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The International Amphitheatre
International Amphitheatre
was an indoor arena located in Chicago, Illinois, between 1934 and 1999. It was located on the west side of Halsted Street, at 42nd Street, on the city's south side, adjacent to the Union Stock Yards. The arena was built for $1.5 million, by the stock yard company, principally to host the International Livestock Exhibition. The arena replaced Dexter Park, a horse-racing track that had stood on the site for over 50 years prior to its destruction by fire in May 1934. The completion of the Amphitheatre ushered in an era where Chicago
Chicago
reigned as a convention capital. In an era before air conditioning and space for the press and broadcast media were commonplace, the International Amphitheatre was among the first arenas to be equipped with these innovations. The arena, which seated 9,000, was the first home of the Chicago Packers of the NBA during 1961–62, before changing their name to the Chicago
Chicago
Zephyrs and moving to the Chicago
Chicago
Coliseum for their second season.[2] It was also the home of the Chicago
Chicago
Bulls during their inaugural season of 1966–67; they also played only one game in the Chicago
Chicago
Coliseum, a playoff game in their first season, as no other arena was available for a game versus the St. Louis Hawks. Afterwards, the Bulls then moved permanently to Chicago
Chicago
Stadium. The Amphitheatre was also the primary home of the Chicago
Chicago
Cougars of the WHA from 1972–1975. It was originally intended to be only a temporary home for the Cougars, but the permanent solution, the Rosemont Horizon, was not completed until 1980, five years after the team folded and a year after the WHA ceased operation. The International Amphitheatre
International Amphitheatre
was the home for Chicago's wrestling scene for years as well as the Chicago
Chicago
Auto Show for approximately 20 years beginning in the 1940s.[3][4] The Amphitheatre hosted several national American political conventions:

1952 Republican National Convention
1952 Republican National Convention
(nominated Dwight D. Eisenhower for President and Richard M. Nixon for Vice President; ticket won) 1952 Democratic National Convention
1952 Democratic National Convention
(nominated Adlai E. Stevenson for President and John J. Sparkman for Vice President; ticket lost) 1956 Democratic National Convention
1956 Democratic National Convention
(nominated Adlai E. Stevenson for President and Estes Kefauver
Estes Kefauver
for Vice President; ticket lost) 1960 Republican National Convention
1960 Republican National Convention
(nominated Richard M. Nixon for President and Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.
Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.
for Vice President; ticket lost) 1968 Democratic National Convention
1968 Democratic National Convention
(nominated Hubert H. Humphrey for President and Edmund S. Muskie for Vice President; ticket lost)

The 1952 Republican National Convention
1952 Republican National Convention
was held at what was then called the Chicago
Chicago
Amphitheater, and had the distinction of being the first political convention broadcast live by television coast to coast with special studio facilities provided for all the major networks.[5] The 1968 Democratic convention was one of the most tumultuous political conventions in American history, noted by anti-war protests. Prior to that, the Amphitheatre was noted for being the site of one of Elvis Presley's most notable concerts, in 1957, with the singer wearing his now legendary gold lame suit for the first time.[6] On September 5, 1964 and August 12, 1966, The Beatles
The Beatles
performed at the Amphitheatre. The 1966 show was the first show of what proved to be their last tour.[7] Indoor wintertime Drag Racing was held at The Amphitheatre twice. On December 30, 1962, and January 5, 1964. It was great fun, but dangerous, because of the slick cement floors. Drag Racers need asphalt to get tire grip, launch, and control. The Amphitheatre cement "floor" had very little of these. On March 13–14, 1976, the Midwest Regional of the North American Soccer League's 1976 Indoor tournament was hosted by the Chicago
Chicago
Sting at the Amphitheater. The Rochester Lancers won the Region to advance to the Final Four played in Florida.[8] In October 1978, English rock group UFO recorded Strangers in the Night at the International Amphitheatre. The Stock Yards closed in 1971, but the Amphitheatre remained open, hosting rock concerts, college basketball and IHSA playoff games, circuses, religious gatherings, and other events. The shift of many conventions and trade shows to the more modern and more conveniently-located lakefront McCormick Place
McCormick Place
convention center during the 60s and 70s began the International Amphitheatre's decline; as other convention and concert venues opened in the suburbs, its bookings dropped more. In December 1981, Joe Frazier
Joe Frazier
had his final boxing match at the Amphitheatre against Floyd Cummings, which resulted in a draw. Sold in 1983 for a mere $250,000, the sprawling Amphitheatre became difficult to maintain, and proved unable to attract enough large events to pay for its own upkeep. It was eventually sold to promoters Cardenas & Fernandez and then the City of Chicago, which had no more success at attracting events than its previous owner. In August 1999, demolition of the International Amphitheatre
International Amphitheatre
began.[4] An Aramark Uniform Services plant is located on the site once occupied by the Amphitheatre. Image gallery[edit]

The Amphitheatre was adjacent to the Union Stock Yards 

1952 Republican National Convention 

Adlai Stevenson during the 1952 Democratic National Convention 

John F. Kennedy
John F. Kennedy
nominates Adlai Stevenson at the 1956 Democratic National Convention 

Nixon supporters in Chicago
Chicago
during the 1960 Republican National Convention 

Illinois
Illinois
delegates (including Richard M. Daley
Richard M. Daley
and Richard J. Daley) during the 1968 Democratic National Convention 

References[edit]

^ Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Community Development Project. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved January 2, 2018.  ^ Hareas, John. "A Colorful Tradition". Washington Wizards. Retrieved 2008-03-19.  ^ Tito, Rich (April 21, 2004). "Regional Territories-WWA Indianapolis". Kayfabe Memories. Retrieved 2016-02-03.  ^ a b Boylan, Anthony Burke (May 30, 1999). "Amphitheatre Gets Its Final Curtain Call". Chicago
Chicago
Tribune. Retrieved 2016-02-03.  ^ "TV Goes to the Conventions". Popular Mechanics: 94–97. June 1952.  ^ Cora, Casey (January 8, 2015). "Elvis in Chicago
Chicago
Was 'Electrifying': An 80th Birthday Celebration". DNAinfo.com. Archived from the original on March 16, 2016.  ^ "Live: International Amphitheatre, Chicago". The Beatles
The Beatles
Bible. Retrieved 2016-02-03.  ^ Milbert, Neil (March 13, 1976). "Opener for the Sting tonight". Chicago
Chicago
Tribune. p. 5, Section 2. 

External links[edit]

International Amphitheatre
International Amphitheatre
article in the Encyclopedia of Chicago

Events and tenants

Preceded by first arena Home of the Chicago
Chicago
Packers 1961–1962 Succeeded by Chicago
Chicago
Coliseum

Preceded by first arena Home of the Chicago
Chicago
Bulls 1966–1967 Succeeded by Chicago
Chicago
Stadium

v t e

Venues of the Democratic National Convention

The Athenaeum and Warfield's Church (1832) Fourth Presbyterian Church (Baltimore) (1835) The Assembly Rooms (1840) Odd Fellows Hall (1844) Universalist Church (Baltimore) (1848) Maryland Institute (1852) Smith and Nixon's Hall (1856) South Carolina Institute Hall / Front Street Theater (1860) The Amphitheatre (Chicago) (1864) Tammany Hall
Tammany Hall
(1868) Ford's Grand Opera House (1872) Merchants Exchange Building (1876) Cincinnati Music Hall (1880) Interstate Exposition Building (1884) Exposition Building (1888) Wigwam (1892) Chicago
Chicago
Coliseum (1896) Convention Hall
Convention Hall
(1900) St. Louis Coliseum
St. Louis Coliseum
(1904) Denver Auditorium Arena
Denver Auditorium Arena
(1908) Fifth Regiment Armory
Fifth Regiment Armory
(1912) Convention Hall
Convention Hall
(1916) San Francisco Civic Auditorium (1920) Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
(II) (1924) Sam Houston Hall (1928) Chicago
Chicago
Stadium (1932) Philadelphia Convention Hall/ Franklin Field
Franklin Field
(1936) Chicago
Chicago
Stadium (1940) Chicago
Chicago
Stadium (1944) Philadelphia Convention Hall
Convention Hall
(1948) International Amphitheatre
International Amphitheatre
(1952) International Amphitheatre
International Amphitheatre
(1956) Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena
Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena
/ Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum (1960) Atlantic City Convention Hall
Convention Hall
(1964) International Amphitheatre
International Amphitheatre
(1968) Miami Beach Convention Center
Miami Beach Convention Center
(1972) Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
(IV) (1976) Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
(IV) (1980) Moscone Center
Moscone Center
(1984) Omni Coliseum
Omni Coliseum
(1988) Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
(IV) (1992) United Center (1996) Staples Center
Staples Center
(2000) FleetCenter (2004) Pepsi Center
Pepsi Center
/ Invesco Field (2008) Time Warner Cable Arena (2012) Wells Fargo Center (2016)

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Venues of the Republican National Convention

Musical Fund Hall
Musical Fund Hall
(1856) Wigwam (1860) Front Street Theater (1864) Crosby's Opera House
Crosby's Opera House
(1868) Academy of Music (1872) Exposition Hall (Cincinnati)
Exposition Hall (Cincinnati)
(1876) Interstate Exposition Building (1880) Exposition Hall (Chicago) (1884) Auditorium (1888) Industrial Exposition Building
Industrial Exposition Building
(1892) St. Louis Exposition and Music Hall
St. Louis Exposition and Music Hall
(1896) Convention Hall
Convention Hall
(1900) Chicago
Chicago
Coliseum (1904) Chicago
Chicago
Coliseum (1908) Chicago
Chicago
Coliseum (1912) Chicago
Chicago
Coliseum (1916) Chicago
Chicago
Coliseum (1920) Public Auditorium
Public Auditorium
(1924) Convention Hall
Convention Hall
(1928) Chicago
Chicago
Stadium (1932) Public Auditorium
Public Auditorium
(1936) Convention Hall
Convention Hall
(1940) Chicago
Chicago
Stadium (1944) Convention Hall
Convention Hall
(1948) International Amphitheatre
International Amphitheatre
(1952) Cow Palace
Cow Palace
(1956) International Amphitheatre
International Amphitheatre
(1960) Cow Palace
Cow Palace
(1964) Miami Beach Convention Center
Miami Beach Convention Center
(1968) Miami Beach Convention Center
Miami Beach Convention Center
(1972) Kemper Arena
Kemper Arena
(1976) Joe Louis Arena
Joe Louis Arena
(1980) Dallas Convention Center
Dallas Convention Center
(1984) Louisiana Superdome (1988) Houston Astrodome
Astrodome
(1992) San Diego Convention Center
San Diego Convention Center
(1996) First Union Center (2000) Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
(2004) Xcel Energy Center
Xcel Energy Center
(2008) Tampa Bay Times Forum (2012) Quicken Loans Arena
Quicken Loans Arena
(2016)

v t e

Music venues of Illinois

Outdoor

Guaranteed Rate Field Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre Huntington Bank Pavilion Jay Pritzker Pavilion Maxwell Street
Maxwell Street
Market Petrillo Music Shell Ravinia Festival Soldier Field Wrigley Field

Theaters and clubs

Aragon Ballroom Arcada Theater Arie Crown Theater Bottom Lounge Buddy Guy's Legends Chicago
Chicago
Theatre Congress Theater Coronado Theatre Double Door Empty Bottle Foellinger Auditorium Genesee Theatre Green Mill House of Blues Jazz Showcase Kingston Mines Krannert Center Lincoln Hall Metro Paramount Theatre Park West Peoria Civic Center
Peoria Civic Center
Theatre Rialto Square Theatre Riviera Theatre Rosemont Theatre Velvet Lounge Vic Theatre Virginia Theatre

Arenas

Allstate Arena Bank of Springfield Center BMO Harris Bank Center Grossinger Motors Arena NIU Convocation Center Peoria Civic Center Sears Centre SIU Arena State Farm Center TaxSlayer Center UIC Pavilion United Center Wharton Field House

Festivals

Chicago
Chicago
Blues Festival Chicago
Chicago
Jazz Festival Grant Park Music Festival Lollapalooza Pitchfork Music Festival Pygmalion Music Festival Riot Fest Summer Camp Music Festival

Historic venues

Checkerboard Lounge Chicago
Chicago
Coliseum Chicago
Chicago
Stadium E2 International Amphitheatre The Limelight/Excalibur and Vision/Castle Lounge Ax Neo Poplar Creek Music Theater The Thirsty Whale Uptown Theatre

v t e

Chicago
Chicago
Bulls

Founded in 1966 Based in Chicago, Illinois

Franchise

Franchise Expansion Draft All-time roster Draft history Seasons Records Broadcasters Head coaches Current season

Arenas

International Amphitheatre Chicago
Chicago
Stadium United Center

Personnel

Owner: Jerry Reinsdorf Vice president of basketball operations: John Paxson General manager: Gar Forman Head coach: Fred Hoiberg

Culture

Air Jordan

Jumpman

Tommy Edwards Benny the Bull "Sirius" Ray Clay Jordan Rules Triangle offense Ashland Green/Pink Line Station Tex Winter The Spirit ( Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
statue)

Lore

Phantom Buzzer Game The Shot Disputed foul against Scottie Pippen 72–10 Michael Jordan's last shot

Rivals

Cleveland Cavaliers Detroit Pistons Miami Heat New York Knicks

Retired numbers

4 10 23 33 Coach General Manager

G League affiliate

Windy City Bulls

NBA Championships (6)

1991 1992 1993 1996 1997 1998

Eastern Conference Championships (6)

1991 1992 1993 1996 1997 1998

Division titles (9)

1975 1991 1992 1993 1996 1997 1998 2011 2012

Hall of Famers

George Gervin Artis Gilmore Phil Jackson Michael Jordan Robert Parish Scottie Pippen Dennis Rodman Jerry Sloan Nate Thurmond Tex Winter Jerry Reinsdorf

Media

TV WGN (through WGN Sports) NBC Sports Chicago CN100 Radio WSCR Announcers Neil Funk Stacey King Chuck Swirsky Bill Wennington

v t e

Washington Wizards

Founded in 1961 Formerly the Chicago
Chicago
Packers (1961–1962), the Chicago
Chicago
Zephyrs (1962–1963), the Baltimore Bullets (1963–1973), the Capital Bullets (1973–1974), and the Washington Bullets (1974–1997) Based in Washington, D.C.

Franchise

Franchise Expansion Draft All-time roster Draft history Head coaches Seasons Current season

Arenas

International Amphitheatre Chicago
Chicago
Coliseum Baltimore Civic Center Cole Field House Capital Centre/US Airways Arena Capital One Arena

General Managers

Ferry Nash Unseld Grunfeld

G-League affiliate

Capital City Go-Go
Capital City Go-Go
in 2018

Administration

Ted Leonsis
Ted Leonsis
(Owner) Ernie Grunfeld
Ernie Grunfeld
(President & GM of Basketball Ops.) Scott Brooks
Scott Brooks
(Head Coach)

Retired numbers

10 11 25 41 45

NBA Championships (1)

1978

Eastern Conference Championships (4)

1971 1975 1978 1979

Culture and lore

Wes Unseld 1975 championship upset It ain't over till the fat lady sings The Big E Abe Pollin Earl the Pearl Agent Zero Robin Ficker

Media

TV WDCW NBC Sports Washington Comcast Network Radio WJFK-FM Announcers Steve Buckhantz Phil Chenier Dave Johnson Glenn Consor

Coordinates: 41°49′1″N 87°38′48″W / 41.81694°N 87.64667°W / 4

.