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Hursley
Hursley
House is an 18th-century Queen Anne style mansion in Hursley, near Winchester
Winchester
in the English county of Hampshire. The building is Grade II* listed.

Contents

1 History 2 IBM
IBM
Hursley 3 References 4 External links

History[edit] The Hursley
Hursley
estate was bought by William Heathcote, MP from the daughters of Richard Cromwell. Cromwell had acquired the estate by marriage to the daughter of Richard Major, MP. Heathcote commissioned the present house to be built between 1721 and 1724, during the reign of George I, and was created a baronet in 1733. The estate descended in the Heathcote family to the 5th Baronet, whose widow sold it after his death in 1881 to Joseph Baxendale, the owner of the Pickfords logistics and removal company. He sold it in 1902 to Sir George Cooper whose wife, Mary Emma Smith, an American railways heiress from Chicago,[1] commissioned architect Alexander Marshall Mackenzie
Alexander Marshall Mackenzie
to carry out extensive development work in 1902 to create the house that can be seen today. Sir George was created a baronet in 1905. During the First World War
First World War
the second floor of the house was made available as a nursing hospital for officers. It was intended to turn it over again as a military hospital during the Second World War but Sir George died in 1940 and it was requisitioned instead by the Ministry of Aircraft Production (MAP) to rehouse the Design and Production departments of Vickers Supermarine, which had been bombed out of its original premises in Woolston, Hampshire. During its time in the House, Supermarine
Supermarine
worked on the development of many aircraft, of which the most famous is the Spitfire but also includes the early Jet fighters like the Attacker, Swift and Scimitar. IBM
IBM
Hursley[edit] Main article: IBM
IBM
Hursley

"A" block, one of several modern buildings added to the estate as part of the IBM
IBM
Hursley
Hursley
development laboratory

In 1958 IBM
IBM
started using the House and its grounds as development laboratories. In 1963 IBM
IBM
purchased the 100 acres (405,000 m²) of surrounding land and have since erected a large modern office complex employing over 1500 people. The original house is still used by IBM
IBM
as an Executive Briefing Centre. The lower ground floor of the house is home to the IBM
IBM
Hursley
Hursley
Museum,[2] a computing museum that covers the history of IBM
IBM
Hursley
Hursley
Park, IBM
IBM
United Kingdom and IBM Corporation.[3] References[edit]

^ Gail MacColl and Carol McD. Wallace, To Marry an English Lord, 2012:275 ^ http://www-05.ibm.com/uk/clientcentre/hursley/ ^ Peach, D.L.; Meek, M (1972). The History of Hursley
Hursley
Park. IBM
IBM
United Kingdom Laboratories Limited. 

External links[edit]

IBM
IBM
Hursley
Hursley
Site Map of Hursley
Hursley
Park in 1588

Coordinates: 51°01′36″N 1°23′55″W / 51.02655°N 1.39870°W / 51.02655; -1.39870

IBM
IBM
Hursley
Hursley
Labs Flickr Galleries IBM
IBM
Hursley
Hursley
Labs Pinterest Pins IBM
IBM
Hursley
Hursley
Labs YouTube Channel IBM
IBM
Hursley
Hursley
Labs Vimeo Channel IBM
IBM
Hursley
Hursley
Museum

v t e

IBM

History

History of IBM Mergers and acquisitions Think (motto) Operating Systems

Products

Cell microprocessor Mainframe Personal Computer IBM
IBM
Power Systems Information Management Software Lotus Software Rational Software SPSS ILOG Tivoli Software: Service Automation Manager WebSphere alphaWorks Criminal Reduction Utilising Statistical History Mashup Center PureQuery Redbooks FlashSystem Fortran Connections

Business entities

Center for The Business of Government Cloud computing Global Services International subsidiaries jStart Kenexa Research The Weather Company
The Weather Company
(Weather Underground)

Facilities

Towers

1250 René-Lévesque, Montreal, QC One Atlantic Center, Atlanta, GA

Software Labs

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IBM
IBM
Buildings

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Research Labs

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Thomas J. Watson
Center, New York Tokyo Zurich Laboratory

Facilities

Hakozaki Facility Yamato Facility

Cambridge Scientific Center IBM
IBM
Hursley Canada Head Office Building IBM
IBM
Rochester Somers Office Complex

Initiatives

Academy of Technology Centers for Advanced Studies: CASCON Deep Thunder IBM
IBM
Fellow Pulse conference The Great Mind Challenge DeveloperWorks: Develothon Linux Technology Center IBM
IBM
Virtual Universe Community Smarter Planet World Community Grid

Inventions

Automated teller machine Electronic keypunch Hard disk drive Floppy disk DRAM Relational model Selectric typewriter Financial swaps Universal Product Code Magnetic stripe card Sabre airline reservation system Scanning tunneling microscope

Terminology

Globally Integrated Enterprise Commercial Processing Workload Consumability e-business

CEOs

Thomas J. Watson
Thomas J. Watson
(1914–1956) Thomas Watson Jr.
Thomas Watson Jr.
(1956–1971) T. Vincent Learson
T. Vincent Learson
(1971–1973) Frank T. Cary (1973–1981) John R. Opel (1981–1985) John Fellows Akers (1985–1993) Louis V. Gerstner Jr.
Louis V. Gerstner Jr.
(1993–2002) Samuel J. Palmisano
Samuel J. Palmisano
(2002–2011) Ginni Rometty
Ginni Rometty
(2012–present)

Board of directors

Alain Belda William R. Brody Kenneth Chenault Michael L. Eskew David Farr Shirley Ann Jackson Andrew N. Liveris James McNerney James W. Owens Samuel J. Palmisano Virginia M. Rometty Joan E. Spero Sidney Taurel Lorenzo Zambrano

Other

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.