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Jacob Joseph "Jack" Lew (born August 29, 1955) is an American attorney who was the 76th United States Secretary of the Treasury, serving from 2013 to 2017. He served as the 25th White House Chief of Staff
White House Chief of Staff
from 2012 to 2013. Lew previously served as Director of the Office of Management and Budget in the Clinton and Obama Administrations, and is a member of the Democratic Party. Born in New York City, Lew received his A.B. from Harvard College
Harvard College
and his J.D. from Georgetown University
Georgetown University
Law Center. Lew began his career as a legislative assistant to Representative Joe Moakley
Joe Moakley
and as a senior policy adviser to former House Speaker Tip O'Neill. Lew then worked as an attorney in private practice before working as a deputy in Boston's office of management and budget. In 1993, he began work for the Clinton Administration
Clinton Administration
as Special
Special
Assistant to the President. In 1994 Lew served as Associate Director for Legislative Affairs and Deputy Director of the Office of Management and Budget, where he served as Director of that agency from 1998 to 2001 and from 2010 to 2012. After leaving the Clinton Administration, Lew worked as the Executive Vice President for Operations at New York University
New York University
from 2001 to 2006, and as the COO at Citigroup
Citigroup
from 2006 to 2008. Lew then served as the first Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources, from 2009 to 2010. On January 10, 2013, Lew was nominated as the replacement for retiring Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, to serve in President Barack Obama's second term.[1] On February 27, 2013, the Senate confirmed Lew for the position. He was sworn in the following day, and served until the conclusion of the Obama administration
Obama administration
with the inauguration of Donald Trump. He was immediately replaced on an interim basis by Adam Szubin, before being officially succeeded as Secretary of the Treasury by Steve Mnuchin.

Contents

1 Early life, education, and early career 2 Clinton administration 3 Between Clinton and Obama tenures 4 Obama administration

4.1 Deputy Secretary of State 4.2 Budget director 4.3 Chief of Staff 4.4 Secretary of the Treasury

5 Personal life 6 References 7 External links

Early life, education, and early career[edit] Lew was born in New York City, the son of Ruth (Turoff) and Irving Lew.[2][3] His family is Jewish. He attended New York City
New York City
public schools, graduating from Forest Hills High School.[4] His father was a lawyer and rare-book dealer who came to the United States from Poland as a child.[5] Lew attended Carleton College
Carleton College
in Minnesota for a year, where his faculty adviser was Paul Wellstone, who eventually represented Minnesota in the U.S. Senate.[6] He graduated from Harvard College in 1978 and the Georgetown University
Georgetown University
Law Center in 1983.[7] He worked as an aide to Rep. Joe Moakley
Joe Moakley
(D-Mass.) from 1974 to 1975.[8] In 1979, he was a senior policy adviser to House Speaker Tip O'Neill.[9] Under O'Neill he served at the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee as Assistant Director and then Executive Director, and was responsible for work on domestic and economic issues including Social Security, Medicare, budget, tax, trade, appropriations, and energy issues.[10] Lew practiced as an attorney for five years as a partner at Van Ness Feldman and Curtis.[11] His practice dealt primarily with electric power generation. He has also worked as Executive Director of the Center for Middle East Research, Issues Director for the Democratic National Committee's Campaign 88, and Deputy Director of the Office of Program Analysis in the city of Boston's Office of Management and Budget.[12][13] Clinton administration[edit] From February 1993 to 1994, Lew served as Special
Special
Assistant to the President under President Clinton.[14] Lew was responsible for policy development and the drafting of the national service initiative (AmeriCorps) and health care reform legislation.[15] Lew left the White House
White House
in October 1994 to work as OMB's Executive Associate Director and Associate Director for Legislative Affairs.[16] From August 1995 until July 1998, Lew served as Deputy Director of OMB.[17] There, Lew was chief operating officer responsible for day-to-day management of a staff of 500. He had crosscutting responsibilities to coordinate Clinton administration efforts on budget and appropriations matters. He frequently served as a member of the Administration negotiating team, including regarding the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. President Clinton nominated Lew to be Director of the OMB,[18] and the United States Senate
United States Senate
confirmed him for that job on July 31, 1998.[19] He served in that capacity until the end of the Clinton administration in January 2001. As OMB Director, Lew had the lead responsibility for the Clinton Administration’s policies on budget, management, and appropriations issues. As a member of the Cabinet and senior member of the economic team, he advised the President on a broad range of domestic and international policies. He represented the Administration in budget negotiations with Congress and served as a member of the National Security Council. Between Clinton and Obama tenures[edit] After leaving public office in the Clinton administration, Lew served as the Executive Vice President for Operations at New York University and was a Clinical Professor of Public Administration at NYU's Wagner School of Public Service.[20] While at NYU, Lew aided the university in ending graduate students' collective bargaining rights. The Obama administration has maintained that Lew supports workers' union rights.[21] According to a 2004 report in NYU's student newspaper, the Washington Square News, Lew was paid $840,339 during the 2002-2003 academic year.[22] In addition, the university forgave several hundred thousand dollars in mortgage loans it made to Lew.[23] In June 2006, Lew was named chief operating officer of Citigroup's Alternative Investments unit, a proprietary trading group. The unit he oversaw invested in a hedge fund "that bet on the housing market to collapse."[24] During his work at Citigroup, Lew had invested heavily in funds in Ugland House
Ugland House
while he worked as an investment banker at Citigroup
Citigroup
during the 2008 financial meltdown.[25] Lew also had oversight of Citigroup
Citigroup
subsidiaries in countries including, Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, and Hong Kong; and during his time at Citigroup, Citigroup
Citigroup
subsidiaries in the Cayman Islands
Cayman Islands
increased to 113.[26] Lew co-chaired the Advisory Board for City Year
City Year
New York.[27] He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Brookings Institution Hamilton Project Advisory Board, and the National Academy of Social Insurance.[28] Lew is also a member of the bar in Massachusetts and the District of Columbia.[29] Obama administration[edit] Deputy Secretary of State[edit]

Lew with former Chair of the Joint Chiefs Admiral Mike Mullen at the Combined Press Information Center in Baghdad, July 27, 2010.

As Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources, Lew was the State Department's chief operating officer and was primarily responsible for resource issues, while James Steinberg, who also served as Deputy Secretary of State during that period was responsible for policy.[30][31] Lew was co-leader of the State Department's Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review.[32] Budget director[edit] On July 13, 2010, the White House
White House
announced that Lew had been chosen to replace Peter Orszag
Peter Orszag
as Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), subject to Senate confirmation.[33] During confirmation hearings in the Senate, in response to questioning by Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT), Lew said that he did not believe deregulation was a "proximate cause" of the financial crisis of 2007–2008: Lew told the panel that "the problems in the financial industry preceded deregulation," and after discussing those issues, added that he didn't "personally know the extent to which deregulation drove it, but I don't believe that deregulation was the proximate cause."[34][35] On November 18, 2010, Lew was confirmed by the Senate by unanimous consent. The $3.7 trillion 2011 budget President Obama unveiled the administration estimated reductions to federal spending deficits by $1.1 trillion over the next decade if adopted and economic assumptions were fully achieved. Two-thirds of that estimated reduction would come from spending cuts through a 5-year freeze in discretionary spending first announced in Obama’s 2011 State of the Union
2011 State of the Union
address, as well as savings to mandatory programs such as Medicare and lower interest payments on the debt that would result from the lower spending. Tax increases are responsible for the other third of the reduction, including a cap on itemized reductions for wealthier taxpayers and the elimination of tax breaks for oil and gas companies.[36] Economist and former financial fraud investigator William K. Black
William K. Black
warned that the OMB budget statement prepared under Lew's direction was "an ode to austerity," and that austerity would force the U.S. economy back into recession.[37]

Lew meeting with President Barack Obama
Barack Obama
and the Legislative Affairs Director Rob Nabors

In an op-ed in the Huffington Post, Lew cited top Administration priorities to achieve deficit reduction; including: $400 billion in savings from non-security discretionary spending freezes, $78 billion in cuts to the Department of Defense, returning to the Clinton-era tax rates for the top 2% of income earners, and lowering the Corporate tax from 35% to 25%.[38] Chief of Staff[edit] On January 9, 2012, President Obama announced that Lew would replace William M. Daley
William M. Daley
as White House
White House
Chief of Staff.[39] Lew's nomination was followed with criticism[40][41][42][43] after renewed reports that he received over $900,000 in bonuses while working at Citigroup, which had been rescued with $45 billion from the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) after losing $27.7 billion, or 90% of its value.[44][45] During his tenure as Chief of Staff, Lew was seen as a supporter and top negotiator for a "grand bargain" deal between President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner, to avoid "Fiscal cliff" sequester cuts and tax increases.[10] Secretary of the Treasury[edit]

Lew's signature

Lew's money signature

On January 10, 2013, President Obama nominated Lew for the position of Secretary of the Treasury.[1] The nomination became the subject of some humorous commentary, due to Lew's unusual loopy signature, which would have appeared on all U.S. paper currency for the duration of his tenure;[46] the signature generated enough media attention that Obama joked at a press conference that he had considered rescinding his nomination when he learned of it.[47] Lew later adopted a more conventional signature for currency.[48] The Senate Finance Committee held confirmation hearings for Lew on February 13, 2013,[49] and approved his nomination 19–5 on February 26, 2013, sending his nomination to the full Senate.[50]

Lew is sworn as Secretary of the Treasury by Vice President Joe Biden in the Oval Office
Oval Office
of the White House, February 28, 2013.

During his confirmation hearings before the United States Senate Committee on Finance, Republican Senator Chuck Grassley
Chuck Grassley
expressed concern that Lew did not know what Ugland House
Ugland House
was, though he had invested in it.[51] Lew had invested heavily in funds in Ugland House while he worked as an investment banker at Citigroup
Citigroup
during the 2008 financial meltdown.[52] Lew had taken advantage of current tax law and his financial allocation in the venture resulted in Lew taking roughly a 2.8% loss, a $1,582 decrease in his investment principal.[53] On February 27, 2013, the full Senate voted and approved Lew for Secretary of the Treasury 71–26. He was sworn into office on February 28.[54] In December 2013, Lew said that the government might run out of cash to pay the country’s bills by late February or early March 2014. That sets up yet another showdown in Congress over raising or suspending the debt limit, a statutory limit on the total amount of United States borrowing, early in the year. “The creditworthiness of the United States is an essential underpinning of our strength as a nation; it is not a bargaining chip to be used for partisan political ends,” Mr. Lew said in the letter. “Increasing the debt limit does not authorize new spending commitments. It simply allows the government to pay for expenditures Congress has already approved.”[55] In May 2014, Lew received an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Georgetown University
Georgetown University
and spoke at the first commencement ceremony of the McCourt School of Public Policy.[56] In 2016, a fictionalized version of Lew appeared in the Mr. Robot season 2 premiere.[57][58] Personal life[edit] Lew married his high school sweetheart, Ruth Schwartz.[59] As Chief of Staff, Lew commuted to Washington from the couple's Riverdale, New York home.[59][60] They have two grown children.[59] Lew is an Orthodox Jew who observes the Jewish
Jewish
Sabbath[61][62] and has attended Beth Sholom Congregation in Potomac, Maryland, Kesher Israel Congregation in Washington, D.C.[63] and the Hebrew Institute of Riverdale in the Bronx, New York.[64] Interviewed in a 2010 article, Lew's former boss on the National Security Council, Sandy Berger, commented that "Lew's faith never got in the way of performing his duties."[61] A 2011 press release from the Religion News Service noted that Lew also "has extensive connections in the American Jewish community," and that he might be able to help President Obama "build a more friendly rapport" with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.[65] References[edit]

^ a b Jackie Calmes (January 10, 2013). "Lew Would Complete Transformation of Obama's Economic Team". The New York Times. Retrieved January 10, 2013.  ^ "Paid Notice: Deaths LEW, RUTH (TUROFF)". The New York Times. 2003-07-23. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-01-22.  ^ "Jack Lew's Life Shaped by Faith and Service". The Forward. Retrieved 2017-01-22.  ^ "Homecoming". whitehouse.gov. June 27, 2011.  ^ "Trusted Aide to Obama Faces Test in Budget Showdown". The New York Times. December 1, 2012.  ^ Sullivan, Sean (January 9, 2013). "Who is Jack Lew?". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 13, 2016.  ^ "Biographical information on Jack Lew". The Wall Street Journal. January 9, 2012.  ^ "Incoming White House Chief of Staff
White House Chief of Staff
Jack Lew
Jack Lew
like Rahm sans %@#!". The Hill. January 12, 2012. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ "Biographical information on Jack Lew". The Seattle Times. January 9, 2012. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ a b Cook, Nancy (9 January 2013). "Jack Lew: The Man Who Could Save Obama's Legacy". National Journal. Archived from the original on 3 March 2014. Retrieved 14 January 2013.  ^ " Van Ness Feldman Congratulates Jack Lew
Jack Lew
on His Anticipated Nomination to Serve as Head of the White House
White House
Office of Management and Budget". VNF. July 13, 2010. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ "Thompson Schedules Nomination Hearing on Jacob J. Lew". hsgac.senate.gov. May 28, 1998. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ Pear, Robert (November 15, 2008). "Jacob J. Lew". The New York Times. Archived from the original on July 6, 2012.  ^ "Obama's New Chief of Staff Third Gu Alumnus to Serve in Post". Georgetown University. January 18, 2012. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ "Lew, Jacob J. "Jack"". Our Campaigns. January 26, 2012. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ "The White House
White House
Office of the Press Secretary". Houston, Texas: National Archives and Records Administration. April 14, 1998. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014. Retrieved January 14, 2013.  ^ "A Look at the New White House Chief of Staff
White House Chief of Staff
Jack Lew". Yahoo! News. January 9, 2012. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ "President Clinton Announces OMB Director Raines' Departure". clinton4.nara.gov. April 14, 1998. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ "OMB's Organization". clinton3.nara.gov. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ "Nat'l Security Team Additions". RealClearPolitics. December 23, 2008. Archived from the original on July 7, 2011.  ^ Eidelson, Josh. "Jack Lew's union-busting past". Salon. Archived from the original on 3 March 2014. Retrieved 10 January 2013.  ^ James Freeman (January 30, 2013). "What Did Lew Do at NYU?". The Wall Street Journal.  ^ Kaminer, Ariel. "NYU will cease loans to top employees for second homes". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014. Retrieved August 16, 2013.  ^ "Flashback: Lew's Time at Citi And Other Disappointments". Mother Jones. January 9, 2012. Archived from the original on October 10, 2013.  ^ "From the Citi to the Caymans". WSJ News. February 12, 2012. Retrieved February 12, 2013.  ^ Daniel Halper (13 February 2013). " Jack Lew
Jack Lew
Oversaw Up to 113 Cayman Island Investment Funds". Weekly Standard. Archived from the original on 3 March 2014. Retrieved 22 February 2013.  ^ "Director Jack Lew
Jack Lew
Blogs About CYNY". cityyearnewyork.wordpress.com. January 18, 2011. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ " White House Chief of Staff
White House Chief of Staff
Jack Lew
Jack Lew
to Keynote December 16 Convocation; Stanley Raskas, Moise Safra and Diane Wassner to be Honored". Yeshiva University. November 26, 2012. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ "Obama National Security Team Takes Shape". National Journal. December 23, 2008. Archived from the original on December 27, 2008. Retrieved July 13, 2010.  ^ "Obama Names Steinberg, Lew State Department Deputies". Bloomberg L.P. December 23, 2008. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014. Retrieved February 6, 2011.  ^ "Senior Officials". United States Department of State. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014. Retrieved February 6, 2011.  ^ Long, Emily (July 15, 2009). "State Department launches quadrennial review". Government Executive. Retrieved February 6, 2011.  ^ "President Obama Announces His Intent to Nominate Jacob Lew as OMB Director". The White House. July 13, 2010. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ Nasiripour, Shahien (September 21, 2010). "Jacob Lew, Obama Nominee And Former Citigroup
Citigroup
Executive, Doesn't Believe Deregulation Led To Financial Crisis". The Huffington Post.  ^ "Matt Taibbi & Bill Black: Obama's New Treasury Secretary a 'Failure of Epic Proportions'". AlterNet. January 11, 2013. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ Wasson, Erik (February 14, 2011). "Obama 2012 budget proposes $1.1T deficit cut over next decade". The Hill. Archived from the original on October 10, 2013. Retrieved November 14, 2012.  ^ "Obama's OMB Channels its Inner Tea Party". New Economic Perspectives. December 27, 2012. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ Lew, Jacob (February 14, 2011). "The 2012 Budget". The Huffington Post. Retrieved January 7, 2013.  ^ "Obama chief of staff Bill Daley steps down, budget chief Jack Lew steps up". CBS News. January 9, 2012. Retrieved November 14, 2012.  ^ "The new WH Chief of Staff and Citigroup". Salon. January 10, 2012. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014. Retrieved January 7, 2013.  ^ "Are These Examples of Washington Corruption?". cato.org. Retrieved January 7, 2013.  ^ "OMB nominee got $900,000 after Citigroup
Citigroup
bailout". washingtontimes.com. July 28, 2010. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014. Retrieved January 7, 2013.  ^ Lipton, Eric (February 11, 2009). "Advisers' Citigroup
Citigroup
Ties Raise Questions". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 16, 2013. Retrieved January 7, 2013.  ^ "BUSTED: Obama's New Budget Chief Got A $900K Bonus From Citigroup After It Got A Bailout". Business Insider. July 29, 2010. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014. Retrieved January 7, 2013.  ^ Bray, Chad (December 5, 2012). " Citigroup
Citigroup
Inc". International New York Times. Archived from the original on January 9, 2014. Retrieved January 7, 2013.  ^ "Likely Treasury Secretary Under Fire for Signature". ABC News. January 9, 2013. Retrieved January 9, 2013.  ^ Rachel Weiner (January 10, 2013). "Obama mocks Lew's signature". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 10, 2013.  ^ Goldfarb, Zachary A. (June 18, 2013). "Treasury Secretary Jack Lew unveils new signature after quibbles with his scribble". The Washington Post. The Washington Post
The Washington Post
Company. Retrieved July 29, 2013.  ^ Nomination of Jacob J. Lew: Hearing Before the Committee on Finance, United States Senate, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, First Session, on the Nomination of Jacob J. Lew, to be Secretary, Department of the Treasury, February 13, 2013 ^ Kelsey Snell (February 26, 2013). "Senate Finance approves Jack Lew nomination for Treasury". Politico. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ "Grassley Says Lew's Ignorance of Ugland House
Ugland House
'Does not Build Confidence'". Tax Notes Today. February 13, 2013. p. 2013 TNT 31-26.  Missing or empty url= (help); access-date= requires url= (help) ^ "From the Citi to the Caymans". WSJ News. February 12, 2012. Retrieved February 21, 2013.  ^ Timothy W. Coleman (February 16, 2013). "Politically inconvenient taxation". Washington Times Communities. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014. Retrieved February 18, 2013.  ^ " Jack Lew
Jack Lew
Gets Enough Senate Votes to Be Confirmed as Treasury Secretary". CNBC. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014. Retrieved February 27, 2013.  ^ Annie Lowrey (December 19, 2013). "Congress Is Warned Anew Not to Breach Debt Ceiling". International New York Times. Archived from the original on March 3, 2014.  ^ "Georgetown Announces Speakers for 2014 Commencement". Georgetown University. May 1, 2014. Archived from the original on May 2, 2014. Retrieved May 1, 2014.  ^ Riesman, Abraham (13 July 2016). "How Mr. Robot Got President Obama to Say 'Tyrell Wellick'". Vulture.com. Archived from the original on 23 June 2017. Retrieved 23 June 2017.  ^ "Mr. Robot: Which (Mostly) New Characters Live Only In Elliot's Mind?". MTV News. Retrieved June 24, 2017.  ^ a b c Wisnieski, Adam (January 16, 2013). "Riverdalian named for top treasury post". The Riverdale Press. Retrieved December 17, 2016.  ^ "14 things you should know about Jack Lew". The Washington Post. January 7, 2013. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved December 17, 2016.  ^ a b Wagner, Ellis, White House
White House
Correspondent, "Clinton's Budget Brain Returning to OMB Helm," Politics Daily, July 16, 2010, retrieved February 5, 2012. ^ "Obama names Jack Lew
Jack Lew
new chief of staff". Ynetnews. Retrieved January 9, 2012.  ^ Hoffman, Allison (April 3, 2013). "A School for D.C.'s Jewish Elite". Baltimore Jewish
Jewish
Life. Archived from the original on October 22, 2014. Retrieved December 2, 2014.  ^ Donn, Yochonon. "Jack Lew: Liberal Jew, White House's First 'Gabbai'". Hamodia. Retrieved January 3, 2013.  ^ Gibson, David (January 10, 2012). "New White House
White House
Staffers, Cecille Munoz and Jacob Lew, Have Strategic Catholic, Jewish
Jewish
Ties". The Huffington Post. Retrieved February 5, 2012. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Jacob Lew.

About the Secretary-U.S. Department of the Treasury Chief of Staff Jack Lew
Jack Lew
at The White House

Appearances on C-SPAN

Political offices

Preceded by Franklin Raines Director of the Office of Management and Budget 1998–2001 Succeeded by Mitch Daniels

New office Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources 2009–2010 Succeeded by Tom Nides

Preceded by Jeff Zients Acting Director of the Office of Management and Budget 2010–2012 Succeeded by Jeff Zients Acting

Preceded by William Daley White House
White House
Chief of Staff 2012–2013 Succeeded by Denis McDonough

Preceded by Timothy Geithner United States Secretary of the Treasury 2013–2017 Succeeded by Steven Mnuchin

v t e

Obama administration
Obama administration
personnel

v t e

Cabinet and cabinet-level

Office Name Term Office Name Term

Secretary of State John Kerry 2013–2017 Secretary of Treasury Jack Lew 2013–2017

Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter 2015–2017 Attorney General Loretta Lynch 2015–2017

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell 2013–2017 Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack 2009–2017

Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker 2013–2017 Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez 2013–2017

Secretary of Health and   Human Services Sylvia Mathews Burwell 2014–2017 Secretary of Education Secretary of Transportation John King Jr. Anthony Foxx 2016–2017 2013–2017

Secretary of Housing and Urban   Development Julian Castro 2014–2017 Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert A. McDonald 2014–2017

Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz 2013–2017 Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson 2013–2017

Vice President Joe Biden 2009–2017 White House
White House
Chief of Staff Denis McDonough 2013–2017

Director of the Office of Management and   Budget Shaun Donovan 2014–2017 Administrator of the Environmental   Protection Agency Gina McCarthy 2013–2017

Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power 2013–2017 Chair of the Council of Economic   Advisers Jason Furman 2013–2017

Trade Representative Michael Froman 2013–2017 Administrator of the Small Business Administration Maria Contreras-Sweet 2014–2017

Below solid line: Granted Cabinet rank although not automatically part of the Cabinet. See also: Confirmations of Barack Obama's Cabinet

v t e

Executive Office of the President

Office Name Term Office Name Term

White House
White House
Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel 2009–10 National Security Advisor James L. Jones 2009–10

Pete Rouse 2010–11

Thomas E. Donilon 2010–13

William M. Daley 2011–12

Susan Rice 2013–17

Jack Lew 2012–13 Deputy National Security Advisor Thomas E. Donilon 2009–10

Denis McDonough 2013–17

Denis McDonough 2010–13

White House
White House
Deputy Chief of Staff for Policy Mona Sutphen 2009–11

Tony Blinken 2013–14

Nancy-Ann DeParle 2011–13

Avril Haines 2015–17

Rob Nabors 2013–15 Dep. National Security Advisor, Homeland Security John O. Brennan 2009–13

White House
White House
Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations Jim Messina 2009–11

Lisa Monaco 2013–17

Alyssa Mastromonaco 2011–14 Dep. National Security Advisor, Iraq and Afghanistan Douglas Lute† 2009–13

Anita Decker Breckenridge 2014–17 Dep. National Security Advisor, Strategic Comm. Ben Rhodes 2009–17

White House
White House
Deputy Chief of Staff for Planning Mark B. Childress 2012–14 Dep. National Security Advisor, Chief of Staff Mark Lippert 2009

Kristie Canegallo 2014–17

Denis McDonough 2009–10

Counselor to the President Pete Rouse 2011–13

Brooke D. Anderson 2011–12

John Podesta 2014–15 White House
White House
Communications Director Ellen Moran 2009

Senior Advisor to the President David Axelrod 2009–11

Anita Dunn 2009

David Plouffe 2011–13

Daniel Pfeiffer 2009–13

Daniel Pfeiffer 2013–15

Jennifer Palmieri 2013–15

Shailagh Murray 2015–17

Jen Psaki 2015–17

Senior Advisor to the President Pete Rouse 2009–10 Deputy White House
White House
Communications Director Jen Psaki 2009–11

Brian Deese 2015–17

Jennifer Palmieri 2011–14

Senior Advisor to the President and Valerie Jarrett 2009–17

Amy Brundage 2014–16

Assistant to the President for

Liz Allen 2016–17

Public Engagement and Intergovernmental Affairs

White House
White House
Press Secretary Robert Gibbs 2009–11

Director, Public Engagement Christina Tchen 2009–11

Jay Carney 2011–13

Jon Carson 2011–13

Josh Earnest 2013–17

Paulette L. Aniskoff 2013–17 Deputy Press Secretary Bill Burton 2009–11

Director, Intergovernmental Affairs Cecilia Muñoz 2009–12

Josh Earnest 2011–13

David Agnew 2012–14

Eric Schultz 2014–17

Jerry Abramson 2014–17 Director of Special
Special
Projects Stephanie Cutter 2010–11

Director, National Economic Council Lawrence Summers 2009–10 Director, Speechwriting Jon Favreau 2009–13

Gene Sperling 2011–14

Cody Keenan 2013–17

Jeffrey Zients 2014–17 Director, Digital Strategy Macon Phillips 2009–13

Chair, Council of Economic Advisors Christina Romer 2009–10 Chief Digital Officer Jason Goldman 2015–17

Austan Goolsbee 2010–13 Director, Legislative Affairs Phil Schiliro 2009–11

Jason Furman 2013–17

Rob Nabors 2011–13

Chair, Economic Recovery Advisory Board Paul Volcker 2009–11

Katie Beirne Fallon 2013–16

Chair, Council on Jobs and Competitiveness Jeff Immelt 2011–13

Miguel Rodriguez 2016

Director, Domestic Policy Council Melody Barnes 2009–12

Amy Rosenbaum 2016–17

Cecilia Muñoz 2012–17 Director, Political Affairs Patrick Gaspard 2009–11

Director, Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships Joshua DuBois 2009–13

David Simas 2014–17

Melissa Rogers 2013–17 Director, Presidential Personnel Nancy Hogan 2009–13

Director, Office of Health Reform Nancy-Ann DeParle 2009–11

Johnathan D. McBride 2013–14

Director, Office of National AIDS Policy Jeffrey Crowley 2009–11

Valerie E. Green 2014–15

Grant N. Colfax 2011–13

Rodin A. Mehrbani 2016–17

Douglas M. Brooks 2013–17 White House
White House
Staff Secretary Lisa Brown 2009–11

Director, Office of Urban Affairs Adolfo Carrión Jr. 2009–10

Rajesh De 2011–12

Racquel S. Russell 2010–14

Douglas Kramer 2012–13

Roy Austin Jr. 2014–17

Joani Walsh 2014–17

Director, Office of Energy and Climate Change Policy Carol Browner 2009–11 Director, Management and Administration Bradley J. Kiley 2009–11

White House
White House
Counsel Greg Craig 2009–10

Katy A. Kale 2011–15

Bob Bauer 2010–11

Maju S. Varghese 2016–17

Kathryn Ruemmler 2011–14 Director, Scheduling and Advance Alyssa Mastromonaco 2009–11

Neil Eggleston 2014–17

Danielle Crutchfield 2011–14

White House
White House
Cabinet Secretary Chris Lu 2009–13

Chase Cushman 2014–17

Danielle C. Gray 2013–14 Director, White House
White House
Information Technology David Recordon 2015–17

Broderick D. Johnson 2014–17 Director, Office of Administration Cameron Moody 2009–11

Personal Aide to the President Reggie Love 2009–11

Beth Jones 2011–15

Brian Mosteller 2011–12

Cathy Solomon 2015–17

Marvin D. Nicholson 2012–17 Director, Office of Science and Technology Policy John Holdren 2009–17

Director, Oval Office
Oval Office
Operations Brian Mosteller 2012–17 Chief Technology Officer Aneesh Chopra 2009–12

Personal Secretary to the President Katie Johnson 2009–11

Todd Park 2012–14

Anita Decker Breckenridge 2011–14

Megan Smith 2014–17

Ferial Govashiri 2014–17 Director, Office of Management and Budget Peter R. Orszag 2009–10

Chief of Staff to the First Lady Jackie Norris 2009

Jack Lew 2010–12

Susan Sher 2009–11

Jeffrey Zients 2012–13

Christina Tchen 2011–17

Sylvia Mathews Burwell 2013–14

White House
White House
Social Secretary Desirée Rogers 2009–10

Brian Deese 2014

Julianna Smoot 2010–11

Shaun Donovan 2014–17

Jeremy Bernard 2011–15 Chief Information Officer Vivek Kundra 2009–11

Deesha Dyer 2015–17

Steven VanRoekel 2011–14

Chief of Staff to the Vice President Ron Klain 2009–11

Tony Scott 2015–17

Bruce Reed 2011–13 United States Trade Representative Ron Kirk 2009–13

Steve Ricchetti 2013–17

Michael Froman 2013–17

White House
White House
Chief Usher Stephen W. Rochon† 2009–11 Director, Office of National Drug Control Policy Gil Kerlikowske 2009–14

Angella Reid 2011–17

Michael Botticelli 2014–17

Director, White House
White House
Military Office George Mulligan 2009–13 Chair, Council on Environmental Quality Nancy Sutley 2009–14

Emmett Beliveau 2013–15

Michael Boots 2014–15

Dabney Kern 2016–17

Christy Goldfuss 2015–17

†Remained from previous administration.

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Office of the Vice President

Position Appointee

Chief of Staff to the Vice President Steve Ricchetti

Counsel to the Vice President Cynthia Hogan

Counselor to the Vice President Mike Donilon

Assistant to the Vice President for Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Liaison Evan Ryan

Assistant to the Vice President and Director of Communications Shailagh Murray

Deputy Chief of Staff to the Vice President Shailagh Murray

Deputy National Security Adviser to the Vice President Brian McKeon

Residence Manager and Social Secretary for the Vice President and Second Lady Carlos Elizondo

National Security Adviser to the Vice President Colin Kahl

Position Appointee

Chief of Staff to the Second Lady Catherine M. Russell

Director of Administration for the Office of the Vice President Moises Vela

Domestic Policy Adviser to the Vice President Terrell McSweeny

Chief Economist and Economic Policy Adviser to the Vice President Jared Bernstein

Press Secretary to the Vice President Elizabeth Alexander

Deputy Press Secretary to the Vice President Annie Tomasini

Director of Legislative Affairs Sudafi Henry

Director of Communications for the Second Lady Courtney O’Donnell

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United States Secretaries of the Treasury

18th century

Hamilton Wolcott Dexter

19th century

Gallatin Campbell Dallas Crawford Rush Ingham McLane Duane Taney Woodbury Ewing Forward Spencer Bibb Walker Meredith Corwin Guthrie Cobb Thomas Dix Chase Fessenden McCulloch Boutwell Richardson Bristow Morrill Sherman Windom Folger Gresham McCulloch Manning Fairchild Windom Foster Carlisle Gage

20th century

Shaw Cortelyou MacVeagh McAdoo Glass Houston Mellon Mills Woodin Morgenthau Vinson Snyder Humphrey Anderson Dillon Fowler Barr Kennedy Connally Shultz Simon Blumenthal Miller Regan Baker Brady Bentsen Rubin Summers

21st century

O'Neill Snow Paulson Geithner Lew Mnuchin

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Cabinet of President Barack Obama
Barack Obama
(2009–2017)

Cabinet

Secretary of State

Hillary Clinton
Hillary Clinton
(2009–2013) John Kerry
John Kerry
(2013–2017)

Secretary of the Treasury

Timothy Geithner
Timothy Geithner
(2009–2013) Jack Lew
Jack Lew
(2013–2017)

Secretary of Defense

Robert Gates
Robert Gates
(2009–2011) Leon Panetta
Leon Panetta
(2011–2013) Chuck Hagel
Chuck Hagel
(2013–2015) Ash Carter
Ash Carter
(2015–2017)

Attorney General

Eric Holder
Eric Holder
(2009–2015) Loretta Lynch
Loretta Lynch
(2015–2017)

Secretary of the Interior

Ken Salazar
Ken Salazar
(2009–2013) Sally Jewell
Sally Jewell
(2013–2017)

Secretary of Agriculture

Tom Vilsack
Tom Vilsack
(2009–2017)

Secretary of Commerce

Gary Locke
Gary Locke
(2009–2011) John Bryson
John Bryson
(2011–2012) Penny Pritzker
Penny Pritzker
(2013–2017)

Secretary of Labor

Hilda Solis
Hilda Solis
(2009–2013) Thomas Perez (2013–2017)

Secretary of Health and Human Services

Kathleen Sebelius
Kathleen Sebelius
(2009–2014) Sylvia Mathews Burwell
Sylvia Mathews Burwell
(2014–2017)

Secretary of Housing and Urban Development

Shaun Donovan
Shaun Donovan
(2009–2014) Julian Castro
Julian Castro
(2014–2017)

Secretary of Transportation

Ray LaHood
Ray LaHood
(2009–2013) Anthony Foxx
Anthony Foxx
(2013–2017)

Secretary of Energy

Steven Chu
Steven Chu
(2009–2013) Ernest Moniz
Ernest Moniz
(2013–2017)

Secretary of Education

Arne Duncan
Arne Duncan
(2009–2016) John King (2016–2017)

Secretary of Veterans Affairs

Eric Shinseki
Eric Shinseki
(2009–2014) Robert McDonald (2014–2017)

Secretary of Homeland Security

Janet Napolitano
Janet Napolitano
(2009–2013) Jeh Johnson
Jeh Johnson
(2013–2017)

Cabinet-level

Vice President

Joe Biden
Joe Biden
(2009–2017)

White House
White House
Chief of Staff

Rahm Emanuel
Rahm Emanuel
(2009–2010) William Daley (2011–2012) Jack Lew
Jack Lew
(2012–2013) Denis McDonough
Denis McDonough
(2013–2017)

Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency

Lisa Jackson (2009–2013) Gina McCarthy
Gina McCarthy
(2013–2017)

Director of the Office of Management and Budget

Peter Orszag
Peter Orszag
(2009–2010) Jack Lew
Jack Lew
(2010–2012) Sylvia Mathews Burwell
Sylvia Mathews Burwell
(2013–2014) Shaun Donovan
Shaun Donovan
(2014–2017)

Trade Representative

Ron Kirk
Ron Kirk
(2009–2013) Michael Froman
Michael Froman
(2013–2017)

Ambassador to the United Nations

Susan Rice
Susan Rice
(2009–2013) Samantha Power
Samantha Power
(2013–2017)

Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers

Christina Romer
Christina Romer
(2009–2010) Austan Goolsbee
Austan Goolsbee
(2010–2011) Alan Krueger
Alan Krueger
(2011–2013) Jason Furman
Jason Furman
(2013–2017)

Administrator of the Small Business Administration

Karen Mills
Karen Mills
(2012–2013)** Maria Contreras-Sweet
Maria Contreras-Sweet
(2014–2017)

* Acting ** took office in 2009, raised to cabinet-rank in 2012 See also: Confirmations of Barack Obama's Cabinet

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Cabinet of President Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
(1993–2001)

Cabinet

Secretary of State

Warren M. Christopher (1993–97) Madeleine Albright
Madeleine Albright
(1997–2001)

Secretary of the Treasury

Lloyd Bentsen
Lloyd Bentsen
(1993–94) Robert Rubin
Robert Rubin
(1995–99) Larry Summers (1999–2001)

Secretary of Defense

Les Aspin
Les Aspin
(1993–94) William J. Perry (1994–97) William S. Cohen (1997–2001)

Attorney General

Janet Reno
Janet Reno
(1993–2001)

Secretary of the Interior

Bruce Babbitt
Bruce Babbitt
(1993–2001)

Secretary of Agriculture

Mike Espy
Mike Espy
(1993–94) Dan Glickman
Dan Glickman
(1995–2001)

Secretary of Commerce

Ron Brown (1993–96) Mickey Kantor
Mickey Kantor
(1996–97) William M. Daley
William M. Daley
(1997–2000) Norman Mineta
Norman Mineta
(2000–01)

Secretary of Labor

Robert Reich
Robert Reich
(1993–97) Alexis M. Herman (1997–2001)

Secretary of Health and Human Services

Donna Shalala
Donna Shalala
(1993–2001)

Secretary of Housing and Urban Development

Henry G. Cisneros (1993–97) Andrew M. Cuomo (1997–2001)

Secretary of Transportation

Federico Peña
Federico Peña
(1993–97) Rodney Slater (1997–2001)

Secretary of Energy

Hazel O'Leary (1993–97) Federico Peña
Federico Peña
(1997–98) Bill Richardson
Bill Richardson
(1998–2001)

Secretary of Education

Richard W. Riley (1993–2001)

Secretary of Veterans Affairs

Jesse Brown
Jesse Brown
(1993–97) Togo West (1998–2000)

* Acting secretary

Cabinet-level

Vice President

Al Gore
Al Gore
(1993–2001)

White House
White House
Chief of Staff

Mack McLarty
Mack McLarty
(1993–94) Leon Panetta
Leon Panetta
(1994–97) Erskine Bowles
Erskine Bowles
(1997–98) John Podesta
John Podesta
(1998–2001)

Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency

Carol M. Browner (1993–2001)

Ambassador to the United Nations

Madeleine Albright
Madeleine Albright
(1993–97) Bill Richardson
Bill Richardson
(1997–98) Richard C. Holbrooke (1999–2001)

Director of the Office of Management and Budget

Leon Panetta
Leon Panetta
(1993–94) Alice Rivlin
Alice Rivlin
(1994–96) Franklin D. Raines (1996–98) Jack Lew
Jack Lew
(1998–2001)

Director of National Drug Control Policy

Lee P. Brown
Lee P. Brown
(1993–95) Barry McCaffrey
Barry McCaffrey
(1996–2001)

Trade Representative

Mickey Kantor
Mickey Kantor
(1993–97) Charlene Barshefsky
Charlene Barshefsky
(1997–2001)

Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency

James L. Witt (1993–2001)*

Director of Central Intelligence

R. James Woolsey Jr.
R. James Woolsey Jr.
(1993–95) John M. Deutch
John M. Deutch
(1995–96) George Tenet
George Tenet
(1997–2001)

Chairperson of the Council of Economic Advisers

Laura Tyson
Laura Tyson
(1993–95) Joseph Stiglitz
Joseph Stiglitz
(1995–97) Janet Yellen
Janet Yellen
(1997–99) Martin Neil Baily
Martin Neil Baily
(1999–2001)

Administrator of the Small Business Administration

Philip Lader
Philip Lader
(1994–97) Aída M. Álverez (1997–2001)

* took office in 1993, raised to cabinet-rank in 1996

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Directors of the United States Office of Management and Budget

Dawes Lord Roop Douglas D. W. Bell Smith Webb Pace Lawton Dodge Hughes Brundage Stans D. E. Bell Gordon Schultze Zwick Mayo Shultz Weinberger Ash Lynn Lance McIntyre Stockman Miller Wright Darman Panetta Rivlin Raines Lew Daniels Bolten Portman Nussle Orszag Lew Burwell Donovan Mulvaney

v t e

White House
White House
Chiefs of Staff

Steelman Adams Persons Watson Jones Haldeman Haig Rumsfeld Cheney Jordan Watson J. Baker Regan H. Baker Duberstein Sununu Skinner J. Baker McLarty Panetta Bowles Podesta Card Bolten Emanuel Daley Lew McDonough Priebus Kelly

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 21768103 LCCN: no98116

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