HOME
The Info List - Hutterite German


--- Advertisement ---



Hutterite
Hutterite
German (Hutterisch) is an Upper German
Upper German
dialect of the Bavarian variety of the German language, which is spoken by Hutterite communities in Canada
Canada
and the United States. Hutterite
Hutterite
is also called Tirolean, but this is an anachronism.

Contents

1 Distribution and literacy 2 History and related languages 3 See also 4 References 5 External links 6 Literature

Distribution and literacy[edit] Hutterite
Hutterite
is spoken in the US states of Washington, Montana, North and South Dakota, Minnesota
Minnesota
and Oregon; and in the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. Its speakers belong to the Schmiedleit, Lehrerleit, and Dariusleit Hutterite
Hutterite
groups, but there are also some few speakers among the older generations of Prairieleit (the descendants of those Hutterites who chose not to settle in colonies). Hutterite
Hutterite
children who grow up in the colonies learn and speak first Hutterite
Hutterite
German before learning English, the standard language of the surrounding areas. As of 2003, there are about 34,000 speakers in the world, 85% of them living in 333 communities in Canada
Canada
and the remaining 15% in 123 communities in the USA. Canadian adults are generally literate in Early New High German
Early New High German
(also called "Biblical German", the predecessor to Standard German
Standard German
used by Martin Luther) that they employ as the written form for Scriptures while Standard German
Standard German
is used in the USA for religious activities. Children learn English at school; Canadian Hutterites have a functional knowledge of English. Hutterite
Hutterite
is for the most part an unwritten language, though in August 2006 Hutterite author Linda Maendel released a children's story titled Lindas glücklicher Tag (Linda's Happy Day) in which all the dialogue is written in the dialect. Maendel is also working on a series of biblical stories with Wycliff Bible translators. History and related languages[edit] Hutterite
Hutterite
German is a koiné language based on the Bavarian dialects spoken in Tyrol, home of Jacob Hutter, and Carinthia in the mid-18th century. It is only 50% intelligible to a speaker of Pennsylvania German,[3] as the latter variant is based on dialects spoken around the Electoral Palatinate. Hutterite
Hutterite
German therefore belongs to the Southern Bavarian
Southern Bavarian
dialect group which is spoken in the southern parts of Bavaria
Bavaria
and in Austria
Austria
except for the westernmost part (Vorarlberg). Although the Hutterites once spoke Tirolean German, they no longer do. The switch among Hutterites from Tirolean German to Carinthian German occurred during years of severe persecution in Europe when Hutterite communities were devastated and survival depended on the conversion of many Carinthian Landler refugees to Hutterite
Hutterite
anabaptism. The language has adopted a limited number of Russian and also many English loan words, which are the result of Hutterite
Hutterite
migrations into Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
and now North America. The core vocabulary is still almost exclusively of German origin. See also[edit]

Pennsylvania German Plautdietsch
Plautdietsch
language Texas German

References[edit]

^ Hutterite
Hutterite
German at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). " Hutterite
Hutterite
German". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.  ^ The Ethnologue, 16th ed

External links[edit]

Lindas glücklicher Tag Hutterischa Bibl Tschichtlen 1

Literature[edit]

Helga Lorenz-Andreasch: "Mir sein jå kolla Teitschverderber" - die Sprache der Schmiedeleut-Hutterer in Manitoba/Kanada, Wien 2004. (Contains a short description of Hutterisch) Hoover, Walter B. (1997). Di Hutrisha Shproch, An Introduction to the Language of the Hutterites of North America
North America
with a Special
Special
Emphasis upon the Language and History of the Hutterian Prairie People at Langham, Saskatchewan, Canada : A Grammar and Lexicon. Saskatoon.  Herfried Scheer: Die deutsche Mundart der Hutterischen Brüder in Nordamerika, Wien 1987. (A Hutterisch - Standard German
Standard German
- English dictionary of about 1.0000 words on 321 pages)

v t e

Varieties of German spoken outside Europe

Africa

Namibia: Namibian German, Namibian Black German South Africa: Nataler Deutsch

North America

Amana German Alsatian German Bernese German Hutterite
Hutterite
German Pennsylvania German Texas German Wisconsin German

South America

Alemán Coloniero Argentinian Swiss German Belgranodeutsch Brazilian German
Brazilian German
(Ostpommersch, Paraná Volga German and Riograndenser Hunsrückisch)

Oceania

Barossa German Unserdeutsch

v t e

Germanic languages
Germanic languages
and dialects

West Germanic

Anglo- Frisian

Anglic

English

dialects Yola Fingallian

Scots

Frisian

East Frisian

Saterland Frisian Wangerooge Frisian Wursten Frisian

North Frisian

Söl'ring Fering Öömrang Heligolandic Mooring Halligen Frisian Strand Frisian Eiderstedt Frisian

West Frisian

Clay Frisian Wood Frisian

Low German

East Low German

Mecklenburg-Western Pomeranian

Mecklenburgish West Pomeranian

Brandenburgisch East Pomeranian-West Prussian

Western East Pomeranian Eastern East Pomeranian Bublitzisch Pommerellisch

Central Pomeranian

West Central Pomeranian

Low Prussian

Mennonite Low German

West Low German

Dutch Low Saxon

Stellingwarfs Tweants Gronings Drèents Gelders-Overijssels

Achterhooks Sallaans Urkers

Veluws

Northern Low Saxon

East Frisian Low Saxon Schleswigsch Holsteinisch Hamburgisch Ollnborger North Hanoveranian Dithmarsch Emsländisch

Westphalian Eastphalian

Low Franconian

Standard variants

Dutch Afrikaans

West Low Franconian

Hollandic West Flemish

French Flemish

Zeelandic East Flemish Brabantian Surinamese Dutch Jersey Dutch Mohawk Dutch Stadsfries Bildts Yiddish
Yiddish
Dutch

East Low Franconian

Meuse-Rhenish

Limburgish

Southeast Limburgish

South Guelderish

Transitional

Low Dietsch

High German

 

German

Namibian German Namibian Black German Brazilian German Unserdeutsch Barossa German Belgranodeutsch Parana Volga German

Yiddish

Eastern Western Litvish Poylish Ukrainish Galitzish Scots Yiddish Alsatian Yiddish Klezmer-loshn Ganovim Balagole Katsoves Lachoudisch

Yenish Rotwelsch

Lotegorisch

Central German

West Central German

Central Franconian

Ripuarian

Colognian

Moselle Franconian

Luxembourgish Transylvanian Saxon Hunsrückisch

Rhine Franconian

Lorraine Franconian Palatine

Volga German Pennsylvania German

Hessian

Amana

East Central German

Thuringian Upper Saxon Lusatian-Neumarkish

Berlinerisch

Silesian High Prussian Wymysorys Pragerisch

High Franconian

South Franconian East Franconian

Main Franconian Vogtlandian

Upper German

Alemannic

Low Alemannic

Alsatian Coloniero

High Alemannic

Swiss German

Highest Alemannic

Walser German

Swabian

Bavarian

Northern Bavarian Central Bavarian

Viennese German

Southern Bavarian

South Tyrolean Cimbrian Mòcheno Hutterite
Hutterite
German

Langobardic

Standard German

German Standard German Austrian Standard German Swiss Standard German

North Germanic

West Scandinavian

Norwegian

Bokmål

Bergensk Kebabnorsk Sognamål Trøndersk Valdris Vestlandsk Vikværsk

Nynorsk

Elfdalian Insular Scandinavian

Faroese Icelandic Gronlandsk Norn

East Scandinavian

Swedish

Åland Estonian Finlandic Gotlandic Jamtlandic Kalix Kiruna Luleå Norrland Ostrobothnian Småländska South Swedish

Scanian

Stockholm Rinkeby Uppländska Västgötska Westrobothnian

Danish

Bornholmsk Gøtudanskt Insular Danish Jutlandic South Jutlandic Perkerdansk

Dalecarlian

East Germanic

Gothic

Crimean Gothic

Burgundian Vandalic

Italics indicate extinct languages Bold indicates languages with more than 3 million speakers Languages between parentheses are varieties of the langu

.