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Jennifer Maria Capriati[2] (born March 29, 1976) is an American former professional tennis player. A member of the International Tennis
Tennis
Hall of Fame, she won three singles championships in Grand Slam tournaments, was the gold medalist at the 1992 Summer Olympics, reached the World No. 1 ranking, and is considered one of the greatest tennis players of all time.[3][4] Capriati set a number of youngest-ever records at the start of her career. She made her professional debut in 1990 at the age of 13 years 11 months, reaching the final of the hard-court tournament in Boca Raton, Florida. Capriati reached the semifinals of the French Open
French Open
in her debut and later became the youngest ever player to reach the top 10 at age 14 years, 235 days in October of that year. Following a first-round loss at the 1993 US Open, Capriati took a 14-month break from competitive pro tennis. Her personal struggles during this time (including arrests for shoplifting and possession of marijuana) were well-documented by the press. In 1998, Capriati won her first Grand Slam singles match in five years at Wimbledon. During the next two years, Capriati slowly returned to championship form, winning her first title in six years in Strasbourg in 1999 and regaining a top-20 ranking. At the 2001 Australian Open, the reinvigorated Capriati became the lowest seed to ever win the championship when she defeated Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
in straight sets for her first Grand Slam championship. She also won the French Open
French Open
that year, claiming the Women's Tennis
Tennis
Association No. 1 ranking in October. After successfully defending her Australian Open
Australian Open
title in 2002, Capriati became a top-10 mainstay until injuries derailed her career in 2004. She won 14 professional singles tournaments during her career, along with one women's doubles championship.

Contents

1 Career

1.1 1990–1991: The records 1.2 1992–1993: Continued success, Olympic gold medal 1.3 1994–95: Break from tour 1.4 1996: Return 1.5 1997–98: Descent in the rankings 1.6 1999–2000: Ascent 1.7 2001: Grand Slam champion and World No. 1 1.8 2002: Third Grand Slam title 1.9 2003: New Haven champion 1.10 2004: Final full season

2 Playing style 3 Equipment and endorsements 4 Legacy and accolades 5 Post-tennis endeavors 6 Personal life 7 Significant finals

7.1 Grand Slam singles finals (3 titles) 7.2 Summer Olympics singles finals (1 Gold Medal)

8 References 9 External links

Career[edit] 1990–1991: The records[edit] She won the Junior Orange Bowl in both the 12- and the 14-year categories, and is one of only nine tennis players to win the Junior Orange Bowl championship twice in its 70-year history, which list includes Andy Murray, Jimmy Connors, Monica Seles, and Yishai Oliel.[5] Capriati made her professional debut as a 13-year-old, reaching the finals of two of her first three pro events, losing to Gabriela Sabatini and Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
in the Boca Raton and Hilton Head tournaments respectively, earning her first two wins over top-10 players (No. 10 Helena Suková
Helena Suková
and number-five Arantxa Sánchez Vicario). She entered the rankings in April, at No. 23. Capriati made her Grand Slam debut at the French Open. She went all the way to the semifinals, losing to eventual champion Monica Seles. She then reached the fourth round at Wimbledon, losing to Steffi Graf. Later in the year Capriati won her first career title in Puerto Rico, defeating Zina Garrison. After this victory Capriati entered the world's top 10. She qualified for the WTA Championships, narrowly losing to Graf in the first round in three sets. She finished her first season as a professional at World Number Eight. Throughout the season Capriati set multiple "youngest ever" records. She was the youngest player to reach a tour final, the youngest player to reach the semifinals at the French Open, the youngest seed ever at Wimbledon, and the youngest player to qualify for the season-ending championships. She was also the fourth-youngest player to win a WTA title. In her second season as a touring pro, Capriati established herself as a consistent top-10 player. She won two singles titles during the summer hard court circuit, defeating World No. 1 Monica Seles
Monica Seles
in a third set tie-breaker in finals of San Diego, and Katerina Maleeva in straight sets in the final of Toronto. She also reached two Grand Slam semifinals, at Wimbledon and the US Open. At Wimbledon, the 15-year-old Capriati stunned nine-time champion Martina Navratilova, defeating her in the quarterfinals in straight sets.[6] Capriati became the youngest person to ever reach the semifinal round of the tournament, losing to Sabatini. At the US Open, Capriati defeated Sabatini in the quarters but lost in the semis to eventual champion Seles after serving for the match twice. Capriati qualified for the year-end championships for the second time, reaching the quarterfinals. She ended the year at No. 6, which would be a career high until 2001. Capriati also won the only doubles title of her career at the Italian Open, partnering with Seles.[1] 1992–1993: Continued success, Olympic gold medal[edit] Capriati's 1992 season was highlighted by her victory at the Summer Olympics. She defeated second-seeded Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
in the semifinals and came from a set down to defeat top-seeded Steffi Graf in the gold-medal match. Capriati next defended her title in San Diego, defeating Conchita Martínez
Conchita Martínez
in the final, the only time that Capriati won back-to-back singles titles during her career. She reached the quarter-finals at the Australian Open
Australian Open
(in her debut), at the French Open, and at Wimbledon, and then she lost in the third round at the US Open. In Miami, Capriati ended Monica Seles's streak of 21 consecutive finals by defeating her in the quarterfinals. Capriati finished the year ranked in the top 10 for the third straight year, at No. 7. She also became the youngest player to surpass $1 million in prize money ( Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
would later break this record).[1] Also in 1992, a Sega Genesis video game titled Jennifer Capriati Tennis
Tennis
was released by Renovation Products.[7] At her first tournament (Sydney 1993), Capriati defeated third-ranked Sabatini in the semifinals before defeating Anke Huber
Anke Huber
in the final. For the second straight year, she reached the quarterfinals at the first three majors of the year. She reached the final of the Rogers Cup in Montreal, losing to Steffi Graf. At the US Open, the seventh-seeded Capriati lost her opening match to former top 15-player Leila Meskhi, her first loss in the first round of any pro tournament. Following this loss, Capriati decided to take a break from tennis. She finished the year ranked ninth.[1] 1994–95: Break from tour[edit] Capriati only played one match in 1994, losing in the first round of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
to Anke Huber. She fell off the rankings in June. She did not play at all in 1995.[1] 1996: Return[edit] Capriati, unranked, played her first match in 15 months in Essen, where she reached the quarterfinals, losing to Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
in three sets. She reached her first final in more than three years at Chicago, defeating Monica Seles
Monica Seles
en route, before losing again to Novotná in three sets. Capriati also reached the quarters in the fall at the Zurich Open, defeating Sabatini in the opening round in what would be the last singles match of Sabatini's career. Capriati competed in her first Grand Slam tournaments since 1993 at the French Open
French Open
and the U.S. Open, losing in the first round of both. Capriati re-appeared on the rankings in April at No. 103, and finished the year inside the top 25, at No. 24.[1] 1997–98: Descent in the rankings[edit] In January 1997, Capriati reached the final in Sydney for the second time in her career, defeating World No. 9 Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
en route to her only top-10 win of the year, losing to Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
in the final. She only reached the quarterfinals at one other tournament, Oklahoma City, where she lost to Davenport. Capriati finished the year at No. 66, having played in just three tournaments. Capriati did not play the first half of 1998. By the spring, she was ranked below the top 200. She accepted a wildcard entry into the clay-court tournament in Hamburg, Germany, where she reached the quarterfinals, but then lost to Martina Hingis. Capriati was also a quarterfinalist in Palermo, Italy. In the first round at Wimbledon, Capriati won her first Grand Slam singles match in five years, before losing to Lori McNeil in the second round. Capriati finished 1998 ranked 101.[1] 1999–2000: Ascent[edit] 1999 was Capriati's best season in several years. She won her first title in six years at Strasbourg, defeating ninth ranked Nathalie Tauziat in a quarterfinal for her first win over a top 10 player in two years. She defeated Russian Elena Likhovtseva
Elena Likhovtseva
in the final. She won her second title of the year at Quebec City, defeating American Chanda Rubin
Chanda Rubin
in the final. She also reached the round of 16 at both Roland Garros and US Open. She finished the year at No. 23. At the 2000 Australian Open, Capriati reached her first Grand Slam semifinal in nine years before losing to eventual champion Lindsay Davenport in straight sets. At the Miami
Miami
Masters, Capriati defeated World No. 6 Serena Williams for her first win over a player ranked in the top six in four years en route to a quarterfinal finish. Shortly after, Capriati was sidelined with right Achilles tendonitis
Achilles tendonitis
in April and an elbow injury in June. Capriati had a strong fall season, winning her ninth career title at Luxembourg, defeating Magdalena Maleeva. She also finished runner up in Quebec City
Quebec City
to Chanda Rubin
Chanda Rubin
and was a semifinalist in Zürich. These results propelled Capriati back into the top 20 for the first time since April 1994. She qualified for the season-ending championships for the first time in seven years. Her year-end ranking was 14, her highest in seven years. Capriati was also a member of the US Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Team, winning a singles and doubles rubber in the US's victory over Spain
Spain
in the final.[1] 2001: Grand Slam champion and World No. 1[edit] Capriati was seeded 12th at the 2001 Australian Open. She rallied from a set and a break down to defeat Monica Seles
Monica Seles
to reach the semis for the second consecutive year, beating World No. Two Davenport. In her first Grand Slam final, she defeated top seed and World No. 1 Martina Hingis in straight sets to win her first Grand Slam singles title. She was the lowest seed to ever win the title, and also the first player since Tracy Austin
Tracy Austin
in 1979 to defeat the top two ranked players in straight sets at a major. As a result of this triumph, Capriati re-entered the top 10 in the rankings at No. 7, the longest absence (nearly eight years) from the top 10 in WTA history. Capriati then reached the finals of the Cellular Cup in Oklahoma City, losing in the final to Seles. After electing not to participate at the 2001 Indian Wells Masters, Capriati reached the final in Miami, losing to Venus Williams
Venus Williams
after having failed to convert on eight championship points. Capriati then embarked on a remarkably successful clay court campaign. She won her second title of the year at the Family Circle Cup
Family Circle Cup
in Charleston, South Carolina, defeating Hingis in three sets in the final. She then lost in the final of Berlin to Amélie Mauresmo, also in three sets. Seeded fourth at the 2001 French Open, Capriati defeated top seed Hingis in the semis and the 12th seeded Kim Clijsters in the final to win her second consecutive Grand Slam title. Her 1–6, 6–4, 12–10 win over Clijsters had the longest-ever third set in a women's final in the French Open. Capriati was two points away from being defeated four times. She was only the fifth woman in history to win the Australian Open
Australian Open
and the French Open consecutively. At Wimbledon, Capriati rallied from 7–6, 5–3, 30–0 down in the quarters to defeat Serena Williams. Capriati's 19-match Grand Slam win streak ended in the semis at the hands of eighth seeded Justine Henin. Capriati rebounded at the Rogers Cup in Toronto, Ontario, making it to the final before losing to Serena Williams
Serena Williams
after saving match point in the second set. Capriati then lost in the semifinals of the US Open to Venus Williams. Despite the loss, Capriati accumulated the best Grand Slam record of 2001, and she was the only player to reach at least the semifinals of all four of the Grand Slam tournaments. Despite playing very little in the fall, Capriati became ranked world No. 1 on October 15. She lost her opening match at the WTA Tour Championships to Maleeva. Capriati would have finished the year ranked No. 1 had she reached the semifinals. Instead, she finished No. 2, behind Lindsay Davenport, with a 56–14 record.[1] 2002: Third Grand Slam title[edit] As a result of Lindsay Davenport's withdrawal from the Australian Open due to an injury, Capriati was the top seed. She defeated the sixth-seeded Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
and the fourth-seeded Kim Clijsters
Kim Clijsters
en route to her second consecutive final there, where she once again faced Martina Hingis. The match was played in very hot conditions, with the temperature exceeding 35 degrees Celsius. Capriati fought back from 6–4, 4–0 down and four championship points to eventually prevail 4–6, 7–6(7), 6–2. This was Capriati's third and final Grand Slam title. In the spring, Capriati reached finals in Scottsdale and Miami
Miami
losing to Serena Williams
Serena Williams
on both occasions. Capriati prepared for her French Open title defense by participating in events in Charleston, Berlin, and Rome, losing in the semifinals of all three. As the top seed at the French Open, Capriati reached the semifinals—before losing to the eventual champion Serena Williams
Serena Williams
in three sets. Capriati surrendered her No. 1 ranking to Venus Williams
Venus Williams
as a result of this loss. Capriati's streak of six consecutive Grand Slam semifinals was broken at Wimbledon, where she lost to Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
in three sets in the quarterfinals. She also lost to Mauresmo in the finals of the Canadian Open, and in the quarterfinals of the US Open after having served for the match. Capriati won only one match in the three European indoor events she played. She rebounded at the year-ending championships, reaching the semifinals for the first time, losing to Serena Williams. Capriati finished the year ranked third.[1] 2003: New Haven champion[edit] A week after the 2002 WTA Championships, Capriati had eye surgery in order to remove pterygiums (sun spots) from both eyes. Recovery from the surgery hampered Capriati's off-season preparation. In the opening round of the 2003 Australian Open
Australian Open
Capriati lost to unseeded and unheralded Marlene Weingärtner. Capriati was the first Australian Open
Australian Open
title-holder to lose in the first round. She withdrew from the Pan Pacific Open
Pan Pacific Open
to further recover from her surgery. Capriati rebounded by reaching at least semifinals of the next five tournaments she played. She lost to Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
in the semifinals of the Indian Wells tournament. She then reached the final of the Sony Ericsson Open for the third consecutive year before losing to World No. 1 Serena Williams. Capriati lost in the round of 16 of the French Open
French Open
to unseeded Nadia Petrova. She reached the quarters of Wimbledon for the sixth time, losing to Serena Williams
Serena Williams
in three sets, her eighth consecutive loss to her compatriot. Capriati then reached her second final of 2003 in Stanford, losing to Kim Clijsters
Kim Clijsters
in three sets. A pectoral strain forced Capriati to retire from her opening match in San Diego
San Diego
and pull out of Montreal. Capriati won her first title of 2003 in New Haven after Davenport retired in the final while trailing. This ended a 28-tournament title drought for Capriati, and was her first tour victory since she won the 2002 Australian Open. Seeded 6th at the U.S. Open, Capriati reached the semifinal where she lost to second-seeded Justine Henin
Justine Henin
in a tight third-set tiebreak many experts believed she should have won. Capriati served for the match twice and was two points away from victory eleven times, but Henin prevailed in a three-hour marathon, despite of Henin's serve being visibly affected by muscle cramps in her left leg throughout much of the last half hour of the match. Capriati did not play again until the WTA Tour Championships when she lost in the semifinal to Justine Henin
Justine Henin
again, now the World No. 1.[1] 2004: Final full season[edit] Injuries plagued Capriati's 2004 season. A back injury suffered during the 2003 WTA Tour Championships forced Capriati to withdraw from the 2004 Australian Open
Australian Open
and the Toray Pan Pacific Open
Pan Pacific Open
in Tokyo. Capriati advanced beyond the quarterfinals just once in her first four events of the year in Doha, losing to Anastasia Myskina
Anastasia Myskina
in the semifinals. Her back continued to be an issue, forcing her out of Indian Wells and Miami. Her ranking dropped to No. 10 as a result of her injuries. Capriati produced her best results of the year during the European clay-court season. She reached the semis of Berlin, defeating world No. 5 Myskina in the quarters for her first top 5 win of the season, before losing to Mauresmo in the semifinals. At the Italian Open, Capriati defeated top seed Serena Williams
Serena Williams
in the quarterfinals, her first win over the American since Wimbledon 2001. Capriati moved on to the final, where she lost to Mauresmo in a 3-hour struggle. Seeded 7th at the French Open, Capriati went on to the semifinals, before losing to sixth seeded and eventual champion Myskina in straight sets. At Wimbledon, Capriati reached the quarters for the fourth straight year, where she lost to Serena Williams
Serena Williams
in 45 minutes, the most lopsided result of their 17-match rivalry. A hamstring injury forced her to withdraw from Los Angeles and San Diego, but she reached the quarterfinals of both Montreal
Montreal
and New Haven. Seeded 8th at the US Open, Capriati defeated Williams in a controversial line call quarterfinal match to reach her fourth US Open semifinal. Capriati then lost to fifth seed Elena Dementieva
Elena Dementieva
in the last four in yet another, her third, tight US Open semifinal tiebreak, replicating the result in the tournament from the year before. Capriati had reached the semifinals of the US Open four times in her career (1991, 2001, 2003 and 2004), losing to a different opponent each time. Three of those times (1991, 2003 and 2004), she had lost in tough third-set tiebreaks, and two of those three opponents (Monica Seles in 1991, and Justine Henin
Justine Henin
in 2003) had then gone on to win the final and US Open championships easily in straight sets thereafter. Following the US Open, Capriati lost in the quarterfinals of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
to World No. 11 Vera Zvonareva, her worst loss since 1999 (where she won only one game against Graf in Miami). Capriati failed to qualify for the season-ending championships for the first time since 1999 and finished the year World No. 10.[1] Playing style[edit] Capriati was one of the first power players to emerge on the women's circuit in the early-to-mid-1990s, along with Monica Seles, Lindsay Davenport, and Mary Pierce. Her style of play was characterized by taking the ball early and on the rise, powerful ground-strokes, and an aggressive mindset on the return of service. Capriati's game was built around her groundstrokes and movement. Her flat forehand, devastating when hit hard, was considered her biggest weapon, especially when she was stretched out wide. She also possessed a solid backhand. She was quick around the court, able to play defense as well as offense. Her biggest weakness was considered to be her serve. Her first serve was powerful but offset by a wandering ball-toss, and her second serve was considered to be the most vulnerable part of her game. However, Capriati was known to counter her inconsistent serve with her exceptional return of serve. Equipment and endorsements[edit] In the 1990s, she signed a reported $3-million contract with Diadora, and a $1-million contract with Prince tennis rackets.[8] In the early 2000s, Capriati's apparel on court was manufactured by Fila.[9] She used a Prince Precision Retro 27 Midplus racket.[10] Legacy and accolades[edit] Capriati was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame
International Tennis Hall of Fame
in 2012 and is generally considered one of the greatest tennis players of all time.[3][4] A video game titled Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
Tennis
Tennis
was released for the Sega Genesis in 1992.[7] In 2001, ESPN named Capriati one of the world's sexiest athletes.[11] Post-tennis endeavors[edit] In April 2009, the media announced that Capriati would appear on the ABC television reality series The Superstars. The show, described as a revival of the 1970s series of the same name, premiered on June 23, 2009, in a co-ed format, with Capriati paired with singer and actor David Charvet, best known for his role as a lifeguard on the television show Baywatch. In the first episode of the show, they were one of the lower-performing teams and were sent into a run-off in an obstacle course race against basketball player Lisa Leslie
Lisa Leslie
and actor Dan Cortese. Capriati/Charvet won their race and avoided elimination.[12] At the start of the next episode, however, which aired on June 30, 2009, came the sudden announcement that Capriati had re-aggravated a previous injury during the first episode's events, and that as a result she and her partner were eliminated from the competition. Capriati appeared in an Oil of Olay
Oil of Olay
commercial in the early 1990s. She also appeared in an American Express
American Express
commercial during the US Open. Personal life[edit] Capriati was born in New York, New York, the daughter of Denise and Stefano Capriati.[13] She is of Italian descent. In 1993, at the age of 17, Capriati was charged with shoplifting a $15 ring from a mall kiosk, which she has described as accidental.[14] She was arrested on May 16, 1994, and charged with misdemeanor marijuana possession. She agreed to enter a drug counselling program.[15] In 1994, Capriati admitted that she had contemplated suicide due to tennis burnout and issues over her appearance and relationships.[16] In 2010, she required treatment for a drug overdose.[17] Capriati was in a relationship with Belgian tennis player Xavier Malisse.[18] In 2013, Capriati was charged with battery and stalking after reportedly following and striking former boyfriend Ivan Brennan on Valentine's Day.[19] The charges were later dropped.[20] In 2014, the state attorney's office in Palm Beach County, Florida, announced that Capriati had completed 30 hours of community service and four hours of anger management counseling in connection with the incident.[20] Significant finals[edit] Main article: Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
career statistics Grand Slam singles finals (3 titles)[edit]

Outcome Year Tournament Surface Opponent Score

Winner 2001 Australian Open Hard Martina Hingis 6–4, 6–3

Winner 2001 French Open Clay Kim Clijsters 1–6, 6–4, 12–10

Winner 2002 Australian Open
Australian Open
(2) Hard Martina Hingis 4–6, 7–6(9–7), 6–2

Summer Olympics singles finals (1 Gold Medal)[edit]

Outcome Year Tournament Surface Opponent Score

Gold 1992 Barcelona Olympics Clay Steffi Graf 3–6, 6–3, 6–4

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Jennifer Capriati". wtatennis.com. Retrieved 2015-09-07.  ^ "Jennifer Capriati". britannica.com. Retrieved 17 May 2013.  ^ a b "100 Greatest of All Time". Yahoo. Retrieved 2015-09-07.  ^ a b "Capriati into Hall of Fame". skysports.com. 2014-04-12. Retrieved 2015-09-07.  ^ "14-year-old Israeli wins revered junior tennis tournament". ynetnews.  ^ Finn, Robin (July 4, 1991). "TENNIS; Navratilova Finds 15 Beats 34 at Wimbledon". The New York Times. Retrieved September 21, 2014.  ^ a b " Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
Tennis". gamerankings.com. Retrieved 2015-09-07.  ^ Horovitz, Bruce (June 26, 1990). "Athletic Firms Going to the Net in Quest for Next Tennis
Tennis
Celebrity". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 11, 2014.  ^ "WHAT THEY'RE WEARING (AND HITTING WITH) AT THE U.S. OPEN". SportsBusiness Journal. August 28, 2000. Retrieved September 10, 2014.  ^ "What they're wearing (and hitting with) at Wimbledon". SportsBusiness Journal. June 25, 2001. Retrieved September 10, 2014.  ^ "Jennifer Capriati". ESPN. Retrieved 2015-09-07.  ^ "Capriati to compete on reality show". Entertainment Weekly (Entertainment Weekly). Retrieved April 27, 2009.  ^ Who's Who of American Women 1999–2000 – Google Books. Retrieved 2013-05-17 – via Google Books.  ^ Finn, Robin (11 December 1993). "Shoplifting an Accident, Capriati Says of Charge". The New York Times. Retrieved 12 March 2013.  ^ "Capriati prepared to seek counseling". The Milwaukee Journal. 14 June 1994. Retrieved 12 March 2013.  ^ "Capriati thought of suicide". The Milwaukee Sentinel. 26 September 1994. Retrieved 12 March 2013.  ^ "Capriati recovering after 'accidental overdose'". abc.net.au. 29 June 2010. Retrieved 12 March 2013.  ^ Tresniowski, Alex (12 February 2001). "Jenny, Anyone?". People.com. Retrieved 7 September 2014.  ^ "Ivan Brannan – Former Tennis
Tennis
Player Jennifer Capriati's Boyfriend".  ^ a b Yan, Holly (2014-01-14). "Stalking charge against tennis star Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
dropped". CNN. Retrieved 2015-09-07. 

External links[edit]

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portal

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on IMDb "Jennifer Capriati". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. 

Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
(Achievement predecessor & successor)

Sporting positions

Preceded by Martina Hingis Lindsay Davenport Venus Williams Venus Williams World No. 1 October 15, 2001 – November 4, 2001 January 14, 2002 – February 24, 2002 March 18, 2002 – April 21, 2002 May 20, 2002 – June 9, 2002 Succeeded by Lindsay Davenport Venus Williams Venus Williams Venus Williams

Awards and achievements

Preceded by Conchita Martínez WTA Newcomer of the Year 1990 Succeeded by Andrea Strnadová

Preceded by Monica Seles WTA Comeback Player of the Year 1996 Succeeded by Mary Pierce

Preceded by Venus Williams WTA Player of the Year 2001 Succeeded by Serena Williams

Preceded by Martina Hingis ITF World Champion 2001 Succeeded by Serena Williams

Preceded by Marion Jones Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year 2001 Succeeded by Serena Williams

Preceded by Marion Jones USOC Sportswoman of the Year 2001 Succeeded by Sarah Hughes

Preceded by Cathy Freeman World Sportswoman of the Year 2002 Succeeded by Serena Williams

Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
in the Grand Slam Tournaments

v t e

Women's tennis players who won two or more Grand Slam singles titles in one calendar year

Four wins

1953: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker 1970: Margaret Court 1988: Steffi Graf

Three wins

1928: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI&US) 1929: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI&US) 1962: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1965: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&WI&US) 1969: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1972: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(FO&WI&US) 1973: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO&US) 1983: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(AO&WI&US) 1984: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(FO&WI&US) 1989: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(AO&WI&US) 1991: Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(AO&FO&US) 1992: Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(AO&FO&US) 1993: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1995: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1996: Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(FO&WI&US) 1997: Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
(AO&WI&US) 2002: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(FO&WI&US) 2015: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&FO&WI)

Two wins

1925: Suzanne Lenglen
Suzanne Lenglen
(FO&WI) 1927: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (WI&US) 1930: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI) 1931: Cilly Aussem
Cilly Aussem
(FO&WI) 1932: Helen Wills
Helen Wills
Moody (FO&WI) 1939: Alice Marble
Alice Marble
(WI&US) 1946: Pauline Betz
Pauline Betz
Addie (WI&US) 1949: Margaret Osborne duPont
Margaret Osborne duPont
(FO&US) 1950: Louise Bough Clapp (AO&WI) 1952: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker (WI&US) 1954: Maureen Connolly
Maureen Connolly
Brinker (FO&WI) 1956: Shirley Fry Irvin
Shirley Fry Irvin
(WI&US) 1957: Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
(WI&US) 1958: Althea Gibson
Althea Gibson
(WI&US) 1959: Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
(WI&US) 1960: Darlene Hard (FO&US) 1963: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&WI) 1964: Margaret Court
Margaret Court
(AO&FO) 1964: Maria Bueno
Maria Bueno
(WI&US) 1967: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(WI&US) 1968: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
(AO&WI) 1971: Evonne Goolagong Cawley
Evonne Goolagong Cawley
(FO&WI) 1974: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&WI) 1975: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&US) 1976: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(WI&US) 1980: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(FO&US) 1982: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(FO&WI) 1982: Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(AO&US) 1985: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(AO&WI) 1986: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(WI&US) 1987: Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(WI&US) 1994: Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
(FO&US) 2000: Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(WI&US) 2001: Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
(AO&FO) 2001: Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(WI&US) 2003: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2003: Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(FO&US) 2006: Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
(AO&WI) 2007: Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(FO&US) 2009: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2010: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(AO&WI) 2012: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(WI&US) 2013: Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(FO&US) 2016: Angelique Kerber
Angelique Kerber
(AO&US)

AO=Australian Open, FO=French Open, WI=Wimbledon, US=US Open

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French Open
French Open
girls' singles champions

Pre Open Era

1953 Christine Brunon 1954 Beatrice de Chambure 1955 Maria-Teresa Reidl 1956 Eliane Launay 1957 Ilse Buding 1958 Francesca Gordigani 1959 Joan Cross 1960 Françoise Dürr 1961 Robyn Ebbern 1962 Kaye Dening 1963 Monique Salfati 1964 Nicole Seghers 1965 Esme Emanuel 1966 Odile de Roubin 1967 Corinne Molesworth

Open Era

1968 Lesley Hunt 1969 Kazuko Sawamatsu 1970 Veronica Burton 1971 Elena Granatourova 1972 Renáta Tomanová 1973 Mima Jaušovec 1974 Mariana Simionescu 1975 Regina Maršíková 1976 Michelle Tyler 1977 Anne Smith 1978 Hana Mandlíková 1979 Lena Sandin 1980 Kathleen Horvath 1981 Bonnie Gadusek 1982 Manuela Maleeva 1983 Pascale Paradis 1984 Gabriela Sabatini 1985 Laura Garrone 1986 Patricia Tarabini 1987 Natalia Zvereva 1988 Julie Halard 1989 Jennifer Capriati 1990 Magdalena Maleeva 1991 Anna Smashnova 1992 Rossana de los Ríos 1993 Martina Hingis 1994 Martina Hingis 1995 Amélie Cocheteux 1996 Amélie Mauresmo 1997 Justine Henin 1998 Nadia Petrova 1999 Lourdes Domínguez 2000 Virginie Razzano 2001 Kaia Kanepi 2002 Angelique Widjaja 2003 Anna-Lena Grönefeld 2004 Sesil Karatantcheva 2005 Ágnes Szávay 2006 Agnieszka Radwańska 2007 Alizé Cornet 2008 Simona Halep 2009 Kristina Mladenovic 2010 Elina Svitolina 2011 Ons Jabeur 2012 Annika Beck 2013 Belinda Bencic 2014 Daria Kasatkina 2015 Paula Badosa Gibert 2016 Rebeka Masarova 2017 Whitney Osuigwe

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US Open girls' singles champions

1974 Ilana Kloss 1975 Natasha Chmyreva 1976 Marise Kruger 1977 Claudia Casabianca 1978 Linda Siegel 1979 Alycia Moulton 1980 Susan Mascarin 1981 Zina Garrison 1982 Beth Herr 1983 Elizabeth Minter 1984 Katerina Maleeva 1985 Laura Garrone 1986 Elly Hakami 1987 Natalia Zvereva 1988 Carrie Cunningham 1989 Jennifer Capriati 1990 Magdalena Maleeva 1991 Karina Habšudová 1992 Lindsay Davenport 1993 Maria Francesca Bentivoglio 1994 Meilen Tu 1995 Tara Snyder 1996 Mirjana Lučić 1997 Cara Black 1998 Jelena Dokic 1999 Lina Krasnoroutskaya 2000 María Emilia Salerni 2001 Marion Bartoli 2002 Maria Kirilenko 2003 Kirsten Flipkens 2004 Michaëlla Krajicek 2005 Victoria Azarenka 2006 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova 2007 Kristína Kučová 2008 Coco Vandeweghe 2009 Heather Watson 2010 Daria Gavrilova 2011 Grace Min 2012 Samantha Crawford 2013 Ana Konjuh 2014 Marie Bouzková 2015 Dalma Gálfi 2016 Kayla Day 2017 Amanda Anisimova

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Wimbledon (Open Era) girls' doubles champions

1982 Penny Barg / Beth Herr 1983 Patty Fendick / Patricia Hy-Boulais 1984 Caroline Kuhlman / Stephanie Rehe 1985 Louise Field / Janine Thompson 1986 Michelle Jaggard / Lisa O’Neill 1987 Natalia Medvedeva / Natalia Zvereva 1988 Jo-Anne Faull / Rachel McQuillan 1989 Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
/ Meredith McGrath 1990 Karina Habšudová / Andrea Strnadová 1991 Catherine Barclay / Limor Zaltz 1992 Marja Avotins / Lisa McShea 1993 Laurence Courtois / Nancy Feber 1994 Nannie de Villiers / Lizzie Jelfs 1995 Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Aleksandra Olsza 1996 Olga Barabanschikova / Amélie Mauresmo 1997 Cara Black
Cara Black
/ Irina Selyutina 1998 Eva Dyrberg / Jelena Kostanić 1999 Dája Bedáňová / María Emilia Salerni 2000 Ioana Gaspar / Tatiana Perebiynis 2001 Gisela Dulko
Gisela Dulko
/ Ashley Harkleroad 2002 Elke Clijsters / Barbora Strýcová 2003 Alisa Kleybanova
Alisa Kleybanova
/ Sania Mirza 2004 Victoria Azarenka
Victoria Azarenka
/ Olga Govortsova 2005 Victoria Azarenka
Victoria Azarenka
/ Ágnes Szávay 2006 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova
/ Alisa Kleybanova 2007 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova
/ Urszula Radwańska 2008 Jessica Moore / Polona Hercog 2009 Noppawan Lertcheewakarn
Noppawan Lertcheewakarn
/ Sally Peers 2010 Tímea Babos
Tímea Babos
/ Sloane Stephens 2011 Eugenie Bouchard
Eugenie Bouchard
/ Grace Min 2012 Eugenie Bouchard
Eugenie Bouchard
/ Taylor Townsend 2013 Barbora Krejčíková
Barbora Krejčíková
/ Kateřina Siniaková 2014 Tami Grende / Ye Qiuyu 2015 Dalma Gálfi
Dalma Gálfi
/ Fanny Stollár 2016 Usue Maitane Arconada
Usue Maitane Arconada
/ Claire Liu 2017 Olga Danilović / Kaja Juvan

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US Open girls' doubles champions

1982 Penny Barg / Beth Herr 1983 Ann Hulbert / Bernadette Randall 1984 Mercedes Paz / Gabriela Sabatini 1985 Andrea Holíková / Radka Zrubáková 1986 Jana Novotná
Jana Novotná
/ Radka Zrubáková 1987 Meredith McGrath / Kimberly Po 1988 Meredith McGrath / Kimberly Po 1989 Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
/ Meredith McGrath 1990 Kristin Godridge / Nicole Pratt 1991 Kristin Godridge / Kirrily Sharpe 1992 Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
/ Nicole London 1993 Nicole London / Julie Steven 1994 Surina de Beer / Chantal Reuter 1995 Corina Morariu
Corina Morariu
/ Ludmila Varmužová 1996 Surina de Beer / Jessica Steck 1997 Marissa Irvin / Alexandra Stevenson 1998 Kim Clijsters
Kim Clijsters
/ Eva Dyrberg 1999 Dája Bedáňová / Iroda Tulyaganova 2000 Gisela Dulko
Gisela Dulko
/ María Emilia Salerni 2001 Galina Fokina / Svetlana Kuznetsova 2002 Elke Clijsters / Kirsten Flipkens 2004 Marina Erakovic
Marina Erakovic
/ Michaëlla Krajicek 2005 Nikola Fraňková / Alisa Kleybanova 2006 Raluca Olaru
Raluca Olaru
/ Mihaela Buzărnescu 2007 Urszula Radwańska
Urszula Radwańska
/ Ksenia Milevskaya 2008 Noppawan Lertcheewakarn
Noppawan Lertcheewakarn
/ Sandra Roma 2009 Valeriya Solovyeva
Valeriya Solovyeva
/ Maryna Zanevska 2010 Tímea Babos
Tímea Babos
/ Sloane Stephens 2011 Demi Schuurs
Demi Schuurs
/ Irina Khromacheva 2012 Gabrielle Andrews / Taylor Townsend 2013 Barbora Krejčíková
Barbora Krejčíková
/ Kateřina Siniaková 2014 İpek Soylu
İpek Soylu
/ Jil Teichmann 2015 Viktória Kužmová
Viktória Kužmová
/ Aleksandra Pospelova 2016 Jada Hart
Jada Hart
/ Ena Shibahara 2017 Olga Danilović / Marta Kostyuk

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Australian Open
Australian Open
women's singles champions

(1969) Margaret Court (1970) Margaret Court (1971) Margaret Court (1972) Virginia Wade (1973) Margaret Court (1974) Evonne Goolagong (1975) Evonne Goolagong (1976) Evonne Goolagong (1977 (Jan)) Kerry Reid (1977 (Dec)) Evonne Goolagong (1978) Chris O'Neil (1979) Barbara Jordan (1980) Hana Mandlíková (1981) Martina Navratilova (1982) Chris Evert (1983) Martina Navratilova (1984) Chris Evert (1985) Martina Navratilova (1987) Hana Mandlíková (1988) Steffi Graf (1989) Steffi Graf (1990) Steffi Graf (1991) Monica Seles (1992) Monica Seles (1993) Monica Seles (1994) Steffi Graf (1995) Mary Pierce (1996) Monica Seles (1997) Martina Hingis (1998) Martina Hingis (1999) Martina Hingis (2000) Lindsay Davenport (2001) Jennifer Capriati (2002) Jennifer Capriati (2003) Serena Williams (2004) Justine Henin (2005) Serena Williams (2006) Amélie Mauresmo (2007) Serena Williams (2008) Maria Sharapova (2009) Serena Williams (2010) Serena Williams (2011) Kim Clijsters (2012) Victoria Azarenka (2013) Victoria Azarenka (2014) Li Na (2015) Serena Williams (2016) Angelique Kerber (2017) Serena Williams (2018) Caroline Wozniacki

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French Open
French Open
women's singles champions

(1968) Nancy Richey (1969) Margaret Court (1970) Margaret Court (1971) Evonne Goolagong (1972) Billie Jean King (1973) Margaret Court (1974) Chris Evert (1975) Chris Evert (1976) Sue Barker (1977) Mima Jaušovec (1978) Virginia Ruzici (1979) Chris Evert (1980) Chris Evert (1981) Hana Mandlíková (1982) Martina Navratilova (1983) Chris Evert (1984) Martina Navratilova (1985) Chris Evert (1986) Chris Evert (1987) Steffi Graf (1988) Steffi Graf (1989) Arantxa Sánchez (1990) Monica Seles (1991) Monica Seles (1992) Monica Seles (1993) Steffi Graf (1994) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (1995) Steffi Graf (1996) Steffi Graf (1997) Iva Majoli (1998) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (1999) Steffi Graf (2000) Mary Pierce (2001) Jennifer Capriati (2002) Serena Williams (2003) Justine Henin (2004) Anastasia Myskina (2005) Justine Henin (2006) Justine Henin (2007) Justine Henin (2008) Ana Ivanovic (2009) Svetlana Kuznetsova (2010) Francesca Schiavone (2011) Li Na (2012) Maria Sharapova (2013) Serena Williams (2014) Maria Sharapova (2015) Serena Williams (2016) Garbiñe Muguruza (2017) Jeļena Ostapenko

Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
achievements

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Women's Tennis
Tennis
Association (WTA) world No. 1 singles players

Chris Evert
Chris Evert
(1975/1985 – 260 w) Evonne Goolagong
Evonne Goolagong
(1976 – 2 w) Martina Navratilova
Martina Navratilova
(1978/1987 – 331 w) Tracy Austin
Tracy Austin
(1980 – 22 w) Steffi Graf
Steffi Graf
(1987/1997 – 377 w) // Monica Seles
Monica Seles
(1991/1996 – 178 w) Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
(1995 – 12 w) Martina Hingis
Martina Hingis
(1997/2001 – 209 w) Lindsay Davenport
Lindsay Davenport
(1998/2006 – 98 w) Jennifer Capriati
Jennifer Capriati
(2001/2002 – 17 w) Venus Williams
Venus Williams
(2002 – 11 w) Serena Williams
Serena Williams
(2002/2017 – 319 w) Kim Clijsters
Kim Clijsters
(2003/2011 – 20 w) Justine Henin
Justine Henin
(2003/2008 – 117 w) Amélie Mauresmo
Amélie Mauresmo
(2004/2006 – 39 w) Maria Sharapova
Maria Sharapova
(2005/2012 – 21 w) Ana Ivanovic
Ana Ivanovic
(2008 – 12 w) Jelena Janković
Jelena Janković
(2008/2009 – 18 w) Dinara Safina
Dinara Safina
(2009 – 26 w) Caroline Wozniacki
Caroline Wozniacki
(2010/2018 – 71 w) Victoria Azarenka
Victoria Azarenka
(2012/2013 – 51 w) Angelique Kerber
Angelique Kerber
(2016/2017 – 34 w) Karolína Plíšková
Karolína Plíšková
(2017 – 8 w) Garbiñe Muguruza
Garbiñe Muguruza
(2017 – 4 w) Simona Halep
Simona Halep
(2017/2018 – 22 w)

WTA rankings incepted on November 3, 1975 (year first held/year last held – number of weeks (w)) current No. 1 in bold, as of week of April 2, 2018[update]

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Tennis
Tennis
at the Summer Olympics • Olympic champions in women's singles

Demonstration

1968:  Helga Niessen (FRG) 1984:  Steffi Graf (FRG)

Indoor

1908:  Gwendoline Eastlake-Smith (GBR) 1912:  Edith Hannam (GBR)

Outdoor

1900:  Charlotte Cooper (GBR) 1908:  Dorothea Chambers (GBR) 1912:  Marguerite Broquedis (FRA) 1920:  Suzanne Lenglen (FRA) 1924:  Helen Wills (USA) 1988:  Steffi Graf (FRG) 1992:  Jennifer Capriati (USA) 1996:  Lindsay Davenport (USA) 2000:  Venus Williams (USA) 2004:  Justine Henin-Hardenne (BEL) 2008:  Elena Dementieva (RUS) 2012:  Serena Williams (USA) 2016:  Monica Puig (PUR)

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Laureus World Sports Award for Sportswoman of the Year

2000: Marion Jones* 2001: Cathy Freeman 2002: Jennifer Capriati 2003: Serena Williams 2004: Annika Sörenstam 2005: Kelly Holmes 2006: Janica Kostelić 2007: Yelena Isinbayeva 2008: Justine Henin 2009: Yelena Isinbayeva 2010: Serena Williams 2011: Lindsey Vonn 2012: Vivian Cheruiyot 2013: Jessica Ennis 2014: Missy Franklin 2015: Genzebe Dibaba 2016: Serena Williams 2017: Simone Biles 2018: Serena Williams

* Since this award, Jones has admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs. Her award has been rescinded.

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Laureus World Sports Award for Comeback of the Year

2000: Lance Armstrong* 2001: Jennifer Capriati 2002: Goran Ivanišević 2003: Ronaldo 2004: Hermann Maier 2005: Alex Zanardi 2006: Martina Hingis 2007: Serena Williams 2008: Paula Radcliffe 2009: Vitali Klitschko 2010: Kim Clijsters 2011: Valentino Rossi 2012: Darren Clarke 2013: Félix Sánchez 2014: Rafael Nadal 2015: Schalk Burger 2016: Dan Carter 2017: Michael Phelps 2018: Roger Federer

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Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year

1931: Helene Madison 1932: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1933: Helen Jacobs 1934: Virginia Van Wie 1935: Helen Wills 1936: Helen Stephens 1937: Katherine Rawls 1938: Patty Berg 1939: Alice Marble 1940: Alice Marble 1941: Betty Hicks 1942: Gloria Callen 1943: Patty Berg 1944: Ann Curtis 1945: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1946: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1947: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1948: Fanny Blankers-Koen 1949: Marlene Hagge 1950: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1951: Maureen Connolly 1952: Maureen Connolly 1953: Maureen Connolly 1954: Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1955: Patty Berg 1956: Pat McCormick 1957: Althea Gibson 1958: Althea Gibson 1959: Maria Bueno 1960: Wilma Rudolph 1961: Wilma Rudolph 1962: Dawn Fraser 1963: Mickey Wright 1964: Mickey Wright 1965: Kathy Whitworth 1966: Kathy Whitworth 1967: Billie Jean King 1968: Peggy Fleming 1969: Debbie Meyer 1970: Chi Cheng 1971: Evonne Goolagong 1972: Olga Korbut 1973: Billie Jean King 1974: Chris Evert 1975: Chris Evert 1976: Nadia Comăneci 1977: Chris Evert 1978: Nancy Lopez 1979: Tracy Austin 1980: Chris Evert 1981: Tracy Austin 1982: Mary Decker 1983: Martina Navratilova 1984: Mary Lou Retton 1985: Nancy Lopez 1986: Martina Navratilova 1987: Jackie Joyner-Kersee 1988: Florence Griffith Joyner 1989: Steffi Graf 1990: Beth Daniel 1991: Monica Seles 1992: Monica Seles 1993: Sheryl Swoopes 1994: Bonnie Blair 1995: Rebecca Lobo 1996: Amy Van Dyken 1997: Martina Hingis 1998: Pak Se-ri 1999: United States
United States
women's national soccer team 2000: Marion Jones 2001: Jennifer Capriati 2002: Serena Williams 2003: Annika Sörenstam 2004: Annika Sörenstam 2005: Annika Sörenstam 2006: Lorena Ochoa 2007: Lorena Ochoa 2008: Candace Parker 2009: Serena Williams 2010: Lindsey Vonn 2011: Abby Wambach 2012: Gabby Douglas 2013: Serena Williams 2014: Mo'ne Davis 2015: Serena Williams 2016: Simone Biles 2017: Katie Ledecky

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 311710

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