HOME
The Info List - Ibn Al-Haytham


--- Advertisement ---



Hasan Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
(Latinized Alhazen[8] /ˌælˈhɑːzən/; full name Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥasan ibn al-Ḥasan ibn al-Haytham أبو علي، الحسن بن الحسن بن الهيثم; c. 965 – c. 1040) was an Arab[9][10][11][12][13] mathematician, astronomer, and physicist of the Islamic Golden Age.[14] He made significant contributions to the principles of optics and visual perception in particular, his most influential work being his Kitāb al-Manāẓir (كتاب المناظر, "Book of Optics"), written during 1011–1021, which survived in the Latin
Latin
edition.[15] A polymath, he also wrote on philosophy, theology and medicine.[16] Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
was the first to explain that vision occurs when light bounces on an object and then is directed to one's eyes.[17] He was also an early proponent of the concept that a hypothesis must be proved by experiments based on confirmable procedures or mathematical evidence—hence understanding the scientific method five centuries before Renaissance
Renaissance
scientists.[18][19][20][21][22][23] Born in Basra, he spent most of his productive period in the Fatimid capital of Cairo
Cairo
and earned his living authoring various treatises and tutoring members of the nobilities.[24] Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
is sometimes given the byname al-Baṣrī after his birthplace,[25] or al-Miṣrī ("of Egypt").[26] In medieval Europe, Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
was honored as Ptolemaeus secundus (the "Second Ptolemy")[27] or simply "The Physicist".[28] Ibn al-Haytham paved the way for the modern science of physical optics.[29]

Contents

1 Biography 2 Book of Optics

2.1 Theory of optics 2.2 Scientific method 2.3 Alhazen's problem 2.4 Other contributions

3 Other works on physics

3.1 Optical treatises 3.2 Celestial physics 3.3 Mechanics

4 Astronomical works

4.1 On the Configuration of the World 4.2 Doubts Concerning Ptolemy 4.3 Model of the Motions of Each of the Seven Planets 4.4 Other astronomical works

5 Mathematical works

5.1 Geometry 5.2 Number theory 5.3 Calculus

6 Other works

6.1 Influence of Melodies on the Souls of Animals 6.2 Engineering 6.3 Philosophy 6.4 Theology

7 Legacy 8 Commemorations 9 Criticism

9.1 Refraction

10 List of works

10.1 Lost works

11 See also 12 Notes 13 Sources 14 Further reading

14.1 Primary 14.2 Secondary

15 External links

Biography[edit] Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
(Alhazen) was born c. 965 to an Arab[14][10] family in Basra, Iraq, which was at the time part of the Buyid emirate. He held a position with the title vizier in his native Basra, and made a name for himself for his knowledge of applied mathematics. As he claimed to be able to regulate the flooding of the Nile, he was invited to by Fatimid Caliph
Caliph
al-Hakim in order to realise a hydraulic project at Aswan. However, Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
was forced to concede the impracticability of his project.[30] Upon his return to Cairo, he was given an administrative post. After he proved unable to fulfill this task as well, he contracted the ire of the caliph Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah,[31] and is said to have been forced into hiding until the caliph's death in 1021, after which his confiscated possessions were returned to him.[32] Legend has it that Alhazen feigned madness and was kept under house arrest during this period.[33] During this time, he wrote his influential Book of Optics. Alhazen continued to live in Cairo, in the neighborhood of the famous University of al-Azhar, and lived from the proceeds of his literary production[34] until his death in c. 1040.[30] Among his students were Sorkhab (Sohrab), a Persian from Semnan, and Abu al-Wafa Mubashir ibn Fatek, an Egyptian prince.[35] Book of Optics[edit] Main article: Book of Optics Alhazen's most famous work is his seven-volume treatise on optics Kitab al-Manazir (Book of Optics), written from 1011 to 1021.[36] Optics
Optics
was translated into Latin
Latin
by an unknown scholar at the end of the 12th century or the beginning of the 13th century.[37][a] It was printed by Friedrich Risner
Friedrich Risner
in 1572, with the title Opticae thesaurus: Alhazeni Arabis libri septem, nuncprimum editi; Eiusdem liber De Crepusculis et nubium ascensionibus (English : Thesaurus of Optics: seven books of the Arab
Arab
Alhazeni, first edition: concerning twilight and the advancement of clouds).[38] Risner is also the author of the name variant "Alhazen"; before Risner he was known in the west as Alhacen, which is the correct transcription of the Arabic name.[39] This work enjoyed a great reputation during the Middle Ages. Works by Alhazen on geometric subjects were discovered in the Bibliothèque nationale in Paris
Paris
in 1834 by E. A. Sedillot. In all, A. Mark Smith has accounted for 18 full or near-complete manuscripts, and five fragments, which are preserved in 14 locations, including one in the Bodleian Library
Bodleian Library
at Oxford, and one in the library of Bruges.[40] Theory of optics[edit] See also: Horopter

Front page of the Opticae Thesaurus, which included the first printed Latin
Latin
translation of Alhazen's Book of Optics. The illustration incorporates many examples of optical phenomena including perspective effects, the rainbow, mirrors, and refraction.

Two major theories on vision prevailed in classical antiquity. The first theory, the emission theory, was supported by such thinkers as Euclid
Euclid
and Ptolemy, who believed that sight worked by the eye emitting rays of light. The second theory, the intromission theory supported by Aristotle
Aristotle
and his followers, had physical forms entering the eye from an object. Previous Islamic writers (such as al-Kindi) had argued essentially on Euclidean, Galenist, or Aristotelian lines. The strongest influence on the Book of Optics
Book of Optics
was from Ptolemy's Optics, while the description of the anatomy and physiology of the eye was based on Galen's account.[41] Alhazen's achievement was to come up with a theory that successfully combined parts of the mathematical ray arguments of Euclid, the medical tradition of Galen, and the intromission theories of Aristotle. Alhazen's intromission theory followed al-Kindi (and broke with Aristotle) in asserting that "from each point of every colored body, illuminated by any light, issue light and color along every straight line that can be drawn from that point".[42] This however left him with the problem of explaining how a coherent image was formed from many independent sources of radiation; in particular, every point of an object would send rays to every point on the eye. What Alhazen needed was for each point on an object to correspond to one point only on the eye.[42] He attempted to resolve this by asserting that the eye would only perceive perpendicular rays from the object—for any one point on the eye only saw the ray that reached it directly, without being refracted by any other part of the eye, would be perceived. He argued using a physical analogy that perpendicular rays were stronger than oblique rays; in the same way that a ball thrown directly at a board might break the board, whereas a ball thrown obliquely at the board would glance off, perpendicular rays were stronger than refracted rays, and it was only perpendicular rays which were perceived by the eye. As there was only one perpendicular ray that would enter the eye at any one point, and all these rays would converge on the centre of the eye in a cone, this allowed him to resolve the problem of each point on an object sending many rays to the eye; if only the perpendicular ray mattered, then he had a one-to-one correspondence and the confusion could be resolved.[43] He later asserted (in book seven of the Optics) that other rays would be refracted through the eye and perceived as if perpendicular.[44] His arguments regarding perpendicular rays do not clearly explain why only perpendicular rays were perceived; why would the weaker oblique rays not be perceived more weakly?[45] His later argument that refracted rays would be perceived as if perpendicular does not seem persuasive.[46] However, despite its weaknesses, no other theory of the time was so comprehensive, and it was enormously influential, particularly in Western Europe: Directly or indirectly, his De Aspectibus (Book of Optics) inspired much activity in optics between the 13th and 17th centuries.[47] Kepler's later theory of the retinal image (which resolved the problem of the correspondence of points on an object and points in the eye) built directly on the conceptual framework of Alhazen.[47] Alhazen showed through experiment that light travels in straight lines, and carried out various experiments with lenses, mirrors, refraction, and reflection.[48] His analyses of reflection and refraction considered the vertical and horizontal components of light rays separately.[49] The camera obscura was known to the ancient Chinese, and was described by the Han Chinese
Han Chinese
polymathic genius Shen Kuo
Shen Kuo
in his scientific book Dream Pool Essays, published in the year 1088 C.E.. Aristotle
Aristotle
had discussed the basic principle behind it in his Problems, however Alhazen's work also contained the first clear description, outside of China, of camera obscura in the areas of the middle east, Europe, Africa
Africa
and India.[50] and early analysis[51] of the device. Alhazen studied the process of sight, the structure of the eye, image formation in the eye, and the visual system. Ian P. Howard argued in a 1996 Perception article that Alhazen should be credited with many discoveries and theories previously attributed to Western Europeans writing centuries later. For example, he described what became in the 19th century Hering's law of equal innervation. He wrote a description of vertical horopters 600 years before Aguilonius
Aguilonius
that is actually closer to the modern definition than Aguilonius's—and his work on binocular disparity was repeated by Panum in 1858.[52] Craig Aaen-Stockdale, while agreeing that Alhazen should be credited with many advances, has expressed some caution, especially when considering Alhazen in isolation from Ptolemy, who Alhazen was extremely familiar with. Alhazen corrected a significant error of Ptolemy
Ptolemy
regarding binocular vision, but otherwise his account is very similar; Ptolemy also attempted to explain what is now called Hering's law.[53] In general, Alhazen built on and expanded the optics of Ptolemy.[54] In a more detailed account of Ibn al-Haytham's contribution to the study of binocular vision based on Lejeune[55] and Sabra,[56] Raynaud[57] showed that the concepts of correspondence, homonymous and crossed diplopia were in place in Ibn al-Haytham's optics. But contrary to Howard, he explained why Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
did not give the circular figure of the horopter and why, by reasoning experimentally, he was in fact closer to the discovery of Panum's fusional area than that of the Vieth-Müller circle. In this regard, Ibn al-Haytham's theory of binocular vision faced two main limits: the lack of recognition of the role of the retina, and obviously the lack of an experimental investigation of ocular tracts. Alhazen's most original contribution was that after describing how he thought the eye was anatomically constructed, he went on to consider how this anatomy would behave functionally as an optical system.[58] His understanding of pinhole projection from his experiments appears to have influenced his consideration of image inversion in the eye,[59] which he sought to avoid.[60] He maintained that the rays that fell perpendicularly on the lens (or glacial humor as he called it) were further refracted outward as they left the glacial humor and the resulting image thus passed upright into the optic nerve at the back of the eye.[61] He followed Galen
Galen
in believing that the lens was the receptive organ of sight, although some of his work hints that he thought the retina was also involved.[62] Alhazen's synthesis of light and vision adhered to the Aristotelian scheme, exhaustively describing the process of vision in a logical, complete fashion.[63] Scientific method[edit]

The duty of the man who investigates the writings of scientists, if learning the truth is his goal, is to make himself an enemy of all that he reads, and ... attack it from every side. He should also suspect himself as he performs his critical examination of it, so that he may avoid falling into either prejudice or leniency. — Alhazen[56]

An aspect associated with Alhazen's optical research is related to systemic and methodological reliance on experimentation (i'tibar)(Arabic: إعتبار) and controlled testing in his scientific inquiries. Moreover, his experimental directives rested on combining classical physics (ilm tabi'i) with mathematics (ta'alim; geometry in particular). This mathematical-physical approach to experimental science supported most of his propositions in Kitab al-Manazir (The Optics; De aspectibus or Perspectivae) and grounded his theories of vision, light and colour, as well as his research in catoptrics and dioptrics (the study of the reflection and refraction of light, respectively).[64] According to Matthias Schramm,[65] Alhazen "was the first to make a systematic use of the method of varying the experimental conditions in a constant and uniform manner, in an experiment showing that the intensity of the light-spot formed by the projection of the moonlight through two small apertures onto a screen diminishes constantly as one of the apertures is gradually blocked up."[66] G. J. Toomer expressed some skepticism regarding Schramm's view,[67] arguing that caution is needed to avoid reading anachronistically particular passages in Alhazen's very large body of work, because at the time (1964), his Book of Optics
Book of Optics
had not yet been fully translated from Arabic. While acknowledging Alhazen's importance in developing experimental techniques, Toomer argued that Alhazen should not be considered in isolation from other Islamic and ancient thinkers.[67] Toomer does concede that "Schramm sums up [Alhazen's] achievement in the development of scientific method."[68] Toomer 1964 lists, as a precondition, what is needed for historians to investigate Schramm's claim (1963) that Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
was the true founder of modern physics,[65] is translations of Ibn al-Haytham.[69] Mark Smith recounts Alhazen's elaboration of Ptolemy's experiments in double vision, reflection, and refraction: Alhazen's Optics
Optics
book influenced the Perspectivists in Europe, Roger Bacon, Witelo, and Peckham. The Optics
Optics
was incorporated into Risner's 1572 printing of Opticae Thesaurus, through which Kepler[70] finally resolved the contradictions inherent in Witelo's explanation of the imaging chain, from external object to the retina of the eye.[71] Alhazen's problem[edit] Main article: Alhazen's problem

The theorem of Ibn Haytham

His work on catoptrics in Book V of the Book of Optics
Book of Optics
contains a discussion of what is now known as Alhazen's problem, first formulated by Ptolemy
Ptolemy
in 150 AD. It comprises drawing lines from two points in the plane of a circle meeting at a point on the circumference and making equal angles with the normal at that point. This is equivalent to finding the point on the edge of a circular billiard table at which a player must aim a cue ball at a given point to make it bounce off the table edge and hit another ball at a second given point. Thus, its main application in optics is to solve the problem, "Given a light source and a spherical mirror, find the point on the mirror where the light will be reflected to the eye of an observer." This leads to an equation of the fourth degree.[72] This eventually led Alhazen to derive a formula for the sum of fourth powers, where previously only the formulas for the sums of squares and cubes had been stated. His method can be readily generalized to find the formula for the sum of any integral powers, although he did not himself do this (perhaps because he only needed the fourth power to calculate the volume of the paraboloid he was interested in). He used his result on sums of integral powers to perform what would now be called an integration, where the formulas for the sums of integral squares and fourth powers allowed him to calculate the volume of a paraboloid.[73] Alhazen eventually solved the problem using conic sections and a geometric proof. His solution was extremely long and complicated and may not have been understood by mathematicians reading him in Latin translation. Later mathematicians used Descartes' analytical methods to analyse the problem,[74] with a new solution being found in 1997 by the Oxford
Oxford
mathematician Peter M. Neumann.[75] Recently, Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories (MERL) researchers Amit Agrawal, Yuichi Taguchi and Srikumar Ramalingam solved the extension of Alhazen's problem to general rotationally symmetric quadric mirrors including hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptical mirrors.[76] They showed that the mirror reflection point can be computed by solving an eighth degree equation in the most general case. If the camera (eye) is placed on the axis of the mirror, the degree of the equation reduces to six.[77] Alhazen's problem can also be extended to multiple refractions from a spherical ball. Given a light source and a spherical ball of certain refractive index, the closest point on the spherical ball where the light is refracted to the eye of the observer can be obtained by solving a tenth degree equation.[77] Other contributions[edit]

Hevelius's Selenographia, showing Alhasen [sic] representing reason, and Galileo representing the senses.

The Kitab al-Manazir (Book of Optics) describes several experimental observations that Alhazen made and how he used his results to explain certain optical phenomena using mechanical analogies. He conducted experiments with projectiles and concluded that only the impact of perpendicular projectiles on surfaces was forceful enough to make them penetrate, whereas surfaces tended to deflect oblique projectile strikes. For example, to explain refraction from a rare to a dense medium, he used the mechanical analogy of an iron ball thrown at a thin slate covering a wide hole in a metal sheet. A perpendicular throw breaks the slate and passes through, whereas an oblique one with equal force and from an equal distance does not.[78] He also used this result to explain how intense, direct light hurts the eye, using a mechanical analogy: Alhazen associated 'strong' lights with perpendicular rays and 'weak' lights with oblique ones. The obvious answer to the problem of multiple rays and the eye was in the choice of the perpendicular ray, since only one such ray from each point on the surface of the object could penetrate the eye.[79] Sudanese psychologist Omar Khaleefa has argued that Alhazen should be considered the founder of experimental psychology, for his pioneering work on the psychology of visual perception and optical illusions.[80] Khaleefa has also argued that Alhazen should also be considered the "founder of psychophysics", a sub-discipline and precursor to modern psychology.[80] Although Alhazen made many subjective reports regarding vision, there is no evidence that he used quantitative psychophysical techniques and the claim has been rebuffed.[81] Alhazen offered an explanation of the Moon illusion, an illusion that played an important role in the scientific tradition of medieval Europe.[82] Many authors repeated explanations that attempted to solve the problem of the Moon appearing larger near the horizon than it does when higher up in the sky. Alhazen argued against Ptolemy's refraction theory, and defined the problem in terms of perceived, rather than real, enlargement. He said that judging the distance of an object depends on there being an uninterrupted sequence of intervening bodies between the object and the observer. When the Moon is high in the sky there are no intervening objects, so the Moon appears close. The perceived size of an object of constant angular size varies with its perceived distance. Therefore, the Moon appears closer and smaller high in the sky, and further and larger on the horizon. Through works by Roger Bacon, John Pecham
John Pecham
and Witelo
Witelo
based on Alhazen's explanation, the Moon illusion
Moon illusion
gradually came to be accepted as a psychological phenomenon, with the refraction theory being rejected in the 17th century.[83] Although Alhazen is often credited with the perceived distance explanation, he was not the first author to offer it. Cleomedes (c. 2nd century) gave this account (in addition to refraction), and he credited it to Posidonius
Posidonius
(c. 135-50 BC).[84] Ptolemy
Ptolemy
may also have offered this explanation in his Optics, but the text is obscure.[85] Alhazen's writings were more widely available in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
than those of these earlier authors, and that probably explains why Alhazen received the credit. Other works on physics[edit] Optical treatises[edit] Besides the Book of Optics, Alhazen wrote several other treatises on the same subject, including his Risala fi l-Daw’ (Treatise on Light). He investigated the properties of luminance, the rainbow, eclipses, twilight, and moonlight. Experiments with mirrors and magnifying lenses provided the foundation for his theories on catoptrics.[86] Celestial physics[edit] Alhazen discussed the physics of the celestial region in his Epitome of Astronomy, arguing that Ptolemaic models must be understood in terms of physical objects rather than abstract hypotheses—in other words that it should be possible to create physical models where (for example) none of the celestial bodies would collide with each other. The suggestion of mechanical models for the Earth centred Ptolemaic model "greatly contributed to the eventual triumph of the Ptolemaic system among the Christians of the West". Alhazen's determination to root astronomy in the realm of physical objects was important, however, because it meant astronomical hypotheses "were accountable to the laws of physics", and could be criticised and improved upon in those terms.[87] He also wrote Maqala fi daw al-qamar (On the Light
Light
of the Moon). Mechanics[edit] In his work, Alhazen discussed theories on the motion of a body.[86] In his Treatise on Place, Alhazen disagreed with Aristotle's view that nature abhors a void, and he used geometry in an attempt to demonstrate that place (al-makan) is the imagined three-dimensional void between the inner surfaces of a containing body.[88]

Astronomical works[edit] On the Configuration of the World[edit] In his On the Configuration of the World Alhazen presented a detailed description of the physical structure of the earth:

The earth as a whole is a round sphere whose center is the center of the world. It is stationary in its [the world's] middle, fixed in it and not moving in any direction nor moving with any of the varieties of motion, but always at rest.[89]

The book is a non-technical explanation of Ptolemy's Almagest, which was eventually translated into Hebrew
Hebrew
and Latin
Latin
in the 13th and 14th centuries and subsequently had an influence on astronomers such as Georg von Peuerbach[90] during the European Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and Renaissance.[91] Doubts Concerning Ptolemy[edit] In his Al-Shukūk ‛alā Batlamyūs, variously translated as Doubts Concerning Ptolemy
Ptolemy
or Aporias against Ptolemy, published at some time between 1025 and 1028, Alhazen criticized Ptolemy's Almagest, Planetary Hypotheses, and Optics, pointing out various contradictions he found in these works, particularly in astronomy. Ptolemy's Almagest concerned mathematical theories regarding the motion of the planets, whereas the Hypotheses concerned what Ptolemy
Ptolemy
thought was the actual configuration of the planets. Ptolemy
Ptolemy
himself acknowledged that his theories and configurations did not always agree with each other, arguing that this was not a problem provided it did not result in noticeable error, but Alhazen was particularly scathing in his criticism of the inherent contradictions in Ptolemy's works.[92] He considered that some of the mathematical devices Ptolemy
Ptolemy
introduced into astronomy, especially the equant, failed to satisfy the physical requirement of uniform circular motion, and noted the absurdity of relating actual physical motions to imaginary mathematical points, lines and circles:[93]

Ptolemy
Ptolemy
assumed an arrangement (hay'a) that cannot exist, and the fact that this arrangement produces in his imagination the motions that belong to the planets does not free him from the error he committed in his assumed arrangement, for the existing motions of the planets cannot be the result of an arrangement that is impossible to exist... [F]or a man to imagine a circle in the heavens, and to imagine the planet moving in it does not bring about the planet's motion.[94]

Having pointed out the problems, Alhazen appears to have intended to resolve the contradictions he pointed out in Ptolemy
Ptolemy
in a later work. Alhazen believed there was a "true configuration" of the planets that Ptolemy
Ptolemy
had failed to grasp. He intended to complete and repair Ptolemy's system, not to replace it completely.[92] In the Doubts Concerning Ptolemy
Ptolemy
Alhazen set out his views on the difficulty of attaining scientific knowledge and the need to question existing authorities and theories:

Truth is sought for itself [but] the truths, [he warns] are immersed in uncertainties [and the scientific authorities (such as Ptolemy, whom he greatly respected) are] not immune from error...[56]

He held that the criticism of existing theories—which dominated this book—holds a special place in the growth of scientific knowledge. Model of the Motions of Each of the Seven Planets[edit] Alhazen's The Model of the Motions of Each of the Seven Planets was written c. 1038. Only one damaged manuscript has been found, with only the introduction and the first section, on the theory of planetary motion, surviving. (There was also a second section on astronomical calculation, and a third section, on astronomical instruments.) Following on from his Doubts on Ptolemy, Alhazen described a new, geometry-based planetary model, describing the motions of the planets in terms of spherical geometry, infinitesimal geometry and trigonometry. He kept a geocentric universe and assumed that celestial motions are uniformly circular, which required the inclusion of epicycles to explain observed motion, but he managed to eliminate Ptolemy's equant. In general, his model didn't try to provide a causal explanation of the motions, but concentrated on providing a complete, geometric description that could explain observed motions without the contradictions inherent in Ptolemy's model.[95] Other astronomical works[edit] Alhazen wrote a total of twenty-five astronomical works, some concerning technical issues such as Exact Determination of the Meridian, a second group concerning accurate astronomical observation, a third group concerning various astronomical problems and questions such as the location of the Milky Way; Alhazen argued for a distant location, based on the fact that it does not move in relation to the fixed stars.[96] The fourth group consists of ten works on astronomical theory, including the Doubts and Model of the Motions discussed above.[97] Mathematical works[edit]

Alhazen's geometrically proven summation formula

In mathematics, Alhazen built on the mathematical works of Euclid
Euclid
and Thabit ibn Qurra
Thabit ibn Qurra
and worked on "the beginnings of the link between algebra and geometry."[98] He developed a formula for summing the first 100 natural numbers, using a geometric proof to prove the formula.[99] Geometry[edit]

The lunes of Alhazen. The two blue lunes together have the same area as the green right triangle.

Alhazen explored what is now known as the Euclidean parallel postulate, the fifth postulate in Euclid's Elements, using a proof by contradiction,[100] and in effect introducing the concept of motion into geometry.[101] He formulated the Lambert quadrilateral, which Boris Abramovich Rozenfeld names the "Ibn al-Haytham–Lambert quadrilateral".[102] In elementary geometry, Alhazen attempted to solve the problem of squaring the circle using the area of lunes (crescent shapes), but later gave up on the impossible task.[103] The two lunes formed from a right triangle by erecting a semicircle on each of the triangle's sides, inward for the hypotenuse and outward for the other two sides, are known as the lunes of Alhazen; they have the same total area as the triangle itself.[104] Number theory[edit] Alhazen's contributions to number theory include his work on perfect numbers. In his Analysis
Analysis
and Synthesis, he may have been the first to state that every even perfect number is of the form 2n−1(2n − 1) where 2n − 1 is prime, but he was not able to prove this result; Euler later proved it in the 18th century.[103] Alhazen solved problems involving congruences using what is now called Wilson's theorem. In his Opuscula, Alhazen considers the solution of a system of congruences, and gives two general methods of solution. His first method, the canonical method, involved Wilson's theorem, while his second method involved a version of the Chinese remainder theorem.[103] Calculus[edit] Alhazen discovered the sum formula for the fourth power, using a method that could be generally used to determine the sum for any integral power. He used this to find the volume of a paraboloid. He could find the integral formula for any polynomial without having developed a general formula.[105] Other works[edit] Influence of Melodies on the Souls of Animals[edit] Alhazen also wrote a Treatise on the Influence of Melodies on the Souls of Animals, although no copies have survived. It appears to have been concerned with the question of whether animals could react to music, for example whether a camel would increase or decrease its pace. Engineering[edit] In engineering, one account of his career as a civil engineer has him summoned to Egypt by the Fatimid Caliph, Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, to regulate the flooding of the Nile
Nile
River. He carried out a detailed scientific study of the annual inundation of the Nile
Nile
River, and he drew plans for building a dam, at the site of the modern-day Aswan Dam. His field work, however, later made him aware of the impracticality of this scheme, and he soon feigned madness so he could avoid punishment from the Caliph.[106] Philosophy[edit] In his Treatise on Place, Alhazen disagreed with Aristotle's view that nature abhors a void, and he used geometry in an attempt to demonstrate that place (al-makan) is the imagined three-dimensional void between the inner surfaces of a containing body.[88] Abd-el-latif, a supporter of Aristotle's philosophical view of place, later criticized the work in Fi al-Radd ‘ala Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
fi al-makan (A refutation of Ibn al-Haytham’s place) for its geometrization of place.[88] Alhazen also discussed space perception and its epistemological implications in his Book of Optics. In "tying the visual perception of space to prior bodily experience, Alhazen unequivocally rejected the intuitiveness of spatial perception and, therefore, the autonomy of vision. Without tangible notions of distance and size for correlation, sight can tell us next to nothing about such things."[107] Theology[edit] Alhazen was a Muslim, however, it is not certain to which school of Islam, he belonged. As a Sunni, he may have been either a follower of the Ash'ari
Ash'ari
school,[108] or a follower of the Mu'tazili
Mu'tazili
school.[109] Sabra (1978) even suggested he might have been an adherent of Shia Islam.[110][need quotation to verify] Alhazen wrote a work on Islamic theology in which he discussed prophethood and developed a system of philosophical criteria to discern its false claimants in his time.[111] He also wrote a treatise entitled Finding the Direction of Qibla
Qibla
by Calculation in which he discussed finding the Qibla, where prayers (salat) are directed towards, mathematically.[112] There are occasional references to theology or religious sentiment in his technical works, e.g. in Doubts Concerning Ptolemy:

Truth is sought for its own sake ... Finding the truth is difficult, and the road to it is rough. For the truths are plunged in obscurity. ... God, however, has not preserved the scientist from error and has not safeguarded science from shortcomings and faults. If this had been the case, scientists would not have disagreed upon any point of science...[113]

In The Winding Motion:

From the statements made by the noble Shaykh, it is clear that he believes in Ptolemy's words in everything he says, without relying on a demonstration or calling on a proof, but by pure imitation (taqlid); that is how experts in the prophetic tradition have faith in Prophets, may the blessing of God be upon them. But it is not the way that mathematicians have faith in specialists in the demonstrative sciences.[114]

Regarding the relation of objective truth and God:

I constantly sought knowledge and truth, and it became my belief that for gaining access to the effulgence and closeness to God, there is no better way than that of searching for truth and knowledge.[115]

Legacy[edit]

Cover page of the Latin
Latin
translation of Kitāb al-Manāẓir

Alhazen made significant contributions to optics, number theory, geometry, astronomy and natural philosophy. Alhazen's work on optics is credited with contributing a new emphasis on experiment. His main work, Kitab al-Manazir (Book of Optics), was known in the Muslim world
Muslim world
mainly, but not exclusively, through the thirteenth-century commentary by Kamāl al-Dīn al-Fārisī, the Tanqīḥ al-Manāẓir li-dhawī l-abṣār wa l-baṣā'ir.[116] In al-Andalus, it was used by the eleventh-century prince of the Banu Hud dynasty of Zaragossa and author of an important mathematical text, al-Mu'taman ibn Hūd. A Latin
Latin
translation of the Kitab al-Manazir was made probably in the late twelfth or early thirteenth century.[117] This translation was read by and greatly influenced a number of scholars in Christian Europe
Europe
including: Roger Bacon,[118] Robert Grosseteste,[119] Witelo, Giambattista della Porta,[120] Leonardo Da Vinci,[121] Galileo Galilei,[122] Christiaan Huygens,[123] René Descartes,[124] and Johannes Kepler.[125] His research in catoptrics (the study of optical systems using mirrors) centred on spherical and parabolic mirrors and spherical aberration. He made the observation that the ratio between the angle of incidence and refraction does not remain constant, and investigated the magnifying power of a lens. His work on catoptrics also contains the problem known as "Alhazen's problem".[48] Meanwhile in the Islamic world, Alhazen's work influenced Averroes' writings on optics,[126] and his legacy was further advanced through the 'reforming' of his Optics
Optics
by Persian scientist Kamal al-Din al-Farisi
Kamal al-Din al-Farisi
(died ca. 1320) in the latter's Kitab Tanqih al-Manazir (The Revision of [Ibn al-Haytham's] Optics).[64] Alhazen wrote as many as 200 books, although only 55 have survived. Some of his treatises on optics survived only through Latin translation. During the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
his books on cosmology were translated into Latin, Hebrew
Hebrew
and other languages. The impact crater Alhazen on the Moon is named in his honour,[127] as was the asteroid 59239 Alhazen.[128] In honour of Alhazen, the Aga Khan University (Pakistan) named its Ophthalmology endowed chair as "The Ibn-e-Haitham Associate Professor and Chief of Ophthalmology".[129] Alhazen, by the name Ibn al-Haytham, is featured on the obverse of the Iraqi 10,000-dinar banknote issued in 2003,[130] and on 10-dinar notes from 1982. The 2015 International Year of Light
Light
celebrated the 1000th anniversary of the works on optics by Ibn Al-Haytham.[131] Commemorations[edit] In 2014, the "Hiding in the Light" episode of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, presented by Neil deGrasse Tyson, focused on the accomplishments of Ibn al-Haytham. He was voiced by Alfred Molina
Alfred Molina
in the episode. Over forty years previously, Jacob Bronowski
Jacob Bronowski
presented Alhazen's work in a similar television documentary (and the corresponding book), The Ascent of Man. In episode 5 (The Music of the Spheres), Bronowski remarked that in his view, Alhazen was "the one really original scientific mind that Arab
Arab
culture produced", whose theory of optics was not improved on till the time of Newton and Leibniz. UNESCO
UNESCO
declared 2015 the International Year of Light
Light
and its Director-General Irina Bokova dubbed Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
'the father of optics'.[132] Amongst others, this was to celebrate Ibn Al-Haytham's achievements in optics, mathematics and astronomy. An international campaign, created by the 1001 Inventions
1001 Inventions
organisation, titled 1001 Inventions and the World of Ibn Al-Haytham featuring a series of interactive exhibits, workshops and live shows about his work, partnering with science centers, science festivals, museums, and educational institutions, as well as digital and social media platforms.[133] The campaign also produced and released the short educational film 1001 Inventions
1001 Inventions
and the World of Ibn Al-Haytham, In honour of Alhazen, the Aga Khan University
Aga Khan University
(Pakistan) named its Ophthalmology endowed chair as "The Ibn-e-Haitham Associate Professor and Chief of Ophthalmology" Criticism[edit] Mark Smith's critical editions of De Aspectibus
De Aspectibus
contain a Latin glossary with page numbers of each occurrence of the words, to illustrate Alhazen's experimental viewpoint. Smith shows that Alhacen was received well in the West because he reinforced the importance of the Hellenic tradition to it.[134] Refraction[edit] Smith (2010) has noted that Alhazen's treatment of refraction describes an experimental setup without publication of data.[135] Ptolemy
Ptolemy
published his experimental results for refraction, in contrast. One generation before Alhazen, Ibn Sahl discovered his statement of the lengths of the hypotenuse for each incident and refracted right triangle, respectively. This is equivalent to Descartes' formulation for refraction. Alhazen's convention for describing the incident and refracted angles is still in use. List of works[edit] According to medieval biographers, Alhazen wrote more than 200 works on a wide range of subjects, of which at least 96 of his scientific works are known. Most of his works are now lost, but more than 50 of them have survived to some extent. Nearly half of his surviving works are on mathematics, 23 of them are on astronomy, and 14 of them are on optics, with a few on other subjects.[136] Not all his surviving works have yet been studied, but some of the ones that have are given below.[137]

Book of Optics
Book of Optics
(كتاب المناظر) Analysis
Analysis
and Synthesis (مقالة في التحليل والتركيب) Balance of Wisdom (ميزان الحكمة) Corrections to the Almagest
Almagest
(تصويبات على المجسطي) Discourse on Place (مقالة في المكان) Exact Determination of the Pole (التحديد الدقيق للقطب) Exact Determination of the Meridian (رسالة في الشفق) Finding the Direction of Qibla
Qibla
by Calculation (كيفية حساب اتجاه القبلة) Horizontal Sundials (المزولة الأفقية) Hour Lines Doubts Concerning Ptolemy
Ptolemy
(شكوك على بطليموس) Maqala fi'l-Qarastun (مقالة في قرسطون) On Completion of the Conics (إكمال المخاريط) On Seeing the Stars (رؤية الكواكب) On Squaring the Circle (مقالة فی تربیع الدائرة) On the Burning Sphere ( المرايا المحرقة بالدوائر) On the Configuration of the World (تكوين العالم) On the Form of Eclipse
Eclipse
(مقالة فی صورة ‌الکسوف) On the Light
Light
of Stars (مقالة في ضوء النجوم) On the Light
Light
of the Moon (مقالة في ضوء القمر) On the Milky Way
Milky Way
(مقالة في درب التبانة) On the Nature of Shadows (كيفيات الإظلال) On the Rainbow
Rainbow
and Halo (مقالة في قوس قزح) Opuscula Resolution of Doubts Concerning the Almagest Resolution of Doubts Concerning the Winding Motion The Correction of the Operations in Astronomy The Different Heights of the Planets The Direction of Mecca (اتجاه القبلة) The Model of the Motions of Each of the Seven Planets (نماذج حركات الكواكب السبعة) The Model of the Universe
Universe
(نموذج الكون) The Motion of the Moon (حركة القمر) The Ratios of Hourly Arcs to their Heights The Winding Motion (الحركة المتعرجة) Treatise on Light
Light
(رسالة في الضوء) Treatise on Place (رسالة في المكان) Treatise on the Influence of Melodies on the Souls of Animals (تأثير اللحون الموسيقية في النفوس الحيوانية) كتاب في تحليل المسائل الهندسية (A book in engineering analysis) الجامع في أصول الحساب (The whole in the assets of the account) قول فی مساحة الکرة (Say in the sphere) القول المعروف بالغریب فی حساب المعاملات (Saying the unknown in the calculation of transactions) خواص المثلث من جهة العمود (Triangle properties from the side of the column) رسالة فی مساحة المسجم المکافی (A message in the free space) شرح أصول إقليدس (Explain the origins of Euclid) المرايا المحرقة بالقطوع (The burning mirrors of the rainbow)

Lost works[edit]

A Book in which I have Summarized the Science of Optics
Optics
from the Two Books of Euclid
Euclid
and Ptolemy, to which I have added the Notions of the First Discourse which is Missing from Ptolemy's Book[138] Treatise on Burning Mirrors Treatise on the Nature of [the Organ of] Sight and on How Vision is Achieved Through It

See also[edit]

"Hiding in the Light" History of mathematics History of optics History of physics History of science History of scientific method Hockney–Falco thesis Mathematics
Mathematics
in medieval Islam Physics
Physics
in medieval Islam Science in the medieval Islamic world Fatima al-Fihri Islamic Golden Age

Notes[edit]

^ A. Mark Smith has determined that there were at least two translators, based on their facility with Arabic; the first, more experienced scholar began the translation at the beginning of Book One, and handed it off in the middle of Chapter Three of Book Three. Smith 2001 91 Volume 1: Commentary and Latin
Latin
text pp.xx-xxi. See also his 2006, 2008, 2010 translations.

^ Falco 2007. ^ Rosenthal 1960–1961. ^ O'Connor & Robertson 1999. ^ El-Bizri 2010, p. 11: "Ibn al-Haytham's groundbreaking studies in optics, including his research in catoptrics and dioptrics (respectively the sciences investigating the principles and instruments pertaining to the reflection and refraction of light), were principally gathered in his monumental opus: Kitåb al-manåóir (The Optics; De Aspectibus
De Aspectibus
or Perspectivae; composed between 1028 CE and 1038 CE)." ^ Rooney 2012, p. 39: "As a rigorous experimental physicist, he is sometimes credited with inventing the scientific method." ^ Baker 2012, p. 449: "As shown earlier, Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
was among the first scholars to experiment with animal psychology. ^ A. Mark Smith (1996). Ptolemy's Theory of Visual Perception: An English Translation of the Optics. American Philosophical Society. p. 58.  ^ Also Alhacen, Avennathan, Avenetan (etc.); the identity of "Alhazen" with Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
al-Basri "was identified towards the end of the 19th century". (Vernet 1996, p. 788) ^ Vernet 1996, p. 788: "IBN AL-HAYXHAM, B. AL-HAYTHAM AL-BASRI, AL-MisRl, was identified towards the end of the 19th century with the ALHAZEN, AVENNATHAN and AVENETAN of mediaeval Latin
Latin
texts. He is one of the principal Arab
Arab
mathematicians and, without any doubt, the best physicist." ^ a b Simon 2006 ^ "OPTICS – Encyclopaedia Iranica". www.iranicaonline.org.  ^ " Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
Arab
Arab
astronomer and mathematician". Encyclopedia Britannica.  ^ " Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
Infoplease". Columbia Encyclopedia.  ^ a b For the description of his main fields, see e.g. Vernet 1996, p. 788 ("He is one of the principal Arab
Arab
mathematicians and, without any doubt, the best physicist.") Sabra 2008, Kalin, Ayduz & Dagli 2009 ("Ibn al-Ḥaytam was an eminent eleventh-century Arab
Arab
optician, geometer, arithmetician, algebraist, astronomer, and engineer."), Dallal 1999 (" Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
(d. 1039), known in the West as Alhazan, was a leading Arab
Arab
mathematician, astronomer, and physicist. His optical compendium, Kitab al-Manazir, is the greatest medieval work on optics.") ^ Selin 2008: "The three most recognizable Islamic contributors to meteorology were: the Alexandrian mathematician/ astronomer Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen 965-1039), the Arab-speaking Persian physician Ibn Sina ( Avicenna
Avicenna
980-1037), and the Spanish Moorish physician/jurist Ibn Rushd (Averroes; 1126-1198)." He has been dubbed the "father of modern optics" by the UNESCO. "Impact of Science on Society". UNESCO. 26–27: page–140. 1976. CS1 maint: Extra text (link) . "International Year of Light
Light
- Ibn Al-Haytham and the Legacy of Arabic Optics". www.light2015.org. Retrieved 2017-10-09. . "International Year of Light: Ibn al Haytham, pioneer of modern optics celebrated at UNESCO". UNESCO. Retrieved 2017-10-09. . Specifically, he was the first to explain that vision occurs when light bounces on an object and then is directed to one's eyes. Adamson, Peter (7 July 2016). Philosophy
Philosophy
in the Islamic World: A History of Philosophy
Philosophy
Without Any Gaps. Oxford
Oxford
University Press. p. 77. ISBN 978-0-19-957749-1.  ^ Roshdi Rashed, Ibn al-Haytham's Geometrical Methods and the Philosophy
Philosophy
of Mathematics: A History of Arabic Sciences and Mathematics, Volume 5, Routledge
Routledge
(2017), p. 635 ^ Adamson, Peter (7 July 2016). Philosophy
Philosophy
in the Islamic World: A History of Philosophy
Philosophy
Without Any Gaps. Oxford
Oxford
University Press. p. 77. ISBN 978-0-19-957749-1.  ^ Ackerman 1991. ^ Haq, Syed (2009). "Science in Islam". Oxford
Oxford
Dictionary of the Middle Ages. ISSN 1703-7603. Retrieved 2014-10-22. ^ G. J. Toomer. Review on JSTOR, Toomer's 1964 review of Matthias Schramm (1963) Ibn Al-Haythams Weg Zur Physik Toomer p.464: "Schramm sums up [Ibn Al-Haytham's] achievement in the development of scientific method." ^ "International Year of Light
Light
- Ibn Al-Haytham and the Legacy of Arabic Optics".  ^ Al-Khalili, Jim (4 January 2009). "The 'first true scientist'". BBC News. Retrieved 24 September 2013.  ^ Gorini, Rosanna (October 2003). "Al-Haytham the man of experience. First steps in the science of vision" (PDF). Journal of the International Society for the History of Islamic Medicine. 2 (4): 53–55. Retrieved 2008-09-25.  ^ According to Al-Qifti. O'Connor & Robertson 1999. ^ O'Connor & Robertson 1999 ^ O'Connor & Robertson 1999 ^ Corbin 1993, p. 149. ^ Lindberg 1967, p. 331 ^ A. Mark Smith (1996). Ptolemy's Theory of Visual Perception: An English Translation of the Optics. American Philosophical Society. p. 57.  ^ a b Corbin 1993, p. 149. ^ The Prisoner of Al-Hakim. Clifton, NJ: Blue Dome Press, 2017. ISBN 1682060160 ^ Carl Brockelmann, Geschichte der arabischen Litteratur, vol. 1 (1898), p. 469. ^ "the Great Islamic Encyclopedia". Cgie.org.ir. Archived from the original on September 30, 2011. Retrieved 2012-05-27. [verification needed] ^ For Ibn al-Haytham's life and works, (Smith 2001, p. cxix) recommends (Sabra 1989, pp. vol.2, xix-lxxiii) ^ Sajjadi, Sadegh, "Alhazen", Great Islamic Encyclopedia, Volume 1, Article No. 1917;[verification needed] ^ Al-Khalili 2015. ^ Crombie 1971, p. 147, n. 2. ^ Alhazen (965–1040): Library of Congress Citations, Malaspina Great Books, archived from the original on September 27, 2007, retrieved 2008-01-23 [verification needed] ^ Smith 2001, p. xxi. ^ Smith 2001, p. xxii. ^ Smith 2001, p. lxxix. ^ a b Lindberg 1976, p. 73. ^ (Lindberg 1976, p. 74) ^ (Lindberg 1976, p. 76) ^ Lindberg 1976, p. 75 ^ Lindberg 1976, pp. 76–78 ^ a b Lindberg 1976, p. 86. ^ a b Al Deek 2004. ^ Heeffer 2003. ^ Kelley, Milone & Aveni 2005, p. 83:

"The first clear description of the device appears in the Book of Optics
Optics
of Alhazen."

^ Wade & Finger (2001):

"The principles of the camera obscura first began to be correctly analysed in the eleventh century, when they were outlined by Ibn al-Haytham."

^ Howard 1996. ^ Aaen-Stockdale 2008 ^ Wade 1998, pp. 240,316,334,367; Howard & Wade 1996, pp. 1195,1197,1200. ^ Lejeune 1958. ^ a b c Sabra 1989. ^ Raynaud 2003. ^ Russell 1996, p. 691. ^ Russell 1996, p. 689. ^ Lindberg 1976, pp. 80–85 ^ Smith 2004, pp. 186, 192. ^ Wade 1998, p. 14 ^ Smith 2001, p. 437 De Aspectibus
De Aspectibus
Book Two, 3.39 p.437, via JSTOR ^ a b El-Bizri 2005a, 2005b. ^ a b see Schramm's Habilitationsschrift, Ibn al-Haythams Weg zur Physik (Steiner, Wiesbaden, 1963) as cited by Rüdiger Thiele (2005) Historia Mathematica 32, 271–274. "In Memoriam: Matthias Schramm, 1928–2005" ^ Toomer 1964, pp. 463–4 ^ a b Toomer 1964, p. 465 ^ Toomer 1964, p. 464 ^ G. J. Toomer. Review on JSTOR, Toomer's 1964 review of Matthias Schramm (1963) Ibn Al-Haythams Weg Zur Physik Toomer p. 464: "Schramm sums up [Ibn Al-Haytham's] achievement in the development of scientific method.", p. 465: "Schramm has demonstrated .. beyond any dispute that Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
is a major figure in the Islamic scientific tradition, particularly in the creation of experimental techniques." p.465: "Only when the influence of ibn al-Haytam and others on the mainstream of later medieval physical writings has been seriously investigated can Schramm's claim that ibn al-Haytam was the true founder of modern physics be evaluated." ^ Smith 2015, p. 329 ^ Smith 2004, p. 192 ^ O'Connor & Robertson 1999, Weisstein 2008. ^ Katz 1995, pp. 165–9 & 173–4. ^ Smith 1992. ^ Highfield 1997. ^ Agrawal, Taguchi & Ramalingam 2011. ^ a b Agrawal, Taguchi & Ramalingam 2010. ^ Russell 1996, p. 695. ^ Russell 1996. ^ a b Khaleefa 1999 ^ Aaen-Stockdale 2008. ^ Ross & Plug 2002. ^ Hershenson 1989, pp. 9–10. ^ Ross 2000. ^ Ross & Ross 1976. ^ a b El-Bizri 2006. ^ Duhem 1969, p. 28. ^ a b c El-Bizri 2007. ^ Langermann 1990, chap. 2, sect. 22, p. 61 ^ Lorch 2008. ^ Langermann 1990, pp. 34–41; Gondhalekar 2001, p. 21. ^ a b Sabra 1998. ^ Langermann 1990, pp. 8–10 ^ Sabra 1978b, p. 121, n. 13 ^ Rashed 2007. ^ Mohamed 2000, pp. 49–50 ^ Rashed 2007, pp. 8–9. ^ Faruqi 2006, pp. 395–6:

In seventeenth century Europe
Europe
the problems formulated by Ibn al-Haytham (965–1041) became known as 'Alhazen's problem'. [...] Al-Haytham’s contributions to geometry and number theory went well beyond the Archimedean tradition. Al-Haytham also worked on analytical geometry and the beginnings of the link between algebra and geometry. Subsequently, this work led in pure mathematics to the harmonious fusion of algebra and geometry that was epitomised by Descartes
Descartes
in geometric analysis and by Newton in the calculus. Al-Haytham was a scientist who made major contributions to the fields of mathematics, physics and astronomy during the latter half of the tenth century.

^ Rottman 2000, Chapter 1. ^ Eder 2000. ^ Katz 1998, p. 269:

In effect, this method characterised parallel lines as lines always equidistant from one another and also introduced the concept of motion into geometry.

^ Rozenfeld 1988, p. 65. ^ a b c O'Connor & Robertson 1999. ^ Alsina & Nelsen 2010. ^ Katz, Victor J. (1995). "Ideas of Calculus in Islam and India". Mathematics
Mathematics
Magazine. 68 (3): 163–174. doi:10.2307/2691411. JSTOR 2691411.  [165–9, 173–4] ^ Plott 2000, Pt. II, p. 459. ^ Smith 2005, pp. 219–40. ^ Sardar 1998, Bettany 1995, p. 251. ^ Hodgson 2006, p. 53. ^ (Sabra 1978a, p. 54) ^ Plott 2000, Pt. II, p. 464 ^ Topdemir 2007b, pp. 8–9. ^ Translated by S. Pines, as quoted in Sambursky 1974, p. 139. ^ Rashed 2007, p. 11. ^ Plott 2000, Pt. II, p. 465 ^ Sabra 2007. ^ Sabra 2007, pp. 122, 128–129. Grant (1974, p. 392) notes the Book of Optics
Book of Optics
has also been denoted as Opticae Thesaurus Alhazen Arabis, as De Aspectibus, and also as Perspectiva ^ Lindberg 1996, p. 11, passim. ^ Authier 2013, p. 23: "Alhazen's works in turn inspired many scientists of the Middle Ages, such as the English bishop, Robert Grosseteste (ca 1175–1253), and the English Franciscan, Roger Bacon (ca 1214–1294), Erazmus Ciolek Witelo, or Witelon (ca 1230* 1280), a Silesian-born Polish friar, philosopher and scholar, published in ca 1270 a treatise on optics, Perspectiva, largely based on Alhazen's works." ^ Magill & Aves 1998, p. 66: "Roger Bacon, John Peckham, and Giambattista della Porta
Giambattista della Porta
are only some of the many thinkers who were influenced by Alhazen's work." ^ Zewail & Thomas 2010, p. 5: "The Latin
Latin
translation of Alhazen's work influenced scientists and philosophers such as (Roger) Bacon and da Vinci, and formed the foundation for the work by mathematicians like Kepler, Descartes
Descartes
and Huygens..." ^ El-Bizri 2010, p. 12: "This [Latin] version of Ibn al-Haytham's Optics, which became available in print, was read and consulted by scientists and philosophers of the caliber of Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, and Huygens as discussed by Nader El-Bizri." ^ Magill & Aves 1998, p. 66: "Sabra discusses in detail the impact of Alhazen's ideas on the optical discoveries of such men as Descartes
Descartes
and Christiaan Huygens; see also El-Bizri 2005a." ^ El-Bizri 2010, p. 12. ^ Magill & Aves 1998, p. 66: "Even Kepler, however, used some of Alhazen's ideas, for example, the one-to-one correspondence between points on the object and points in the eye. It would not be going too far to say that Alhazen's optical theories defined the scope and goals of the field from his day to ours." ^ Topdemir 2007a, p. 77. ^ Chong, Lim & Ang 2002 Appendix 3, p. 129. ^ NASA
NASA
2006. ^ AKU Research Publications 1995-98 Archived January 4, 2015, at the Wayback Machine. ^ Murphy 2003. ^ "Ibn Al-Haytham and the Legacy of Arabic Optics". 2015 INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF LIGHT. 2015.  ^ 2015, International Year of Light ^ "1000 Years of Arabic Optics
Optics
to be a Focus of the International Year of Light
Light
in 2015". United Nations. Retrieved 27 November 2014.  ^ Smith 2001, 2006, 2008, 2010. ^ Smith 2010 para.[3.33], p.259, footnote67. Note 67 is on p.361. [3.33] is the summary of how to measure the sizes of the angle of refraction for air to water, air to glass, glass to air, glass to water, for plane, concave, and convex surfaces ^ Rashed 2002a, p. 773. ^ Rashed 2007, pp. 8–9; Topdemir 2007b ^ From Ibn Abi Usaibia's catalog, as cited in Smith 2001 91(vol.1), p.xv.

Sources[edit]

Simon, G (2006), "The gaze in Ibn al-Haytham.", The Medieval History Journal, 9 (1): 89–98, doi:10.1177/097194580500900105 

Daneshfard, Babak (2016), " Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
(965–1039 AD), the original portrayal of the modern theory of vision", Journal of Medical Biography, Sage Publications, 24: 1, doi:10.1177/0967772014529050 

Masoud, Mohammad T; Masoud, Faiza (2006), "How Islam changed medicine: Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
and optics", The BMJ, British Medical Association, 332: 332:120, doi:10.1136/bmj.332.7533.120-a, PMC 1326979 , PMID 16410601 

Masic I (2008), "Ibn al-Haitham--father of optics and describer of vision theory", Med Arh, Academy of medical sciences of bosnia and herzegovina, 62: 62(3):183–8, PMID 18822953 

Sweileh, Waleed M; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Shanti, Yousef I; Sawalha, Ansam F; Zyoud, Sa’ed H (2015), "Contribution of Arab
Arab
researchers to ophthalmology: a bibliometric and comparative analysis", Springerplus, Springer Publishing, 4: 4:42, doi:10.1186/s40064-015-0806-0 

Aaen-Stockdale, C. R. (2008), " Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
and psychophysics", Perception, 37 (4): 636–638, doi:10.1068/p5940, PMID 18546671 

Ackerman, James S (August 1991), Distance Points: Essays in Theory and Renaissance
Renaissance
Art and Architecture, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA: MIT Press, ISBN 978-0262011228 .

Agrawal, Amit; Taguchi, Yuichi; Ramalingam, Srikumar (2010), Analytical Forward Projection for Axial Non-Central Dioptric and Catadioptric Cameras, European Conference on Computer Vision, archived from the original on 2012-03-07 

Agrawal, Amit; Taguchi, Yuichi; Ramalingam, Srikumar (2011), Beyond Alhazen's Problem: Analytical Projection Model for Non-Central Catadioptric Cameras with Quadric Mirrors, IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CiteSeerX 10.1.1.433.9727 , archived from the original on 2012-03-07 

Alsina, Claudi; Nelsen, Roger B. (2010), "9.1 Squarable lunes", Charming Proofs: A Journey into Elegant Mathematics, Dolciani mathematical expositions, 42, Mathematical Association of America, pp. 137–144, ISBN 978-0-88385-348-1 

Arjomand, Kamran (1997), "The emergence of scientific modernity in Iran: controversies surrounding astrology and modern astronomy in the mid-nineteenth century", Iranian Studies, 30 (1) 

Authier, André (2013), "3: The Dual Nature of Light", Early Days of X-ray Crystallography, Oxford
Oxford
University Press, ISBN 9780199659845 .

Baker, David B., ed. (2012), The Oxford
Oxford
Handbook of the History of Psychology: Global Perspectives, Oxford
Oxford
University Press, ISBN 9780195366556 .

Bettany, Laurence (1995), "Ibn al-Haytham: an answer to multicultural science teaching?", Physics
Physics
Education, 30: 247–252, Bibcode:1995PhyEd..30..247B, doi:10.1088/0031-9120/30/4/011 

El-Bizri, Nader (2005a), "A Philosophical Perspective on Alhazen's Optics", Arabic Sciences and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, 15 (2): 189–218, doi:10.1017/S0957423905000172 

El-Bizri, Nader (2005b), "Ibn al-Haytham", in Wallis, Faith, Medieval Science, Technology, and Medicine: An Encyclopedia, New York & London: Routledge, pp. 237–240, ISBN 0-415-96930-1, OCLC 218847614 

El-Bizri, Nader (2006), " Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
or Alhazen", in Meri, Josef W., Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopaedia, II, New York & London: Routledge, pp. 343–345, ISBN 0-415-96692-2, OCLC 224371638 

El-Bizri, Nader (2007), "In Defence of the Sovereignty of Philosophy: Al-Baghdadi's Critique of Ibn al-Haytham's Geometrisation of Place", Arabic Sciences and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, 17: 57–80, doi:10.1017/S0957423907000367 

El-Bizri, Nader (2009a), "La perception de la profondeur: Alhazen, Berkeley, et Merleau-Ponty", Oriens Occidens, Paris: CNRS, 5 (1): 171–184 

El-Bizri, Nader (2009b), " Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
et le problème de la couleur", Oriens Occidens, Paris: CNRS, 7 (1): 201–226 

El-Bizri, Nader (2010). "Classical Optics
Optics
and the Perspectiva Traditions Leading to the Renaissance". In Hendrix, John Shannon; Carman, Charles H. Renaissance
Renaissance
Theories of Vision (Visual Culture in Early Modernity). Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate. pp. 11–30. ISBN 1-409400-24-7. 

Burns, Robert (1999-08-08), "Some fear Iraq may be rebuilding its weapons of mass destruction", Topeka Capital-Journal, retrieved 2008-09-21 

Chong, S.M.; Lim, A.C.H.; Ang, P.S, (2002), Photographic Atlas of the Moon, ISBN 9780521813921 .

Corbin, Henry (1993) [Original French 1964], History of Islamic Philosophy, translated by Sherrard, Liadain; Sherrard, Philip, London: Kegan Paul International in association with Islamic Publications for The Institute of Ismaili Studies, ISBN 0-7103-0416-1, OCLC 22109949 

Crombie, A. C. (1971), Robert Grosseteste
Robert Grosseteste
and the Origins of Experimental Science, 1100–1700, Clarendon Press, Oxford University 

Dallal, Ahmad S. (1999), "Science, Medicine
Medicine
and Technology", in Esposito, John L., The Oxford
Oxford
History of Islam, Oxford
Oxford
University Press .

Al Deek, Mahmoud (2004), "Ibn Al-Haitham: Master of Optics, Mathematics, Physics
Physics
and Medicine", Al Shindagah (November–December 2004) 

Duhem, Pierre (1969) [First published 1908], To Save the Phenomena: An Essay on the Idea of Physical theory from Plato to Galileo, University of Chicago
Chicago
Press, Chicago, ISBN 0-226-16921-9, OCLC 12429405 

Eder, Michelle (2000), Views of Euclid's Parallel Postulate in Ancient Greece and in Medieval Islam, Rutgers University, retrieved 2008-01-23 

Falco, Charles M. (12–15 February 2007), Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
and the Origins of Modern Image Analysis
Analysis
(PDF), presented at a plenary session at the International Conference on Information Sciences, Signal Processing and its Applications, retrieved 2008-01-23 .[dead link] Falco, Charles M. (November 27–29, 2007), Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
and the Origins of Computerized Image Analysis
Analysis
(PDF), International Conference on Computer Engineering & Systems (ICCES), retrieved 2010-01-30 .[dead link]

Faruqi, Yasmeen M. (2006), "Contributions of Islamic scholars to the scientific enterprise", International Education Journal, 7 (4): 391–396 

Gondhalekar, Prabhakar M. (2001), The Grip of Gravity: The Quest to Understand the Laws of Motion and Gravitation, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-80316-0, OCLC 224074913 

Grant, Edward (1974), A source book in medieval science, Volume One, Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press 

Grant, Edward (2008), "Alhazen", Encarta Online Encyclopedia, Microsoft, retrieved 2008-09-16 

Heeffer, Albrecht (September 14–15, 2003), "Kepler's near discovery of the sine law: A qualitative computational model", Third International workshop: Computer models of scientific reasoning and applications (PDF), Buenos Aires: National Library of the Argentine Republic, retrieved 2008-01-23 

Hershenson, Maurice (1989), The Moon Illusion, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, ISBN 0-8058-0121-9, OCLC 20091171, retrieved 2008-09-22 

Hess, David J. (1995), Science and Technology in a Multicultural World: The Cultural Politics of Facts and Artifacts, Columbia University Press, ISBN 0-231-10196-1 .

Highfield, Roger (1 April 1997), "Don solves the last puzzle left by ancient Greeks", The Daily Telegraph, 676, retrieved 2008-09-24 

Hodgson, Peter Edward (2006), Theology
Theology
And Modern Physics, Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing (published 2006-01-15), ISBN 978-0-7546-3622-9, OCLC 56876894, DDC: 201.653, LCC: BL265.P4 H63 2005 

Howard, Ian P. (1996), "Alhazen's neglected discoveries of visual phenomena", Perception, 25 (10): 1203–1217, doi:10.1068/p251203, PMID 9027923 

Howard, Ian P.; Wade, Nicholas J. (1996), "Ptolemy's contributions to the geometry of binocular vision", Perception, 25 (10): 1189–201, doi:10.1068/p251189, PMID 9027922 

Kalin, Ibrahim; Ayduz, Salim; Dagli, Caner, eds. (2009), "Ibn al-Ḥaytam", The Oxford
Oxford
Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Science, and Technology in Islam, Oxford
Oxford
University Press 

Katz, Victor J. (1995), "Ideas of Calculus in Islam and India", Mathematics
Mathematics
Magazine, 68 (3): 163–174, doi:10.2307/2691411 

Katz, Victor J. (1998), History of Mathematics: An Introduction, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-321-01618-1, OCLC 38199387 

Kelley, David H.; Milone, E. F.; Aveni, A. F. (2005), Exploring Ancient Skies: An Encyclopedic Survey of Archaeoastronomy, Birkhäuser, ISBN 0-387-95310-8, OCLC 213887290 

Khaleefa, Omar (1999), "Who Is the Founder of Psychophysics
Psychophysics
and Experimental Psychology?", American Journal of Islamic Social Sciences, 16 (2) 

Al-Khalili, Jim (12 February 2015), "In retrospect: Book of Optics", Nature, Nature Publishing Group, 518: 164–165, Bibcode:2015Natur.518..164A, doi:10.1038/518164a, retrieved 2015-03-13 .

Langermann, Y. Tzvi (1990), Ibn al Haytham's On the Configuration of the World 

Lejeune, Albert (1958), "Les recherches de Ptolémée sur la vision binoculaire", Janus, 47: 79–86 

Lindberg, David C. (1967), "Alhazen's Theory of Vision and Its Reception in the West", Isis, 58 (3): 321–341, doi:10.1086/350266, PMID 4867472 

Lindberg, David C. (1976), Theories of Vision from al-Kindi to Kepler, University of Chicago
Chicago
Press, Chicago, ISBN 0-226-48234-0, OCLC 1676198 

Lindberg, David C. (1996), Roger Bacon
Roger Bacon
and the Origins of Perspectiva in the Middle Ages, Clarendon Press 

Lorch, Richard (2008), "Ibn al-Haytham", Encyclopædia Britannica, retrieved 2008-08-06 

Magill, Frank Northen; Aves, Alison (1998), "The Middles Ages: Alhazen", Dictionary of World Biography, 2, Routledge, ISBN 9781579580414 .

Mohamed, Mohaini (2000), Great Muslim Mathematicians, Penerbit UTM, ISBN 983-52-0157-9, OCLC 48759017 

Murphy, Dan (2003-10-17), "No more 'Saddams': Iraqis get new currency", The Christian Science Monitor, retrieved 2008-09-21 

NASA
NASA
(2006-03-22), " 59239 Alhazen (1999 CR2)", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA
NASA
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 2008-09-20 .

O'Connor, J. J.; Robertson, E. F., eds. (November 1999), "Abu Ali al-Hasan ibn al-Haytham", MacTutor History of Mathematics
Mathematics
archive, Scotland: School of Mathematics
Mathematics
and Statistics, University of St Andrews, retrieved 2008-09-20 

Omar, Saleh Beshara (1977), Ibn al-Haytham's Optics: A Study of the Origins of Experimental Science, Minneapolis: Bibliotheca Islamica, ISBN 0-88297-015-1, OCLC 3328963 

Plott, C. (2000), Global History of Philosophy: The Period of Scholasticism, Motilal Banarsidass, ISBN 8120805518 

Rashed, Roshdi (August 2002a), "A Polymath
Polymath
in the 10th century", Science, 297 (5582): 773, doi:10.1126/science.1074591, ISSN 0036-8075, PMID 12161634 

Rashed, Roshdi (2002b), "PORTRAITS OF SCIENCE: A Polymath
Polymath
in the 10th Century", Science, Science magazine, 297 (5582): 773, doi:10.1126/science.1074591, ISSN 0036-8075, PMID 12161634, retrieved 2008-09-16 

Rashed, Roshdi (2007), "The Celestial Kinematics of Ibn al-Haytham", Arabic Sciences and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, 17: 7–55, doi:10.1017/S0957423907000355 

Raynaud, D. (2003), " Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
sur la vision binoculaire: un précurseur de l'optique physiologique", Arabic Sciences and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, 13 (1): 79–99, doi:10.1017/S0957423903003047 

Rooney, Anne (2012), "Ibn Al-Haytham", The History of Physics, The Rosen Publishing Group, ISBN 9781448873715 .

Rosenthal, Franz (1960–1961), "Al-Mubashshir ibn Fâtik. Prolegomena to an Abortive Edition", Oriens, Brill Publishers, 13/14: 132–158, 136–7, doi:10.2307/1580309, JSTOR 1580309 

Ross, H.E. (2000), " Cleomedes c. 1st century AD) on the celestial illusion, atmospheric enlargement and size-distance invariance", Perception, 29: 853–861, doi:10.1068/p2937 .

Ross, H .E.; Plug, C. (2002), The mystery of the moon illusion: Exploring size perception, Oxford
Oxford
University Press, ISBN 978-0198508625 .

Ross, H .E.; Ross, G .M. (1976), "Did Ptolemy
Ptolemy
understand the moon illusion?", Perception, 5: 377–385, doi:10.1068/p050377, PMID 794813 .

Rottman, J. (February 28, 2000), A first course in Abstract Algebra, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-011584-3, OCLC 42960682 

Rozenfeld, Boris A. (1988), A History of Non-Euclidean Geometry: Evolution of the Concept of a Geometric Space, Springer Science+Business Media, ISBN 0-387-96458-4, OCLC 15550634 

Rozenfeld, Boris Abramovich; Youschkevitch, Adolf P. (1996), "Geometry", in Rashed, Roshdi, Encyclopedia of the History of Arabic Science, 2, London
London
& New York: Routledge, pp. 447–494 

Russell, Gül A. (1996), "Emergence of Physiological Optics", in Rāshid, Rushdī; Morelon, Régis, Encyclopedia of the History of Arabic Science, Routledge, pp. 672–716, ISBN 0-415-12410-7, OCLC 34731151 .

Sabra, A. I. (1971), "The astronomical origin of Ibn al-Haytham's concept of experiment", Actes du XIIe congrès international d’histoire des sciences, Albert Blanchard, Paris, 3: 133–136 . Reprinted in Sabra 1994.

Sabra, A. I. (1978a), " Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
and the Visual Ray Hypothesis", in Nasr, Seyyed Hossein, Ismaili Contributions to Islamic Culture, Boston: Shambhala Publications, pp. 178–216, ISBN 0877737312 

Sabra, A. I. (1978b), "An Eleventh-Century Refutation of Ptolemy's Planetary Theory", in Hilfstein, Erna; Czartoryski, Paweł; Grande, Frank D., Science and History: Studies in Honor of Edward Rosen, Studia Copernicana, XVI, Ossolineum, Wrocław, pp. 117–131 

Sabra, A. I., ed. (1989), The Optics
Optics
of Ibn al-Haytham. Books I-II-III: On Direct Vision. English Translation and Commentary. 2 vols, Studies of the Warburg Institute, 40, translated by Sabra, A. I., London: The Warburg Institute, University of London, ISBN 0-85481-072-2, OCLC 165564751 .

Sabra, A. I. (1994), Optics, Astronomy
Astronomy
and Logic: Studies in Arabic Science and Philosophy, Collected Studies Series, 444, Variorum, Aldershot, ISBN 0-86078-435-5, OCLC 29847104 .

Sabra, A. I. (1998), "Configuring the Universe: Aporetic, Problem Solving, and Kinematic Modeling as Themes of Arabic Astronomy", Perspectives on Science, 6 (3): 288–330 

Sabra, A. I. (October–December 2003), "Ibn al-Haytham: Brief life of an Arab
Arab
mathematician", Harvard Magazine, archived from the original on 2007-09-27, retrieved 2008-01-23 

Sabra, A. I. (2007), "The "Commentary" That Saved the Text. The Hazardous Journey of Ibn al-Haytham's Arabic "Optics"", Early Science and Medicine, 12 (2): 117–133, doi:10.1163/157338207x194668, JSTOR 20617660, retrieved 2014-01-22 

Sabra, A. I. (2008) [1970–80], "Ibn Al-Haytham, Abū ʿAlī Al-Ḥasan Ibn Al-Ḥasan", Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography, Charles Scribner's Sons 

Sambursky, Shmuel, ed. (1974), Physical Thought from the Presocratics to the Quantum Physicists, Pica Press, ISBN 0-87663-712-8 . (Various editions.)

Sardar, Ziauddin (1998), "Science in Islamic philosophy", Islamic Philosophy, Routledge
Routledge
Encyclopedia of Philosophy, retrieved 2008-02-03 

Selin, Helaine, ed. (2008), "M", Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine
Medicine
in Non-Western Cultures, 1, Springer, p. 1667, ISBN 9781402045592 .

Van Sertima, Ivan (1992), Golden Age Of The Moor, Transaction Publishers, ISBN 1-56000-581-5, OCLC 123168739  Smith, A. Mark, ed. (2001), Alhacen's theory of visual perception: a critical edition, with English translation and commentary, of the first three books of Alhacen's De aspectibus, the medieval Latin version of Ibn al-Haytham's Kitab al-Manazir, Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, 91-4, 91-5, translated by Smith, A. Mark, Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society
American Philosophical Society
& DIANE Publishing, ISBN 978-0-87169-914-5, OCLC 163278528  Books I-III (2001) Vol 1 Commentary and Latin
Latin
text via JSTOR; Vol 2 English translation I:TOCp339-341, II:TOCp415-6, III:TOCp559-560, Notes 681ff, Bibl. via JSTOR

Smith, A. Mark (June 2004), "What is the History of Medieval Optics Really About?" (PDF), Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 148 (2): 180–194, JSTOR 1558283, archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-18 

Smith, A. Mark (2005), "The Alhacenian Account Of Spatial Perception And Its Epistemological Implications", Arabic Sciences and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, 15, doi:10.1017/S0957423905000184 

Smith, A. Mark, ed. (2006), Alhacen on the principles of reflection : a critical edition, with English translation and commentary, of books 4 and 5 of Alhacen's De aspectibus, [the Medieval Latin
Latin
version of Ibn-al-Haytham's Kitāb al-Manāẓir], Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, 95-4, 95-5, translated by Smith, A. Mark, Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society  Books 4-5 (2006) 95-4 Vol 1 Commentary and Latin
Latin
text via JSTOR; 95-5 Vol 2 English translation IV:TOCp289-294, V:TOCp377-384, Notes, Bibl. via JSTOR

Smith, A. Mark, ed. (2008), Alhacen on Image-formation and distortion in mirrors : a critical edition, with English translation and commentary, of Book 6 of Alhacen's De aspectibus, [the Medieval Latin version of Ibn-al-Haytham's Kitāb al-Manāẓir], Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, 98–1, translated by Smith, A. Mark, Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society  Book 6 (2008) 98(#1, section 1)— Vol 1 Commentary and Latin
Latin
text via JSTOR; 98(#1, section 2)— Vol 2 English translation VI:TOCp155-160, Notes, Bibl. via JSTOR

Smith, A. Mark, ed. (2010), Alhacen on Refraction : a critical edition, with English translation and commentary, of Book 7 of Alhacen's De aspectibus, [the Medieval Latin
Latin
version of Ibn-al-Haytham's Kitāb al-Manāẓir], Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, 100–3, translated by Smith, A. Mark, Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society  Book 7 (2010) 100(#3, section 1) — Vol 1 Commentary and Latin
Latin
text via JSTOR;100(#3, section 2) — Vol 2 English translation VII:TOCp213-218, Notes, Bibl. via JSTOR

Smith, A. Mark (2015), From Sight to Light: The Passage from Ancient to Modern Optics, Chicago: University of Chicago
Chicago
Press 

Smith, John D. (1 March 1992), "The Remarkable Ibn al-Haytham", The Mathematical Gazette, Mathematical Association, 76 (475): 189–198, doi:10.2307/3620392, ISSN 0025-5572 

Toomer, G. J. (December 1964), "Review: Ibn al-Haythams Weg zur Physik by Matthias Schramm", Isis, 55 (4): 463–465, doi:10.1086/349914 

Topdemir, Hüseyin Gazi (2007a), "Kamal Al-Din Al-Farisi's Explanation of the Rainbow" (PDF), Humanity & Social Sciences Journal, 2 (1): 75–85, retrieved 2008-09-16 

Topdemir, Huseyin Gazi (July 18, 2007b), Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
(965-1039) His Life and Works 

Vernet, J. (1996) [1960], "Ibn al-Haytham", in Gibb, H. A. R.; Bearman, P., Encyclopaedia of Islam (First ed.), Leiden: Brill Publishers, ISBN 9789004161214 .

Vernet, J. (2012), "Ibn al-Haytham", in Bearman, P.; Bianquis, Th.; Bosworth, C. E.; van Donzel, E.; Heinrichs, W. P., Encyclopaedia of Islam (Second ed.), Brill Online: Brill Publishers, retrieved 2008-09-16 .

Wade, Nicholas J. (1998), A Natural History of Vision, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press 

Wade, Nicholas J.; Finger, Stanley (2001), "The eye as an optical instrument: from camera obscura to Helmholtz's perspective", Perception, 30 (10): 1157–1177, doi:10.1068/p3210, PMID 11721819 

Weisstein, Eric (2008), Alhazen's Billiard Problem, Mathworld, retrieved 2008-09-24 

Whitaker, Brian (2004-09-23), "Centuries in the House of Wisdom", The Guardian, retrieved 2008-09-16 

Zewail, Ahmed H.; Thomas, John Meurig (2010), 4D Electron Microscopy: Imaging in Space and Time, World Scientific, ISBN 9781848163904 

Further reading[edit] Primary[edit]

Sabra, A. I, ed. (1983), The Optics
Optics
of Ibn al-Haytham, Books I-II-III: On Direct Vision. The Arabic text, edited and with Introduction, Arabic- Latin
Latin
Glossaries and Concordance Tables, Kuwait: National Council for Culture, Arts and Letters 

Sabra, A. I, ed. (2002), The Optics
Optics
of Ibn al-Haytham. Edition of the Arabic Text of Books IV-V: On Reflection and Images Seen by Reflection. 2 vols, Kuwait: National Council for Culture, Arts and Letters 

Sabra, A. I., ed. (1989), The Optics
Optics
of Ibn al-Haytham. Books I-II-III: On Direct Vision. English Translation and Commentary. 2 vols, Studies of the Warburg Institute, 40, translated by Sabra, A. I., London: The Warburg Institute, University of London, ISBN 0-85481-072-2, OCLC 165564751 

Smith, A. Mark, ed. (2001), translated by Smith, A. Mark, "Alhacen's Theory of Visual Perception: A Critical Edition, with English Translation and Commentary, of the First Three Books of Alhacen's De Aspectibus, the Medieval Latin
Latin
Version of Ibn al-Haytham's Kitāb al-Manāẓir, 2 vols.", Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 91 (4–5), ISBN 0-87169-914-1, OCLC 47168716  Books I-III (2001 — 91(4)) Vol 1 Commentary and Latin
Latin
text via JSTOR; — 91(5) Vol 2 English translation, Book I:TOCpp.339-341, Book II:TOCpp.415-6, Book III:TOCpp.559-560, Notes 681ff, Bibl. via JSTOR

Smith, A. Mark, ed. and trans. (2006), "Alhacen on the principles of reflection: A Critical Edition, with English Translation and Commentary, of books 4 and 5 of Alhacen's De Aspectibus, the Medieval Latin
Latin
Version of Ibn al-Haytham's Kitāb al-Manāẓir, 2 vols.", Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 95 (2–3)  2 vols: . (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society), 2006 — 95(#2) Books 4-5 Vol 1 Commentary and Latin
Latin
text via JSTOR; 95(#3) Vol 2 English translation, Notes, Bibl. via JSTOR

Smith, A. Mark, ed. and trans. (2008) Alhacen on Image-formation and distortion in mirrors : a critical edition, with English translation and commentary, of Book 6 of Alhacen's De aspectibus, [the Medieval Latin
Latin
version of Ibn al-Haytham's Kitāb al-Manāzir], Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, 2 vols: Vol 1 98(#1, section 1— Vol 1 Commentary and Latin
Latin
text); 98(#1, section 2 — Vol 2 English translation). (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society), 2008. Book 6 (2008) Vol 1 Commentary and Latin
Latin
text via JSTOR; Vol 2 English translation, Notes, Bibl. via JSTOR Smith, A. Mark, ed. and trans. (2010) Alhacen on Refraction : a critical edition, with English translation and commentary, of Book 7 of Alhacen's De aspectibus, [the Medieval Latin
Latin
version of Ibn al-Haytham's Kitāb al-Manāzir], Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, 2 vols: 100(#3, section 1 — Vol 1, Introduction and Latin
Latin
text); 100(#3, section 2 — Vol 2 English translation). (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society), 2010. Book 7 (2010) Vol 1 Commentary and Latin
Latin
text via JSTOR;Vol 2 English translation, Notes, Bibl. via JSTOR

Secondary[edit]

Belting, Hans, Afterthoughts on Alhazen’s Visual Theory and Its Presence in the Pictorial Theory of Western Perspective, in: Variantology 4. On Deep Time Relations of Arts, Sciences and Technologies In the Arabic-Islamic World and Beyond, ed. by Siegfried Zielinski and Eckhard Fürlus in cooperation with Daniel Irrgang and Franziska Latell (Cologne: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, 2010), pp. 19–42. El-Bizri, Nader (2005a), "A Philosophical Perspective on Alhazen's Optics", Arabic Sciences and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, 15 (2): 189–218, doi:10.1017/S0957423905000172 

El-Bizri, Nader (2007), "In Defence of the Sovereignty of Philosophy: Al-Baghdadi's Critique of Ibn al-Haytham's Geometrisation of Place", Arabic Sciences and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, 17: 57–80, doi:10.1017/S0957423907000367 

El-Bizri, Nader (2009b), " Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
et le problème de la couleur", Oriens Occidens, Paris: CNRS, 7 (1): 201–226 

El-Bizri, Nader (2016), "Grosseteste's Meteorological Optics: Explications of the Phenomenon of the Rainbow
Rainbow
after Ibn al-Haytham", in Cunningham, Jack P.; Hocknull, Mark, Robert Grosseteste
Robert Grosseteste
and the Pursuit of Religious and Scientific Knowledge in the Middle Ages, Studies in the History of Philosophy
Philosophy
of Mind, 18, Dordrecht: Springer, pp. 21–39, ISBN 978-3-319-33466-0 

Graham, Mark. How Islam Created the Modern World. Amana Publications, 2006. Omar, Saleh Beshara (June 1975), Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
and Greek optics: a comparative study in scientific methodology, PhD Dissertation, University of Chicago, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations 

Roshdi Rashed, Optics
Optics
and Mathematics: Research on the history of scientific thought in Arabic, Variorum reprints, Aldershot, 1992. Roshdi Rashed, Geometry
Geometry
and Dioptrics the tenth century: Ibn Sahl al-Quhi and Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
(in French), Les Belles Lettres, Paris, 1993 Roshdi Rashed, Infinitesimal Mathematics, vols. 1-5, al-Furqan Islamic Heritage Foundation, London, 1993-2006 Saliba, George (2007), Islamic Science and the Making of the European Renaissance, MIT Press, ISBN 0-262-19557-7 

Siegfried Zielinski & Franziska Latell, How One Sees, in: Variantology 4. On Deep Time Relations of Arts, Sciences and Technologies In the Arabic-Islamic World and Beyond, ed. by Siegfried Zielinski and Eckhard Fürlus in cooperation with Daniel Irrgang and Franziska Latell (Cologne: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, 2010), pp. 19–42. [1]

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Ibn al-Haytham.

Works by Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
at Open Library Langermann, Y. Tzvi (2007). "Ibn al‐Haytham: Abū ʿAlī al‐Ḥasan ibn al‐Ḥasan". In Thomas Hockey; et al. The Biographical Encyclopedia of Astronomers. New York: Springer. pp. 556–7. ISBN 978-0-387-31022-0.  (PDF version) Sabra, A. I. (2008) [1970–80]. "Ibn Al-Haytham, Abū ʿAlī Al-Ḥasan Ibn Al-Ḥasan". Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography. Charles Scribner's Sons.  'A Brief Introduction on Ibn al-Haytham' based on a lecture delivered at the Royal Society in London
London
by Nader El-Bizri Ibn al-Haytham
Ibn al-Haytham
on two Iraqi banknotes The Miracle of Light – a UNESCO
UNESCO
article on Ibn al-Haytham Biography from Malaspina Global Portal Short biographies on several "Muslim Heroes and Personalities" including Ibn al-Haytham Biography from ioNET at the Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
(archived October 13, 1999) "Biography from the BBC". Archived from the original on 2006-02-11. Retrieved 2008-09-16. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) Biography from Trinity College (Connecticut) Biography from Molecular Expressions The First True Scientist from BBC News Over the Moon From The UNESCO
UNESCO
Courier on the occasion of the International Year of Astronomy
Astronomy
2009 The Mechanical Water Clock Of Ibn Al-Haytham, Muslim Heritage Alhazen's (1572) Opticae thesaurus (English) - digital facsimile from the Linda Hall Library

v t e

Astronomy
Astronomy
in the medieval Islamic world

Astronomers

by century (CE AD)

8th

Ahmad Nahavandi Al-Fadl ibn Naubakht Muḥammad ibn Ibrāhīm al-Fazārī Mashallah ibn Athari Yaʿqūb ibn Ṭāriq

9th

Abu Maʿshar Abu Said Gorgani Al-Farghānī Al-Kindi Al-Mahani Abu Hanifa Dinawari Al-Ḥajjāj ibn Yūsuf Al-Marwazi Ali ibn Isa al-Asturlabi Banu Musa Iranshahri Khālid ibn ʿAbd al‐Malik Al-Khwārizmī Sahl ibn Bishr Thābit ibn Qurra Yahya ibn Abi Mansur

10th

Abd al-Rahman al-Sufi Ibn Al-Adami al-Khojandi l-Khāzin al-Qūhī Abu al-Wafa Ahmad ibn Yusuf al-Battani Al-Qabisi Al-Nayrizi Al-Saghani Aṣ-Ṣaidanānī Ibn Yunus Ibrahim ibn Sinan Ma Yize al-Sijzi Mariam al-Asturlabi Nastulus Abolfadl Harawi Haseb-i Tabari al-Majriti

11th

Abu Nasr Mansur al-Biruni Ali ibn Ridwan Al-Zarqālī Ibn al-Samh Al-Muradi Alhazen Avicenna Ibn al-Saffar Kushyar Gilani Said al-Andalusi Al-Isfizari

12th

Al-Bitruji Avempace Ibn Tufail Al-Kharaqī Al-Khazini Al-Samawal al-Maghribi Abu al-Salt Anvari Averroes Ibn al-Kammad Jabir ibn Aflah Omar Khayyam Sharaf al-Dīn al-Ṭūsī

13th

Ibn al-Banna' al-Marrakushi Ibn al‐Ha'im al‐Ishbili Jamal ad-Din al-Hanafi Muhyi al-Dīn al-Maghribī Nasir al-Din al-Tusi Qutb al-Din al-Shirazi Shams al-Dīn al-Samarqandī Zakariya al-Qazwini Ibn Abi al-Shukr al-ʿUrḍī al-Abhari Muhammad ibn Abi Bakr al‐Farisi Abu Ali al-Hasan al-Marrakushi Al-Ashraf Umar II

14th

Ibn al-Shatir al-Khalīlī Ibn Shuayb al-Battiwi Abū al‐ʿUqūl Nizam al-Din Nishapuri al-Jadiri

15th

Ali Kuşçu ʿAbd al‐Wājid Jamshīd al-Kāshī Kadızade Rumi Ulugh Beg Sibt al-Maridini Ibn al-Majdi al-Wafa' al-Kubunani

16th

Al-Birjandi Bahāʾ al-dīn al-ʿĀmilī Piri Reis Takiyüddin

17th

Yang Guangxian Ahmad Khani Al Achsasi al Mouakket Mohammed al-Rudani

Topics

Works

Arabic star names Islamic calendar ʿAjā'ib al-makhlūqāt wa gharā'ib al-mawjūdāt Encyclopedia of the Brethren of Purity Tabula Rogeriana The Book of Healing

Zij

Alfonsine tables Huihui Lifa Book of Fixed Stars Toledan Tables Zij-i Ilkhani Zij-i Sultani Sullam al-sama'

Instruments

Alidade Analog computer Aperture Armillary sphere Astrolabe Astronomical clock Celestial globe Compass Compass
Compass
rose Dioptra Equatorial ring Equatorium Globe Graph paper Magnifying glass Mural instrument Navigational astrolabe Nebula Planisphere Quadrant Sextant Shadow square Sundial Schema for horizontal sundials Triquetrum

Concepts

Almucantar Apogee Astrology in medieval Islam Astrophysics Axial tilt Azimuth Celestial mechanics Celestial spheres Circular orbit Deferent and epicycle Earth's rotation Eccentricity Ecliptic Elliptic orbit Equant Galaxy Geocentrism Gravitational potential energy Gravity Heliocentrism Inertia Islamic cosmology Moonlight Multiverse Obliquity Parallax Precession Qibla Salah times Specific gravity Spherical Earth Sublunary sphere Sunlight Supernova Temporal finitism Trepidation Triangulation Tusi couple Universe

Institutions

Al-Azhar University House of Knowledge House of Wisdom University of Al Quaraouiyine Observatories

Constantinople (Taqi al-Din) Maragheh Samarkand (Ulugh Beg)

Influences

Babylonian astronomy Egyptian astronomy Hellenistic astronomy Indian astronomy

Influenced

Byzantine science Chinese astronomy Medieval European science Indian astronomy

v t e

Mathematics
Mathematics
in medieval Islam

Mathematicians

9th century

'Abd al-Hamīd ibn Turk Sind ibn Ali al-Jawharī Al-Ḥajjāj ibn Yūsuf Al-Kindi Al-Mahani al-Dinawari Banū Mūsā Hunayn ibn Ishaq al-Khwārizmī Yusuf Al-Khuri ibn Qurra Na'im ibn Musa Sahl ibn Bishr al-Marwazi Abu Said Gorgani

10th century

al-Sufi Abu al-Wafa al-Khāzin Abū Kāmil Al-Qabisi al-Khojandi Ahmad ibn Yusuf Aṣ-Ṣaidanānī al-Uqlidisi Al-Nayrizi Al-Saghani Brethren of Purity Ibn Sahl Ibn Yunus Ibrahim ibn Sinan Al-Battani Sinan ibn Thabit Al-Isfahani Nazif ibn Yumn al-Qūhī Abu al-Jud al-Majriti al-Jabali

11th century

al-Zarqālī Abu Nasr Mansur Said al-Andalusi Ibn al-Samh Al-Biruni Alhazen ibn Fatik Al-Sijzi al-Nasawī Al-Karaji Avicenna Muhammad al-Baghdadi ibn Hud al-Jayyānī Kushyar Gilani Al-Muradi Al-Isfizari Abu Mansur al-Baghdadi

12th century

Al-Samawal al-Maghribi Avempace Al-Khazini Omar Khayyam Jabir ibn Aflah al-Hassar Al-Kharaqī Sharaf al-Dīn al-Ṭūsī Ibn al-Yasamin

13th century

al-Hanafi al-Abdari Muhyi al-Dīn al-Maghribī Ibn 'Adlan Nasir al-Din al-Tusi Shams al-Dīn al-Samarqandī Ibn al‐Ha'im al‐Ishbili Ibn Abi al-Shukr al-Hasan al-Marrakushi

14th century

al-Umawī Ibn al-Banna' Ibn Shuayb Ibn al-Shatir Kamāl al-Dīn al-Fārisī Al-Khalili Qutb al-Din al-Shirazi Ahmad al-Qalqashandi Ibn al-Durayhim

15th century

al-Qalaṣādī Ali Qushji al-Wafa'i al-Kāshī al-Rūmī Ulugh Beg Ibn al-Majdi Sibt al-Maridini al-Kubunani

16th century

Al-Birjandi Muhammad Baqir Yazdi Taqi ad-Din Ibn Hamza al-Maghribi Ibn Ghazi al-Miknasi Ahmad Ibn al-Qadi

Mathematical works

The Compendious Book on Calculation by Completion and Balancing De Gradibus Principles of Hindu Reckoning Book of Optics The Book of Healing Almanac Encyclopedia of the Brethren of Purity Toledan Tables Tabula Rogeriana Zij

Concepts

Alhazen's problem Islamic geometric patterns

Centers

Al-Azhar University Al-Mustansiriya University House of Knowledge House of Wisdom Constantinople observatory of Taqi al-Din Madrasa Maktab Maragheh observatory University of Al Quaraouiyine

Influences

Babylonian mathematics Greek mathematics Indian mathematics

Influenced

Byzantine mathematics European mathematics Indian mathematics

v t e

Islamic philosophy

Fields

Alchemy Aqidah (theology) 'Aql (intellect) Cosmology

astrology medieval astronomy

Eschatology Ethics Kalam (dialectic) Fiqh
Fiqh
(jurisprudence) Logic Metaphysics Natural philosophy (physics) Peace Madrasah (education) Medieval science Medieval psychology Sufism
Sufism
(mysticism)

Schools

Early Farabism Avicennism Averroism Illuminationism Sufi

cosmology metaphysics

Transcendent theosophy Traditionalist Contemporary

Concepts

ʻAṣabīya Ḥāl Iʻjaz ʼIjtihād ʻlm ʻIrfān Ijmāʿ Maslaha Nafs Qadar Qalb Qiyās Shūrā Tawḥīd Ummah

Philosophers by century (CE)

9th–10th

Al-Kindi Ali ibn Sahl Rabban al-Tabari Abu al-Abbas Iranshahri Zakariya Razi Apharabius Abu Hatim al-Razi Al Amiri Ikhwan al-Safa Abu Sulayman Sijistani Ibn Masarrah Abu Yaqub al-Sijistani

11th

Al-Ghazali Ibn Miskawayh Avicenna Ibn Hazm Bahmanyār Mu'ayyad fi'l-Din al-Shirazi Nasir Khusraw

12th

Abu'l-Barakāt al-Baghdādī Afdal al-Din Kashani Ahi Evren Ahmad Yasavi Ayn-al-Quzat Averroes Ibn Tufail Omar Khayyám Suhrawardi Shams Tabrizi

13th

Hajji Bektash Wali Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi Ibn Sab’in Ibn Arabi al-Abharī Nasir al-Din Tusi Fakhr ad-Din ar-Razi Qutb al-Din al-Shirazi Sadr al-Din al-Qunawi

14th–16th

Ibn Khaldun Yunus Emre Hajji Bayram Jalaladdin Davani Sadr ad-Din Dashtaki Aziz Mahmud Hudayi Qadi Mir Husayn al-Maybudi Mahmud Shabistari Sayyid Haydar Amuli Dawūd al-Qayṣarī Jami

17th–19th

Mir Damad Mir Fendereski Mulla Sadra Mohsen Fayz Kashani Abd al-Razzaq Lahiji Mujaddid Alf-i-Sani Rajab Ali Tabrizi Qazi Sa’id Qumi Shah Waliullah Dehlawi Hādī Sabzavārī

20th–present

Muhammad Husayn Tabatabaei Muhammad Iqbal Gohar Shahi Mohammad Baqir al-Sadr René Guénon Frithjof Schuon Martin Lings Hossein Nasr Naquib al-Attas Abdolkarim Soroush Gholamhossein Ebrahimi Dinani Taha Abdurrahman Mohammed Abed al-Jabri Mohammed Arkoun Fouad Zakariyya Reza Davari Ardakani Ahmad Fardid Mostafa Malekian Hasanzadeh Amoli Javadi Amoli Partawi Shah

v t e

Medicine
Medicine
in the medieval Islamic world

Physicians

7th century

Al-Harith ibn Kalada and his son Abu Hafsa Yazid Bukhtishu Masarjawaih Ibn Abi Ramtha al-Tamimi Rufaida Al-Aslamia Ibn Uthal

8th century

Bukhtishu family Ja'far al-Sadiq

9th century

Ali al-Ridha Albubather Bukhtishu family Jabril ibn Bukhtishu Jābir ibn Hayyān Hunayn ibn Ishaq
Hunayn ibn Ishaq
and his son Yusuf Al-Khuri Yahya ibn Sarafyun Al-Kindi Masawaiyh Shapur ibn Sahl al-Tabari Al-Ruhawi Yuhanna ibn Bukhtishu Salmawaih ibn Bunan

10th century

Qusta ibn Luqa Abu ul-Ala Shirazi Abul Hasan al-Tabari Al-Natili Qumri Abu Zayd al-Balkhi Isaac Israeli ben Solomon al-Majusi al-Masihi Muvaffak al-Razi Ibn Juljul al-Jabali Al-Tamimi, the physician al-Zahrawi Ibn al-Jazzar Al-Kaŝkarī Ibn Abi al-Ashʿath Ibn al-Batriq Ibrahim ibn Baks Abu al-Qasim Muqane'i Abu Bakr Bokhari

11th century

Abu 'Ubayd al-Juzjani Ibn al-Haytham Al-Biruni Ali ibn Ridwan Avicenna Ephraim ibn al-Za'faran Ibn al-Wafid Ammar Al-Mawsili Abdollah ibn Bukhtishu Ibn Butlan al-Kirmani Ibn al-Kattani Ibn Jazla Masawaih al-Mardini al-Ilaqi Ibn Al-Thahabi Ibn Abi Sadiq Ali ibn Isa al-Kahhal Ibn Hindu

12th century

Avempace Abu al-Bayan ibn al-Mudawwar Ahmad ibn Farrokh Ibn Hubal Zayn al-Din Gorgani Maimonides Serapion the Younger Ibn Zuhr Ya'qub ibn Ishaq al-Israili al-Turjali Averroes Ibn Tufail Al-Ghafiqi Ibn Abi al-Hakam Abu'l-Barakāt al-Baghdādī Al-Samawal al-Maghribi Ibn al-Tilmīdh Ibn Jumay‘

13th century

Ibn al-Baitar Ibn Ṭumlūs Sa'ad al-Dawla Al-Shahrazuri Rashidun al-Suri As-Suwaydi Amin al-Din Rashid al-Din Vatvat Abraham ben Moses ben Maimon Da'ud Abu al-Fadl Al-Dakhwar Ibn Abi Usaibia Joseph ben Judah of Ceuta Abd al-Latif al-Baghdadi Ibn al-Nafis Zakariya al-Qazwini Najib ad-Din-e-Samarqandi Qutb al-Din al-Shirazi Ibn al-Quff

14th century

Ibn al-Akfani Muhammad ibn Mahmud Amuli Al-Nagawri Aqsara'i Zayn-e-Attar Mansur ibn Ilyas Jaghmini Mas‘ud ibn Muhammad Sijzi Najm al-Din al-Shirazi Nakhshabi al-Kazaruni al-Kutubi Ibn Shuayb Ibn al-Khatib Rashid-al-Din Hamadani

15th century

Abu Sa'id al-Afif Muhammad Ali Astarabadi Husayni Isfahani Burhan-ud-din Kermani Şerafeddin Sabuncuoğlu al-Harawi Nurbakhshi Shaykh Muhammad ibn Thaleb

16th century

Hakim-e-Gilani Abul Qasim ibn Mohammed al-Ghassani Taqi ad-Din Muhammad ibn Ma'ruf Dawud al-Antaki Sultan Ali Khorasani

Concepts

Psychology Ophthalmology

Works

Al-Risalah al-Dhahabiah The Canon of Medicine Anatomy Charts of the Arabs The Book of Healing Book of the Ten Treatises of the Eye De Gradibus Al-Tasrif Zakhireye Khwarazmshahi Adab al-Tabib Kamel al-Sanaat al-Tibbyya Al-Hawi Commentary on Anatomy in Avicenna's Canon

Centers

Bimaristan Nur al-Din Bimaristan Al-'Adudi

Influences

Ancient Greek medicine

Influenced

Medical Renaissance Ibn Sina Academy of Medieval Medicine
Medicine
and Sciences

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 90038995 LCCN: n81027793 ISNI: 0000 0001 1774 221X GND: 118648160 SELIBR: 34961 SUDOC: 08612756X BNF: cb12028218d (data) NKC: xx0083904 BNE: XX824

.