati 74 – 41.6 .551 – .755 18.4 4.1 – – 18.3

1969–70 Cincinnati 4 – 29.5 .514 – .714 11.3 2.3 – – 10.3

1969–70 San Francisco 63 – 36.5 .507 – .786 14.4 2.6 – – 15.4

1970–71 San Francisco 80 – 40.6 .498 – .787 15.8 3.7 – – 19.2

1971–72 New York 77 – 38.0 .512 – .791 13.1 4.1 – – 16.7

1972–73† New York 71 – 28.2 .513 – .800 7.2 4.5 – – 9.9

1973–74 New York 73 – 22.3 .462 – .698 5.1 3.2 0.4 0.3 6.2

Career 829 – 38.8 .499 – .783 15.6 3.3 0.4 0.3 17.0

All-Star 7 6 26.1 .547 – .905 9.1 1.7 – – 12.7

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1964 Cincinnati 10 – 37.0 .390 – .703 12.5 3.4 – – 12.2

1965 Cincinnati 4 – 48.8* .507 – .773 21.0 2.3 – – 23.3

1966 Cincinnati 5 – 46.2 .471 – .771 20.2 2.8 – – 21.4

1967 Cincinnati 4 – 45.8 .436 – 1.000 19.3 2.0 – – 12.5

1971 San Francisco 5 – 34.2 .506 – .688 10.0 3.2 – – 17.8

1972 New York 16 – 46.1 .500 – .831 10.8 5.3 – – 18.6

1973† New York 17 – 21.6 .482 – .870 5.0 2.3 – – 7.5

1974 New York 11 – 10.5 .238 – – 2.0 0.8 0.4 0.0 0.9

Career 72 – 32.9 .467 – .786 10.0 3.0 0.4 0.0 12.4

See also[edit]

Mr. Basketball
Basketball
USA List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career rebounding leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association players with most rebounds in a game List of NCAA Division I men's basketball season rebounding leaders

References[edit]

^ http://middletownmiddiebasketball.com/tradition/jerry_lucas.html ^ ESPN Classic - Lucas had a secret weapon, his mind

External links[edit]

Lucas' Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame page NBA biography of Jerry Lucas Career stats

Links to related articles

v t e

Ohio State Buckeyes men's basketball
Ohio State Buckeyes men's basketball
1959–60 NCAA champions

3 Mel Nowell 5 John Havlicek 11 Jerry Lucas
Jerry Lucas
(MOP) 14 Joe Roberts 21 Larry Siegfried 24 Bob Knight

Head coach Fred Taylor

Assistant coaches Jack Graf Frank Truitt

v t e

United States basketball squad – 1960 Summer Olympics
1960 Summer Olympics
– Gold medal

4 Arnette 5 Bellamy 6 Boozer 7 Dischinger 8 Haldorson 9 Imhoff 10 Kelley 11 Lane 12 Lucas 13 Robertson 14 Smith 15 West Coach: Newell

v t e

1962 NBA Draft

Territorial pick

Dave DeBusschere Jerry Lucas

First round

Bill McGill Paul Hogue Zelmo Beaty Len Chappell Wayne Hightower LeRoy Ellis John Havlicek

Second round

Terry Dischinger John Rudometkin Bob Duffy Kevin Loughery Chet Walker Bud Olsen Hubie White Gene Wiley Jack Foley

v t e

New York Knicks
New York Knicks
1972–73 NBA champions

7 Meminger 10 Frazier 12 Barnett 15 Monroe 17 Bibby 18 Jackson 19 Reed (Finals MVP) 22 DeBusschere 24 Bradley 32 Lucas 40 Gianelli 43 Wingo

Head coach Holzman

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Golden State Warriors

Founded in 1946 Played in Philadelphia (1946–1962) and San Francisco (1962–1971) Based in Oakland, California

Franchise

Franchise Team history All-time roster Draft history Seasons Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Philadelphia Arena Philadelphia Convention Hall Cow Palace San Francisco Civic Auditorium War Memorial Gymnasium
War Memorial Gymnasium
(University of San Francisco) San Jose Arena Oracle Arena Chase Center

General managers

Tyrell Gottlieb Feerick Vertlieb Stirling Attles Nelson Twardzik St. Jean Mullin Riley Myers

G League affiliate

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Retired numbers

13 14 16 17 24 42

Hall of Famers

Paul Arizin Rick Barry Wilt Chamberlain Joe Fulks Tom Gola Neil Johnston Jerry Lucas Šarūnas Marčiulionis Chris Mullin Mitch Richmond Don Nelson Robert Parish Andy Phillip Guy Rodgers Ralph Sampson Nate Thurmond Jamaal Wilkes

NBA Championships (5)

1947 1956 1975 2015 2017

Conference Championships (9)

1947 1948 1956 1964 1967 1975 2015 2016 2017

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100 point game

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Rivalries

Cleveland Cavaliers

Media

TV NBC Sports Bay Area Radio KGMZ Announcers Bob Fitzgerald Jim Barnett Tim Roye

v t e

Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Class of 1980

Players

Jerry Lucas Oscar Robertson Jerry West

Coaches

Everett Shelton

Contributors

Les Harrison

Referees

Dallas Shirley

v t e

Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States Olympic Team 1992 United States Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

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National Basketball
Basketball
Association's 50 Greatest Players in NBA History

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Nate Archibald Paul Arizin Charles Barkley Rick Barry Elgin Baylor Dave Bing Larry Bird Wilt Chamberlain Bob Cousy Dave Cowens Billy Cunningham Dave DeBusschere Clyde Drexler Julius Erving Patrick Ewing Walt Frazier George Gervin Hal Greer John Havlicek Elvin Hayes Magic Johnson Sam Jones Michael Jordan Jerry Lucas Karl Malone Moses Malone Pete Maravich Kevin McHale George Mikan Earl Monroe Hakeem Olajuwon Shaquille O'Neal Robert Parish Bob Pettit Scottie Pippen Willis Reed Oscar Robertson David Robinson Bill Russell Dolph Schayes Bill Sharman John Stockton Isiah Thomas Nate Thurmond Wes Unseld Bill Walton Jerry West Lenny Wilkens James Worthy

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NBA Rookie of the Year Award

1953: Meineke 1954: Felix 1955: Pettit 1956: Stokes 1957: Heinsohn 1958: Sauldsberry 1959: Baylor 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Bellamy 1963: Dischinger 1964: Lucas 1965: Reed 1966: Barry 1967: Bing 1968: Monroe 1969: Unseld 1970: Alcindor 1971: Cowens & Petrie 1972: Wicks 1973: McAdoo 1974: DiGregorio 1975: Wilkes 1976: Adams 1977: Dantley 1978: Davis 1979: Ford 1980: Bird 1981: Griffith 1982: Williams 1983: Cummings 1984: Sampson 1985: Jordan 1986: Ewing 1987: Person 1988: Jackson 1989: Richmond 1990: Robinson 1991: Coleman 1992: Johnson 1993: O'Neal 1994: Webber 1995: Hill & Kidd 1996: Stoudamire 1997: Iverson 1998: Duncan 1999: Carter 2000: Brand & Francis 2001: Miller 2002: Gasol 2003: Stoudemire 2004: James 2005: Okafor 2006: Paul 2007: Roy 2008: Durant 2009: Rose 2010: Evans 2011: Griffin 2012: Irving 2013: Lillard 2014: Carter-Williams 2015: Wiggins 2016: Towns 2017: Brogdon

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NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game Most Valuable Player Award

1951: Macauley 1952: Arizin 1953: Mikan 1954: Cousy 1955: Sharman 1956: Pettit 1957: Cousy 1958: Pettit 1959: Baylor & Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Pettit 1963: Russell 1964: Robertson 1965: Lucas 1966: A. Smith 1967: Barry 1968: Greer 1969: Robertson 1970: Reed 1971: Wilkens 1972: West 1973: Cowens 1974: Lanier 1975: Frazier 1976: Bing 1977: Erving 1978: R. Smith 1979: Thompson 1980: Gervin 1981: Archibald 1982: Bird 1983: Erving 1984: Thomas 1985: Sampson 1986: Thomas 1987: Chambers 1988: Jordan 1989: Malone 1990: Johnson 1991: Barkley 1992: Johnson 1993: Stockton & Malone 1994: Pippen 1995: Richmond 1996: Jordan 1997: Rice 1998: Jordan 1999: No game played 2000: O'Neal & Duncan 2001: Iverson 2002: Bryant 2003: Garnett 2004: O'Neal 2005: Iverson 2006: James 2007: Bryant 2008: James 2009: Bryant & O'Neal 2010: Wade 2011: Bryant 2012: Durant 2013: Paul 2014: Irving 2015: Westbrook 2016: Westbrook 2017: Davis

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NCAA Men's Division I Basketball
Basketball
Tournament Most Outstanding Player

1939: Hull 1940: Huffman 1941: Kotz 1942: Dallmar 1943: Sailors 1944: Ferrin 1945: Kurland 1946: Kurland 1947: Kaftan 1948: Groza 1949: Groza 1950: Dambrot 1951: Spivey 1952: Lovellette 1953: Born 1954: Gola 1955: Russell 1956: Lear 1957: Chamberlain 1958: Baylor 1959: West 1960: Lucas 1961: Lucas 1962: Hogue 1963: Heyman 1964: Hazzard 1965: Bradley 1966: Chambers 1967: Alcindor 1968: Alcindor 1969: Alcindor 1970: Wicks 1971: Porter * 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Thompson 1975: Washington 1976: Benson 1977: Lee 1978: Givens 1979: Johnson 1980: Griffith 1981: Thomas 1982: Worthy 1983: Olajuwon 1984: Ewing 1985: Pinckney 1986: Ellison 1987: Smart 1988: Manning 1989: Rice 1990: Hunt 1991: Laettner 1992: Hurley 1993: Williams 1994: Williamson 1995: O'Bannon 1996: Delk 1997: Simon 1998: Sheppard 1999: Hamilton 2000: Cleaves 2001: Battier 2002: Dixon 2003: Anthony 2004: Okafor 2005: May 2006: Noah 2007: Brewer 2008: Chalmers 2009: Ellington 2010: Singler 2011: Walker 2012: Davis 2013: Hancock 2014: Napier 2015: Jones 2016: Arcidiacono 2017: Berry II 2018: DiVincenzo

*Ruled ineligible after tournament

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Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
Trophy winners

1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Hazzard 1965: Bradley 1966: Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Alcindor 1969: Maravich 1970: Maravich 1971: Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: Dantley 1977: M. Johnson 1978: Ford 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Mullin 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: Ferry 1990: Simmons 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: O'Bannon 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: West 2004: Nelson 2005: Bogut 2006: Morrison & Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Burke 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Hield 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

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Helms Foundation College Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1905: Steinmetz 1906: Grebenstein 1907: Kinney 1908: Keinath 1909: Schommer 1910: Page 1911: Kiendl 1912: Stangel 1913: Calder 1914: Halstead 1915: Houghton 1916: Levis 1917: Woods 1918: Chandler 1919: Platou 1920: Cann 1921: Williams 1922: Carney 1923: Endacott 1924: Black 1925: Mueller 1926: Cobb 1927: Hanson 1928: Holt 1929: C. Thompson 1930: Hyatt 1931: Carlton 1932: Wooden 1933: Sale 1934: Bennett 1935: Edwards 1936: Moir 1937: Luisetti 1938: Luisetti 1939: Jaworski 1940: Glamack 1941: Glamack 1942: Modzelewski 1943: Senesky 1944: Mikan 1945: Mikan 1946: Kurland 1947: Tucker 1948: Macauley 1949: Lavelli 1950: Arizin 1951: Groat 1952: Lovellette 1953: Houbregs 1954: Gola 1955: B. Russell 1956: B. Russell 1957: Rosenbluth 1958: Baylor 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Hogue 1963: Heyman 1964: Hazzard 1965: Bradley & Goodrich 1966: C. Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Alcindor 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich & Wicks 1971: Carr & Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: D. Thompson 1975: D. Thompson 1976: Benson & May 1977: Johnson 1978: Givens 1979: Bird

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Associated Press Men's College Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Bradds 1965: Bradley 1966: Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Carr 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Thompson 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: Johnson 1978: Lee 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Ewing 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: Elliott 1990: Simmons 1991: O'Neal 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: West 2004: Nelson 2005: Bogut 2006: Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Burke 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Valentine 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

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UPI College Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year Award winners

1955: Gola 1956: B. Russell 1957: Forte 1958: Robertson 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Bradds 1965: Bradley 1966: C. Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Carr 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: Johnson 1978: Lee 1979: Bird 1980: Aguirre 1981: Sampson 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Mullin 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: Ferry 1990: Simmons 1991: O'Neal 1992: Jackson 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Allen

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Sporting News Men's College Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1943: Phillip 1944: Hall 1945: Mikan 1946: Kurland 1947–49: None selected 1950: Arizin 1951: White 1952–57: None selected 1958: Robertson 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Heyman 1964: Bradley 1965: Bradley 1966: Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich 1971: Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Walton 1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: M. Johnson 1978: P. Ford 1979: Bird 1980: Griffith 1981: Aguirre 1982: Sampson 1983: Jordan 1984: Jordan 1985: Ewing 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Hawkins 1989: King 1990: Scott 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Respert 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Battier 2002: Williams 2003: T. J. Ford 2004: Nelson 2005: Brown 2006: Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Davis 2013: Oladipo 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Hield 2017: Mason III 2018: Brunson

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NCAA Division I men's basketball season rebounding leaders

1951: Beck 1952: Hannon 1953: Conlin 1954: Quimby 1955: Slack 1956: Holup 1957: Baylor 1958: Ellis 1959: Wright 1960: Wright 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Silas 1964: Pelkington 1965: Kimball 1966: Ware 1967: Cunningham 1968: Walk 1969: Haywood 1970: Gilmore 1971: Gilmore 1972: Washington 1973: Washington 1974: Barnes 1975: Irving 1976: Pellom 1977: Mosley 1978: K. Williams 1979: Davis 1980: Smith 1981: Watson 1982: Thompson 1983: McDaniel 1984: Olajuwon 1985: McDaniel 1986: Robinson 1987: Lane 1988: Miller 1989: Gathers 1990: Bonner 1991: O'Neal 1992: Jones 1993: Kidd 1994: Lambert 1995: Thomas 1996: Mann 1997: Duncan 1998: Perryman 1999: McGinnis 2000: Phillip 2001: Marcus 2002: Bishop 2003: Hunter 2004: Millsap 2005: Millsap 2006: Millsap 2007: Jones-Jennings 2008: Beasley 2009: Griffin 2010: Parakhouski 2011: Faried 2012: Anosike 2013: Anosike 2014: A. Williams 2015: A. Williams 2016: Mockevičius 2017: Delgado 2018: Cacok

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Mr. Basketball
Basketball
USA winners

1955: Chamberlain 1956: Robertson 1957: Lucas 1958: Lucas 1959: Raftery 1960: Hawkins 1961: Bradley 1962: Russell 1963: Lacy 1964: Alcindor 1965: Alcindor 1966: Murphy 1967: Haywood 1968: Westphal 1969: McGinnis 1970: McMillen 1971: Lucas 1972: Buckner 1973: Dantley 1974: Malone 1975: Cartwright 1976: Griffith 1977: King 1978: Aguirre 1979: Kellogg 1980: Rivers 1981: Ewing 1982: Tisdale 1983: R. Williams 1984: J. Williams 1985: Ferry 1986: Reid 1987: Johnson 1988: Mourning 1989: Anderson 1990: Bailey 1991: Webber 1992: Kidd 1993: Wallace 1994: Lopez 1995: Garnett 1996: Bibby 1997: McGrady 1998: Lewis 1999: Bender 2000: Miles 2001: Wagner 2002: James 2003: James 2004: Telfair 2005: Ellis 2006: Oden 2007: Mayo 2008: Jennings 2009: Favors 2010: Barnes 2011: Kidd-Gilchrist 2012: Muhammad 2013: Wiggins 2014: Alexander 2015: Simmons 2016: Ball 2017: Porter

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1960 NCAA Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Darrall Imhoff Jerry Lucas Oscar Robertson Tom Stith Jerry West

Second Team

Terry Dischinger Tony Jackson Roger Kaiser Lee Shaffer Len Wilkens

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1961 NCAA Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Terry Dischinger Roger Kaiser Jerry Lucas Tom Stith Chet Walker

Second Team

Walt Bellamy Frank Burgess Tony Jackson Bill McGill Larry Siegfried

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1962 NCAA Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Len Chappell Terry Dischinger Jerry Lucas Bill McGill Chet Walker

Second Team

Jack Foley John Havlicek Art Heyman Cotton Nash John Rudometkin Rod Thorn

v t e

Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year

1954: Roger Bannister 1955: Johnny Podres 1956: Bobby Morrow 1957: Stan Musial 1958: Rafer Johnson 1959: Ingemar Johansson 1960: Arnold Palmer 1961: Jerry Lucas 1962: Terry Baker 1963: Pete Rozelle 1964: Ken Venturi 1965: Sandy Koufax 1966: Jim Ryun 1967: Carl Yastrzemski 1968: Bill Russell 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: Bobby Orr 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
& John Wooden 1973: Jackie Stewart 1974: Muhammad Ali 1975: Pete Rose 1976: Chris Evert 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Jack Nicklaus 1979: Terry Bradshaw
Terry Bradshaw
& Willie Stargell 1980: U.S. Olympic Hockey Team 1981: Sugar Ray Leonard 1982: Wayne Gretzky 1983: Mary Decker 1984: Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
& Mary Lou Retton 1985: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 1986: Joe Paterno 1987: Bob Bourne, Judi Brown King, Kipchoge Keino, Dale Murphy, Chip Rives, Patty Sheehan, Rory Sparrow, & Reggie Williams 1988: Orel Hershiser 1989: Greg LeMond 1990: Joe Montana 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Arthur Ashe 1993: Don Shula 1994: Bonnie Blair
Bonnie Blair
& Johann Olav Koss 1995: Cal Ripken Jr. 1996: Tiger Woods 1997: Dean Smith 1998: Mark McGwire
Mark McGwire
& Sammy Sosa 1999: U.S. Women's Soccer Team 2000: Tiger Woods 2001: Curt Schilling
Curt Schilling
& Randy Johnson 2002: Lance Armstrong 2003: David Robinson & Tim Duncan 2004: Boston Red Sox 2005: Tom Brady 2006: Dwyane Wade 2007: Brett Favre 2008: Michael Phelps 2009: Derek Jeter 2010: Drew Brees 2011: Mike Krzyzewski
Mike Krzyzewski
& Pat Summitt 2012: LeBron James 2013: Peyton Manning 2014: Madison Bumgarner 2015: Serena Williams 2016: LeBron James 2017: José Altuve
José Altuve
& J. J. Watt

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 72637447 LCCN: n50039144 ISNI: 0

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