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Identity formation is a person's mental representation of who they are. Identity formation is a type of individuation that relates to the development of an individual's development of their own distinct personality.[1] This concept is regarded as a persisting entity (known as personal continuity) in a particular stage of life in which individual characteristics are developed or by which a person is recognized or known (such as the establishment of a reputation). This process defines individuals to others and themselves. Pieces of the person's actual identity include a sense of continuity, a sense of uniqueness from others, and a sense of affiliation based on their membership in various groups—familial, ethnic, occupational, and others. These group identities, in addition to satisfying the need for affiliation, help people define themselves in the eyes of both others and themselves.

Identity formation includes creating a sense of personal continuity and uniqueness of self in comparison to other people. In addition to this self creation, a social identity is formulated from various group memberships, family affiliation, ethnic group interaction, occupation, and other social interactions.[2]

Identity formation sometimes leads to personal identity issues and an identity where the individual comprehends themselves as a discrete and separate entity. This may be through individuation, whereby the undifferentiated individual tends to become unique, or undergoes stages through which differentiated facets of a person's life tend toward becoming a more indivisible whole.[3]

Identities are formed on many levels: micro, meso, macro, and global. The micro level is self definition, relations with people, and issues as seen from a person or individual perspective. The meso level is how identities are viewed, formed, and questioned by immediate communities and/or families. Macro are the connections among and between individuals, issues, and groups as a view from a national perspective. The global level are connections among and between individuals, issues, and groups from a worldwide perspective. [4]

Identity is often described as finite and consisting of separate and distinct parts (family, cultural, personal, professional, etc.), yet according to Parker Palmer, it is an ever-evolving core where genetics (biology), culture, loved ones, good and bad deeds done to self and others, experiences lived, and choices made come together to form the self.[5]

Theories

Many theories of development have aspects of identity formation included in them. Two theories in particular directly address the process of identity formation: Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development (specifically the "identity versus role confusion" stage) and James Marcia's identity status theory.

Erikson[Identity formation includes creating a sense of personal continuity and uniqueness of self in comparison to other people. In addition to this self creation, a social identity is formulated from various group memberships, family affiliation, ethnic group interaction, occupation, and other social interactions.[2]

Identity formation sometimes leads to personal identity issues and an identity where the individual comprehends themselves as a discrete and separate entity. This may be through individuation, whereby the undifferentiated individual tends to become unique, or undergoes stages through which differentiated facets of a person's life tend toward becoming a more indivisible whole.[3]

Identities are formed on many levels: micro, meso, macro, and global. The micro level is self definition, relations with people, and issues as seen from a person or individual perspective. The meso level is how identities are viewed, formed, and questioned by immediate communities and/or families. Macro are the connections among and between individuals, issues, and groups as a view from a national perspective. The global level are connections among and between individuals, issues, and groups from a worldwide perspective. [4]

Identity is often described as finite and consisting of separate and distinct parts (family, cultural, personal, professional, etc.), yet according to Parker Palmer, it is an ever-evolving core where genetics (biology), culture, loved ones, good and bad deeds done to self and others, experiences lived, and choices made come together to form the self.[5]

Many theories of development have aspects of identity formation included in them. Two theories in particular directly address the process of identity formation: Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development (specifically the "identity versus role confusion" stage) and James Marcia's identity status theory.

Erikson

Erikson's belief is that throughout each person's lifetime, they experience different crises or conflicts. Each of the conflicts arises at a certain point in life and must be successfully resolved for progression to the next of the eight stages. The particular stage relevant to identity formation takes place during adolescence, called "Identity versus Role Confusion."[6]

The "Identity versus Role Confusion" stage consists of adolescents trying to figure out who they are in order to form a basic identity that they will build on throughout their life, especially concerning social and occupational identities. They face the complexities of determining one's own identity. Erikson said this crisis is resolved with identity achievement, the point at which an individual has extensively considered various goals and values, accepting some and rejecting others, and understands who they are as a unique person.[7] Once an adolescent has attained identity achievement, they are ready to enter the next stage of Erikson's theory, "Intimacy versus Isolation", where they will form strong friendships and a sense of companionship with others. If the "Identity versus Role Confusion" crisis is not positively resolved, an adolescent will face confusion about future plans, particularly their roles in adulthood. Failure to form one's own identity leads to failure to form a shared identity with others, which could lead to instability in many areas as an adult. The identity formation stage of Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development is a crucial stage in life.[6]

Marcia

James Marcia created a structural interview designed to classify adolescents into one of four statuses of identity. The identity statuses are used to describe and pinpoint the progression of an adolescent's identity formation process. In James Marcia's theory, the operational definition of identity is whether an individual has explored various alternatives and made firm commitments to: an occupation, religion, sexual orientation and a set of political values.

The four identity statuses in James Marcia's theory are:[8]

  1. Identity Diffusion (also known as Role Confusion): This is the opposite of identity achievement. The individual has not yet resolved their identity crisis, failing to commit to any goals or values and establish future life direction. In adolescents, this stage is characterized by disorganized thinking, procrastination, and avoidance of issues and action.[7]
  2. Identity Foreclosure: This occurs when teenagers accept traditional values and cultural norms, rather than determining their own values. In other words, the person conforms to an identity without exploration as to what really suits them best. For instance, teenagers might follow the values and roles of their parents or cultural norms. They might also foreclose on a negative identity, the direct opposite of their parent's values or cultural norms.[7]
  3. Identity Moratorium: This postpones identity achievement by providing temporary shelter. This status provides opportunities for exploration, either in breadth or in depth. Examples of moratoria common in American society include college or the military.[7]
  4. Identity Achievement: This status is attained when the person has solved the identity issues by making commitments to goals, beliefs, and values after extensive exploration of different areas.

Self-concept

Erikson's belief is that throughout each person's lifetime, they experience different crises or conflicts. Each of the conflicts arises at a certain point in life and must be successfully resolved for progression to the next of the eight stages. The particular stage relevant to identity formation takes place during adolescence, called "Identity versus Role Confusion."[6]

The "Identity versus Role Confusion" stage consists of adolescents trying to figure out who they are in order to form a basic identity that they will build on throughout their life, especially concerning social and occupational identities. They face the complexities of determining one's own identity. E

The "Identity versus Role Confusion" stage consists of adolescents trying to figure out who they are in order to form a basic identity that they will build on throughout their life, especially concerning social and occupational identities. They face the complexities of determining one's own identity. Erikson said this crisis is resolved with identity achievement, the point at which an individual has extensively considered various goals and values, accepting some and rejecting others, and understands who they are as a unique person.[7] Once an adolescent has attained identity achievement, they are ready to enter the next stage of Erikson's theory, "Intimacy versus Isolation", where they will form strong friendships and a sense of companionship with others. If the "Identity versus Role Confusion" crisis is not positively resolved, an adolescent will face confusion about future plans, particularly their roles in adulthood. Failure to form one's own identity leads to failure to form a shared identity with others, which could lead to instability in many areas as an adult. The identity formation stage of Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development is a crucial stage in life.[6]

James Marcia created a structural interview designed to classify adolescents into one of four statuses of identity. The identity statuses are used to describe and pinpoint the progression of an adolescent's identity formation process. In James Marcia's theory, the operational definition of identity is whether an individual has explored various alternatives and made firm commitments to: an occupation, religion, sexual orientation and a set of political values.

The four identity statuses in James Marcia's theory are:[8]

  1. Identity Diffusion (also known as Role Confusion): This is the opposite of identity achievement. The individual has not yet resolved

    The four identity statuses in James Marcia's theory are:[8]

    Self-concept or self-identity is the beliefs and ideas one has about themselves. The self-concept is different from self-consciousness, which is an awareness of one's self. Components of the self-concept include physical, psychological, and social attributes, which can be influenced by the individual's attitudes, habits, beliefs and ideas. These components and attributes cannot be condensed to the general concepts of self-image or self-esteem.[9] Multiple types of identity come together within one person; these can be broken down into the following.

    Cultural identity

    Cultural identity is the (feeling of) identity of a group or culture, or of an individual as far as they are influenced by their belonging to a group or culture. Cultural identity relates to, but not synonymous with identity politics. There are modern questions of culture that are transferred into questions of identity. Historical culture also influences individual identity, and as with modern cultural identity, individuals may pick and choose aspects of cultural identity, while rejecting or disowning other associated ideas.

    Professional identity

    Professional identity is the identification with a profession, exhibited by an aligning of roles, responsibilities, Cultural identity is the (feeling of) identity of a group or culture, or of an individual as far as they are influenced by their belonging to a group or culture. Cultural identity relates to, but not synonymous with identity politics. There are modern questions of culture that are transferred into questions of identity. Historical culture also influences individual identity, and as with modern cultural identity, individuals may pick and choose aspects of cultural identity, while rejecting or disowning other associated ideas.

    Professional identity

    Professional identity is the identification with a Professional identity is the identification with a profession, exhibited by an aligning of roles, responsibilities, values, and ethical standards as accepted by the profession.[10]

    Ethnic and national identity

    In soc

    In sociology, gender identity describes the gender with which a person identifies (i.e., whether one perceives oneself to be a man, a woman, outside of the gender binary, etc.), but can also be used to refer to the gender that other people attribute to the individual on the basis of what they know from gender role indications (social behavior, clothing, hairstyle, etc.). Gender identity may be affected by a variety of social structures, including the person's ethnic group, employment status, religion or irreligion, and family.

    Disability identity

    Disability identity refers to the particular disabilities with which an individual identifies. This may be something as obvious as a paraplegic person identifying as such, or something less prominent such as a Deaf person regarding themselves as part of a local, national, or global community of Deaf People Culture.

    Disability identity is almost always determined by the particular disabilities that an individual is born with, however, it may change later in life if an individual later becomes disabled or when an individual later discovers a previously overlooked disability (particularly applicable to mental disorders), and in some rare cases it may b

    Disability identity is almost always determined by the particular disabilities that an individual is born with, however, it may change later in life if an individual later becomes disabled or when an individual later discovers a previously overlooked disability (particularly applicable to mental disorders), and in some rare cases it may be influenced by exposure to disabled people as with BIID.

    Social relation can refer to a multitude of social interactions, regulated by social norms, between two or more people, with each having a social position and performing a social role. In sociological hierarchy, social relation is more advanced than behavior, action, social behavior, social action, social contact, and social interaction. Social relations form the basis of concepts such as social organization, social structure, social movement, and social system.

    Interpersonal identity development is composed of three elements:

    • Categorisation: Labeling others (and ourselves) into categories. (Tajfel & Turner,1986)
    • Identification: Associating others with certain groups.
    • Comparison: Comparing groups.

    Interpersona

    Interpersonal identity development is composed of three elements:

    Interpersonal identity development allows an individual to question and examine various personality elements, such as ideas, beliefs, and behaviors. The actions or thoughts of others create social influences that change an individual. Examples of social influence can be seen in socialization and peer pressure. This is the effect of other people on a person's behavior, thinking about one's Self, and subsequent acceptance or rejection of how other people attempt to influence the individual. Interpersonal identity development occurs during exploratory self-analysis and self-evaluation, ending at various times with the establishment of an easy-to-understand and consolidative sense of self or identity.

    Interaction

    The term collective identity is a sense of belonging to a group (the collective) that is

    The term collective identity is a sense of belonging to a group (the collective) that is so strong that a person who identifies with the group will dedicate their life to the group over individual identity: they will defend the views of the group and assume risks for the group, sometimes as great as the loss of life. The cohesiveness of the collective goes beyond community, as the collective suffers the pain of grief from the loss of a member.

    Social support

    Individuals

    Individuals gain a social identity and group identity by their affiliation. This is from membership in various groups. These groups include, among various categories,:

    • family
    • ethnic
    • education a

      One of the most important affiliations is that of their family, whether they be biological, extended or even adoptive families. Each has their own influence on identity through the interaction that takes place between the family members and with the individual person.[14] "Information regarding possible identities of possible selves comes from various contexts that surround adolescents and temporal commitments are tested and practiced in interaction with others."[15] Researchers and theorists basically state that an individual's identity(more specifically an adolescent's identity) is influenced by the people around them and the environment in which they live. Also if a family does not have integration this seems to help create identity diffusion (this is one of James Marcia's 4 identity statuses, meaning that an individual has not made commitments and does not try to make commitments.[16]) This is true for both males and females.[17] These concepts prove that a family has influence on an individual no matter if the influence be good or bad.

      Peer relationships

      The purpose of this study[18] was to analyze the influence of same-sex friendships in the development of one's identity. This study involved the use of 24 same-sex college student friendship triads, consisting of 12 males and 12 females, with a total of 72 participants. Each triad was required to have known each other for a minimum of six months. A qualitative method was chosen, as it is the most appropriate in assessing the development of identity. Semi-structured group interviewers took place, where the students were asked to reflect on stories and experiences with relationship problem

      The purpose of this study[18] was to analyze the influence of same-sex friendships in the development of one's identity. This study involved the use of 24 same-sex college student friendship triads, consisting of 12 males and 12 females, with a total of 72 participants. Each triad was required to have known each other for a minimum of six months. A qualitative method was chosen, as it is the most appropriate in assessing the development of identity. Semi-structured group interviewers took place, where the students were asked to reflect on stories and experiences with relationship problems. The results showed 5 common responses when assessing these relationship problems. The responses involved joking about the relationship problems, providing support, offering advice, relating others' experiences to their own similar experiences, and providing encouragement. The results concluded that adolescents are actively constructing their identities through common themes of conversation between same-sex friendships, in this case, involving relationship issues. The common themes of conversation that close peers seem to engage in, help to further their identity formation in life.[19]

      Influences on identity<

      Cognitive development influences identity formation. When adolescents are able to think abstractly and reason logically they have an easier time exploring and contemplating possible identities. When an adolescent has advanced cognitive development and maturity they tend to resolve identity issues more so than age mates that are less cognitively developed. When identity issues are solved quicker and better, there is more time and effort put into developing that identity. Having a solid identity earlier is a preferred situation and is one of the first steps in forming the desired life and goals of the individual.

      Scholastic influences

      Adolescents that have a post-secondary education tend to make more concrete goals and stable occupational commitments. So going to college or university can influence identity formation in a productive way. Of course, the opposite can also be true, where identity influences education and academics. The two can influence each other, ultimately

      Adolescents that have a post-secondary education tend to make more concrete goals and stable occupational commitments. So going to college or university can influence identity formation in a productive way. Of course, the opposite can also be true, where identity influences education and academics. The two can influence each other, ultimately forming an identity in the process. Education's effect on identity can be beneficial for the individual's identity; the individual will be getting educated on different approaches and paths to take in the process of identity formation. Ultimately scholastics are important for our brains as well as our identities.

      Sociocultural influencesSociocultural influences are those of a broader social and historical context. For example, in the past, adolescents would likely just adopt the job, religious beliefs, etc. that was expected of them or that were the same as their parents. In a society like today's, adolescents have more resources to explore identity choices as well as more options for commitments. This influence is becoming less significant due to the growing acceptance of identity options that were once less accepted. Also, more of the identity options from the past are becoming unrecognized and less popular today. The changing sociocultural situation is forcing individuals to develop a unique identity based on their own aspirations. Sociocultural influences are playing a different role in identity formation now than they have in the past. However, it still affects identity, just in a different way.

      Parenting influences

      The type

      The type of relationship that adolescents have with their parents has a significant role in identity formation. For example, when there is a solid and positive relationship between parent and adolescent, they are more likely to feel freedom in exploring identity options for themselves. A study found that for boys and girls, identity formation is positively influenced by parental involvement specifically in the areas of: support, social monitoring, and school monitoring.[20] In contrast, when the relationship is not as close and the adolescent fears rejection from the parent, they are more likely to feel less confident in forming a separate identity from their parent(s).[citation needed] These are just examples; of course there are other outcomes possible in adolescent identity formation when examining the parenting as well as the parent-child relationship.[citation needed]

      Cyber-socializing and the Internet

      In business, professional identity is the "persona" of a professional which is designed[In business, professional identity is the "persona" of a professional which is designed[by whom?] to accord with and facilitate the attainment of business objectives.[citation needed] A professional identity comes into being when there is a philosophy that is manifested in a distinct corporate culture - the corporate personality.[citation needed] A business professional is a person in a profession with certain types of skills that sometimes require formal training or education.[citation needed]

      The career development of an individual focuses on how individuals manage their careers within and between organizations and how organizations structure t

      The career development of an individual focuses on how individuals manage their careers within and between organizations and how organizations structure the career progress of their members, and can be tied[by whom?] into succession planning within some organizations.

      Within the business realm and many careers is the role of management.[clarification needed] Management tasks can enhance leadership, by creating an environment where all team members know and assume responsibility for their roles.[citation needed] Employees' self-concept and affiliation are often[quantify] aligned with their roles in an organization.

      Training is a form of identity setting, since it not only affects knowledge, but also affects a team member's self-concept. Knowledge, on the other hand, of the position introduces a new path of less effort to the trainee, which prolongs the effects of training and promotes a stronger self-concept.[citation needed] Other forms of identity setting in an organization include Business Cards, Specific Benefits by Role, and Task Forwarding.[22][need quotation to verify]

      Definition of Free Cultural Works logo notext.svg This article incorporates text from a free content work. Licensed under CC-BY-SA IGO 3.0 License statement/permission on Wikimedia Commons. Text taken from Youth and changing realities: rethinking secondary education in Latin America, 44-45, López, Néstor; Opertti, Renato; Vargas Tamez, Carlos, UNESCO. UNESCO. To learn how to add open license text to Wikipedia articles, please see this how-to page. For information on reusing text from Wikipedia, please see the terms of use.

      References

      1. ^ The Free Dictionary (2012). "Individuation". Retrieved 11 October 2012.