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Jamaal Abdul-Lateef (born Jackson Keith Wilkes on May 2, 1953), better known as Jamaal Wilkes, nicknamed "Silk",[1] is an American retired basketball player who played the small forward position and won four NBA championships with the Golden State Warriors
Golden State Warriors
and Los Angeles Lakers. He was a three-time NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
and the 1975 NBA Rookie of the Year. In college, Wilkes was a key player on two NCAA championship teams under coach John Wooden
John Wooden
for the UCLA Bruins. He was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame, and his jersey No. 52 was retired by both the Lakers and the Bruins. Wilkes converted to Islam
Islam
and legally changed his name to Jamaal Abdul-Lateef in 1975,[2] but he continued to use his birth surname only for purposes of public recognition.[3]

Contents

1 Early life 2 Playing career 3 Later years 4 Personal life 5 NBA career statistics

5.1 Regular season 5.2 Playoffs

6 References 7 External links

Early life[edit] Wilkes was born in Berkeley, California
Berkeley, California
and grew up in Ventura.[3][4] He was one of five children of L. Leander Wilkes, a Baptist
Baptist
minister, and Thelma (Benson) Wilkes.[5] Wilkes was the incoming student body president and an All-CIF basketball star at Ventura High School
Ventura High School
in 1969 when his father became pastor of the Second Baptist
Baptist
Church in Santa Barbara, and the family moved there prior to his senior year. Starring for Santa Barbara High School with fellow future NBA player Don Ford, Wilkes was voted CIF Class 4A Player of the Year after leading the Dons to 26 consecutive wins[6] and to the playoff semifinals during the 1969–70 season.[7] Wilkes' number was retired by both Ventura and Santa Barbara high schools.[8][9] Playing career[edit] Wilkes was an All-America Prep player at Santa Barbara High School (his teammate Don Ford also played in the NBA with the Lakers) in Santa Barbara, California. As a two-time All-American at UCLA, Wilkes teamed with Bill Walton
Bill Walton
to bring UCLA the 1972 and 1973 NCAA titles, and a third-place finish in 1974. As a Bruin, Wilkes was part of UCLA teams that won a record 88 consecutive games. In three years at UCLA, Wilkes averaged 15.0 ppg and 7.4 rpg and shot 51.4 percent from the field. He was a two-time All-Pacific-8 selection (1973–1974),[10] a member of the 1972 NCAA All-Tournament Team, and a three-time first-team Academic All-American (1972–1974). Prior to joining the varsity team, Wilkes (20.0 ppg), along with Greg Lee (17.9 ppg) and Bill Walton
Bill Walton
(18.1, 68.6 per cent), was a member of the 20–0 UCLA Frosh team.[11] In March 2007, he was inducted into the Pac-10 Men's Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Honor. In an interview with the New York Post
New York Post
in 1985 and in several public speaking engagements, legendary coach Wooden stated, when asked to describe his ideal player: "I would have the player be a good student, polite, courteous, a good team player, a good defensive player and rebounder, a good inside player and outside shooter. Why not just take Jamaal Wilkes
Jamaal Wilkes
and let it go at that." In 12 professional seasons with the Golden State Warriors, Los Angeles Lakers, and Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Clippers, Wilkes was a member of four NBA championship teams – one with Golden State in 1975, the season he was named Rookie of the Year – and three with the Showtime Lakers (1980, 1982, 1985), though an injury prevented him from playing in the 1985 NBA finals against the Boston Celtics, yet the Lakers won the series in six games over the Celtics, 4–2. One of the most memorable games of his career was the series clinching Game 6 of the 1980 NBA Finals against the Philadelphia 76ers; Wilkes had 37 points and 10 rebounds, but was overshadowed by rookie teammate Magic Johnson, who started at center in place of an injured Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
and finished with 42 points, 15 rebounds, and 7 assists. "Jamaal Wilkes had an unbelievable game", said Johnson in 2011. "Everybody talked about my 42 [points], but it was also his [37-point effort]."[12] Wilkes missed the first seven games of the 1984 Playoffs due to a gastrointestinal virus. When he returned to action on May 8, he received a standing ovation from the Forum crowd.[1] For his career, Wilkes registered 14,664 points (17.7 ppg) and 5,117 rebounds (6.2 rpg), averaging 16.1 ppg in 113 postseason games. He played in the 1976, 1981, and 1983 All-Star Games and was named to the NBA All-Defensive Team twice. The Sporting News named Wilkes to its NBA All-Pro Second Team three years. On April 2, 2012, Wilkes was announced as a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame induction class of 2012. He formally entered the Hall on September 7.[13] On December 28, 2012, the Lakers retired Wilkes' jersey, number 52, and on January 17, 2013, UCLA retired his collegiate jersey, also number 52.[14] Later years[edit] Wilkes was hired as vice president of basketball operations by the Los Angeles Stars for the inaugural season of the new American Basketball Association (ABA) in 2000.[15] At Wilkes' request, Wooden also joined the Stars as a consultant.[16] Personal life[edit] Along with being one of the co-authors behind the book and audio course, Success Under Fire: Lessons For Being Your Best In Crunch Time, Wilkes became a highly sought-after motivational speaker for national organizations and Fortune 500 corporations. Upon his retirement from the NBA, he worked in the real estate and financial services industries in the last 22 years. In 2003, along with business partner Liza Wayne, he founded Jamaal Wilkes
Jamaal Wilkes
Financial Advisors, a firm specializing in wealth management solutions. Wilkes is a long-time resident of Playa Del Rey, where late Lakers owner Jerry Buss, former Lakers coach Phil Jackson, and other Lakers and Clippers players have resided. He has two sons and a daughter. His oldest son, Omar (born May 13, 1984),[17] graduated from the University of California at Berkeley
University of California at Berkeley
where he played as shooting guard (6'4") for the basketball team.[18] His youngest, Jordan (born August 10, 1987), also graduated from Berkeley, where he played center (7'0").[19] Only daughter Sabreen graduated from UCLA in 2005 (also playing volleyball for the college) and went on to pursue a modeling and acting career. Wilkes himself made his feature-film debut as Nathaniel "Cornbread" Hamilton in the 1975 basketball-themed drama, Cornbread, Earl and Me. NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Denotes seasons in which Wilkes won an NBA championship

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1974–75† Golden State 82 – 30.7 .442 – .734 8.2 2.2 1.3 0.3 14.2

1975–76 Golden State 82 – 33.1 .463 – .772 8.8 2.0 1.2 0.4 17.8

1976–77 Golden State 76 – 33.9 .478 – .797 7.6 2.8 1.7 0.2 17.7

1977–78 L.A. Lakers 51 – 29.2 .440 – .716 7.5 3.6 1.5 0.4 12.9

1978–79 L.A. Lakers 82 – 35.5 .504 – .751 7.4 2.8 1.6 0.3 18.6

1979–80† L.A. Lakers 82 – 37.9 .535 .176 .808 6.4 3.0 1.6 0.3 20.0

1980–81 L.A. Lakers 81 – 37.4 .526 .077 .758 5.4 2.9 1.5 0.4 22.6

1981–82† L.A. Lakers 82 82 35.4 .525 .000 .732 4.8 1.7 1.1 0.3 21.1

1982–83 L.A. Lakers 80 80 31.9 .530 .000 .757 4.3 2.3 0.8 0.2 19.6

1983–84 L.A. Lakers 75 74 33.4 .514 .250 .743 4.5 2.9 1.0 0.5 17.3

1984–85† L.A. Lakers 42 8 18.1 .488 .000 .773 2.2 1.0 0.5 0.1 8.3

1985–86 L.A. Clippers 13 1 15.0 .400 .333 .815 2.2 1.2 0.5 0.2 5.8

Career 828 ? 32.9 .499 .135 .759 6.2 2.5 1.3 0.3 17.7

All-Star 3 0 18.0 .481 – 1.000 4.7 2.3 1.3 0.0 11.0

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1975† Golden State 17 – 29.6 .446 – .702 7.0 1.6 1.5 0.8 15.0

1976 Golden State 13 – 34.6 .430 – .778 7.9 2.2 0.9 0.6 15.9

1977 Golden State 10 – 34.6 .429 – .821 8.0 1.6 1.6 0.6 15.5

1978 L.A. Lakers 3 – 36.0 .469 – .545 8.7 2.7 1.0 0.3 12.0

1979 L.A. Lakers 8 – 38.4 .477 – .676 8.5 2.0 1.9 0.3 18.4

1980† L.A. Lakers 16 – 40.8 .476 .000 .815 8.0 3.0 1.5 0.3 20.3

1981 L.A. Lakers 3 – 37.7 .438 .000 .667 2.7 1.3 0.3 0.3 18.0

1982† L.A. Lakers 14 – 38.2 .502 .000 .776 5.0 2.6 1.1 0.2 20.0

1983 L.A. Lakers 15 – 39.3 .498 .000 .614 6.0 3.4 1.3 0.7 19.9

1984 L.A. Lakers 14 – 14.0 .400 .000 .636 1.9 0.6 0.3 0.1 4.5

Career 113 ? 33.6 .465 .000 .727 6.4 2.2 1.2 0.5 16.1

References[edit]

^ a b "Silk returns". The Dallas Morning News. May 9, 1984.  access-date= requires url= (help) ^ "Wilkes wants name changed to Jamaal Abdul-Lateef". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Associated Press. July 26, 1975. p. 3B.  ^ a b Cotton, Anthony (February 9, 1981). "Like Snow On A Bamboo Leaf". Sports Illustrated. Time Inc. Archived from the original on March 29, 2012.  ^ " Jamaal Wilkes
Jamaal Wilkes
NBA & ABA Statistics". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved March 29, 2012.  ^ http://capitolwords.org/date/2005/12/06/E2442-2_honoring-the-life-of-reverend-leander-wilkes/ ^ http://www.independent.com/news/2011/mar/23/super-shot/ ^ http://www.sbroundtable.org/hall-of-fame/inductees/athletes/jamaal-wilkes/ ^ http://presidiosports.com/2013/01/wilkes-to-be-recognized-prior-to-ventura-santa-barbara-game/ ^ http://www.independent.com/news/2012/sep/12/honoring-jamaal-wilkes/ ^ " Pac-12 Conference
Pac-12 Conference
2011–12 Men's Basketball
Basketball
Media Guide". Pac-12 Conference. 2011. p. 119. Retrieved February 9, 2012.  ^ 1972 Official Collegiate Basketball
Basketball
Guide, College Athletics Publishing Service, 1971 ^ Medina, Mark (August 29, 2012). "Magic, Kareem among Jamaal Wilkes' presenters at Hall of Fame". Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times. Archived from the original on 2012-09-01.  ^ "Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Announces Class of 2012" (Press release). Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame. April 2, 2012. Archived from the original on April 5, 2012. Retrieved April 2, 2012.  ^ Kartje, Ryan (January 16, 2013). "Jamaal Wilkes' No. 52 jersey to be retired at Thursday's game". Orange County Register. Archived from the original on January 23, 2013.  ^ Shaikin, Bill (August 8, 2000). "Wilkes to Guide Team in ABA Revival". Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times. Retrieved July 17, 2011.  ^ Crowe, Jerry (January 31, 2001). "Wooden Becomes Star Among the Stars". Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times. Retrieved July 17, 2011.  ^ Bloom, Earl (May 16, 1984). "The Magic show keeps LA rolling". The Register (CA). p. C1, C12.  ^ Omar Wilkes Cal profile ^ Jordan Wilkes Cal profile

External links[edit]

National Basketball
Basketball
Association portal

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Jamaal Wilkes.

Wilkes' official website

Career statistics and player information from Basketball-Reference.com NBA.com bio

Links to related articles

v t e

UCLA Bruins men's basketball
UCLA Bruins men's basketball
1971–72 NCAA champions

22 Tommy Curtis 25 Andy Hill 31 Swen Nater 32 Bill Walton
Bill Walton
(MOP) 43 Greg Lee 45 Henry Bibby 52 Keith Wilkes 53 Larry Hollyfield 54 Larry Farmer

Head coach John Wooden

Assistant coaches Gary Cunningham Frank Arnold

v t e

UCLA Bruins men's basketball
UCLA Bruins men's basketball
1972–73 NCAA champions

22 Tommy Curtis 25 Pete Trgovich 31 Swen Nater 32 Bill Walton
Bill Walton
(MOP) 34 Dave Meyers 35 Ralph Drollinger 43 Greg Lee 52 Keith Wilkes 53 Larry Hollyfield 54 Larry Farmer

Head coach John Wooden

Assistant coaches Gary Cunningham Frank Arnold

v t e

1973 NCAA Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Doug Collins Ernie DiGregorio Bo Lamar Ed Ratleff David Thompson Bill Walton Keith Wilkes

Second Team

Jim Brewer Tommy Burleson Larry Finch Kevin Joyce Tom McMillen Kermit Washington

v t e

1974 NCAA Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Marvin Barnes John Shumate David Thompson Bill Walton Keith Wilkes

Second Team

Len Elmore Larry Fogle Bobby Jones Billy Knight Campy Russell

v t e

1974 NBA Draft

First round

Bill Walton Marvin Barnes Tommy Burleson John Shumate Bobby Jones Scott Wedman Tom Henderson Campy Russell Tom McMillen Mike Sojourner Keith Wilkes Brian Winters Len Elmore Maurice Lucas Al Eberhard Cliff Pondexter Glenn McDonald Gary Brokaw

Second round

Don Smith Jan van Breda Kolff Billy Knight Truck Robinson Gus Bailey Len Kosmalski John Drew Leonard Gray Leon Benbow Aaron James Phil Smith Dennis DuVal Fred Saunders Jesse Dark Eric Money Phil Lumpkin Kevin Stacom Rubin Collins

v t e

Golden State Warriors
Golden State Warriors
1974–75 NBA champions

10 C. Johnson 15 Dudley 20 Smith 21 Beard 22 Bracey 23 Mullins 24 Barry (Finals MVP) 32 Bridges 40 Dickey 41 Wilkes 44 Ray 52 G. Johnson

Head coach Attles

Assistant coach Roberts

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1979–80 NBA champions

7 Byrnes 9 Chones 10 Nixon 14 Holland 15 Lee 21 Cooper 31 Haywood 32 Johnson (Finals MVP) 33 Abdul-Jabbar 52 Wilkes 54 Landsberger

Head coach Westhead

Assistant coaches Thibault Riley

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1981–82 NBA champions

5 Jordan 8 Brewer 10 Nixon 11 McAdoo 21 Cooper 31 Rambis 32 M. Johnson (Finals MVP) 33 Abdul-Jabbar 34 C. Johnson 40 McGee 52 Wilkes 54 Landsberger

Head coach Riley

Assistant coaches Bertka Thibault

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
1984–85 NBA champions

4 Scott 11 McAdoo 12 Lester 21 Cooper 25 Kupchak 31 Rambis 32 Johnson 33 Abdul-Jabbar (Finals MVP) 35 Spriggs 40 McGee 42 Worthy 43 Nevitt

Head coach Riley

Assistant coaches Bertka Wohl

Regular season Playoffs

v t e

NBA Rookie of the Year
NBA Rookie of the Year
Award

1953: Meineke 1954: Felix 1955: Pettit 1956: Stokes 1957: Heinsohn 1958: Sauldsberry 1959: Baylor 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Bellamy 1963: Dischinger 1964: Lucas 1965: Reed 1966: Barry 1967: Bing 1968: Monroe 1969: Unseld 1970: Alcindor 1971: Cowens & Petrie 1972: Wicks 1973: McAdoo 1974: DiGregorio 1975: Wilkes 1976: Adams 1977: Dantley 1978: Davis 1979: Ford 1980: Bird 1981: Griffith 1982: Williams 1983: Cummings 1984: Sampson 1985: Jordan 1986: Ewing 1987: Person 1988: Jackson 1989: Richmond 1990: Robinson 1991: Coleman 1992: Johnson 1993: O'Neal 1994: Webber 1995: Hill & Kidd 1996: Stoudamire 1997: Iverson 1998: Duncan 1999: Carter 2000: Brand & Francis 2001: Miller 2002: Gasol 2003: Stoudemire 2004: James 2005: Okafor 2006: Paul 2007: Roy 2008: Durant 2009: Rose 2010: Evans 2011: Griffin 2012: Irving 2013: Lillard 2014: Carter-Williams 2015: Wiggins 2016: Towns 2017: Brogdon

v t e

Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States Olympic Team 1992 United States Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

v t e

Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Class of 2012

Players

Mel Daniels Katrina McClain Reggie Miller Ralph Sampson Chet Walker Jamaal Wilkes

Coaches

Lidia Alexeeva Don Nelson

Contributors

Donald Barksdale Phil Knight

Referees

Hank Nichols

Teams

All American Red Heads

v t e

Golden State Warriors

Founded in 1946 Played in Philadelphia (1946–1962) and San Francisco (1962–1971) Based in Oakland, California

Franchise

Franchise Team history All-time roster Draft history Seasons Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Philadelphia Arena Philadelphia Convention Hall Cow Palace San Francisco Civic Auditorium War Memorial Gymnasium
War Memorial Gymnasium
(University of San Francisco) San Jose Arena Oracle Arena Chase Center

General managers

Tyrell Gottlieb Feerick Vertlieb Stirling Attles Nelson Twardzik St. Jean Mullin Riley Myers

G League affiliate

Santa Cruz Warriors

Retired numbers

13 14 16 17 24 42

Hall of Famers

Paul Arizin Rick Barry Wilt Chamberlain Joe Fulks Tom Gola Neil Johnston Jerry Lucas Šarūnas Marčiulionis Chris Mullin Mitch Richmond Don Nelson Robert Parish Andy Phillip Guy Rodgers Ralph Sampson Nate Thurmond Jamaal Wilkes

NBA Championships (5)

1947 1956 1975 2015 2017

Conference Championships (9)

1947 1948 1956 1964 1967 1975 2015 2016 2017

Culture/lore

Wilt the Stilt

100 point game

Nate the Great Nellie Ball Run TMC The Sleepy Floyd game Splash Brothers Death Lineup Warrior Girls 73–9 The Block

Rivalries

Cleveland Cavaliers

Media

TV NBC Sports Bay Area Radio KGMZ Announcers Bob Fitzgerald Jim Barnett Tim Roye

v t e

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers

Founded in 1947 Played in Minneapolis (1947–1960) Based in Los Angeles, California

Franchise

Franchise Team history All-time roster Draft history Seasons Records Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Minneapolis Auditorium Minneapolis Armory Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Memorial Sports Arena The Forum Staples Center

G League affiliate

South Bay Lakers

Administration

Jeanie, Jim, and Johnny Buss (majority owners) Anschutz Entertainment Group
Anschutz Entertainment Group
(minority owner) Ed Roski Jr. (minority owner) Patrick Soon-Shiong (minority owner) Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
(President of Basketball
Basketball
Operations) Rob Pelinka
Rob Pelinka
(General manager) Luke Walton
Luke Walton
(Head coach)

Retired numbers

8 13 22 24 25 32 33 34 42 44 52 Chick Hearn
Chick Hearn
(Microphone)

Minneapolis Lakers Hall of Famers Mikan Mikkelsen Martin Lovellette Pollard Coach Kundla

NBA Championships (16)

1949 1950 1952 1953 1954 1972 1980 1982 1985 1987 1988 2000 2001 2002 2009 2010

Western Conference Championships (31)

1949 1950 1952 1953 1954 1959 1962 1963 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1972 1973 1980 1982 1983 1984 1985 1987 1988 1989 1991 2000 2001 2002 2004 2008 2009 2010

Rivalries

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Clippers San Antonio Spurs Boston Celtics Detroit Pistons

Culture and lore

Jack Kent Cooke Jerry Buss Showtime Chick Hearn Shaq–Kobe feud Lawrence Tanter Jack Nicholson "I Love L.A." Laker Girls Laker Band Dancing Barry Celtics/Lakers: Best of Enemies

Media

TV Spectrum SportsNet (Los Angeles) Radio 710 ESPN Radio 1330 ESPN Deportes Announcers Bill Macdonald Stu Lantz John Ireland Mychal Thompson

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 91134360 MusicBrainz: 45ee0566-f390-4377

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