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The Info List - Japan National Football Team


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The Japan
Japan
national football team (サッカー日本代表, Sakkā Nippon Daihyō) represents Japan
Japan
in association football and is operated by the Japan Football Association
Japan Football Association
(JFA), the governing body for association football in Japan. The current head coach is Vahid Halilhodžić.[4] Japan
Japan
is one of the most successful teams in Asia, having qualified for the last six consecutive FIFA World Cups with second round advancements in 2002 and 2010, and having won the AFC Asian Cup
AFC Asian Cup
a record four times, in 1992, 2000, 2004 and 2011. The team has also finished second in the 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup. Their principal continental rivals are South Korea
South Korea
and most recently, Australia. Japan
Japan
is the only team from outside the Americas
Americas
to participate in the Copa América, having been invited in 1999 and 2011.[5] Although they initially accepted the invitation for the 2011 tournament, the JFA later withdrew following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.[6] The Japanese team is commonly known by the fans and media as Sakkā Nippon Daihyō (サッカー日本代表), Nippon Daihyō (日本代表), or Daihyō (代表) as abbreviated expressions. Although the team does not have an official nickname as such, it is often known by the name of the manager. For example, under Takeshi Okada, the team was known as Okada Japan
Japan
(岡田ジャパン, Okada Japan).[7] Recently, the team has been known or nicknamed as the "Samurai Blue", while Japanese news media still refer it to by the manager's last name, as "Halilhodžić Japan" (ハリルホジッチジャパン, Hariruhojitchi Japan), or "Halil Japan" (ハリルジャパン, Hariru Japan) in an abbreviated form.[8][9]

Contents

1 History 2 Rivalries 3 Team image

3.1 Fan chanting 3.2 Kits and colors

3.2.1 Home 3.2.2 Away

3.3 Sponsorship 3.4 Mascot

4 Recent results and fixtures

4.1 2018

5 Team Officials 6 Players

6.1 Current squad 6.2 Recent call-ups 6.3 Records 6.4 Rosters

7 Coaches 8 Competitive record

8.1 FIFA World Cup 8.2 AFC Asian Cup 8.3 FIFA Confederations Cup 8.4 Olympic Games 8.5 Copa América

9 Head-to-head records against other countries 10 FIFA Rankings 11 Team records 12 Honors

12.1 International 12.2 Continental 12.3 Regional 12.4 Other 12.5 Invitational 12.6 Individual awards

13 See also 14 References 15 External links

History[edit]

Japan
Japan
against Brazil
Brazil
at Signal Iduna Park
Signal Iduna Park
in Dortmund, Germany
Germany
in the 2006 FIFA World Cup

Japan's first major achievement in international football came in the 1968 Summer Olympics
1968 Summer Olympics
in Mexico
Mexico
City, where the team won the bronze medal. Although this result earned the sport increased recognition in Japan, the absence of a professional domestic league hindered its growth and Japan
Japan
would not qualify for the FIFA World Cup
FIFA World Cup
until 30 years later.[10] However, Japan
Japan
made its first appearance in the Asian Cup in 1988, where they were eliminated in the group stage following a draw with Iran
Iran
and losses to South Korea, the United Arab Emirates
United Arab Emirates
and Qatar. In 1991, the owners of the semi-professional Japan
Japan
Soccer League agreed to disband the league and re-form as the professional J. League, partly to raise the sport's profile and to strengthen the national team program. The following year Japan
Japan
hosted and won the Asian Cup in their second appearance, defeating Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia
1–0 in the final. The J. League
J. League
was officially launched in 1993, causing interest in football and the national team to grow. However, in its first attempt to qualify with professional players, Japan
Japan
narrowly missed a ticket to the 1994 World Cup after drawing with Iraq in the final match of the qualification round, remembered by fans as the "Agony of Doha". Japan's next tournament was a defence of their continental title at the 1996 Asian Cup. The team won all their games in the group stage but were eliminated in the quarter-finals after a 2–0 loss to Kuwait. The nation's first ever World Cup appearance was in 1998, where Japan lost all their games. The first two fixtures went 1–0 in favour of Argentina
Argentina
and Croatia, despite playing well in both matches. Their campaign ended with a 2–1 defeat to Jamaica. In the 2000 Asian Cup, Japan
Japan
managed to reclaim their title after defeating Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia
in the final, becoming Asian Champions for the second time. Two years later, Japan
Japan
co-hosted the 2002 World Cup with South Korea. After a 2–2 draw with Belgium
Belgium
in their opening match, the Japanese team advanced to the second round with a 1–0 win over Russia
Russia
and a 2–0 victory against Tunisia. However, they subsequently exited the tournament during the round of 16, after losing 1–0 to eventual third-place finishers Turkey. On 8 June 2005, Japan
Japan
qualified for the 2006 World Cup in Germany, its third consecutive World Cup, by beating North Korea 2–0 on neutral ground. However, Japan
Japan
failed to advance to the Round of 16, losing to Australia
Australia
1–3, drawing Croatia 0–0 and losing to Brazil
Brazil
1–4. During the 2010 World Cup qualification, in the fourth round of the Asian Qualifiers, Japan
Japan
became the first team other than the host South Africa
South Africa
to qualify after defeating Uzbekistan 1–0 away. Japan was put in Group E along with the Netherlands, Denmark and Cameroon.[11] Japan
Japan
won its opening match of the 2010 World Cup 1–0 against Cameroon, but subsequently lost to the Netherlands
Netherlands
0–1 before defeating Denmark 3–1 to advance to the next round against Paraguay. In the first knockout round, Japan
Japan
were eliminated from the competition following penalties after a 0–0 draw against Paraguay. After the World Cup, head coach Takeshi Okada resigned. He was replaced by former Juventus and Milan coach Alberto Zaccheroni. In his first few matches, Japan
Japan
recorded victories over Guatemala (2–1) and Paraguay
Paraguay
(1–0), as well as one of their best ever results, a 1–0 victory over Argentina. At the start of 2011, Japan
Japan
participated in the 2011 AFC Asian Cup
AFC Asian Cup
in Qatar. On 29 January, they beat Australia
Australia
1–0 in the final after extra time, their fourth Asian Cup triumph and allowing them to qualify for the 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup.[12] Japan
Japan
then started their road to 2014 World Cup in Brazil
Brazil
with numerous qualifiers. Throughout, they suffered only two losses to Uzbekistan and Jordan, and drawing against Australia. Afterwards, on 12 October, Japan
Japan
earned a historic 1–0 victory over France, a team they had never before defeated. After a 1–1 draw with Australia
Australia
they qualified for the 2014 World Cup, becoming the first nation (outside of Brazil, who hosted the tournament and qualified automatically) to qualify. Japan
Japan
started their 2013 Confederations Cup campaign with a 3–0 loss to Brazil. They were then eliminated from the competition after losing to Italy
Italy
3–4 in a hard-fought match but received praise for their style of play in the match. They lost their final match 1–2 against Mexico
Mexico
and finished in fourth place in Group A. One month later, in the EAFF East Asian Cup, they started out with a 3–3 draw to China. They then beat Australia
Australia
3–2 and beat South Korea
South Korea
2–1 in the third and final match in the 2013 EAFF East Asian Cup
EAFF East Asian Cup
to claim the title. The road to Brazil
Brazil
looked bright as Japan
Japan
managed a 2–2 draw with the Netherlands
Netherlands
and a 2–3 victory over Belgium. This was followed by three straight wins against Cyprus, Costa Rica and Zambia. Japan
Japan
was placed into Group C at the 2014 World Cup alongside the Ivory Coast, Greece and Colombia. They fell in their first match to Ivory Coast 2–1 despite initially taking the lead, allowing two goals in a two-minute span. They drew their second game to Greece 0–0. To qualify for the second round, they needed a victory against Colombia and needed Greece to beat Ivory Coast. Greece beat Ivory Coast 2–1, but Japan
Japan
could not perform well against Colombia and were beaten 4–1, eliminating them from the World Cup. Alberto Zaccheroni resigned as head coach after the World Cup. In July 2014, former Mexico
Mexico
and Espanyol manager Javier Aguirre
Javier Aguirre
took over and Japan lost 0–2 to Uruguay
Uruguay
in the first game he managed. Aguirre would begin a strong revamp of the team, switching out Zaccheroni's long-used 4–2–3–1 formation for his own 4–3–3 and applied this with a roster of the J.League's finest, dropping many regulars. A 2–2 draw against Venezuela was followed by a 1–0 victory over Jamaica. However, they lost their following match to Brazil
Brazil
4–0, with Neymar
Neymar
scoring all four goals. Japan's sights turned to January and their title defense at the 2015 AFC Asian Cup.

Japan
Japan
national team vs Paraguay
Paraguay
2008

Japan
Japan
won its opening match at the 2015 AFC Asian Cup
AFC Asian Cup
in Group D against Asian Cup debutantes Palestine 4–0, with goals from Yasuhito Endō, Shinji Okazaki, Keisuke Honda
Keisuke Honda
via a penalty and Maya Yoshida. Okazaki was named man of the match. They then faced Iraq and Jordan in their next group matches, which they won 1–0 and 2–0 respectively. They qualified to knockout stage as Group D winner with nine points, seven goals scored and no goals conceded. In the quarter-finals, Japan lost to the United Arab Emirates
United Arab Emirates
in a penalty shootout after a 1–1 draw, as Honda and Shinji Kagawa
Shinji Kagawa
missed their penalty kicks. Japan's elimination marked their worst performance in the tournament in 19 years. After the Asian Cup, Aguirre was sacked following allegations of corruption during a prior tenure. He was replaced by Vahid Halilhodžić in March 2015. Japan
Japan
started on a rough note during qualification, losing to the UAE 1-2 at home. They then picked up the pace in their other qualifier games against Iraq, Australia, and Thailand, picking up 5 wins and 2 draws. Then, on August 31, 2017, Japan
Japan
defeated Australia
Australia
2-0 at home thus qualifying them for the 2018 FIFA World Cup
FIFA World Cup
in Russia, making it their sixth successive world cup. Rivalries[edit] Main article: Japan– South Korea
South Korea
football rivalry Main article: Australia– Japan
Japan
football rivalry Japan
Japan
maintains a strong rivalry with South Korea. Japan
Japan
has played 78 matches against the South Korean football team with 14 victories, 22 draws, and 41 losses. The football rivalry is long-seated and is often seen as an extension of an overall rivalry that runs deep between the two nations. Controversies occasionally flare up between matches between the two nations, most recently at the 2013 EAFF East Asian Cup, where at the final match of the tournament, played between South Korea and Japan
Japan
on 28 July, South Korean fans booed the start of the Japanese anthem and later upped the political sloganeering with a banner that covered most of the width of one end of the ground that read, in Korean, "The nation that forgets history has no future."(Korean: 역사를 잊은 민족에게 미래는 없다),[13] in response to the Japanese Rising Sun Flag, apparently aiming at the Japanese leaders' reluctance to admit to wrongdoings during its militaristic and colonial past, after they displayed huge pictures of Ahn Jung-geun, who assassinated the first Prime Minister of Japan
Japan
and then-Japanese Resident-General of Korea
Resident-General of Korea
Itō Hirobumi
Itō Hirobumi
back in 1909, and Yi Sun-sin, a Korean naval commander who is famed for his victories against the Japanese navy during the Imjin war
Imjin war
in the Joseon Dynasty back in the 16th century.[14] Japan
Japan
began to develop a fierce rivalry with fellow Asian powerhouse Australia, shortly after the latter joined the Asian Football Confederation (AFC).[15] The rivalry is regarded as one of Asia's biggest football rivalries.[16] The rivalry is a relatively recent one, born from a number of highly competitive matches between the two teams since Australia
Australia
joined the AFC in 2006.[17] The rivalry began at the 2006 World Cup where the two countries were grouped together. The rivalry continued with the two countries meeting regularly in various AFC competitions, such as the 2007 AFC Asian Cup, the 2011 AFC Asian Cup Final and the 2013 EAFF East Asian Cup.[18] Team image[edit]

Supporters of the Japanese national team during a friendly match against Bosnia and Herzegovina, 30 January 2008

JFA logo used on the kits (2009–2017)

Fan chanting[edit] Japanese national team supporters are known for chanting "Nippon Ole" (Nippon is the Japanese term for Japan) at home matches.[19] Kits and colors[edit] Japan's kit is provided by German company Adidas, the team's sole apparel sponsor since 1999. Before that, Asics and Puma had been the team's official apparel sponsor alongside Adidas. The national team kit design has gone through several alterations in the past. In the early 1980s, the kit was white with blue trim. The kits worn for the 1992 Asian Cup consisted of white stripes (stylized to form a wing) with red diamonds. During Japan's first World Cup appearance in 1996 Asian Cup and in 1998, the national team kits were blue jerseys with red and white flame designs on the sleeves, and were designed by JFA (with the sponsor alternating each year between Asics, Puma, and Adidas). The 1996 design was reproduced in a special kit used against Syria on 7 June 2017. Japan
Japan
uses blue and white rather than red and white due to a superstition. Japan
Japan
used blue shirts in a 3–2 victory over Sweden
Sweden
in the first game of its maiden major international competition, the 1936 Summer Olympics.[20] When Japan
Japan
was coached by Kenzo Yokoyama (1988–1992) the kits were red and white, matching the colors of Japan's national flag. After failures at 1990 FIFA World Cup
FIFA World Cup
and 1992 Summer Olympics qualifications, the red shirt was scrapped. In the 2013 Confederations Cup and the 2015 AFC Asian Cup, Japan temporarily switched the colour of the numbers from white to gold. Home[edit]

1917

1950–75

1975–79

1979–80

1980–83

1983–86

1986–87

1988–92

1992

1992–96

1996–98

1998–99

1999–2000

2001

2002–03

2004–05

2005–07

2008–09

2009–11

2012–13

2013–15

2015–17

7 June 2017

2017-present

Away[edit]

1980–81

1984–85

1985

1992

1998–99

1999–2000

2001

2002–03

2004–05

2006–07

2008–09

2010–11

2012–13

2014–15

2015–17

Sponsorship[edit] Japan
Japan
has one of the highest sponsorship incomes for a national squad. In 2006 their sponsorship income amounted to over 16.5 million pounds. Primary sponsors include Adidas, Kirin, Saison Card International, FamilyMart, JAL, MS&AD Insurance Group, Asahi Shinbun, Mizuho Financial, Daito Trust Construction
Daito Trust Construction
and KDDI. Mascot[edit] The mascots are "Karappe" (カラッペ) and "Karara" (カララ), two Yatagarasu wearing the Japan
Japan
national football team uniform. The mascots were designed by Japanese manga artist Susumu Matsushita. Each year when a new kit is launched, the mascots change uniforms. For the 2014 FIFA World Cup, the Pokémon
Pokémon
character Pikachu
Pikachu
served as the mascot.[21] Recent results and fixtures[edit] Main article: Japan
Japan
national football team results and fixtures 2018[edit] Japan  v  Mali

23 March 2018 International Friendly Japan  1–1  Mali Liège, Belgium

15:20 (UTC+1) Nakajima  90+5' Report Diaby  43' (pen.) Stadium: Stade Maurice Dufrasne Attendance: 250 Referee: Erik Lambrechts (Belgium)

Japan  v  Ukraine

27 March 2018 Kirin Challenge Cup 2018 in Europe Japan  1–2  Ukraine Liège, Belgium

Makino  41' Report Ueda  21' (o.g.) Karavayev  69' Stadium: Stade Maurice Dufrasne

Japan  v  Ghana

30 May 2018 Kirin Challenge Cup 2018 Japan  v  Ghana Yokohama, Japan

Stadium: International Stadium Yokohama

Switzerland   v  Japan

8 June 2018 International Friendly Switzerland   v  Japan Lugano, Switzerland

Stadium: Cornaredo Stadium

Japan  v  Paraguay

12 June 2018 International Friendly Japan  v  Paraguay Lausanne, Switzerland

Stadium: Stade Olympique de la Pontaise

Colombia  v  Japan

19 June 2018 2018 FIFA World Cup: Group H Colombia  v  Japan Saransk, Russia

15:00 UTC+3

Report

Stadium: Mordovia Arena

Japan  v  Senegal

24 June 2018 2018 FIFA World Cup: Group H Japan  v  Senegal Yekaterinburg, Russia

20:00 UTC+5

Report

Stadium: Central Stadium

Japan  v  Poland

28 June 2018 2018 FIFA World Cup: Group H Japan  v  Poland Volgograd, Russia

17:00 UTC+3

Report

Stadium: Volgograd
Volgograd
Arena

Japan  v TBD

7 September 2018 Kirin Challenge Cup 2018 Japan  v TBD Sapporo, Japan

Stadium: Sapporo
Sapporo
Dome

Japan  v TBD

11 September 2018 Kirin Challenge Cup 2018 Japan  v TBD Suita, Osaka, Japan

Stadium: Panasonic Stadium Suita

Japan  v TBD

12 October 2018 Kirin Challenge Cup 2018 Japan  v TBD Niigata, Japan

Stadium: Denka Big Swan Stadium

Japan  v TBD

16 October 2018 Kirin Challenge Cup 2018 Japan  v TBD Saitama, Japan

Stadium: Saitama Stadium 2002

Japan  v TBD

16 November 2018 Kirin Challenge Cup 2018 Japan  v TBD Oita, Japan

Stadium: Oita Stadium

Japan  v TBD

20 November 2018 Kirin Challenge Cup 2018 Japan  v TBD Aichi, Japan

Stadium: Toyota Stadium

Japan  v  England

November 2019 opening New Stadium Japan  v  England Tokyo, Japan

Stadium: New National Stadium

  Win   Draw   Loss Team Officials[edit]

Position Name

Head Coach Vahid Halilhodzic

Assistant Coach Jacky Bonnevay

Assistant Coach Makoto Teguramori

Physical Coach Cyril Moine

Conditioning Coach Naoki Hayakawa

Goalkeeping Coach Enver Lugušić

Goalkeeping Coach Yukiya Hamano

Players[edit] Current squad[edit] The following players were called up for the friendly matches against Mali on March 23 and Ukraine on March 27, 2018.[22] Caps and goals as of 28th March 2018 after the match against Ukraine.[23]

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club

1 1GK Eiji Kawashima (1983-03-20) 20 March 1983 (age 35) 81 0 Metz

12 1GK Masaaki Higashiguchi (1986-05-12) 12 May 1986 (age 31) 4 0 Gamba Osaka

23 1GK Kōsuke Nakamura (1995-02-27) 27 February 1995 (age 23) 3 0 Kashiwa Reysol

2 2DF Tomoya Ugajin (1988-03-23) 23 March 1988 (age 30) 1 0 Urawa Red Diamonds

3 2DF Gen Shōji (1992-12-11) 11 December 1992 (age 25) 10 1 Kashima Antlers

5 2DF Yūto Nagatomo (1986-09-12) 12 September 1986 (age 31) 103 3 Galatasaray

6 2DF Masato Morishige (1987-05-21) 21 May 1987 (age 30) 41 2 FC Tokyo

19 2DF Shintarō Kurumaya (1992-04-05) 5 April 1992 (age 26) 3 0 Kawasaki Frontale

20 2DF Tomoaki Makino (1987-05-11) 11 May 1987 (age 30) 30 4 Urawa Red Diamonds

21 2DF Gōtoku Sakai (1991-03-14) 14 March 1991 (age 27) 39 0 Hamburg

22 2DF Naomichi Ueda (1994-10-24) 24 October 1994 (age 23) 3 0 Kashima Antlers

24 2DF Wataru Endo (1993-02-09) 9 February 1993 (age 25) 11 0 Urawa Red Diamonds

7 3MF Gaku Shibasaki (1992-05-28) 28 May 1992 (age 25) 12 3 Getafe

10 3MF Ryota Morioka (1991-04-12) 12 April 1991 (age 26) 5 0 Anderlecht

16 3MF Hotaru Yamaguchi (1990-10-06) 6 October 1990 (age 27) 39 2 Cerezo Osaka

17 3MF Makoto Hasebe
Makoto Hasebe
(captain) (1984-01-18) 18 January 1984 (age 34) 108 2 Eintracht Frankfurt

25 3MF Ryota Oshima (1993-01-23) 23 January 1993 (age 25) 3 0 Kawasaki Frontale

26 3MF Kento Misao (1996-04-19) 19 April 1996 (age 21) 3 0 Kashima Antlers

4 4FW Keisuke Honda (1986-06-13) 13 June 1986 (age 31) 92 36 Pachuca

8 4FW Genki Haraguchi (1991-05-09) 9 May 1991 (age 26) 29 6 Fortuna Düsseldorf

9 4FW Kenyū Sugimoto (1992-11-18) 18 November 1992 (age 25) 6 1 Cerezo Osaka

11 4FW Takashi Usami (1992-05-06) 6 May 1992 (age 25) 21 3 Fortuna Düsseldorf

13 4FW Yu Kobayashi (1987-09-23) 23 September 1987 (age 30) 13 2 Kawasaki Frontale

14 4FW Yūya Kubo (1993-12-24) 24 December 1993 (age 24) 13 2 Gent

15 4FW Yūya Ōsako (1990-05-18) 18 May 1990 (age 27) 26 7 Köln

18 4FW Shoya Nakajima (1994-08-23) 23 August 1994 (age 23) 2 1 Portimonense

Recent call-ups[edit] The following players have been called up to the Japan
Japan
squad in last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up

GK Shūichi Gonda (1989-03-03) 3 March 1989 (age 29) 3 0 Sagan Tosu 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

GK Shūsaku Nishikawa (1986-06-18) 18 June 1986 (age 31) 31 0 Urawa Red Diamonds v.  Belgium, 14 November 2017

DF Hiroki Sakai (1990-04-12) 12 April 1990 (age 27) 40 0 Marseille v.  Mali, 23 March 2018 INJ

DF Shōgo Taniguchi (1991-07-15) 15 July 1991 (age 26) 3 0 Kawasaki Frontale 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

DF Genta Miura (1995-03-01) 1 March 1995 (age 23) 2 0 Gamba Osaka 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

DF Sei Muroya (1995-04-05) 5 April 1995 (age 23) 1 0 FC Tokyo 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

DF Shūto Yamamoto (1985-06-01) 1 June 1985 (age 32) 1 0 Kashima Antlers 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

DF Ryō Hatsuse (1997-07-10) 10 July 1997 (age 20) 0 0 Gamba Osaka 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

DF Daigo Nishi (1987-08-28) 28 August 1987 (age 30) 1 0 Kashima Antlers 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship INJ

DF Maya Yoshida (1988-08-24) 24 August 1988 (age 29) 80 10 Southampton v.  Belgium, 14 November 2017 INJ

MF Yasuyuki Konno (1983-01-25) 25 January 1983 (age 35) 93 4 Gamba Osaka 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

MF Yōsuke Ideguchi (1996-08-23) 23 August 1996 (age 21) 10 2 Cultural Leonesa 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

MF Yōjiro Takahagi (1986-08-02) 2 August 1986 (age 31) 3 0 FC Tokyo 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

MF Shoma Doi (1992-05-21) 21 May 1992 (age 25) 2 0 Kashima Antlers 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

MF Hiroshi Kiyotake (1989-11-12) 12 November 1989 (age 28) 44 5 Cerezo Osaka 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship INJ

MF Kazuki Nagasawa (1991-12-16) 16 December 1991 (age 26) 1 0 Urawa Red Diamonds v.  Belgium, 14 November 2017

MF Shinji Kagawa (1989-03-17) 17 March 1989 (age 29) 89 29 Borussia Dortmund v.  Haiti, 10 October 2017 INJ

MF Yūki Kobayashi (1992-04-24) 24 April 1992 (age 25) 4 1 Heerenveen v.  Haiti, 10 October 2017

MF Kohei Kato (1989-06-14) 14 June 1989 (age 28) 0 0 Beroe Stara Zagora v.  Syria, 7 June 2017

FW Mū Kanazaki (1989-02-16) 16 February 1989 (age 29) 11 2 Kashima Antlers 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

FW Shū Kurata (1988-11-26) 26 November 1988 (age 29) 9 2 Gamba Osaka 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

FW Kengo Kawamata (1989-10-14) 14 October 1989 (age 28) 8 1 Jubilo Iwata 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

FW Hiroyuki Abe (1989-07-05) 5 July 1989 (age 28) 3 0 Kawasaki Frontale 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

FW Junya Itō (1993-03-09) 9 March 1993 (age 25) 3 0 Kashiwa Reysol 2017 EAFF E-1 Football Championship

FW Takashi Inui (1988-06-02) 2 June 1988 (age 29) 25 2 Eibar v.  Belgium, 14 November 2017

FW Takuma Asano (1994-11-10) 10 November 1994 (age 23) 16 3 Stuttgart v.  Belgium, 14 November 2017

FW Shinzō Kōroki (1986-07-31) 31 July 1986 (age 31) 16 0 Urawa Red Diamonds v.  Belgium, 14 November 2017

FW Yoshinori Mutō (1992-07-15) 15 July 1992 (age 25) 21 2 Mainz 05 v.  Haiti, 10 October 2017

FW Shinji Okazaki (1986-04-16) 16 April 1986 (age 31) 110 50 Leicester City v.  Saudi Arabia, 5 September 2017

INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury. PRE Preliminary squad. RET Retired from national team. SUS Player suspended.

Records[edit]

Statistics below are from matches which the Japan
Japan
Football Association consider as official.[1][24][25][26]

Updated to 28 March 2018:

Most caps

# Player Caps Goals Career

1 Yasuhito Endō 152 15 2002–2015

2 Masami Ihara 122 5 1988–1999

3 Yoshikatsu Kawaguchi 116 0 1997–2010

4 Yuji Nakazawa 110 17 1999–2010

Shinji Okazaki 50 2008–

6 Makoto Hasebe 108 2 2006–

7 Yuto Nagatomo 103 3 2008–

8 Shunsuke Nakamura 98 24 2000–2010

9 Yasuyuki Konno 93 4 2004–2017

10 Keisuke Honda 92 36 2008–

Top goalscorers

# Player Goals Caps Career

1 Kunishige Kamamoto 80 84 1964–1977

2 Kazuyoshi Miura 55 89 1990–2000

3 Shinji Okazaki 50 110 2008–

4 Hiromi Hara 37 75 1978–1988

5 Keisuke Honda 36 92 2008–

6 Shinji Kagawa 29 89 2008–

7 Takuya Takagi 27 44 1992–1997

8 Kazushi Kimura 26 54 1979–1986

9 Shunsuke Nakamura 24 98 2000–2010

10 Naohiro Takahara 23 57 2000–2008

Rosters[edit]

FIFA World Cup

1998 FIFA World Cup 2002 FIFA World Cup 2006 FIFA World Cup 2010 FIFA World Cup 2014 FIFA World Cup

AFC Asian Cup

1988 AFC Asian Cup 1992 AFC Asian Cup 1996 AFC Asian Cup 2000 AFC Asian Cup 2004 AFC Asian Cup 2007 AFC Asian Cup 2011 AFC Asian Cup 2015 AFC Asian Cup

FIFA Confederations Cup

1995 FIFA Confederations Cup 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup 2003 FIFA Confederations Cup 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup

Olympic Games

1936 Olympics 1956 Olympics 1964 Olympics 1968 Olympics

EAFF East Asian Cup

2003 East Asian Football Championship 2005 East Asian Football Championship 2008 East Asian Football Championship 2010 East Asian Football Championship 2013 EAFF East Asian Cup 2015 EAFF East Asian Cup

Copa América

1999 Copa América

Coaches[edit]

As of 16 December 2017[27]

Manager Period Record

Matches Won Draw Lost Win %

Masujiro Nishida 1923 2 0 0 2 0%

Goro Yamada 1925 2 0 0 2 0%

Vacant 1925 2 1 0 1 50%

Shigeyoshi Suzuki (1st) 1930 2 1 1 0 50%

Shigemaru Takenokoshi (1st) 1934 3 1 0 2 33.33%

Shigeyoshi Suzuki (2nd) 1936 2 1 1 0 50%

Shigemaru Takenokoshi (2nd) 1940 1 1 0 0 100%

Hirokazu Ninomiya 1951 3 1 1 1 33.33%

Shigemaru Takenokoshi (3rd) 1954–56 12 2 4 6 16.66%

Taizo Kawamoto 1958 2 0 0 2 0%

Shigemaru Takenokoshi (4th) 1958–59 12 4 2 6 33.33%

Vacant 1960 1 0 0 1 0%

Hidetoki Takahashi 1961–1962 14 3 2 9 21.43%

Ken Naganuma
Ken Naganuma
(1st) 1963–1969 31 18 7 6 58.06%

Shunichiro Okano 1970–1971 19 11 2 6 57.90%

Ken Naganuma
Ken Naganuma
(2nd) 1972–1976 42 16 6 20 38.09%

Hiroshi Ninomiya 1976–1978 27 6 6 15 22.22%

Yukio Shimomura 1979–1980 14 8 4 2 57.14%

Masashi Watanabe 1980 3 2 0 1 66.67%

Saburō Kawabuchi 1980–1981 10 3 2 5 30%

Takaji Mori 1981–1985 43 22 5 16 51.16%

Yoshinobu Ishii 1986–1987 17 11 2 4 64.70%

Kenzo Yokoyama 1988–1992 24 5 7 12 20.83%

Hans Ooft 1992–1993 27 16 7 4 59.25%

Falcão 1994 9 3 4 2 33.33%

Shu Kamo 1994–1997 46 23 10 13 50%

Takeshi Okada (1st) 1997–1998 15 5 4 6 33.33%

Philippe Troussier 1998–2002 50 23 16 11 46%

Zico 2002–2006 71 37 16 18 52.11%

Ivica Osim 2006–2007 20 13 5 3 65%

Takeshi Okada (2nd) 2007–2010 50 26 13 11 52%

Hiromi Hara
Hiromi Hara
(caretaker) 2010 2 2 0 0 100%

Alberto Zaccheroni 2010–2014 55 30 12 13 54.54%

Javier Aguirre 2014–2015 10 7 1 2 70%

Vahid Halilhodžić 2015–Present 36 21 8 7 57.58%

Competitive record[edit]

*Denotes draws includes knockout matches decided on penalty shootouts. Red border indicates that the tournament was hosted on home soil. Gold, silver, bronze backgrounds indicate 1st, 2nd and 3rd finishes respectively. Bold text indicates best finish in tournament.

FIFA World Cup[edit] Main article: Japan
Japan
at the FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup
FIFA World Cup
Finals record

Qualifications record

Hosts / year Result Position GP W D* L GS GA GP W D L GS GA

1930 Did Not Enter - - - - - -

1934 - - - - - -

1938 Withdrew - - - - - -

1950 Banned - - - - - -

1954 Did Not Qualify 2 0 1 1 3 7

1958 Did Not Enter - - - - - -

1962 Did Not Qualify 2 0 0 2 1 4

1966 Did Not Enter - - - - - -

1970 Did Not Qualify 4 0 2 2 4 8

1974 4 1 0 3 5 4

1978 4 0 1 3 0 5

1982 4 2 0 2 4 2

1986 8 5 1 2 15 5

1990 6 2 3 1 7 3

1994 13 9 3 1 35 6

1998 Group Stage 31st 3 0 0 3 1 4 15 9 5 1 51 12

2002 Round of 16 9th 4 2 1 1 5 3 - - - - - -

2006 Group Stage 28th 3 0 1 2 2 7 12 11 0 1 25 5

2010 Round of 16 9th 4 2 1 1 4 2 14 8 4 2 23 9

2014 Group Stage 29th 3 0 1 2 2 6 14 8 3 3 30 8

2018 Qualified 18 13 3 2 44 7

2022 To be determined - - - - - -

Total Round of 16 6/22 17 4 4 9 14 22

120 68 26 26 247 85

AFC Asian Cup[edit]

AFC Asian Cup
AFC Asian Cup
Finals record

Qualifications record

Hosts / year Result Position GP W D* L GS GA GP W D* L GS GA

1956 Withdrew - - - - - -

1960 - - - - - -

1964 - - - - - -

1968 Did Not Qualify 4 3 1 0 8 4

1972 Withdrew - - - - - -

1976 Did Not Qualify 4 1 1 2 3 4

1980 Withdrew - - - - - -

1984 - - - - - -

1988 Group Stage 10th 4 0 1 3 0 6 4 2 1 1 6 3

1992 Champions 1st 5 3 2 0 6 3 - - - - - -

1996 Quarter-Finals 5th 4 3 0 1 7 3 - - - - - -

2000 Champions 1st 6 5 1 0 21 6 3 3 0 0 15 0

2004 Champions 1st 6 4 2 0 13 6 - - - - - -

2007 Fourth Place 4th 6 2 3 1 11 7 6 5 0 1 15 2

2011 Champions 1st 6 4 2 0 14 6 6 5 0 1 17 4

2015 Quarter-Finals 5th 4 3 1 0 8 1 - - - - - -

2019 Qualified 8 7 1 0 27 0

Total 4 Titles 9/17 41 24 12 5 80 38

35 26 4 5 91 17

FIFA Confederations Cup[edit]

FIFA Confederations Cup
FIFA Confederations Cup
record

Hosts / year Result Position Pld W D * L GF GA Squad

1992 Did Not Qualify

1995 Group Stage 6th 2 0 0 2 1 8 Squad

1997 Did Not Qualify

1999

2001 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 1 1 6 1 Squad

2003 Group Stage 6th 3 1 0 2 4 3 Squad

2005 Group Stage 5th 3 1 1 1 4 4 Squad

2009 Did Not Qualify

2013 Group Stage 7th 3 0 0 3 4 9 Squad

2017 Did Not Qualify

Total Runners-up 5/10 16 5 2 9 19 25 -

Olympic Games[edit] Since 1992, the Olympic team has been drawn from a squad with a maximum of three players over 23 years age, and the achievements of this team are not generally regarded as part of the national team's records, nor are the statistics credited to the players' international records.

Olympic Games record

Hosts / year Result Position GP W D* L GS GA

1908 Did Not Enter

1912

1920

1924

1928

1936 Quarter-Finals 8th 2 1 0 1 3 10

1948 Did Not Enter

1952

1956 Group Stage 10th 1 0 0 1 0 2

1960 Did Not Qualify

1964 Quarter-Finals 8th 3 1 0 2 5 9

1968 Third Place 3rd 6 3 2 1 9 8

1972 Did Not Enter

1976 Did Not Qualify

1980 Did Not Enter

1984 Did Not Qualify

1988

1992 – present See Japan
Japan
national under-23 team

Total 1 Bronze Medal 4/17 12 5 2 5 17 29

Olympic Games History

Year Round Score Result

1936 Round1 Japan  3 – 2  Sweden Win

Quarterfinals Japan  0 – 8  Italy Loss

1956 Round 1 Japan  0 – 2  Australia Loss

1964 Round 1 Japan  3 – 2  Argentina Win

Round 1 Japan  2 – 3  Ghana Loss

Quarterfinals Japan  0 – 4  Czechoslovakia Loss

1968 Round 1 Japan  3 – 1  Nigeria Win

Round 1 Japan  1 – 1  Brazil Draw

Round 1 Japan  0 – 0  Spain Draw

Quarterfinals Japan  3 – 1  France Win

Semifinals Japan  0 – 5  Hungary Loss

Bronze match Japan  2 – 0  Mexico Win

Copa América[edit] Japan
Japan
is the only team from outside the Americas
Americas
to participate in the Copa América, having been invited in both 1999 and 2011.[5] However, Japan
Japan
declined their invitation on May 16, 2011, after events related to the difficulty of releasing some Japanese players from European teams to play as replacements. On May 17, 2011, CONMEBOL
CONMEBOL
invited Costa Rica to replace Japan
Japan
in the competition; the Costa Rican Football Federation accepted their invitation later that day.

CONMEBOL
CONMEBOL
Copa América
Copa América
record

Hosts / year Result Position GP W D* L GS GA

1999 Group Stage 10th 3 0 1 2 3 8

2011 Withdrew

2015 Withdrew

2019 Invited

Total Group Stage 2/44 3 0 1 2 3 8

Head-to-head records against other countries[edit] Main article: Japan
Japan
national football team head to head FIFA Rankings[edit] Last updated 21 December 2017

Key to FIFA World Rankings
FIFA World Rankings
table

Highest position

Lowest position

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

2017 46 52 51 44 44 45 46 44 40 44 55 57

Team records[edit]

As of 23 January 2015[28] Biggest victory 15–0 vs Philippines, 27 September 1967 Heaviest defeat 15–2 vs Philippines, 10 May 1917 Most consecutive victories 8, 8 August 1970 vs. Indonesia
Indonesia
– 17 December 1970 vs. India 8, 14 March 1993 vs. United States
United States
– 5 May 1995 vs. Sri Lanka 8, 26 May 1996 vs. Yugoslavia – 12 December 1996 vs. China Most consecutive matches without defeat 20, 24 June 2010 vs. Denmark – 11 November 2011 vs. Tajikistan Most consecutive defeats 6, 10 June 1956 vs. South Korea
South Korea
– 28 December 1958 vs. Malaya Most consecutive matches without victory 11, 13 August 1976 vs. Burma – 15 June 1976 vs. South Korea Most consecutive draws 4, 13 August 1976 vs. Burma – 20 August 1976 vs. Malaya Most consecutive matches scoring 13, 19 December 1966 vs. Singapore
Singapore
– 16 October 1969 vs. Australia 13, 7 February 2004 vs. Malaysia
Malaysia
– 24 July 2004 vs. Thailand Most consecutive matches without scoring 6, 18 June 1989 vs. Hong Kong
Hong Kong
– 31 July 1990 vs. North Korea Most consecutive matches conceding a goal 28, 6 November 1960 vs. South Korea
South Korea
– 11 December 1966 vs. Iran Most consecutive matches without conceding a goal 7, 19 November 2003 vs. Cameroon – 18 February 2004 vs. Oman

Honors[edit] International[edit]

Olympic Games

Bronze Medal (1): 1968

FIFA Confederations Cup

Runners-Up (1): 2001

Continental[edit]

AFC Asian Cup

Champions (4): 1992, 2000, 2004, 2011

Regional[edit]

Dynasty Cup

Champions (3): 1992, 1995, 1998

EAFF East Asian Cup

Champions (1): 2013

Far Eastern Games

Champions (1): 1930

Other[edit]

Afro-Asian Cup of Nations

Champions (2): 1993, 2007

AFC – OFC Challenge Cup

Champions (1): 2001

Invitational[edit]

Kirin Cup

Champions (11): 1991, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011

Individual awards[edit]

Japan
Japan
Professional Sports Grand Prize

Years (1): 2002

AFC National Team of the Year

Years (5): 2000, 2005, 2008, 2010, 2011

See also[edit]

List of Japan
Japan
international footballers Japan– South Korea
South Korea
football rivalry Japan
Japan
Football Association Football in Japan Japan
Japan
national under-23 football team Sport in Japan

References[edit]

^ a b 80 days to go – With 80 goals in 84 appearances, Kunishige Kamamoto is Japan's all-time leading goalscorer. (FIFA.com) ^ " Japan
Japan
National Football Team Results: 1910–1919". Football Japan. p. 29 December 2012. Retrieved 17 July 2014.  ^ Motoaki Inukai 「日本代表公式記録集2008」 Japan
Japan
Football Association p.206 ^ " Japan
Japan
sack coach Javier Aguirre
Javier Aguirre
due to ongoing match-fixing investigation". The Guardian. Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. 2015-02-03. Retrieved 2015-02-03.  ^ a b Japan
Japan
Invited To Copa America 2011 Along With Mexico
Mexico
Goal.com 2 Jun 2009 ^ [1] ESPNFC.com 17 May 2011 ^ A common methodology of nickname creation is done by taking the last name of incumbent head coach followed by "Japan". Past teams have been referred to as, "Osim Japan" (オシムジャパン, Oshimu Japan), " Zico
Zico
Japan" (ジーコジャパン, Jīko Japan), "Troussier Japan" (トルシエジャパン, Torushie Japan) ^ ハリルジャパン、白星発進!!岡崎&本田のゴールで初陣飾る. Gekisaka (in Japanese). Kodansha. 2015-03-27. Retrieved 2015-04-09.  ^ 岡崎、本田がゴール! ハリルジャパン初陣を勝利で飾る. Football Channel (in Japanese). Kanzen ltd. 2015-03-27. Retrieved 2015-04-09.  ^ Matsushima, Ken. "History of the J. League". Rising Sun News. Archived from the original on 2006-05-12. Retrieved 2016-11-02.  ^ Hongo, Jun, "SOCCER IN JAPAN: Japan
Japan
team has foot in World Cup door but can it kick?", Japan
Japan
Times, February 9, 2010, p. 3. ^ " Australia
Australia
0–1 Japan
Japan
(AET". Daily Telegraph. 2011-01-29. Retrieved 2011-02-02.  ^ "Banner Controversy Mars Japan-Korea Soccer Match". Alastair Gale. The Wall Street Journal. 2013-07-29. Retrieved 2013-07-30.  ^ 안중근·이순신 현수막 논란…붉은 악마는 '응원 보이콧' [Ahn Jung-geun, Yi Sun-sin
Yi Sun-sin
banners controversy…Red Devils' "Cheering boycott"] (in Korean). Seoul Broadcasting System. 2013-07-28. Retrieved 2013-07-28.  ^ "Australia, Japan
Japan
rivalry hits new heights". Football Federation Australia. Retrieved 30 September 2013.  ^ "Highlights". Foxtel.com.au. Archived from the original on 16 November 2014. Retrieved 3 May 2015.  ^ Sebastian Hassett. "Socceroos to resume Japan
Japan
rivalry in qualifying group for Brazil". Smh.com.au. Retrieved 2015-05-03.  ^ "Japan-Australia: a classic football rivalry". theroar.com.au. Retrieved 30 September 2013.  ^ Chant of JAPAN National Team "NIPPON Ole" YT ^ "Why does Japan
Japan
wear blue soccer uniforms?". The Wichita Eagle.  ^ Sanchez, Miranda (15 March 2014). " Pikachu
Pikachu
Named Mascot of the 2014 World Cup".  ^ " Japan
Japan
recall Honda for World Cup tune-ups, Okazaki omitted". KFGO. 15 March 2018. Retrieved 15 March 2018.  ^ " Japan
Japan
squad named for Caltex Socceroos WCQ". Football Federation Australia. 16 August 2017. Retrieved 24 August 2017.  ^ Yoon Hyung-Jin. " Japan
Japan
International Match – List of Full International Matches". RSSSF. Retrieved 1 July 2012.  ^ Mamrud, Roberto. " Japan
Japan
– Record International Players". RSSSF. Retrieved 2 July 2012.  ^ "Players Records". Japan
Japan
National Football Team Database. Retrieved May 15, 2014.  ^ "Managers". Japan
Japan
National Football Team Database. Archived from the original on 17 May 2014. Retrieved 15 May 2014.  ^ "Team Records". Japan
Japan
National Football Team Database. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Japan
Japan
national football team.

Japan Football Association
Japan Football Association
(in Japanese) Japan
Japan
Samurai Blue (in Japanese) Japan
Japan
Football Association Japan
Japan
FIFA Japan
Japan
at the World Cups

Preceded by 1988 Saudi Arabia  Asian Champions 1992 (1st title) Succeeded by 1996 Saudi Arabia 

Preceded by 1996 Saudi Arabia  Asian Champions 2000 (2nd title) 2004 (3rd title) Succeeded by 2007 Iraq 

Preceded by 2007 Iraq  Asian Champions 2011 (4th title) Succeeded by 2015 Australia 

Preceded by 2001 Ichiro Suzuki Japan
Japan
Professional Sports Grand Prize 2002 Japan
Japan
National Football Team Succeeded by 2003 Hideki Matsui

v t e

AFC Asian Cup Champions

   

1956:  South Korea 1960:  South Korea 1964:  Israel 1968:  Iran

1972:  Iran 1976:  Iran 1980:  Kuwait 1984:  Saudi Arabia

1988:  Saudi Arabia 1992:  Japan 1996:  Saudi Arabia 2000:  Japan

2004:  Japan 2007:  Iraq 2011:  Japan 2015:  Australia

v t e

FIFA World Cup
FIFA World Cup
hosts

1930:  Uruguay 1934:  Italy 1938:  France 1950:  Brazil 1954:  Switzerland 1958:  Sweden 1962:  Chile 1966:  England 1970:  Mexico 1974:  West Germany 1978:  Argentina 1982:  Spain 1986:  Mexico 1990:  Italy 1994:  United States 1998:  France 2002:   South Korea
South Korea
&  Japan 2006:  Germany 2010:  South Africa 2014:  Brazil 2018:  Russia 2022:  Qatar

v t e

Japan
Japan
national football team

General

Japan
Japan
Football Association History Managers

Venues

Tokyo
Tokyo
National Stadium Saitama Stadium 2002

Statistics

All-time match results Head to head Records All-time goalscorers Hat-tricks

Players

Players (by caps) Captains Other players

World Cup Finals

1998 2002 2006 2010 2014

Asian Cup Finals

1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2007 2011 2015

Other tournaments

FIFA Confederations Cup The Olympics Asian Games East Asian Games East Asian Cup

Culture

Korea Rivalry Australia
Australia
Rivalry Agony of Doha

Other JFA teams

U-17 U-20 U-23 Women's

U-17 U-20 U-23

Futsal

Women's

Beach soccer

v t e

Football in Japan

Japan
Japan
Football Association

National teams

Men's Men's U-23 Men's U-20 Men's U-17 Men's Futsal Beach Soccer Women's (Results) Women's U-20 Women's U-17 Women's Futsal

League System

Men:

J.League

J1 League J2 League J3 League

Japan
Japan
Football League Regional Leagues

Hokkaido Tohoku Kantō Hokushinetsu Tōkai Kansai Chūgoku Shikoku Kyushu

Women:

L. League

Futsal:

F.League

Domestic cups

Emperor's Cup Empress's Cup J. League
J. League
YBC Levain Cup Fuji Xerox Super Cup Shakaijin Cup

Reserve & Academy

Prince Takamado Cup High School Tournament SBS Cup

Culture

Agony of Doha Captain Tsubasa

List of clubs List of venues Champions

J1 J2 J3

Records Kirin Cup Regional Promotion Series Women's football in Japan

v t e

Japan
Japan
national football team yearly records

1923 1925 1927 1930 1934 1936 1940 1951 1954 1955 1956 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

National men's football teams of Asia (AFC)

Southeast Asia (AFF)

Australia Brunei Cambodia Indonesia Laos Malaysia Myanmar Philippines Singapore Thailand Timor-Leste Vietnam

Central Asia (CAFA)

Afghanistan Iran Kyrgyzstan Tajikistan Turkmenistan Uzbekistan

East Asia
East Asia
(EAFF)

China
China
PR Chinese Taipei Guam Hong Kong Japan Korea DPR Korea Republic Macau Mongolia Northern Mariana Islands1

South Asia (SAFF)

Bangladesh Bhutan India Maldives Nepal Pakistan Sri Lanka

West Asia (WAFF)

Bahrain Iraq Jordan Kuwait Lebanon Oman Palestine Qatar Saudi Arabia Syria United Arab Emirates Yemen

Defunct

Malaya North Vietnam South Vietnam South Yemen

Former

Israel
Israel
(moved to UEFA
UEFA
in 1994) Kazakhstan (moved to UEFA
UEFA
in 2002) New Zealand (formed the OFC in 1966)

1 Provisional Associate Member - Not a member of FIFA

v t e

National football teams of East Asia
East Asia
(EAFF)

Men's

China
China
PR Chinese Taipei Guam Hong Kong Japan Korea DPR Korea Republic Macau Mongolia Northern Mariana Islands†

Women's

China
China
PR Chinese Taipei Guam Hong Kong Japan Korea DPR Korea Republic Macau Mongolia Northern Mariana Islands†

†AFC provisional Associate Member

v t e

National sports teams of Japan

Women's teams

Association Football

FU-23 FU-20 FU-17 Futsal

Baseball Basketball

FU-19 FU-17 F-3x3

Boxing Cricket Field hockey Gymnastics Handball Ice hockey

F U-18

Roller Hockey Rugby Union

F7

Softball Squash Tennis Volleyball

FU-23

Water Polo

Men's teams

American football Association Football

MU-23 MU-20 MU-17 Futsal Beach Soccer Cerebral Palsy

Australian rules football Badminton Bandy Baseball Basketball

MU-19 MU-17 3x3

Boxing Cricket Field hockey Handball Ice hockey

M Junior M U18

Kabaddi Korfball Lacrosse Roller Hockey Rugby Union

M7

Rugby league Squash Tennis Volleyball Water Polo

Olympics Paral

.