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The Info List - Islamic Holidays


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There are two official holidays in Islam: Eid Al-Fitr
Eid Al-Fitr
and Eid Al-Adha. Eid Al-Fitr
Eid Al-Fitr
is celebrated at the end of Ramadan
Ramadan
(a month of fasting during daylight hours), and Muslims usually give zakat (charity) on the occasion. Eid Al-Adha
Eid Al-Adha
is celebrated on the tenth day of Dhu al-Hijjah and lasts for four days, during which Muslims usually slaughter a sheep and distribute its meat in 3 parts: among family, friends, and the poor. Both of the holidays occur on dates in the Arabic (Islamic) calendar, which is lunar, and thus their dates in the Gregorian calendar, which is solar, change each year. The Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
is based on the orbital period of the Earth's revolution around the Sun, approximately 365​1⁄4 days, while the Islamic calendar
Islamic calendar
is based on the synodic period of the Moon's revolution around the Earth, approximately 29​1⁄2 days. The Islamic calendar
Islamic calendar
alternates months of 29 and 30 days (which begin with the new moon). Twelve of these months constitute an Islamic year, which is 11 days shorter than the Gregorian year.

Contents

1 Islamic Eid holidays 2 Religious practices

2.1 Fasting 2.2 Pilgrimage

2.2.1 Hajj 2.2.2 Umrah

3 Dates of holidays and other days of note 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External links

Islamic Eid holidays[edit] Main articles: Eid al-Fitr
Eid al-Fitr
and Eid al-Adha Religious practices[edit] Fasting[edit] Main article: Ramadan Muslims fast from dawn to sunset during the month of Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar
Islamic calendar
when the Quran
Quran
was revealed to Muhammad.[1] Fasting is a purifying experience so that Muslims can gain compassion and deepen their faith in Allah.[2] Although the idea of fasting is done so people feel what the poor and the hungry go through, the needy must also fast for Ramadan. Muslims fast by denying themselves food, water and all related sexual activity with their spouses, but also many things religiously forbidden but socially forgotten can void the person's fast, such as Ghibah (backbiting others) and deceiving others. However, people with chronic diseases or unhealthy conditions such as diabetes for example, and children are exempt from fasting. Travelers, and women who are menstruating or nursing a baby, are exempt from fasting as well during their special situation but are required to fast later.[citation needed] Pilgrimage[edit] Further information: Hajj Hajj[edit] Main article: Hajj Umrah[edit] Main article: Umrah Dates of holidays and other days of note[edit]

Hijri date 1438 AH 1439 AH 1440 AH 1441 AH 1442 AH

Islamic New Year 1 Muḥarram 2 Oct. 2016 21 Sep. 2017 11 Sep. 2018 31 Aug. 2019 20 Aug. 2020

Ashura 10 Muḥarram 11 Oct. 2016 30 Sep. 2017 20 Sep. 2018 9 Sep. 2019 29 Aug. 2020

Arba'een[a] 20 or 21 Ṣafar[b] 20 Nov. 2016 9 Nov. 2017 30 Oct. 2018 19 Oct. 2019 8 Oct. 2020

Eid-e-Shuja'[c] (Eid-e-Zahra) 9 Rabī‘ al-Awwal 8 Dec. 2016 27 Nov. 2017 17 Nov. 2018 6 Nov. 2019 26 Oct. 2020

Mawlid
Mawlid
an-Nabī[d] 12 Rabī‘ al-Awwal (Sunni) 11 Dec. 2016 30 Nov. 2017 20 Nov. 2018 9 Nov. 2019 29 Oct. 2020

17 Rabī‘ al-Awwal (Shia) 16 Dec. 2016 5 Dec. 2017 25 Nov. 2018 14 Nov. 2019 3 Nov. 2020

Birthday of ‘Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib[a] 13 Rajab 10 Apr. 2017 30 Mar. 2018 20 Mar. 2019 8 Mar. 2020 25 Feb. 2021

Laylat al-Mi'raj 27 Rajab[e] 24 Apr. 2017 13 Apr. 2018 3 Apr. 2019 22 Mar. 2020 11 Mar. 2021

Laylat al-Bara'at 15 Sha‘bān 11 May 2017 1 May 2018 20 Apr. 2019 8 Apr. 2020 28 Mar. 2021

Birthday of Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Mahdī[c] 15 Sha‘bān 11 May 2017 1 May 2018 20 Apr. 2019 8 Apr. 2020 28 Mar. 2021

First day of Ramaḍān 1 Ramaḍān 27 May 2017 16 May 2018 6 May 2019 24 Apr. 2020 13 Apr. 2021

Laylat al-Qadr 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, or 29 Ramaḍān[f] between 14 & 24 June 2017 between 3 & 13 June 2018 between 24 May & 3 June 2019 between 12 & 22 May 2020 between 1 & 11 May 2021

Chaand Raat[g] 29 or 30 Ramaḍān[h] 24 June 2017 14 June 2018 3 June 2019 23 May 2020 12 May 2021

Eid al-Fitr 1 Shawwāl 25 June 2017 15 June 2018 4 June 2019 24 May 2020 13 May 2021

Hajj 8–13 Dhū al-Ḥijja 30 Aug. – 4 Sep. 2017 19–24 Aug. 2018 9–14 Aug. 2019 29 July – 3 Aug. 2020 18–23 July 2021

Day of Arafah 9 Dhū al-Ḥijja 31 Aug. 2017 20 Aug. 2018 10 Aug. 2019 30 July 2020 19 July 2021

Eid al-Adha 10 Dhū al-Ḥijja 1 Sep. 2017 21 Aug. 2018 11 Aug. 2019 31 July 2020 20 July 2021

Eid al-Ghadeer[a] 18 Dhū al-Ḥijja 9 Sep. 2017 29 Aug. 2018 19 Aug. 2019 8 Aug. 2020 28 July 2021

Eid al-Mubahalah[a] 24 Dhū al-Ḥijja 15 Sep. 2017 4 Sep. 2018 25 Aug. 2019 14 Aug. 2020 3 Aug. 2021

[3][4]

^ a b c d Primarily observed by Shias. ^ Observed 40 days after Ashura. ^ a b Primarily observed by Twelver
Twelver
Shias. ^ Not observed by some Sunnis. ^ There is some disagreement about this date; see Isra and Mi'raj. ^ Most often observed on 23 Ramaḍān by Shias and 27 Ramaḍān by Sunnis; see Laylat al-Qadr. ^ Primarily observed in South Asia. ^ Observed on the last evening of Ramaḍān; see Chaand Raat.

Some Gregorian dates may vary slightly from those given, and may also vary by country. See Islamic calendar. References[edit]

^ Reza, Aslan, (2011). No god but God : the origins and evolution of Islam
Islam
(1st ed.). New York: Delacorte Press. pp. 118–119. ISBN 9780385739757. OCLC 614990718.  ^ Molly., Aloian, (2009). Ramadan. New York: Crabtree. ISBN 0778742857. OCLC 227911610.  ^ " Special
Special
Islamic Days". IslamicFinder. Retrieved 1 October 2016.  ^ "Islamic Calendar". IslamicFinder. Retrieved 1 October 2016. 

Further reading[edit]

Leaman, Oliver, "Festivals of Love", in Muhammad
Muhammad
in History, Thought, and Culture: An Encyclopedia of the Prophet of God (2 vols.), Edited by C. Fitzpatrick and A. Walker, Santa Barbara, ABC-CLIO, 2014, Vol I, pp. 197–199.

External links[edit]

The Umm al-Qura Calendar
Calendar
of Saudi Arabia (with date converter valid from 1937 to 2077)

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