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James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
(born January 17, 1931) is an American actor. His career has spanned more than 60 years, and he has been described as "one of America's most distinguished and versatile" actors[4] and "one of the greatest actors in American history".[5] Since his Broadway debut in 1957, Jones has won many awards, including a Tony Award
Tony Award
and Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for his role in The Great White Hope. Jones has won three Emmy Awards, including two in the same year in 1991, and he also earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor in a Leading Role in the film version of The Great White Hope. He is also known for his voice roles as Darth Vader
Darth Vader
in the Star Wars
Star Wars
film series and Mufasa
Mufasa
in Disney's The Lion King, as well as many other film, stage and television roles. Jones has been said to possess "one of the best-known voices in show business, a stirring basso profondo that has lent gravel and gravitas" to his projects, including live-action acting, voice acting, and commercial voice-overs.[6][7] In 1970, he won a Grammy Award
Grammy Award
for Great American Documents. As a child, Jones had a stutter. In his episode of Biography, he said he overcame the affliction through poetry, public speaking, and acting, although it lasted for several years. A pre-med major in college, he went on to serve in the United States Army
United States Army
during the Korean War
Korean War
before pursuing a career in acting. On November 12, 2011, he received an Honorary Academy Award.[5] On November 9, 2015, Jones received the Voice Arts Icon Award.[8] On May 25, 2017, he received an Honorary Doctor of Arts
Doctor of Arts
degree from Harvard University
Harvard University
and concluded the event's benediction with "May the Force be with you".[9]

Contents

1 Early life

1.1 Childhood 1.2 Education 1.3 Military

2 Film and stage career

2.1 Early career 2.2 Stage roles 2.3 Film roles 2.4 Voice roles 2.5 Television roles

3 List of performances 4 Personal life 5 Awards and nominations 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External links

Early life[edit] Childhood[edit]

Jones' father, Robert Earl Jones, in promotional still for the Langston Hughes
Langston Hughes
play Don't You Want to be Free? (1938)

James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
was born in Arkabutla, Mississippi
Arkabutla, Mississippi
on January 17, 1931,[10] to Ruth (Williams) Jones, a teacher and maid, and Robert Earl Jones, a boxer, butler, and chauffeur who left the family shortly after James Earl's birth. He later became a stage and screen actor in New York and Hollywood.[11][12] Jones and his father did not get to know each other until the 1950s but became reconciled then. His parents were African-American, and Jones has learned they also had Irish and Native American ancestry.[13][14] From the age of five, Jones was raised by his maternal grandparents, John Henry and Maggie Williams,[10] who had moved from Mississippi in the Great Migration and had a farm in Jackson, Michigan.[15] Jones has described his grandmother, Maggie, as "the most racist person I have ever known",[16] having a "double edged contempt for White folk".[14] He had to develop his own independent thinking. His grandmother was of African-American, Cherokee
Cherokee
and Choctaw
Choctaw
ancestry.[16] Jones found the transition to living with his grandparents in Michigan traumatic, and developed a stutter so severe that he refused to speak. When his family moved to the more rural Brethren, Michigan, a teacher helped him overcome his stutter. He remained functionally mute for eight years until he entered high school. He credits his English teacher, Donald Crouch, who discovered he had a gift for writing poetry, with helping him end his silence.[12] Crouch urged him to challenge his reluctance to speak.[17] "I was a stutterer. I couldn't talk. So my first year of school was my first mute year, and then those mute years continued until I got to high school."[18] Education[edit] After being educated at the Browning School for boys in his high school years and graduating as vice president of his class from Dickson Rural Agricultural School (now Brethren High School) in Brethren, Michigan, Jones attended the University of Michigan
University of Michigan
where he was initially a pre-med major.[12] He joined the Reserve Officer Training Corps and excelled. He felt comfortable within the structure of the military environment and enjoyed the camaraderie of his fellow cadets in the Pershing Rifles
Pershing Rifles
Drill Team and Scabbard and Blade
Scabbard and Blade
Honor Society.[19] During the course of his studies, Jones discovered he was not cut out to be a doctor. Instead, he focused on drama at the University of Michigan
University of Michigan
School of Music, Theatre & Dance with the thought of doing something he enjoyed, before, he assumed, he would have to go off to fight in the Korean War. After four years of college, Jones graduated from the university in 1955.[20] Military[edit] With the war intensifying in Korea, Jones expected to be deployed as soon as he received his commission as a second lieutenant. As he waited for his orders, he worked as a part-time stage crew hand at the Ramsdell Theatre
Ramsdell Theatre
in Manistee, Michigan, where he had earlier performed. Jones was commissioned in mid-1953, after the Korean War's end, and reported to Fort Benning
Fort Benning
to attend the Infantry Officers Basic Course. He attended Ranger School
Ranger School
and received his Ranger Tab (although he said during an interview on the BBC's The One Show, screened on November 11, 2009, that he "washed out" of Ranger training). He was initially to report to Fort Leonard Wood, but his unit was instead sent to establish a cold weather training command at the former Camp Hale
Camp Hale
near Leadville, Colorado. His battalion became a training unit in the rugged terrain of the Rocky Mountains. Jones was promoted to first lieutenant prior to his discharge.[21] He moved to New York, where he studied at the American Theatre Wing. He worked as a janitor to support himself. Film and stage career[edit]

External audio

James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
talks with Studs Terkel on WFMT ; 1968/02, 49:25, Studs Terkel Radio Archive[22]

Early career[edit] Jones began his acting career at the Ramsdell Theatre
Ramsdell Theatre
in Manistee, Michigan. In 1953, he was a stage carpenter. During the 1955–57 seasons, he was an actor and stage manager. He performed his first portrayal of Shakespeare’s Othello
Othello
in this theater in 1955.[23] His early career also included an appearance in the ABC radio anthology series Theatre-Five.[24] Stage roles[edit]

Othello

Play media

Jones performs Othello's Act I, scene III monologue from Shakespeare's Othello
Othello
at the White House
White House
Evening of Poetry, Music, and the Spoken Word on May 12, 2009.

"Othello"

Audio only

Problems playing these files? See media help.

Jones is an accomplished stage actor; he has won Tony awards in 1969 for The Great White Hope
The Great White Hope
and in 1987 for Fences. He has acted in many Shakespearean roles: Othello, King Lear, Oberon in A Midsummer Night's Dream, Abhorson in Measure for Measure, and Claudius in Hamlet. Jones played Lennie on Broadway in the 1974 Brooks Atkinson Theatre production of the adaptation of John Steinbeck's novella, Of Mice and Men, with Kevin Conway as George and Pamela Blair as Curley's Wife. Jones received Kennedy Center Honors
Kennedy Center Honors
in 2002. On April 7, 2005, James Earl Jones and Leslie Uggams
Leslie Uggams
headed the cast in an African-American Broadway revival version of On Golden Pond, directed by Leonard Foglia and produced by Jeffrey Finn.[12] In February 2008, he starred on Broadway as Big Daddy in a limited-run, all-African-American production of Tennessee Williams's Pulitzer Prize-winning drama Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, directed by Debbie Allen
Debbie Allen
and mounted at the Broadhurst Theatre. In November 2009, James reprised the role of Big Daddy in Cat On A Hot Tin Roof at the Novello Theatre in London's West End. This production also stars Sanaa Lathan
Sanaa Lathan
as Maggie, Phylicia Rashad
Phylicia Rashad
as Big Mamma, and Adrian Lester as Brick. In October 2010, Jones returned to the Broadway stage in Alfred Uhry's Driving Miss Daisy along with Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
at the Golden Theatre.[25] In November 2011, Jones starred in Driving Miss Daisy in London's West End, and on November 12 received his honorary Oscar in front of the audience at the Wyndham's Theatre, which was presented to him by Ben Kingsley.[26] In March 2012, Jones played the role of President Art Hockstader in Gore Vidal's The Best Man on Broadway at the Schoenfeld Theatre. Earning Jones a Tony nomination for Best Performance in a Lead Role in a Play. The play also starred Angela Lansbury, John Larroquette (as candidate William Russell), Candice Bergen, Eric McCormack (as candidate Senator Joseph Cantwell), Jefferson Mays, Michael McKean, and Kerry Butler, with direction by Michael Wilson.[27][28] In 2013, Jones starred opposite Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
in a production of Much Ado About Nothing
Much Ado About Nothing
directed by Mark Rylance
Mark Rylance
at The Old Vic, London.[29] In 2014, Jones played the role of Grandpa in the comedy You Can't Take it With You at the Longacre Theatre, Broadway. On September 23, 2015, Jones opened in a new revival of The Gin Game opposite Cicely Tyson, in the same venue where the play originally premiered (with Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy): the John Golden Theater. The play had a planned limited run of 16 weeks.[30] Film roles[edit] His first film role was as a young and trim Lt. Lothar Zogg, the B-52 bombardier in 1964's Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. In 1967, Jones portrayed a surgeon and Haitian rebel leader in The Comedians. His first starring film role came with his portrayal of boxer Jack Jefferson in The Great White Hope (1970), co-starring Jane Alexander. They had played these roles in the original stage production, too. For his role, Jones was nominated Best Actor by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, making him the second African-American
African-American
male performer (following Sidney Poitier) to receive a nomination.[12] In 1974, Jones co-starred with Diahann Carroll
Diahann Carroll
in the film Claudine, the story of a woman who raises her six children alone after two failed and two "almost" marriages. Jones also played the villain Thulsa Doom in Conan the Barbarian (1982), "Few Clothes" Johnson in John Sayles' Matewan
Matewan
(1987), King Jaffe Joffer in Coming to America
Coming to America
(1988), the author Terence Mann in Field of Dreams
Field of Dreams
(1989), role of 'Alice', USAF Command General, in By Dawn's Early Light (1990 HBO film), the feared neighbor Mr. Mertle in The Sandlot
The Sandlot
(1993), Reverend Stephen Kumalo in Cry, the Beloved Country (1995), Raymond Lee Murdock in A Family Thing
A Family Thing
(1996), and Vice Admiral James Greer in The Hunt for Red October (1990), Patriot Games (1992) and Clear and Present Danger (1994), among many other roles. Voice roles[edit] Jones is also known as the voice of Darth Vader
Darth Vader
in the 1977 film Star Wars: A New Hope and its sequels The Empire Strikes Back
The Empire Strikes Back
(1980) and Return of the Jedi
Return of the Jedi
(1983). Darth Vader
Darth Vader
was portrayed in costume by David Prowse
David Prowse
in the film trilogy, with Jones dubbing Vader's dialogue in postproduction because Prowse's strong West Country accent was deemed unsuitable for the role by George Lucas.[31] At his own request, Jones was uncredited for the original releases of the first two Star Wars
Star Wars
films,[32] though he later would be credited for the first film in its 1997 " Special
Special
Edition" re-release.[33] As he explained in a 2008 interview:

When Linda Blair
Linda Blair
did the girl in The Exorcist, they hired Mercedes McCambridge to do the voice of the devil coming out of her. And there was controversy as to whether Mercedes should get credit. I was one who thought no, she was just special effects. So when it came to Darth Vader, I said, no, I'm just special effects. But it became so identified that by the third one, I thought, OK I'll let them put my name on it.[32]

Although uncredited, Jones' voice is possibly heard as Vader at the conclusion of Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith (2005). When specifically asked whether he had supplied the voice, possibly from a previous recording, Jones told Newsday: "You'd have to ask Lucas about that. I don't know."[32] Jones reprised his voice role of Vader for the character's appearances in the animated TV series Star Wars Rebels,[34][35] and the live-action film Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016).[36] His other voice roles include Mufasa
Mufasa
in the 1994 Disney film The Lion King and its direct-to-video sequel, The Lion King
The Lion King
II: Simba's Pride. Archive recordings from the film would later be used for the English version of the 2006 video game Kingdom Hearts II
Kingdom Hearts II
since Jones himself did not reprise the role. He more recently voiced Mufasa
Mufasa
in the 2015 TV pilot movie The Lion Guard: Return of the Roar.[37] In February 2017, it was announced that Jones would again voice the character in the 2019 remake of The Lion King, which will be directed by Jon Favreau.[38] In 1990, Jones performed voice work for The Simpsons
The Simpsons
first "Treehouse of Horror" Halloween special, in which he was the narrator for the Simpsons' version of Edgar Allan Poe's poem "The Raven". In 1992, Jones was often seen as the host on the video monitor at SeaWorld Orlando, in Florida, US.[citation needed] He also voiced the Emperor of the Night in Pinocchio and the Emperor of the Night
Pinocchio and the Emperor of the Night
and Ommadon in Flight of Dragons. In 1996, he recited the classic baseball poem "Casey at the Bat" with the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra,[39] and in 2007 before a Philadelphia Phillies
Philadelphia Phillies
home game on June 1, 2007.[40] He also has done the CNN
CNN
tagline, "This is CNN", as well as "This is CNN
CNN
International", and the opening for CNN's morning show New Day. Jones was also a longtime spokesman for Bell Atlantic
Bell Atlantic
and later Verizon. He also lent his voice to the opening for NBC's coverage of the 2000 and 2004 Summer Olympics; "the Big PI in the Sky" (God) in the computer game Under a Killing Moon; a Claymation
Claymation
film, The Creation; and several other guest spots on The Simpsons. Jones also lent his voice for a narrative part in the Adam Sandler
Adam Sandler
comedy Click, released in June 2006. Jones narrated all 27 books of the New Testament in the audiobook James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
Reads the Bible.[41] Television roles[edit] Jones has the distinction of being the only actor to win two Emmys[42] in the same year, in 1991 as Best Actor for his role in Gabriel's Fire and as Best Supporting Actor for his work in Heat Wave.[4] Jones portrayed the older version of author Alex Haley, in the television mini-series Roots: The Next Generations;[12] the GDI's commanding general James Solomon in the live-action sequences of the video game Command & Conquer: Tiberian Sun; and widowed police officer Neb Langston in the television program Under One Roof, for which he received an Emmy nomination. He also appeared in television and radio advertising for Verizon
Verizon
Business DSL and Verizon
Verizon
Online DSL from Verizon
Verizon
Communications. Jones appeared in the 1963–64 television season in an episode of ABC's drama series about college life, Channing, starring Jason Evers
Jason Evers
and Henry Jones. He appeared on the soap opera Guiding Light. He portrayed Thad Green on "Mathnet," a parody of Dragnet that appeared in the PBS program Square One Television. In 1969, Jones participated in making test films for the children's education series Sesame Street; these shorts, combined with animated segments, were shown to groups of children to gauge the effectiveness of the then-groundbreaking Sesame Street
Sesame Street
format. As cited by production notes included in the DVD release Sesame Street: Old School 1969–1974, the short that had the greatest impact with test audiences was one showing bald-headed Jones counting slowly to ten. This and other segments featuring Jones were eventually aired as part of the Sesame Street
Sesame Street
series itself when it debuted later in 1969 and Jones is often cited as the first celebrity guest on that series, although a segment with Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
was the first to actually be broadcast.[12] He has played lead characters on television in three series. First, he appeared on the short-lived CBS
CBS
police drama Paris, which aired during autumn 1979. That show was notable as the first program on which Steven Bochco
Steven Bochco
served as executive producer. The second show aired on ABC between 1990 and 1992, the first season being titled Gabriel's Fire and the second (after a format revision) Pros and Cons. In both formats of that show, Jones played a former policeman wrongly convicted of murder who, upon his release from prison, became a private eye. In 1995, Jones starred in Under One Roof as Neb Langston, a widowed African-American
African-American
police officer sharing his home in Seattle with his daughter, his married son with his children, and Neb's newly adopted son. The show was a mid-season replacement and lasted only six weeks. From 1989 to 1993, Jones served as the host of the children's TV series Long Ago and Far Away. In 1996, James guest starred in the CBS
CBS
drama Touched by an Angel
Touched by an Angel
as the Angels of Angels in the episode "Clipped Wings". In 1998, Jones starred in the widely acclaimed syndicated program An American Moment (created by James R. Kirk
James R. Kirk
and Ninth Wave Productions). Jones took over the role left by Charles Kuralt, upon Kuralt's death. He also made a cameo appearance in "The House of Luthor", the final episode of Season One of Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman as Franklin Stern and has guest-starred on such sitcoms as NBC's Frasier
Frasier
and Will & Grace, CBS's Two and a Half Men, and the WB drama Everwood. In 2009, Jones guest starred in the Fox medical drama House, M.D., in season 6, episode 4, entitled "The Tyrant", as a brutal African dictator named Dibala who has fallen ill. The dictator had made threats of ethnic cleansing against an ethnic minority, the Sitibi, and the team deals with ethical issues of treating a potential mass murderer. In 2013-14, he appeared alongside Malcolm McDowell
Malcolm McDowell
in a series of commercials for Sprint in which the two recited mundane phone and text-message conversations in a dramatic way.[43][44] Jones appeared as himself on the season 7 episode of The Big Bang Theory entitled "The Convention Conundrum". In 2015, Jones starred as the Chief Justice Caleb Thorne in the American drama series Agent X alongside actress Sharon Stone, Jeff Hephner, Jamey Sheridan, and others. The television series was aired by TNT from November 8 to December 27, 2015, running only one season and 10 episodes. List of performances[edit] See also: List of James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
performances Personal life[edit] Jones married American actress/singer Julienne Marie in 1968, whom he met while performing as Othello
Othello
in 1964.[45] They had no children, and divorced in 1972.[46] In 1982, he married actress Cecilia Hart, with whom he had one child, son Flynn Earl Jones.[47][48] Hart died on October 16, 2016, after a one-year battle with ovarian cancer.[49] In April 2016, Jones spoke publicly for the first time in nearly 20 years about his long-term health challenge with type 2 diabetes. He has been dealing with diabetes since the mid 1990s.[50] Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Nominated work Award Result

1963 East Side/West Side Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Nominated

1969 The Great White Hope[51] Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Actor in a Play Won

1970 The Great White Hope Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for New Star of the Year – Actor Won

1970 The Great White Hope Academy Award for Best Actor Nominated

1970 The Great White Hope Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama Nominated

1970 We Love You, Call Collect Grammy Award
Grammy Award
for Best Spoken Word Album Nominated

1974 Claudine Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy Nominated

1977 Great American Documents Grammy Award
Grammy Award
for Best Spoken Word Album Won

1987 Matewan Independent Spirit Award for Best Supporting Male Nominated

1987 Fences[51] Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Actor in a Play Won

1990 By Dawn's Early Light Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated

1990 Heat Wave Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie Won

1990 Gabriel's Fire Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Won

1990 Gabriel's Fire Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Actor – Television Series Drama Nominated

1991 Pros and Cons Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Actor – Television Series Drama Nominated

1994 Picket Fences Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Nominated

1995 Under One Roof Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Nominated

1995 Cry, the Beloved Country Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role Nominated

1997 Frasier Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Nominated

1999 Summer's End Daytime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Performer in a Children's Special Won

2001 The Christmas Miracle of Jonathan Toomey Grammy Award
Grammy Award
for Best Spoken Word Album for Children Nominated

2003 Everwood Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Nominated

2005 On Golden Pond[51] Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Actor in a Play Nominated

2008 N/A Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award Won

2011 N/A Academy Honorary Award Won

2012 The Best Man[51] Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Leading Actor in a Play Nominated

Other awards

1985 Induction into the American Theater Hall of Fame[52][53] 1987 First recipient of the National Association for Hearing and Speech Action's Annie Glenn Award[54] 1991 Common Wealth Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Dramatic Arts 1992 National Medal of Arts 1996 Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs, California, Walk of Stars[55] 2000 Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Performance in a Children's Special Summer's End 2011 Eugene O'Neill Theater Center Monte Cristo Award Recipient[56] 2012 Marian Anderson Award Recipient[57][58] 2014 Voice Icon Award sponsored by Society of Voice Arts and Sciences at the Museum of Moving Image 2017 Honorary Doctor of Arts
Doctor of Arts
from Harvard University[59]

References[edit]

^ "Black Celebrities with White Partners". 19 May 2014. Retrieved 11 January 2015.  ^ Cecilia Hart, wife of James Earl Jones, has died (LA Times) ^ "Cecilia Hart, Actress and Wife of James Earl Jones, Dies at 68".  ^ a b Marx, Rebecca Flint. " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
Biography". All Movie Guide. Retrieved April 12, 2011.  ^ a b Sperling, Nicole; Susan King (November 12, 2011). "Oprah shines, Ratner controversy fades at honorary Oscars gala". LA Times.com. Retrieved November 14, 2011.  ^ Hornaday, Ann (September 25, 2014). "James Earl Jones: A voice for the ages, aging gracefully" – via washingtonpost.com.  ^ Moore, Caitlin (September 25, 2014). " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
might have the most recognizable voice in film and television" – via washingtonpost.com.  ^ "Voice Arts Awards". sovas. Retrieved 2016-10-09.  ^ "Harvard awards 10 honorary degrees". Retrieved 2017-05-26.  ^ a b " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
Biography (1931–)". FilmReference.com. Retrieved February 20, 2008.  ^ " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
Biography (1931–)". Film Reference. Retrieved February 20, 2008.  ^ a b c d e f g Bandler, Michael J. (March 2008). "This is James Earl Jones". NWA World Traveler. Northwest Airlines. Archived from the original on March 20, 2008. Retrieved April 3, 2008.  ^ Levesque, Carl (August 1, 2002). "Unconventional wisdom: James Earl Jones speaks out". Association Management. The Gale Group. Archived from the original on November 18, 2017. Retrieved November 18, 2017. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) ^ a b Davis, Dorothy (February 2005). "Speaking with James Earl Jones". Education Update. Archived from the original on October 20, 2017. Retrieved February 20, 2008.  ^ " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
– Academy of Achievement". A Museum of Living History. Academy of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 20, 2008. Retrieved April 3, 2008.  ^ a b " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
on his 'racist grandmother'", interview with Stephen Sackur, BBC News, December 7, 2011. ^ Andrew Davies-Cole. "The daddy of them all". Herald Scotland. Retrieved November 5, 2011.  ^ (Audio/Transcript). Interview: James Earl Jones, with the American Academy of Achievement for the National Medal of Arts
National Medal of Arts
Archived September 6, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.. June 29, 1996. Sun Valley, Idaho. ^ Ensian (Yearbook of the University of Michigan), p. 156 (1952). ^ "Notable Alumni". University of Michigan. Archived from the original on February 26, 2012. Retrieved February 27, 2012.  ^ "Soldiers to Celebrities: James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
– U.S. Army". Hollywood Hired Guns. Hired Guns Productions. January 20, 2008. Archived from the original on December 27, 2008. Retrieved February 20, 2008.  ^ " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
talks with Studs Terkel on WFMT ; 1968/02". Studs Terkel Radio Archive. February 1968. Retrieved September 27, 2016.  ^ " Ramsdell Theatre
Ramsdell Theatre
History". Ramsdell-theater.org. Archived from the original on January 4, 2009. Retrieved March 1, 2011.  ^ "Theater Five - Single Episodes". Internet Archive.  ^ " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
and Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
to Star in Broadway's Driving Miss Daisy". Playbill. Archived from the original on August 3, 2010. Retrieved March 1, 2011.  ^ "Actor James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
receives Oscar in London", BBC News. Retrieved November 13, 2011. ^ "Gore Vidal's The Best Man" at IBDB. ^ Gans, Andrew and Jones, Kenneth." 'The Best Man', Tony Nominee as Best Revival of a Play, Extends Booking a Second Time" Archived September 4, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Playbill.com, May 17, 2012. ^ Trueman, Matt (December 4, 2012). " Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
and James Earl Jones to reunite for Old Vic's Much Ado". The Guardian. London.  ^ " The Gin Game at John Golden Theater". New York City
New York City
Theater.  ^ "The Green force". BBC News. February 14, 2006. Retrieved March 1, 2011.  ^ a b c Lovece, Frank (March 12, 2008). "Fast Chat: James Earl Jones". Newsday. New York. Archived from the original on July 28, 2012. Retrieved March 1, 2011.  ^ Sragow, Michael (February 6, 1997). "Isn't That Spacial? Back to the future with 'Star Wars: The Special
Special
Edition'". Phoenix New Times. Phoenix, Arizona. Archived from the original on January 31, 2015. Retrieved January 31, 2015.  ^ " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
to Voice Darth Vader
Darth Vader
in Star Wars: Rebels’ Premiere on ABC!" Star Wars
Star Wars
Episode VII News, October 9, 2014. ^ " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
confirmed as Darth Vader" Blastr, April 21, 2015. ^ Skrebels, Joe (June 23, 2016). "Rogue One's Darth Vader
Darth Vader
Will Be Played by James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
and "A Variety of Large-Framed Performers"".  ^ " Mufasa
Mufasa
(and James Earl Jones) returns in exclusive The Lion Guard clip".  ^ Couch, Aaron (February 17, 2017). "'Lion King' Remake Casts Donald Glover as Simba, James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
as Mufasa". The Hollywood Reporter.  ^ Drayer, Shannon (June 3, 2013). "Audio treasure: Dave Niehaus reads 'Casey at the Bat'". KTTH
KTTH
/ 710 ESPN Seattle. Archived from the original on September 20, 2014. Retrieved January 31, 2015. James Earl Jones more than did the piece justice in a recording with the Cincinnati Pops in 1996...  ^ "Actor James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
smiles before reading..." Townhall.com. Reuters. Archived from the original on January 31, 2015. Retrieved January 31, 2015.  ^ " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
Reads The New Testament
New Testament
- Digital Edition". Archived from the original on June 27, 2014.  ^ James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
– Awards & Nominations, Television Academy. ^ Tim Nudd, "Inside James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
and Malcolm McDowell's Dramatic Readings for Sprint", AdWeek, December 16, 2013. ^ "Sprint Commercial (2013 - 2014)". popisms.com.  ^ "As He Readies For His Latest Broadway Return, We Celebrate Over 50 Years of James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
Onstage - Playbill".  ^ Jones, James Earl. Encyclopedia of African American History: 5-Volume Set. Oxford University Press. pp. 53–54. ISBN 9780195167795.  ^ "James Earl Jones: I'll just keep going until I fall over". Metro News. Retrieved March 12, 2014.  ^ " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
Biography: Film Actor, Theater Actor, Television Actor (1931–)". Biography.com
Biography.com
(FYI / A&E Networks). Archived from the original on April 2, 2016. Retrieved April 26, 2016.  ^ Barnes, Mike (October 22, 2016). "Cecilia Hart, Actress and Wife of James Earl Jones, Dies at 68". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on October 22, 2016. Retrieved October 22, 2016.  ^ "Learn more about James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
and INVOKANA®". 2016-02-17. Retrieved 2016-07-23.  ^ a b c d " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
— Nominee for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play". Broadway.com. Retrieved May 19, 2015.  ^ "Broadway's Best". New York Times. March 5, 1985. Retrieved February 6, 2014.  ^ "Theater Hall of Fame members". Retrieved February 6, 2014.  ^ John and Annie Glenn Museum: About: "Annie Glenn" [1] John and Annie Glenn Museum: About: "Annie Glenn" ^ Palm Springs Walk of Stars
Palm Springs Walk of Stars
by date dedicated ^ Adam Hetrick, " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
Receives O'Neill Center's Monte Cristo Award May 9", Playbill, May 9, 2011. Retrieved January 20, 2011. ^ Carrie Rickey, "Actor James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
wins Marian Anderson Award", Philly.com, June 5, 2012. Retrieved January 20, 2015. ^ " James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
to Receive Philadelphia's 2012 Marian Anderson Award", Broadway World, June 5, 2012. Retrieved January 20, 2015. ^ "Harvard awards 10 honorary degrees at 366th Commencement", Harvard Gazette, May 25, 2017. Retrieved May 30, 2017.

Further reading[edit]

Anne Hornaday, "James Earl Jones: A Voice for the Ages, Aging Gracefully," Washington Post, Sept. 27, 2014. Jones, James Earl, and Penelope Niven. James Earl Jones: Voices and Silences (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1993) ISBN 0-684-19513-5 Lifetime Honors – National Medal of Arts

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to James Earl Jones.

James Earl Jones
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on IMDb James Earl Jones
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at the Internet Broadway Database
Internet Broadway Database
James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
at the Internet Off-Broadway Database James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
at the TCM Movie Database James Earl Jones
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at Rotten Tomatoes James Earl Jones
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at AllMovie James Earl Jones
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at Emmys.com

Awards for James Earl Jones

v t e

Academy Honorary Award

1928–1950

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
/ Charlie Chaplin
Charlie Chaplin
(1928) Walt Disney
Walt Disney
(1932) Shirley Temple
Shirley Temple
(1934) D. W. Griffith
D. W. Griffith
(1935) The March of Time
The March of Time
/ W. Howard Greene and Harold Rosson (1936) Edgar Bergen
Edgar Bergen
/ W. Howard Greene / Museum of Modern Art
Museum of Modern Art
Film Library / Mack Sennett
Mack Sennett
(1937) J. Arthur Ball / Walt Disney
Walt Disney
/ Deanna Durbin
Deanna Durbin
and Mickey Rooney
Mickey Rooney
/ Gordon Jennings, Jan Domela, Devereaux Jennings, Irmin Roberts, Art Smith, Farciot Edouart, Loyal Griggs, Loren L. Ryder, Harry D. Mills, Louis Mesenkop, Walter Oberst / Oliver T. Marsh and Allen Davey / Harry Warner
Harry Warner
(1938) Douglas Fairbanks
Douglas Fairbanks
/ Judy Garland
Judy Garland
/ William Cameron Menzies / Motion Picture Relief Fund (Jean Hersholt, Ralph Morgan, Ralph Block, Conrad Nagel)/ Technicolor Company (1939) Bob Hope
Bob Hope
/ Nathan Levinson (1940) Walt Disney, William Garity, John N. A. Hawkins, and the RCA Manufacturing Company / Leopold Stokowski
Leopold Stokowski
and his associates / Rey Scott / British Ministry of Information (1941) Charles Boyer
Charles Boyer
/ Noël Coward
Noël Coward
/ Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
(1942) George Pal
George Pal
(1943) Bob Hope
Bob Hope
/ Margaret O'Brien
Margaret O'Brien
(1944) Republic Studio, Daniel J. Bloomberg, and the Republic Studio Sound Department / Walter Wanger
Walter Wanger
/ The House I Live In / Peggy Ann Garner (1945) Harold Russell
Harold Russell
/ Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
/ Ernst Lubitsch
Ernst Lubitsch
/ Claude Jarman Jr. (1946) James Baskett
James Baskett
/ Thomas Armat, William Nicholas Selig, Albert E. Smith, and George Kirke Spoor
George Kirke Spoor
/ Bill and Coo / Shoeshine (1947) Walter Wanger
Walter Wanger
/ Monsieur Vincent
Monsieur Vincent
/ Sid Grauman
Sid Grauman
/ Adolph Zukor
Adolph Zukor
(1948) Jean Hersholt
Jean Hersholt
/ Fred Astaire
Fred Astaire
/ Cecil B. DeMille
Cecil B. DeMille
/ The Bicycle Thief (1949) Louis B. Mayer
Louis B. Mayer
/ George Murphy
George Murphy
/ The Walls of Malapaga (1950)

1951–1975

Gene Kelly
Gene Kelly
/ Rashomon
Rashomon
(1951) Merian C. Cooper
Merian C. Cooper
/ Bob Hope
Bob Hope
/ Harold Lloyd
Harold Lloyd
/ George Mitchell / Joseph M. Schenck / Forbidden Games
Forbidden Games
(1952) 20th Century-Fox Film Corporation / Bell & Howell Company / Joseph Breen / Pete Smith (1953) Bausch & Lomb Optical Company / Danny Kaye
Danny Kaye
/ Kemp Niver / Greta Garbo / Jon Whiteley
Jon Whiteley
/ Vincent Winter / Gate of Hell (1954) Samurai I: Musashi Miyamoto (1955) Eddie Cantor
Eddie Cantor
(1956) Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers
Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers
/ Gilbert M. "Broncho Billy" Anderson / Charles Brackett / B. B. Kahane (1957) Maurice Chevalier
Maurice Chevalier
(1958) Buster Keaton
Buster Keaton
/ Lee de Forest
Lee de Forest
(1959) Gary Cooper
Gary Cooper
/ Stan Laurel
Stan Laurel
/ Hayley Mills
Hayley Mills
(1960) William L. Hendricks / Fred L. Metzler / Jerome Robbins
Jerome Robbins
(1961) William J. Tuttle
William J. Tuttle
(1964) Bob Hope
Bob Hope
(1965) Yakima Canutt
Yakima Canutt
/ Y. Frank Freeman
Y. Frank Freeman
(1966) Arthur Freed (1967) John Chambers / Onna White (1968) Cary Grant
Cary Grant
(1969) Lillian Gish
Lillian Gish
/ Orson Welles
Orson Welles
(1970) Charlie Chaplin
Charlie Chaplin
(1971) Charles S. Boren / Edward G. Robinson
Edward G. Robinson
(1972) Henri Langlois
Henri Langlois
/ Groucho Marx
Groucho Marx
(1973) Howard Hawks
Howard Hawks
/ Jean Renoir
Jean Renoir
(1974) Mary Pickford
Mary Pickford
(1975)

1976–2000

Margaret Booth (1977) Walter Lantz
Walter Lantz
/ Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
/ King Vidor
King Vidor
/ Museum of Modern Art Department of Film (1978) Hal Elias / Alec Guinness
Alec Guinness
(1979) Henry Fonda
Henry Fonda
(1980) Barbara Stanwyck
Barbara Stanwyck
(1981) Mickey Rooney
Mickey Rooney
(1982) Hal Roach
Hal Roach
(1983) James Stewart
James Stewart
/ National Endowment for the Arts
National Endowment for the Arts
(1984) Paul Newman
Paul Newman
/ Alex North (1985) Ralph Bellamy
Ralph Bellamy
(1986) Eastman Kodak
Kodak
Company / National Film Board of Canada
National Film Board of Canada
(1988) Akira Kurosawa
Akira Kurosawa
(1989) Sophia Loren
Sophia Loren
/ Myrna Loy
Myrna Loy
(1990) Satyajit Ray
Satyajit Ray
(1991) Federico Fellini
Federico Fellini
(1992) Deborah Kerr
Deborah Kerr
(1993) Michelangelo Antonioni
Michelangelo Antonioni
(1994) Kirk Douglas
Kirk Douglas
/ Chuck Jones
Chuck Jones
(1995) Michael Kidd
Michael Kidd
(1996) Stanley Donen
Stanley Donen
(1997) Elia Kazan
Elia Kazan
(1998) Andrzej Wajda
Andrzej Wajda
(1999) Jack Cardiff
Jack Cardiff
/ Ernest Lehman (2000)

2001–present

Sidney Poitier
Sidney Poitier
/ Robert Redford
Robert Redford
(2001) Peter O'Toole
Peter O'Toole
(2002) Blake Edwards
Blake Edwards
(2003) Sidney Lumet
Sidney Lumet
(2004) Robert Altman
Robert Altman
(2005) Ennio Morricone
Ennio Morricone
(2006) Robert F. Boyle (2007) Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
/ Roger Corman
Roger Corman
/ Gordon Willis
Gordon Willis
(2009) Kevin Brownlow / Jean-Luc Godard
Jean-Luc Godard
/ Eli Wallach
Eli Wallach
(2010) James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
/ Dick Smith (2011) D. A. Pennebaker
D. A. Pennebaker
/ Hal Needham
Hal Needham
/ George Stevens Jr.
George Stevens Jr.
(2012) Angela Lansbury
Angela Lansbury
/ Steve Martin
Steve Martin
/ Piero Tosi (2013) Jean-Claude Carrière
Jean-Claude Carrière
/ Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
/ Maureen O'Hara
Maureen O'Hara
(2014) Spike Lee
Spike Lee
/ Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
(2015) Jackie Chan
Jackie Chan
/ Lynn Stalmaster / Anne V. Coates / Frederick Wiseman (2016) Charles Burnett / Owen Roizman / Donald Sutherland
Donald Sutherland
/ Agnès Varda (2017)

v t e

Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Play

Anthony Hopkins
Anthony Hopkins
(1975) John Wood (1976) Al Pacino
Al Pacino
(1977) Barnard Hughes
Barnard Hughes
(1978) Philip Anglim (1979) John Rubinstein
John Rubinstein
(1980) Ian McKellen
Ian McKellen
(1981) Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
(1982) Harvey Fierstein
Harvey Fierstein
(1983) Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
(1984) John Lithgow
John Lithgow
(1985) Ed Harris
Ed Harris
(1986) James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
(1987) Ron Silver
Ron Silver
(1988) Philip Bosco (1989) Nathan Lane
Nathan Lane
(1990) Ron Rifkin
Ron Rifkin
(1991) Brian Bedford
Brian Bedford
(1992) Ron Leibman (1993) Brian Bedford
Brian Bedford
(1994) Ralph Fiennes
Ralph Fiennes
(1995) Frank Langella
Frank Langella
(1996) David Morse / Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
(1997) Anthony LaPaglia
Anthony LaPaglia
(1998) Brian Dennehy
Brian Dennehy
(1999) Stephen Dillane
Stephen Dillane
(2000) Richard Easton (2001) Alan Bates
Alan Bates
(2002) Eddie Izzard
Eddie Izzard
(2003) Kevin Kline
Kevin Kline
(2004) Brían F. O'Byrne (2005) Richard Griffiths
Richard Griffiths
(2006) Frank Langella
Frank Langella
(2007) Mark Rylance
Mark Rylance
(2008) Geoffrey Rush
Geoffrey Rush
(2009) Liev Schreiber
Liev Schreiber
(2010) Bobby Cannavale
Bobby Cannavale
(2011) James Corden
James Corden
(2012) Tracy Letts
Tracy Letts
(2013) Bryan Cranston
Bryan Cranston
(2014) Alex Sharp
Alex Sharp
(2015) Frank Langella
Frank Langella
(2016) Kevin Kline
Kevin Kline
(2017)

v t e

Drama League's Distinguished Performance Award

Katharine Cornell
Katharine Cornell
(1935) Helen Hayes
Helen Hayes
(1936) Maurice Evans (1937) Cedric Hardwicke
Cedric Hardwicke
(1938) Raymond Massey
Raymond Massey
(1939) Paul Muni
Paul Muni
(1940) Paul Lukas
Paul Lukas
(1941) Judith Evelyn
Judith Evelyn
(1942) Alfred Lunt
Alfred Lunt
(1943) Lynn Fontanne
Lynn Fontanne
(1944) Mady Christians
Mady Christians
(1945) Louis Calhern
Louis Calhern
(1946) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1947) Judith Anderson
Judith Anderson
(1948) Robert Morley
Robert Morley
(1949) Grace George
Grace George
(1950) Claude Rains
Claude Rains
(1951) Julie Harris (1952) Shirley Booth
Shirley Booth
(1953) Josephine Hull (1954) Viveca Lindfors
Viveca Lindfors
(1955) David Wayne
David Wayne
(1956) Eli Wallach
Eli Wallach
(1957) Ralph Bellamy
Ralph Bellamy
(1958) Cyril Ritchard
Cyril Ritchard
(1959) Jessica Tandy
Jessica Tandy
(1960) Hume Cronyn
Hume Cronyn
(1961) Paul Scofield
Paul Scofield
(1962) Charles Boyer
Charles Boyer
(1963) Alec Guinness
Alec Guinness
(1964) John Gielgud
John Gielgud
(1965) Richard Kiley
Richard Kiley
(1966) Rosemary Harris
Rosemary Harris
(1967) Zoe Caldwell (1968) Alec McCowen
Alec McCowen
(1969) James Stewart
James Stewart
(1970) Anthony Quayle
Anthony Quayle
(1971) Eileen Atkins / Claire Bloom
Claire Bloom
(1972) Alan Bates
Alan Bates
(1973) Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
(1974) John Wood (1975) Eva Le Gallienne
Eva Le Gallienne
(1976) Tom Courtenay
Tom Courtenay
(1977) Frank Langella
Frank Langella
(1978) Frances Sternhagen
Frances Sternhagen
(1979) Roy Scheider
Roy Scheider
(1980) Ian McKellen
Ian McKellen
(1981) Milo O'Shea
Milo O'Shea
(1982) Edward Herrmann
Edward Herrmann
/ Kate Nelligan (1983) Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
(1984) Derek Jacobi
Derek Jacobi
(1985) Bernadette Peters
Bernadette Peters
(1986) James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
(1987) John Lithgow
John Lithgow
(1988) Pauline Collins
Pauline Collins
(1989) Robert Morse
Robert Morse
(1990) Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing
(1991) Glenn Close
Glenn Close
(1992) Stephen Rea
Stephen Rea
(1993) Sam Waterston
Sam Waterston
(1994) Cherry Jones
Cherry Jones
(1995) Uta Hagen
Uta Hagen
(1996) Charles Durning
Charles Durning
/ Bebe Neuwirth
Bebe Neuwirth
(1997) Brian Stokes Mitchell
Brian Stokes Mitchell
(1998) Kathleen Chalfant (1999) Eileen Heckart (2000) Mary-Louise Parker
Mary-Louise Parker
/ Gary Sinise
Gary Sinise
(2001) Liam Neeson
Liam Neeson
(2002) Harvey Fierstein
Harvey Fierstein
(2003) Hugh Jackman
Hugh Jackman
(2004) Norbert Leo Butz
Norbert Leo Butz
(2005) Christine Ebersole
Christine Ebersole
(2006) Liev Schreiber
Liev Schreiber
(2007) Patti LuPone
Patti LuPone
(2008) Geoffrey Rush
Geoffrey Rush
(2009) Alfred Molina
Alfred Molina
(2010) Mark Rylance
Mark Rylance
(2011) Audra McDonald
Audra McDonald
(2012) Nathan Lane
Nathan Lane
(2013) Neil Patrick Harris
Neil Patrick Harris
(2014) Chita Rivera
Chita Rivera
(2015) Lin-Manuel Miranda
Lin-Manuel Miranda
(2016) Ben Platt (2017)

v t e

Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series

Robert Young (1956) Robert Young (1957) Raymond Burr
Raymond Burr
(1959) Robert Stack
Robert Stack
(1960) Raymond Burr
Raymond Burr
(1961) E. G. Marshall
E. G. Marshall
(1962) E. G. Marshall
E. G. Marshall
(1963) Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
(1966) Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
(1967) Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
(1968) Carl Betz
Carl Betz
(1969) Robert Young (1970) Hal Holbrook
Hal Holbrook
(1971) Peter Falk
Peter Falk
(1972) Richard Thomas (1973) Telly Savalas
Telly Savalas
(1974) Robert Blake (1975) Peter Falk
Peter Falk
(1976) James Garner
James Garner
(1977) Ed Asner
Ed Asner
(1978) Ron Leibman (1979) Ed Asner
Ed Asner
(1980) Daniel J. Travanti (1981) Daniel J. Travanti (1982) Ed Flanders
Ed Flanders
(1983) Tom Selleck
Tom Selleck
(1984) William Daniels
William Daniels
(1985) William Daniels
William Daniels
(1986) Bruce Willis
Bruce Willis
(1987) Richard Kiley
Richard Kiley
(1988) Carroll O'Connor
Carroll O'Connor
(1989) Peter Falk
Peter Falk
(1990) James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
(1991) Christopher Lloyd
Christopher Lloyd
(1992) Tom Skerritt
Tom Skerritt
(1993) Dennis Franz
Dennis Franz
(1994) Mandy Patinkin
Mandy Patinkin
(1995) Dennis Franz
Dennis Franz
(1996) Dennis Franz
Dennis Franz
(1997) Andre Braugher
Andre Braugher
(1998) Dennis Franz
Dennis Franz
(1999) James Gandolfini
James Gandolfini
(2000) James Gandolfini
James Gandolfini
(2001) Michael Chiklis
Michael Chiklis
(2002) James Gandolfini
James Gandolfini
(2003) James Spader
James Spader
(2004) James Spader
James Spader
(2005) Kiefer Sutherland
Kiefer Sutherland
(2006) James Spader
James Spader
(2007) Bryan Cranston
Bryan Cranston
(2008) Bryan Cranston
Bryan Cranston
(2009) Bryan Cranston
Bryan Cranston
(2010) Kyle Chandler
Kyle Chandler
(2011) Damian Lewis
Damian Lewis
(2012) Jeff Daniels
Jeff Daniels
(2013) Bryan Cranston
Bryan Cranston
(2014) Jon Hamm
Jon Hamm
(2015) Rami Malek
Rami Malek
(2016) Sterling K. Brown
Sterling K. Brown
(2017)

v t e

Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie

Anthony Quayle
Anthony Quayle
(1975) Ed Flanders
Ed Flanders
(1976) Burgess Meredith
Burgess Meredith
(1977) Howard Da Silva
Howard Da Silva
(1978) Marlon Brando
Marlon Brando
(1979) George Grizzard
George Grizzard
(1980) David Warner (1981) Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
(1982) Richard Kiley
Richard Kiley
(1983) Art Carney
Art Carney
(1984) Karl Malden
Karl Malden
(1985) John Malkovich
John Malkovich
(1986) Dabney Coleman
Dabney Coleman
(1987) John Shea
John Shea
(1988) Derek Jacobi
Derek Jacobi
(1989) Vincent Gardenia
Vincent Gardenia
(1990) James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
(1991) Hume Cronyn
Hume Cronyn
(1992) Beau Bridges
Beau Bridges
(1993) Michael A. Goorjian (1994) Donald Sutherland
Donald Sutherland
(1995) Tom Hulce
Tom Hulce
(1996) Beau Bridges
Beau Bridges
(1997) George C. Scott
George C. Scott
(1998) Peter O'Toole
Peter O'Toole
(1999) Hank Azaria
Hank Azaria
(2000) Brian Cox (2001) Michael Moriarty (2002) Ben Gazzara
Ben Gazzara
(2003) Jeffrey Wright
Jeffrey Wright
(2004) Paul Newman
Paul Newman
(2005) Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
(2006) Thomas Haden Church
Thomas Haden Church
(2007) Tom Wilkinson
Tom Wilkinson
(2008) Ken Howard
Ken Howard
(2009) David Strathairn
David Strathairn
(2010) Guy Pearce
Guy Pearce
(2011) Tom Berenger
Tom Berenger
(2012) James Cromwell
James Cromwell
(2013) Martin Freeman
Martin Freeman
(2014) Bill Murray
Bill Murray
(2015) Sterling K. Brown
Sterling K. Brown
(2016) Alexander Skarsgård
Alexander Skarsgård
(2017)

v t e

Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for New Star of the Year – Actor

Richard Widmark
Richard Widmark
(1948) Richard Todd, Gene Nelson
Gene Nelson
(1950) Kevin McCarthy (1952) Richard Burton
Richard Burton
(1953) Richard Egan, Steve Forrest, Hugh O'Brian
Hugh O'Brian
(1954) Joe Adams, George Nader, Jeff Richards (1955) Russ Tamblyn, Ray Danton
Ray Danton
(1956) Anthony Perkins, Paul Newman, John Kerr (1957) James Garner, Patrick Wayne, John Saxon
John Saxon
(1958) John Gavin, Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., Bradford Dillman
Bradford Dillman
(1959) George Hamilton, James Shigeta, Barry Coe, Troy Donahue
Troy Donahue
(1960) Michael Callan, Brett Halsey, Mark Damon
Mark Damon
(1961) Bobby Darin, Warren Beatty, Richard Beymer
Richard Beymer
(1962) Terence Stamp, Keir Dullea, Peter O'Toole, Omar Sharif
Omar Sharif
(1963) Stathis Giallelis, Robert Walker (actor, born 1940), Albert Finney (1964) George Segal, Topol, Harve Presnell (1965) Robert Redford
Robert Redford
(1966) James Farentino
James Farentino
(1967) Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
(1968) Leonard Whiting (1969) Jon Voight
Jon Voight
(1970) James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
(1971) Desi Arnaz, Jr.
Desi Arnaz, Jr.
(1972) Edward Albert
Edward Albert
(1973) Paul Le Mat (1974) Joseph Bottoms (1975) Brad Dourif
Brad Dourif
(1976) Arnold Schwarzenegger
Arnold Schwarzenegger
(1977) Brad Davis (1979) Rick Schroder
Rick Schroder
(1980) Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
(1981) Ben Kingsley
Ben Kingsley
(1983)

v t e

Kennedy Center Honorees (2000s)

2000

Mikhail Baryshnikov Chuck Berry Plácido Domingo Clint Eastwood Angela Lansbury

2001

Julie Andrews Van Cliburn Quincy Jones Jack Nicholson Luciano Pavarotti

2002

James Earl Jones James Levine Chita Rivera Paul Simon Elizabeth Taylor

2003

James Brown Carol Burnett Loretta Lynn Mike Nichols Itzhak Perlman

2004

Warren Beatty Ossie Davis
Ossie Davis
& Ruby Dee Elton John Joan Sutherland John Williams

2005

Tony Bennett Suzanne Farrell Julie Harris Robert Redford Tina Turner

2006

Zubin Mehta Dolly Parton Smokey Robinson Steven Spielberg Andrew Lloyd Webber

2007

Leon Fleisher Steve Martin Diana Ross Martin Scorsese Brian Wilson

2008

Morgan Freeman George Jones Barbra Streisand Twyla Tharp Pete Townshend
Pete Townshend
& Roger Daltrey

2009

Mel Brooks Dave Brubeck Grace Bumbry Robert De Niro Bruce Springsteen

Complete list 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s

v t e

Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award

1962: Eddie Cantor 1963: Stan Laurel 1965: Bob Hope 1966: Barbara Stanwyck 1967: William Gargan 1968: James Stewart 1969: Edward G. Robinson 1970: Gregory Peck 1971: Charlton Heston 1972: Frank Sinatra 1973: Martha Raye 1974: Walter Pidgeon 1975: Rosalind Russell 1976: Pearl Bailey 1977: James Cagney 1978: Edgar Bergen 1979: Katharine Hepburn 1980: Leon Ames 1982: Danny Kaye 1983: Ralph Bellamy 1984: Iggie Wolfington 1985: Paul Newman
Paul Newman
and Joanne Woodward 1986: Nanette Fabray 1987: Red Skelton 1988: Gene Kelly 1989: Jack Lemmon 1990: Brock Peters 1991: Burt Lancaster 1992: Audrey Hepburn 1993: Ricardo Montalbán 1994: George Burns 1995: Robert Redford 1996: Angela Lansbury 1997: Elizabeth Taylor 1998: Kirk Douglas 1999: Sidney Poitier 2000: Ossie Davis
Ossie Davis
and Ruby Dee 2001: Ed Asner 2002: Clint Eastwood 2003: Karl Malden 2004: James Garner 2005: Shirley Temple 2006: Julie Andrews 2007: Charles Durning 2008: James Earl Jones 2009: Betty White 2010: Ernest Borgnine 2011: Mary Tyler Moore 2012: Dick Van Dyke 2013: Rita Moreno 2014: Debbie Reynolds 2015: Carol Burnett 2016: Lily Tomlin 2017: Morgan Freeman

v t e

Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play

José Ferrer
José Ferrer
/ Fredric March
Fredric March
(1947) Henry Fonda
Henry Fonda
/ Paul Kelly / Basil Rathbone
Basil Rathbone
(1948) Rex Harrison
Rex Harrison
(1949) Sidney Blackmer
Sidney Blackmer
(1950) Claude Rains
Claude Rains
(1951) José Ferrer
José Ferrer
(1952) Tom Ewell
Tom Ewell
(1953) David Wayne
David Wayne
(1954) Alfred Lunt
Alfred Lunt
(1955) Paul Muni
Paul Muni
(1956) Fredric March
Fredric March
(1957) Ralph Bellamy
Ralph Bellamy
(1958) Jason Robards, Jr. (1959) Melvyn Douglas
Melvyn Douglas
(1960) Zero Mostel
Zero Mostel
(1961) Paul Scofield
Paul Scofield
(1962) Arthur Hill (1963) Alec Guinness
Alec Guinness
(1964) Walter Matthau
Walter Matthau
(1965) Hal Holbrook
Hal Holbrook
(1966) Paul Rogers (1967) Martin Balsam
Martin Balsam
(1968) James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
(1969) Fritz Weaver
Fritz Weaver
(1970) Brian Bedford
Brian Bedford
(1971) Cliff Gorman (1972) Alan Bates
Alan Bates
(1973) Michael Moriarty (1974) John Kani
John Kani
and Winston Ntshona (1975) John Wood (1976) Al Pacino
Al Pacino
(1977) Barnard Hughes
Barnard Hughes
(1978) Tom Conti
Tom Conti
(1979) John Rubinstein
John Rubinstein
(1980) Ian McKellen
Ian McKellen
(1981) Roger Rees
Roger Rees
(1982) Harvey Fierstein
Harvey Fierstein
(1983) Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
(1984) Derek Jacobi
Derek Jacobi
(1985) Judd Hirsch
Judd Hirsch
(1986) James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
(1987) Ron Silver
Ron Silver
(1988) Philip Bosco (1989) Robert Morse
Robert Morse
(1990) Nigel Hawthorne (1991) Judd Hirsch
Judd Hirsch
(1992) Ron Leibman (1993) Stephen Spinella (1994) Ralph Fiennes
Ralph Fiennes
(1995) George Grizzard
George Grizzard
(1996) Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
(1997) Anthony LaPaglia
Anthony LaPaglia
(1998) Brian Dennehy
Brian Dennehy
(1999) Stephen Dillane
Stephen Dillane
(2000) Richard Easton (2001) Alan Bates
Alan Bates
(2002) Brian Dennehy
Brian Dennehy
(2003) Jefferson Mays
Jefferson Mays
(2004) Bill Irwin
Bill Irwin
(2005) Richard Griffiths
Richard Griffiths
(2006) Frank Langella
Frank Langella
(2007) Mark Rylance
Mark Rylance
(2008) Geoffrey Rush
Geoffrey Rush
(2009) Denzel Washington
Denzel Washington
(2010) Mark Rylance
Mark Rylance
(2011) James Corden
James Corden
(2012) Tracy Letts
Tracy Letts
(2013) Bryan Cranston
Bryan Cranston
(2014) Alex Sharp
Alex Sharp
(2015) Frank Langella
Frank Langella
(2016) Kevin Kline
Kevin Kline
(2017)

v t e

Grammy Award
Grammy Award
for Best Spoken Word Album

1959−1980

Stan Freberg
Stan Freberg
– The Best of the Stan Freberg
Stan Freberg
Shows (1959) Carl Sandburg
Carl Sandburg
Lincoln Portrait (1960) Robert Bialek (producer) – FDR Speaks (1961) Leonard Bernstein
Leonard Bernstein
– Humor in Music (1962) Charles Laughton
Charles Laughton
– The Story-Teller: A Session With Charles Laughton (1963) Edward Albee
Edward Albee
(playwright) – Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
(1964) That Was the Week That Was
That Was the Week That Was
– BBC Tribute to John F. Kennedy (1965) Goddard Lieberson
Goddard Lieberson
(producer) – John F. Kennedy - As We Remember Him (1966) Edward R. Murrow
Edward R. Murrow
Edward R. Murrow
Edward R. Murrow
- A Reporter Remembers, Vol. I The War Years (1967) Everett Dirksen
Everett Dirksen
– Gallant Men (1968) Rod McKuen
Rod McKuen
– Lonesome Cities (1969) Art Linkletter
Art Linkletter
& Diane Linkletter – We Love You Call Collect (1970) Martin Luther King Jr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
– Why I Oppose the War in Vietnam (1971) Les Crane
Les Crane
– Desiderata (1972) Bruce Botnick (producer) – Lenny performed by the original Broadway cast (1973) Richard Harris
Richard Harris
Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1974) Peter Cook
Peter Cook
and Dudley Moore
Dudley Moore
– Good Evening (1975) James Whitmore
James Whitmore
Give 'em Hell, Harry!
Give 'em Hell, Harry!
(1976) Henry Fonda, Helen Hayes, James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
and Orson Welles
Orson Welles
- Great American Documents (1977) Julie Harris – The Belle of Amherst
The Belle of Amherst
(1978) Orson Welles
Orson Welles
Citizen Kane
Citizen Kane
Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1979) John Gielgud
John Gielgud
– Ages of Man - Readings From Shakespeare
Shakespeare
(1980)

1981−2000

Pat Carroll – Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein
Gertrude Stein
(1981) Orson Welles
Orson Welles
Donovan's Brain
Donovan's Brain
(1982) Tom Voegeli (producer) – Raiders of the Lost Ark
Raiders of the Lost Ark
- The Movie on Record performed by Various Artists (1983) William Warfield
William Warfield
Lincoln Portrait (1984) Ben Kingsley
Ben Kingsley
– The Words of Gandhi (1985) Mike Berniker (producer) & the original Broadway cast – Ma Rainey's Black Bottom (1986) Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Chips Moman, Ricky Nelson, Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins
Carl Perkins
and Sam Phillips
Sam Phillips
– Interviews From the Class of '55 Recording Sessions (1987) Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor
Lake Wobegon Days (1988) Jesse Jackson
Jesse Jackson
– Speech by Rev. Jesse Jackson
Jesse Jackson
(1989) Gilda Radner
Gilda Radner
– It's Always Something (1990) George Burns
George Burns
– Gracie: A Love Story (1991) Ken Burns
Ken Burns
– The Civil War (1992) Earvin "Magic" Johnson and Robert O'Keefe – What You Can Do to Avoid AIDS (1993) Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
On the Pulse of Morning
On the Pulse of Morning
(1994) Henry Rollins
Henry Rollins
– Get in the Van (1995) Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
– Phenomenal Woman (1996) Hillary Clinton
Hillary Clinton
It Takes a Village (1997) Charles Kuralt
Charles Kuralt
– Charles Kuralt's Spring (1998) Christopher Reeve
Christopher Reeve
Still Me
Still Me
(1999) LeVar Burton
LeVar Burton
– The Autobiography of Martin Luther King Jr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
(2000)

2001−present

Sidney Poitier, Rick Harris & John Runnette (producers) – The Measure of a Man: A Spiritual Autobiography (2001) Quincy Jones, Jeffrey S. Thomas, Steven Strassman (engineers) and Elisa Shokoff (producer) – Q: The Autobiography of Quincy Jones (2002) Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
and Charles B. Potter (producer) – A Song Flung Up to Heaven / Robin Williams, Nathaniel Kunkel (engineer/mixer) and Peter Asher (producer) – Live 2002 (2003) Al Franken
Al Franken
and Paul Ruben (producer) – Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them (2004) Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
– My Life (2005) Barack Obama
Barack Obama
Dreams from My Father
Dreams from My Father
(2006) Jimmy Carter
Jimmy Carter
– Our Endangered Values: America's Moral Crisis / Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee
Ruby Dee
- With Ossie and Ruby (2007) Barack Obama
Barack Obama
and Jacob Bronstein (producer) – The Audacity of Hope (2008) Beau Bridges, Cynthia Nixon
Cynthia Nixon
and Blair Underwood
Blair Underwood
– An Inconvenient Truth by Al Gore
Al Gore
(2009) Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox
– Always Looking Up (2010) Jon Stewart
Jon Stewart
– The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
Jon Stewart
Presents Earth (The Audiobook) (2011) Betty White
Betty White
– If You Ask Me (And Of Course You Won't) (2012) Janis Ian
Janis Ian
– Society's Child (2013) Stephen Colbert
Stephen Colbert
– America Again: Re-becoming The Greatness We Never Weren't (2014) Joan Rivers
Joan Rivers
– Diary of a Mad Diva (2015) Jimmy Carter
Jimmy Carter
– A Full Life: Reflections at 90 (2016) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
– In Such Good Company: Eleven Years of Laughter, Mayhem, and Fun in the Sandbox (2017) Carrie Fisher
Carrie Fisher
The Princess Diarist
The Princess Diarist
(2018)

v t e

People who have won Academy, Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Awards

listed by duration and year of completion

Competitive EGOTs

Richard Rodgers
Richard Rodgers
(1945–1962) Helen Hayes
Helen Hayes
(1932–1976) Rita Moreno
Rita Moreno
(1961–1977) John Gielgud
John Gielgud
(1961–1991) Audrey Hepburn
Audrey Hepburn
(1953–1994) Marvin Hamlisch
Marvin Hamlisch
(1973–1995) Jonathan Tunick (1977–1997) Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
(1967–2001) Mike Nichols
Mike Nichols
(1964–2001) Whoopi Goldberg
Whoopi Goldberg
(1985–2002) Scott Rudin (1984–2012) Robert Lopez
Robert Lopez
(2004–2014)

Honorary recipients

Barbra Streisand
Barbra Streisand
(1963–1970) Liza Minnelli
Liza Minnelli
(1965–1990) James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
(1969–2011) Alan Menken
Alan Menken
(1989–2012) Harry Belafonte
Harry Belafonte
(1953–2014) Quincy Jones
Quincy Jones
(1964–2016)

Book:EGOT winners

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 90666196 LCCN: n84002480 ISNI: 0000 0001 2030 4456 GND: 134802497 SUDOC: 086261665 BNF: cb13987977j (data) MusicBrainz: cfb8476b-625a-4de1-a508-84c91ba22bc3 BNE: XX1266

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