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John Francis "Jack" Buck (August 21, 1924 – June 18, 2002) was an American sportscaster, best known for his work announcing Major League Baseball games of the St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals. His play-by-play work earned him recognition from numerous Halls of Fame, such as the National Baseball Hall of Fame, the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and the National Radio Hall of Fame. He has also been inducted as a member of the St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
Hall of Fame Museum.

Contents

1 Early years and military service 2 Military service 3 College 4 Broadcasting career

4.1 St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals 4.2 Football 4.3 Other sports 4.4 ABC and CBS baseball

5 Final years

5.1 For America

6 Death 7 Awards and recognition 8 See also 9 References 10 External links

Early years and military service[edit]

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Buck was born in Holyoke, Massachusetts, the third of seven children of Earle and Kathleen Buck.[1] His father was a railroad accountant who commuted weekly to New Jersey. From an early age, Buck dreamed of becoming a sports announcer with his early exposure to sports broadcasting coming from listening to Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
baseball games announced by Fred Hoey.[2]

Part of his childhood coincided with the Great Depression, and Buck remembered his family sometimes using a metal slug to keep a coin-operated gas meter going during the winter to provide heat for their home.[3] In 1939, his family moved to Cleveland, Ohio
Cleveland, Ohio
to join their father, who had a job with the Erie Railroad.[4] Soon after though, Buck's father died at the age of 49 due to uremic poisoning related to high blood pressure.[4] Buck planned to quit high school in 1941 to take a full-time job in an effort to support his family. Dissuaded by one of his teachers, Buck decided to finish high school, graduating from Lakewood High School in the winter of 1942.[5] After graduation, he followed one of his friends and began working on an iron ore freight boat operated on the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
by the Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company.[6] Buck served on a 700 foot (8,400 in) steamer named "The Sheadle", where he began as porter and was later promoted to night cook and baker.[7] After performing various other shipping related jobs, Buck attempted to become a "deck watch". A physical examination related to the deck watch application process revealed Buck was color blind, unable to differentiate between the colors green and brown.[8] Ineligible for the promotion to deck watch, Buck subsequently became eligible for the military draft, and was drafted into the United States Army in June 1943.[7] After completion of his military service in 1946, Buck enrolled at (and graduated from) Ohio State University. His early sportscasting career included work for the minor league affiliates of the St. Louis Cardinals. In 1954, he was promoted to radio play-by-play of Cardinal games on KMOX, a position that he maintained for nearly all of the next 47 years. He was known in St. Louis
St. Louis
for his trademark phrase "That's a winner!", which was said after every game that the Cardinals had won. In addition to his work with the Cardinals, Buck also earned assignments on many national sportscasts, including radio coverage of 18 Super Bowls and 11 World Series. Some of his famous play-by-play calls include the dramatic walk-off home runs hit by Ozzie Smith
Ozzie Smith
in Game 5 of the 1985 National League Championship Series, by Kirk Gibson in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series, and by Kirby Puckett
Kirby Puckett
in Game 6 of the 1991 World Series. The later part of his career found him working side-by-side in the Cardinals booth with his son Joe Buck, who also has risen to national sportscasting prominence. Military service[edit] After graduating from high school, he worked on large shipping boats that traveled the Great Lakes. Buck was drafted into the United States Army in June 1943. The physicality of Buck's work on the Great Lakes left in him good physical condition at the time he entered the Army.[9] Buck, who was 19 years old, stood 5' 11" tall, and weighed 165 pounds at the time.[9] His first assignment was anti-aircraft training, and was sent to Fort Eustis, Virginia to undergo his 13-week basic training regimen.[9] After completing his basic training in 1943, Buck was designated as an instructor, and assigned the rank of corporal.[9] In addition to his instructor duties, Buck participated in boxing as a form of recreation.[10] In February 1945 Buck shipped out to the European theater of the war, where he was assigned to K Company, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division.[11] During the night of March 7, 1945, Buck and his compatriots crossed the Ludendorff Bridge
Ludendorff Bridge
at the town of Remagen, Germany.[12] United States forces' successful capture of this bridge led to the Battle of Remagen, a battle lasting from March 7–25. On the morning of March 15, 1945, Buck was the squad leader of a patrol that came under German fire in the Remagen zone. Wounded in his left forearm and leg by shrapnel, Buck received medical treatment on the battlefield from the only medic K company had at that time, Frank Borghi.[13] He was later awarded a Purple Heart
Purple Heart
as part of his service. Buck received further medical treatment at the 177th General Army Hospital in Le Mans, France
Le Mans, France
where he was awarded the Purple Heart. Buck recovered, and rejoined his outfit sometime after German forces had surrendered.[14] Declining to re-enlist, and turning down requests to enroll in the Officiers Training School, Buck joined his compatriots in guard duty of German prisoners of war.[15] Buck received orders to ship home in April 1946, effectively ending his military service.[16] College[edit]

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After returning to the United States, Buck proceeded to work in various industrial-related jobs.[17] When his friend Bill Theil told Buck he needed a roommate to attend Ohio State University
Ohio State University
with, Buck decided on the spot to join Theil and enroll at Ohio State. The suddenness of Buck's decision meant he had no corresponding paperwork that could be used to formally enroll at the University, so Buck attended classes of his own choosing until he was able to formally enroll.[18] Buck majored in radio speech and minored in Spanish. He worked several jobs while attending college, including one position at an all-night gas station. Buck crafted his play-by-play skills broadcasting Ohio State basketball games. After college, he called games for the Columbus Red Birds, a Triple-A (American Association) affiliate of the St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals, in 1950–51. He spent the 1953 season as voice of another AAA Cardinals affiliate, the International League
International League
Rochester Red Wings
Rochester Red Wings
on WHEC (AM). His work there earned him an invitation to join the big-league Cardinals' broadcast team in St. Louis
St. Louis
the following season. Broadcasting career[edit]

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St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals[edit]

Jack Buck
Jack Buck
was honored alongside the retired numbers of the St. Louis Cardinals in 2002.

Buck started broadcasting Cardinals games for KMOX
KMOX
radio in 1954, teaming with Harry Caray, Milo Hamilton
Milo Hamilton
(1954), and Joe Garagiola (from 1955). Buck was dropped from the Cardinals booth in 1959 to make room for Buddy Blattner; the following year, he called Saturday Game of the Week telecasts for ABC. Buck was re-hired by the Cardinals in 1961 after Blattner departed; Garagiola left the following year, leaving Caray and Buck as the team's broadcast voices through 1969.

Buck and Shannon announcing a Cardinals game at Busch, 1992

After Caray was fired by the Cardinals following the 1969 season, Buck ascended to the team's lead play-by-play role. (1969 was also the year that Jack Buck
Jack Buck
divorced his first wife Alyce Larson – whom he had married in 1948 and had six children with – and married his second wife, Carole Lintzenich, who gave birth to their son Joe Buck
Joe Buck
in the same year).

"Smith corks one into right, down the line! It may go!! ... Go crazy, folks! Go crazy! It's a home run, and the Cardinals have won the game, by the score of 3 to 2, on a home run by the Wizard! Go crazy!"

—Jack Buck[19]

Buck teamed with ex-Yankees and Pirates announcer Jim Woods in 1970–71. In 1972, retired Cardinals third baseman Mike Shannon joined Buck in the broadcast booth, beginning a 28-year partnership. On Cardinals broadcasts, Buck routinely punctuated St. Louis
St. Louis
victories with the expression, "That's a winner!" In addition to Joe, Buck has three daughters by his first marriage who worked in broadcasting – Julie Buck on KYKY 98.1 in St. Louis
St. Louis
(she now works at KLOU-FM 103.3, also in St. Louis), Bonnie Buck, who currently works in television in Los Angeles, and Christine Buck, who started her career at KPLR-TV
KPLR-TV
in St. Louis. In addition, Buck's late younger brother, Bob Buck was a sportscaster and sports director at KMOX/KMOV-TV in St. Louis. Buck was well respected in the St. Louis
St. Louis
community, where he lived and regularly volunteered time to host charity events. In addition to his sportscasting work, Buck served as the original host of the KMOX interview/call-in program At Your Service beginning in 1960. His guests on the program included Eleanor Roosevelt.[20] Buck can be heard calling a (fictional) 1964 Cardinals broadcast in the 1988 film Mississippi Burning,[21] and makes a cameo appearance in a 1998 episode of the television series Arliss. He also lent his voice to the 1995 edition of the RBI Baseball
RBI Baseball
video game. Football[edit] Jack Buck
Jack Buck
was also a renowned football broadcaster. In 1964, he began calling National Football League
National Football League
games for CBS television, following a four-year stint doing telecasts of the rival American Football League for ABC, which included the 1962 AFL Championship game between the Houston Oilers and the Dallas Texans, to that point, the longest game ever played. Buck called Chicago Bears
Chicago Bears
games in his first two CBS seasons, then switched to Dallas Cowboys
Dallas Cowboys
games, including the famous "Ice Bowl" championship game in 1967. After the network moved away from dedicated team announcers, Buck continued to call regional NFL action through 1974, as well as several NFC Championship Games and Super Bowl
Super Bowl
IV. He also called the 1965 Cotton Bowl Classic for CBS television and several later Cotton Bowl games for CBS Radio. In 1975, Buck temporarily left his Cardinals baseball duties in order to host the NBC pregame show, GrandStand, alongside Bryant Gumbel. In the 1976 and 1977 seasons, he called regional NFL play-by-play for NBC. On August 16, 1976, Buck called the first-ever NFL game played outside of the United States, a preseason exhibition between the St. Louis Cardinals and San Diego Chargers held at Korakuen Stadium
Korakuen Stadium
in Tokyo, Japan. (Buck also worked NBC's backup Game of the Week during the 1976 baseball season before returning to the Cardinals full-time in 1977.) Buck served as the CBS Radio voice of Monday Night Football
Monday Night Football
(teaming with Hank Stram) for nearly two decades (1978–1984 and again from 1987–1995 after CBS regained the radio rights from NBC). Ironically, in 1970 ABC's Roone Arledge had asked via telephone about Buck's interests in becoming the first television play-by-play announcer for Monday Night Football, but because of personal animosity surrounding his previous stint with the network, Buck would not return their phone call. (The television play-by-play role would go to Keith Jackson instead, and later to Buck's CBS colleague, Frank Gifford.) In addition to MNF, Buck called numerous playoff games for CBS Radio, including 17 Super Bowls (the most of any announcer). Buck also served as a local radio broadcaster for the football Cardinals in 1980 and 1981, and returned to calling Sunday NFL games for CBS television from 1982 to 1987. Late in the 1990 NFL season, Buck's onetime CBS broadcasting partner, Pat Summerall, was hospitalized with a bleeding ulcer after vomiting on a plane during a flight after a game, and was out for a considerable amount of time. While Verne Lundquist
Verne Lundquist
replaced Summerall on games with lead analyst John Madden, Buck (who was at the time the network's lead Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
announcer) filled in for Lundquist, teaming with Dan Fouts
Dan Fouts
to call two games (both of which coincidentally featured the Cardinals, who had moved from St. Louis
St. Louis
to Arizona by that time). See also: List of NFL on CBS
NFL on CBS
commentator pairings Other sports[edit] While much better known for his baseball and football commentary, Jack Buck was also the original voice of the St. Louis Blues
St. Louis Blues
of the National Hockey League. Buck was paired with Jay Randolph and Gus Kyle on Blues broadcasts and covered the 1968 Stanley Cup Final for KMOX radio. He was succeeded after one season by broadcaster Dan Kelly. Buck also broadcast for the St. Louis Hawks
St. Louis Hawks
and Rochester Royals
Rochester Royals
of the National Basketball Association, and called professional wrestling, boxing, and bowling at various times in his career. ABC and CBS baseball[edit]

Jack Buck
Jack Buck
(left) with Ralph Kiner
Ralph Kiner
at the 1987 Hall of Fame induction ceremony.

As previously mentioned, in 1960, Buck along with Carl Erskine broadcast a series of late-afternoon Saturday games on ABC.[22][23] were the lead announcing crew for this series, which lasted one season.[24] Despite temporarily losing the Game of the Week package in 1961, ABC still televised several games in prime time (with Buck returning to call the action). This occurred as Roger Maris[25][26] was poised to tie and subsequently break Babe Ruth's regular season home run record of 60. From 1983–1989, Buck teamed with the likes of Sparky Anderson, Bill White, and Johnny Bench
Johnny Bench
for World Series
World Series
radio broadcasts on CBS. Buck, along with CBS Radio colleagues Johnny Bench
Johnny Bench
and John Rooney, was on hand at San Francisco's Candlestick Park
Candlestick Park
on October 17, 1989, when the Loma Prieta earthquake hit. After the 6.9 magnitude quake rocked the Bay Area, Buck told the listening audience:

“ I must say about Johnny Bench, folks, if he moved that fast when he played, he would have never hit into a double play. I never saw anybody move that fast in my life. ”

He is most famous for his coast-to-coast radio call of Kirk Gibson's game-winning home run in the bottom of the 9th inning of Game 1 of the 1988 World Series
World Series
and his disbelief at Gibson knocking it out while hobbled by injuries to his right hamstring and left knee. His call of the play is so famous that it's sometimes played over the television footage of the play. The television call was handled by long-time Dodgers announcer Vin Scully
Vin Scully
on NBC. This was Buck's call. It begins here with Buck speculating on what might happen if Gibson manages to reach base:

... then you would run for Gibson and have Sax batting. But, we have a big 3–2 pitch coming here from Eckersley. Gibson swings, and a fly ball to deep right field! This is gonna be a home run! Unbelievable! A home run for Gibson! And the Dodgers have won the game, five to four; I don't believe what I just saw!

The last sentence is often remembered and quoted by fans. Buck followed it with,

I don't believe what I just saw! Is this really happening, Bill?

Buck concluded his comments on Gibson's amazing feat with this thought:

One of the most remarkable finishes to any World Series
World Series
Game...a one-handed home run by Kirk Gibson! And the Dodgers have won it...five to four; and I'm stunned, Bill. I have seen a lot of dramatic finishes in a lot of sports, but this one might top almost every other one.

Buck was not intended to be the main play-by-play announcer for CBS baseball telecasts when the network acquired the sport from NBC and ABC. Originally assigned to the network's #2 crew (and therefore, work with Jim Kaat), he was promoted at practically the last minute after Brent Musburger[27] was fired on April Fools Day
April Fools Day
of 1990. After two years of calling baseball telecasts (including the Saturday afternoon Game of the Week, All-Star Game, National League Championship Series, and World Series), Buck was dismissed by CBS. The official reasoning behind Buck's ouster was that he simply had poor chemistry with lead analyst Tim McCarver.[28][29][30] Buck was soon replaced by Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
announcer Sean McDonough. Buck later noted that "CBS never got that baseball play-by-play draws word-pictures. All they knew was that football stars analysts. So they said, 'Let McCarver run the show ... In television, all they want you to do is shut up. I'm not very good at shutting up." Buck was criticized by some for his alleged habit of predicting plays on air.[31] Buck made controversial statements about singer Bobby Vinton
Bobby Vinton
prior to Game 4 of the 1990 National League Championship Series. After Vinton muffed the lyrics of "The Star-Spangled Banner" in his home town of Pittsburgh, Buck lightly referenced Vinton's Polish heritage.[32] Buck soon got death threats from Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
Pirate fans, who even went as far as leaving a footprint on Buck's hotel pillow. The next day, CBS Sports
CBS Sports
executive producer Ted Shaker spotted Buck in the hotel lobby and told Buck that he was in trouble. The final baseball play that Jack Buck
Jack Buck
narrated for CBS television was Gene Larkin's game winning bloop single in Game 7 of the 1991 World Series.

“ The Twins are going to win the World Series! The Twins have won it! It's a base hit! It's a 1–0 10th inning victory! ”

Final years[edit]

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Over the course of the 1990s, Buck decided to reduce his schedule to calling only Cardinals home games (or 81 games a year unless there was a special occurrence). Health concerns obviously could have played a factor in this, as Buck suffered from such ailments as Parkinson's disease, diabetes, requiring a pacemaker, cataracts, sciatica, and vertigo.[citation needed] Buck once joked, "I wish I'd get Alzheimer's, then I could forget I've got all the other stuff." In 1998, the Cardinals dedicated a bust of Buck that showed him smiling with a hand cupping his left ear. In 1999, he lent his name to a restaurant venture called J. Buck's, with the restaurant's name being shared with son Joe and daughter Julie.[33] In the final years of his life, Buck became recognized for writing poetry, culminating in national attention for his poem "For America", written after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. One of Buck's final public appearances was on September 17, 2001 at Busch Memorial Stadium in St. Louis. It was the first night that Major League Baseball resumed after the terrorist attacks of September 11. Sick with lung cancer and showing the signs of Parkinson's disease
Parkinson's disease
as well, Buck looked frail and struggled to maintain his composure.[34] He read a patriotic-themed poem during the pregame ceremonies. He concluded by silencing critics who thought baseball had come back too soon: "I don't know about you, but as for me, the question has already been answered: Should we be here? Yes!"[citation needed] For America[edit]

Video Replay on the scoreboard at Busch Stadium
Busch Stadium
shown on the 5th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks of Buck reading his For America poem at Busch Memorial Stadium
Busch Memorial Stadium
before the first Cardinals game after the 9/11 attacks.

Buck wrote a poem named For America that he read at the first Cardinals game after the 9/11 attacks to describe his opinion and the general opinion, regarding defeating terrorism, of Americans after September 11. Death[edit]

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Jack Buck
Jack Buck
died on June 18, 2002, in St. Louis's Barnes-Jewish Hospital from a combination of illnesses. He had stayed in the hospital since January 3 of that year to undergo treatment for lung cancer, Parkinson's disease, and to correct an intestinal blockage. Within two hours of his death, fans were leaving flowers at the base of his bust outside Busch Stadium
Busch Stadium
even though it was the middle of the night. The flags at St. Louis
St. Louis
City Hall and the St. Louis
St. Louis
County Government Center were lowered to half-staff, the local television news anchors all wore black suits for the next several days, and a public visitation was held in the stadium before the next baseball game after his death, with free admission to the game for all the mourners who filed past his coffin. Buck was interred at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery
Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery
in south St. Louis County. His spot on the KMOX
KMOX
Cardinals broadcasts was subsequently filled by former Colorado Rockies
Colorado Rockies
announcer Wayne Hagin. Hagin, who went on to the New York Mets
New York Mets
after his stint in St. Louis, moved over to television, and his spot was filled by one of Buck's protégés, former Chicago White Sox
Chicago White Sox
announcer John Rooney. Buck's youngest son, Joe, read the eulogy at his father's church funeral. Jack Buck
Jack Buck
was married twice and had eight children in all; five daughters and three sons. Joe Buck
Joe Buck
is currently the lead play-by-play announcer for both Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
and the NFL on the Fox network. Joe Buck
Joe Buck
has also done occasional local telecasts for the Cardinals as well as commercials for a local automobile dealership. Jack and Joe Buck
Joe Buck
are also the only father and son to call play-by-play of Super Bowl
Super Bowl
telecasts. During postseason telecasts, Joe has often paid homage to his father by signing off with "We'll see you tomorrow night!" When the Cardinals won the 2006 World Series, Joe quoted his father again saying, "For the first time since 1982, St. Louis
St. Louis
has a World Series
World Series
winner!", referencing Jack's line when the Cards won in 1982, "And that's a winner! That's a winner! A World Series
World Series
winner for the Cardinals!". During the 2011 Series, Joe punctuated David Freese's 11th inning walk-off homer for the Cardinals in Game 6 with "We will see you...tomorrow night!", near similar to the 1991 Puckett home run description, a call he said he did to celebrate Jack, but would never repeat the same situation.[35] When the Cardinals won Game 7, he did not quote his father.[36][35] Awards and recognition[edit] Buck received the Ford C. Frick Award
Ford C. Frick Award
for broadcasting from the National Baseball Hall of Fame
National Baseball Hall of Fame
in 1987, and the Pete Rozelle Radio-Television Award from the Pro Football Hall of Fame
Pro Football Hall of Fame
in 1996. The Missouri Sports Hall of Fame inducted Buck twice, as a media personality (1980) and Missouri sports legend (2000). The National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association named Buck as Missouri Sportscaster
Sportscaster
of the Year 22 times, and inducted him into its Hall of Fame in 1990. Buck was also inducted into the American Sportscasters Association Hall of Fame in 1990, the Missouri Athletic Club
Missouri Athletic Club
Hall of Fame in 1993, the National Radio Hall of Fame in 1995, and the NAB Broadcasting Hall of Fame in 2005. The American Sportscasters Association ranked Buck 11th in its listing of the Top 50 Sportscasters of All Time in 2009.[37] Buck is honored with a star on the St. Louis
St. Louis
Walk of Fame,.[38] A bronze statue of him was erected at the entrance to Busch Memorial Stadium in 1998 (and moved to a new location outside the current Busch Stadium in 2007). A section of I-64/US-40 in St. Louis
St. Louis
is named the Jack Buck
Jack Buck
Memorial Highway in his honor. In January, 2014, the Cardinals announced Buck among 22 former players and personnel to be inducted into the St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
Hall of Fame Museum for the inaugural class of 2014.[39] The Jack Buck
Jack Buck
Award, presented by the Missouri Athletic Club
Missouri Athletic Club
"in recognition of the enthusiastic and dedicated support of sports in St. Louis", is named in his honor. See also[edit]

United States Army
United States Army
portal

St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
Hall of Fame Museum List of St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
broadcasters

References[edit]

Footnotes

^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: 5–8 ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pp. 1, 5. ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pp. 8-9 ^ a b Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: 15 ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: 19–20 ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pp. 21-24 ^ a b Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pg. 24 ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pg. 30 ^ a b c d Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pg. 33 ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pg. 38 ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pg. 40 ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pg. 41 ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pp. 42–43. ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pp. 44–47 ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pg. 47 ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pg. 51 ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pp. 51-54. ^ Buck, Rains, and Broeg 1997: pg. 54–55. ^ Garner 2000: pg. 98 ^ "LISTEN: Jack Buck
Jack Buck
Introduces First "At Your Service" Program On KMOX". CBS St. Louis. June 13, 2012.  ^ Thomas, Robert McG., Jr (March 27, 1989). "Sports World Specials; The Ring of Truth". The New York Times.  ^ "ABC Signs Erskine as TV Color Man". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. April 12, 1960. p. C7.  ^ "Can't Hide No-Hitter From Fans—Erskine". The Miami News. Associated Press. June 5, 1960. p. 2C.  ^ "No Major Changes Loom in TV Sports During 1961". Hartford Courant. Associated Press. January 1, 1961.  ^ Adams, Val (September 19, 1961). "NETWORKS PLAN WIDE U.N. REPORT". New York Times. p. 71.  ^ "ABC-TV to Film Tilt 154". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Associated Press. September 19, 1961.  ^ Rusnak, Jeff (April 6, 1990). "Buck In Brent At Cbs". Sun Sentinel.  ^ Buck never could come to terms with emphasis on analysts in televised sports. He always believed that a good play-by-play broadcast is what the people wanted., freeinfosociety.com; accessed April 3, 2018. ^ I did get a nice note from Neal Pilson ( CBS Sports
CBS Sports
head). And we did have a helluva World Series
World Series
last year, didn't we?" One stated reason for the McDonough- for-Buck move was Buck and Tim McCarver
Tim McCarver
didn't mix well on-air, that Buck's radio style didn't allow McCarver enough room. ..., pqarchiver.com/bostonheral, October 22, 1992. ^ The network that three years ago didn't even have a sports department is televising its first World Series. ... When McCarver was paired with Jack during CBS's World Series
World Series
broadcasts in 1990-91, they weren't great together, primarily because Jack had been trained in radio. ..., newsbank.com, October 18, 1996. ^ Buck took a lot of criticism from national audiences, as well. Numerous critics pointed out his tendency of predicting plays on the air. This sometimes led to him making the wrong call, and confusing the listeners, freeinfosociety.com; accessed April 3, 2018. ^ Polish group takes broadcaster Buck to task ^ " J. Buck's opens downtown St. Louis
St. Louis
restaurant". St. Louis
St. Louis
Business Journal. June 19, 2007. Retrieved 2013-01-06.  ^ Top 10 Motivational Sports Speeches of All Time, nesn.com, February 2010. ^ a b Caesar, Dan (28 October 2011). " Joe Buck
Joe Buck
honors father in Series call". St. Louis
St. Louis
Post-Dispatch. Retrieved 29 October 2011.  ^ "Cardinals win 2011 World Series". MLB.com. October 28, 2011. Retrieved October 29, 2011.  ^ http://www.americansportscastersonline.com/top50sportscasters.html ^ St. Louis
St. Louis
Walk of Fame. " St. Louis Walk of Fame
St. Louis Walk of Fame
Inductees". stlouiswalkoffame.org. Retrieved 25 April 2013.  ^ Cardinals Press Release (January 18, 2014). "Cardinals establish Hall of Fame & detail induction process". www.stlouis.cardinals.mlb.com. Archived from the original on January 26, 2014. Retrieved January 29, 2014. 

Bibliography

Buck, Jack; Rob Rains; Bob Broeg
Bob Broeg
(1997). That's A Winner!. Champaign: Sagamore Publishing. ISBN 1-57167-111-0. OCLC 36641485.  Garner, Joe (2000). And The Fans Roared. Naperville: Sourcebooks. ISBN 1-57071-582-3. OCLC 44509368. 

External links[edit]

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Baseball Hall of Fame
Baseball Hall of Fame
– Frick Award recipient MLB.com
MLB.com
memorial page Jack Buck
Jack Buck
(1924–2002) "Jack Buck". Find a Grave. Retrieved 2008-07-26.  Jack Buck
Jack Buck
Wall of Fame

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Preceded by Al Michaels World Series
World Series
network television play-by-play announcer 1990–1991 Succeeded by Sean McDonough

Preceded by Vin Scully World Series
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national radio play-by-play announcer 1983–1989 Succeeded by Vin Scully

Preceded by Lindsey Nelson Don Criqui Monday Night Football
Monday Night Football
national radio play-by-play announcer 1978–1984 1987–1995 Succeeded by Don Criqui Howard David

Preceded by none NFL on CBS
NFL on CBS
lead play-by-play announcer 1968 Succeeded by Ray Scott

Preceded by Ray Scott Super Bowl
Super Bowl
television play-by-play announcer (NFC package carrier) 1969 Succeeded by Ray Scott

Preceded by none Studio host, NFL on NBC 1975 (with Bryant Gumbel) Succeeded by Lee Leonard

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Lore

Roger Maris' 61 home run season (1961) "The Bird" (1976) "The Double" (1995)

Tiebreaker games

1959 National League playoff series 1978 AL East Playoff 1980 NL West Playoff

LCS games

Chris Chambliss' Walk-Off Home Run
Chris Chambliss' Walk-Off Home Run
(1976) "Garvey Home Run" (1984) "Gatorade Glove Play" (1984) "You're Looking at One for the Ages Here" (1986)

World Series
World Series
games

"Ladies and Gentlemen, the Bronx Is Burning" (1977) "Mr. October" (1977) "The Call" (1985) 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

World Series

1948 1949 1950 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1994 (cancelled) 1995 (Games 1, 4-5)

AL Championship Series

1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1995 (Games 1–2)

NL Championship Series

1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1995 (Games 1–2)

AL Division Series

1981 1995 2002 (ABC Family, coverage produced by ESPN)

NL Division Series

1995 2002 (ABC Family, coverage produced by ESPN)

All-Star Game

1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1995

Music

"Hello Old Friend" "Lights"

Seasons

Saturday Game of the Week

1953 1954 1959 (NL tie-breaker series) 1960 1961 (prime time games) 1965

Monday Night Baseball

1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 (now on Thursday nights)

The Baseball Network

1994 1995

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Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on CBS

Related programs

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Game of the Week (1955–1965; 1990–1993) Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on CBS Radio (1927–1941; 1976–1997) College World Series
World Series
on CBS (1988–2002, broadcasters) The Franchise (2011-2012)

Related articles

World Series
World Series
television ratings Television contracts

1964 season

Baltimore Orioles Chicago Cubs New York Yankees Philadelphia Phillies St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals

CBS TV Stations

WJZ 13 (Baltimore Orioles, 1954) WBZ 4 (Boston Braves, 1948-1949; Boston Red Sox, 1948-1954) WCBS 2 (Brooklyn Dodgers, 1946–1949; New York Yankees, 2002-2004) KPIX 5 (Oakland Athletics, 1975-1981; 1985-1992) WPTZ 3 (later KYW) (Philadelphia Athletics, 1947-1954) KDKA 2 ( Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
Pirates, 1958-1995)

Sponsors

Falstaff Brewing Corporation

Commentators

All-Star Game ALCS NLCS World Series

Key figures

Red Barber Jack Buck Dizzy Dean Connie Desmond Bill Geist Greg Gumbel George Kell Gene Kirby Sean McDonough Don Robertson Dick Stockton Jack Whitaker

Color commentators

Buddy Blattner Frankie Frisch Gabby Hartnett Jim Kaat Tim McCarver Jim McKay Pee Wee Reese Frank Reynolds

Hosts & field reporters

James Brown Jerry Coleman Jim Gray Andrea Joyce Pat O'Brien Lesley Visser

Guest commentators

Johnny Bench Tommy Lasorda Steve Stone

World Series

1947 (Games 3-4) 1948 1949 1950 1990 1991 1992 1993

AL Championship

1990 1991 1992 1993

NL Championship

1990 1991 1992 1993

All-Star Game

1949 1990 1991 1992 1993

Lore

1951 National League tie-breaker series
1951 National League tie-breaker series
(Game 1) Nasty Boys (Cincinnati Reds) (1990) "And we'll see you tomorrow night!" (1991) "The Slide" (1992) "Touch 'em all Joe!" (1993)

Music

"The Boys of Summer" "The Famous Final Scene" "Famous Last Words" "Right Now"

Instrumentals

"Desert Ride" Jurassic Park (film score) "Overture" "The Walk Home"

Seasons

Early World Series
World Series
coverage

1947 1948 1949

Initial Game of the Week era

1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 ( New York Yankees
New York Yankees
games only)

Exclusive network package

1990 1991 1992 1993

Website: MLB Baseball - CBSSports.com

v t e

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on CBS Radio

Related programs

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on CBS (1955–1965; 1990–1993) Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Game of the Week (1985–1997) Sunday Night Baseball
Sunday Night Baseball
(1990–1997)

Related articles

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on the radio 1950 Brooklyn Dodgers season (simulcasts)

Commentators

All-Star Game ALCS ALDS NLCS NLDS World Series

Key figures

Marty Brennaman Steve Busby Jack Buck Gary Cohen Jerry Coleman Win Elliot Gene Elston Curt Gowdy Hank Greenwald Ernie Harwell Jim Hunter Harry Kalas Ralph Kiner Denny Matthews Frank Messer Bob Murphy Brent Musburger Ned Martin Lindsey Nelson Ross Porter Ted Robinson John Rooney Herb Score Vin Scully Dick Stockton Bill White

Color commentators

Sparky Anderson Johnny Bench Rick Cerone Al Downing Steve Garvey Brooks Robinson Duke Snider Jeff Torborg Joe Torre

Pre-1976 commentators

Mel Allen Red Barber Boake Carter Bob Elson Jack Graney Fred Hoey Ted Husing France Laux

Lore

1978 American League East tie-breaker game The Double (Seattle Mariners)

World Series
World Series
games

Babe Ruth's called shot
Babe Ruth's called shot
(1932) Ladies and Gentlemen, the Bronx Is Burning (1977) Michael Sergio (1986) Kirk Gibson's 1988 World Series
World Series
home run 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

LCS games

Francisco Cabrera game (1992) Jeffrey Maier (1996)

AL Championship Series

1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1995 1996 1997

NL Championship Series

1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1995 1996 1997

AL Division Series

1981 1995 1996 1997

NL Division Series

1981 1995 1996 1997

All-Star Game

1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

World Series

1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 (cancelled) 1995 1996 1997

v t e

Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on NBC

Related programs

Baseball Night in America (1994–1995) Major League Baseball: An Inside Look (1979–1989) Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Game of the Week (1957–1964; 1966–1989) Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on NBC Radio (1927–1938; 1957–1975) Monday Night Baseball (1967–1975)

Misc. programs

Gillette
Gillette
Cavalcade of Sports USA Thursday Game of the Week (1979–1983)

Related articles

The Baseball Network World Series
World Series
television ratings Television contracts

NBC's owned & operated TV stations

W2XBS (later WNBT) (New York Yankees, 1939–1945) WCAU
WCAU
10 (Philadelphia Phillies, 2014–present) KCST 39 (later KNSD) (San Diego Padres, 1971–1972; 1984–1986) KNTV
KNTV
11 (San Francisco Giants, 2008–present)

NBC Sports

Bay Area (San Francisco Giants) California (Oakland Athletics) Chicago (Chicago Cubs & White Sox) Philadelphia (Philadelphia Phillies) New York (New York Mets)

Sponsors

Ford Gillette National Bohemian

Commentators

The Baseball Network All-Star Game ALCS ALDS NLCS NLDS World Series

Key figures

Mel Allen Jim Britt Jack Buck Skip Caray Bob Carpenter Bob Costas Dick Enberg Bill Enis Joe Garagiola Curt Gowdy Greg Gumbel Merle Harmon Ernie Harwell Charlie Jones George Kell Jon Miller Monte Moore Bob Neal Lindsey Nelson Bill O'Donnell Jay Randolph Ted Robinson Vin Scully Jim Simpson Chuck Thompson Gary Thorne Pete van Wieren Bob Wolff Jim Woods

Color commentators

Sal Bando Bucky Dent Larry Dierker Don Drysdale Leo Durocher Joe Garagiola Ken Harrelson Fred Haney Tommy Hutton Jim Kaat Sandy Koufax Tony Kubek Ron Luciano John Lowenstein Mickey Mantle Tim McCarver Joe Morgan Bobby Murcer Wes Parker Pee Wee Reese Al Rosen Tom Seaver Mike Shannon Joe Torre Bob Uecker Bill Veeck Maury Wills

Guest commentators

Rick Dempsey Barry Larkin Ronald Reagan Mike Schmidt Don Sutton Bobby Valentine

Hosts

Mike Adamle Marv Albert Len Berman Jimmy Cefalo Gayle Gardner Bryant Gumbel Bill Macatee Keith Olbermann Ahmad Rashād Hannah Storm

Field reporters

Johnny Bench Jim Gray Jimmy Roberts Craig Sager Bob Wischusen

Lore

Regular season games

#715 (1974) "The Sandberg Game" (1984)

Tie-breaker games

1951 National League tie-breaker series
1951 National League tie-breaker series
(Games 2-3) 1962 National League tie-breaker series

LCS games

"Go crazy folks!" (1985) Jeffrey Maier (1996) "Grand Slam Single" (1999)

World Series games

Subway Series "The Catch (1954)" Don Larsen's Perfect Game (1956) "Shoe polish incident" (1969) "Fisk Waves it Fair" (1975) Michael Sergio (1986) "It gets through Buckner!" (1986) Kirk Gibson's home run (1988) All-Century Team (1999)

Music

"Broken Wings" "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" "Don't Look in My Eyes" "Fame" "Limelight" "One Moment in Time" "The Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of"

Instrumentals

The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. "Chase" "Don't Turn Away" "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" The Untouchables

World Series

1947 (Games 1 & 5) 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1995 (Games 2–3, & 6) 1997 1999

AL Championship

1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1995 (Games 3–6) 1996 1998 2000

NL Championship

1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1995 (Games 3–4) 1997 1999

AL Division Series

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

NL Division Series

1981 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

All-Star Game

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959: First–Second 1960: First–Second 1961: First–Second 1962: First–Second 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1994 1996 1998 2000

Seasons

Pre-Game of the Week

1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956

Game of the Week era

1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 (All-Star Game and World Series
World Series
only) 1966 (exclusive coverage begins) 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

The Baseball Network
The Baseball Network
era

1994 1995

No regular season coverage

1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

v t e

St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
in the National Baseball Hall of Fame

Inducted as a Cardinal

Jim Bottomley Lou Brock Dizzy Dean Frankie Frisch Bob Gibson Chick Hafey Jesse Haines Rogers Hornsby Whitey Herzog Joe Medwick Johnny Mize Stan Musial Red Schoendienst Enos Slaughter Ozzie Smith Billy Southworth Bruce Sutter

Inductees who played for the Cardinals

Grover Cleveland Alexander Walter Alston Jake Beckley Roger Bresnahan Mordecai Brown Jesse Burkett Steve Carlton Orlando Cepeda Charles Comiskey Leo Durocher Dennis Eckersley Burleigh Grimes Miller Huggins Rabbit Maranville John McGraw Kid Nichols Wilbert Robinson Joe Torre Dazzy Vance Bobby Wallace Hoyt Wilhelm Vic Willis Cy Young

Cardinals managers

Roger Bresnahan Charles Comiskey Frankie Frisch Whitey Herzog Miller Huggins Tony La Russa Bill McKechnie Kid Nichols Branch Rickey Red Schoendienst Billy Southworth Joe Torre

Cardinals executives

Stan Musial Branch Rickey

Frick Award

Jack Buck Harry Caray

Spink Award

Bob Broeg
Bob Broeg
( St. Louis
St. Louis
Post-Dispatch) Rick Hummel ( St. Louis
St. Louis
Post-Dispatch) J. G. Taylor Spink (The Sporting News) J. Roy Stockton ( St. Louis
St. Louis
Post-Dispatch)

v t e

St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals

Based in St. Louis, Missouri

Franchise

Hall of Fame Members of the National Hall of Fame Awards & League Leaders Records No-hitters Roster Players Coaches Managers General Managers and Owners Broadcasters Opening Day starting pitchers Minor League Players First-round draft picks All articles

History

1875–1919 1920–52 1953–89 1990–present Seasons

Ballparks

Robison Field Sportsman's Park Busch Memorial Stadium Busch Stadium

Spring training

Whittington Park Herald Park West End Park City Park City Island Ball Park Ninth Street Park Al Lang Stadium Roger Dean Stadium

Culture

Jack Buck Cardinal Nation Fredbird "Here Comes the King" Gashouse Gang KMOX Mike Shannon Rally Squirrel Whiteyball The Pride of St. Louis Death on the Diamond Budweiser Clydesdales Ballpark Village

Lore

1946 NL tie-breaker series Slaughter's Mad Dash Brock for Broglio "Go Crazy, Folks!" The Call Home run chase Fernando Tatís' two grand slams 2011 World Series
World Series
Game 6 2017 MLB Little League Classic

Rivalries

Chicago Cubs Kansas City Royals

Key personnel

Owner: Bill DeWitt, Jr. President of Baseball Operations: John Mozeliak General Manager: Mike Girsch Manager: Mike Matheny

Minor league affiliates

AAA Memphis Redbirds AA Springfield Cardinals A Adv. Palm Beach Cardinals A Peoria Chiefs Short A State College Spikes Rookie Adv. Johnson City Cardinals Rookie Gulf Coast League Cardinals Dominican Summer League Cardinals

World Series Championships

pre-MLB

1885 1886

MLB

1926 1931 1934 1942 1944 1946 1964 1967 1982 2006 2011

League pennants

American Association

1885 1886 1887 1888

National League

1926 1928 1930 1931 1934 1942 1943 1944 1946 1964 1967 1968 1982 1985 1987 2004 2006 2011 2013

Division titles

National League East 1982 1985 1987 National League Central 1996 2000 2001 2002 2004 2005 2006 2009 2013 2014 2015

Wild card titles

2001 2011 2012

All Star Games hosted

1940 1957 1966 2009

Seasons (137)

1880s

1880 · 1881 · 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889

1890s

1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899

1900s

1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909

1910s

1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919

1920s

1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929

1930s

1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939

1940s

1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949

1950s

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

1960s

1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969

1970s

1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979

1980s

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

1990s

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000s

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2010s

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

Baseball Hall of Fame
Baseball Hall of Fame
Class of 1987

BBWAA Vote

Catfish Hunter
Catfish Hunter
(76.3%) Billy Williams (85.7%)

Veterans Committee

Ray Dandridge

J. G. Taylor Spink Award

Jack Lang

Ford C. Frick Award

Jack Buck

v t e

Ford C. Frick Award

1978: Allen & Barber 1979: Elson 1980: Hodges 1981: Harwell 1982: Scully 1983: Brickhouse 1984: Gowdy 1985: Canel 1986: Prince 1987: Buck 1988: Nelson 1989: Caray 1990: Saam 1991: Garagiola 1992: Hamilton 1993: Thompson 1994: Murphy 1995: Wolff 1996: Carneal 1997: Dudley 1998: Jarrín 1999: McDonald 2000: Brennaman 2001: Ramírez 2002: Kalas 2003: Uecker 2004: Simmons 2005: Coleman 2006: Elston 2007: Matthews 2008: Niehaus 2009: Kubek 2010: Miller 2011: Van Horne 2012: McCarver 2013: Cheek 2014: Nadel 2015: Enberg 2016: McNamee 2017: King 2018: Costas

v t e

Sports Lifetime Achievement Award

Jim McKay
Jim McKay
(1989) Lindsey Nelson
Lindsey Nelson
(1990) Curt Gowdy (1991) Chris Schenkel
Chris Schenkel
(1992) Pat Summerall
Pat Summerall
(1993) Howard Cosell
Howard Cosell
(1994) Vin Scully
Vin Scully
(1995) Frank Gifford
Frank Gifford
(1996) Jim Simpson (1997) Keith Jackson
Keith Jackson
(1998) Jack Buck
Jack Buck
(1999) Dick Enberg
Dick Enberg
(2000) Herb Granath (2001) Roone Arledge (2002) Ed Sabol and Steve Sabol
Steve Sabol
(2003) Chet Simmons (2004) Bud Greenspan (2005) Don Ohlmeyer (2006) Frank Chirkinian (2007) Dick Ebersol
Dick Ebersol
(2008) John Madden
John Madden
(2009) Al Michaels
Al Michaels
(2010) Jack Whitaker (2011) Not awarded (2012) Ted Turner
Ted Turner
(2013) George Bodenheimer (2014) Verne Lundquist
Verne Lundquist
(2015) Brent Musburger
Brent Musburger
(2016)

v t e

Pete Rozelle Radio-Television Award recipients

Bill MacPhail (1989) Lindsey Nelson
Lindsey Nelson
(1990) Ed Sabol (1991) Chris Schenkel
Chris Schenkel
(1992) Curt Gowdy (1993) Pat Summerall
Pat Summerall
(1994) Frank Gifford
Frank Gifford
(1995) Jack Buck
Jack Buck
(1996) Charlie Jones (1997) Val Pinchbeck (1998) Dick Enberg
Dick Enberg
(1999) Ray Scott (2000) Roone Arledge (2001) John Madden
John Madden
(2002) Don Criqui (2003) Van Miller
Van Miller
(2004) Myron Cope
Myron Cope
(2005) Lesley Visser
Lesley Visser
(2006) Don Meredith
Don Meredith
(2007) Dan Dierdorf (2008) Irv Cross (2009) Chris Berman
Chris Berman
(2010) Jim Nantz
Jim Nantz
(2011) Len Dawson
Len Dawson
(2012) Al Michaels
Al Michaels
(2013) Bob Trumpy (2014) Tom Jackson (2015) James Brown (2016) David Hill (2017)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 3708522 LCC

.