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Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
(HRW) is an international non-governmental organization that conducts research and advocacy on human rights. HRW is headquartered in New York City
New York City
with offices in Amsterdam, Beirut, Berlin, Brussels, Chicago, Geneva, Johannesburg, London, Los Angeles, Moscow, Nairobi, Paris, San Francisco, Sydney, Tokyo, Toronto, Washington, D.C., and Zürich.[1] The group pressures governments, policy makers and human rights abusers to denounce abuse and respect human rights, and the group often works on behalf of refugees, children, migrants and political prisoners. Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
in 1997 shared in the Nobel Peace Prize
Nobel Peace Prize
as a founding member of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, and it played a leading role in the 2008 treaty banning cluster munitions.[2] The organization's annual expenses totaled $50.6 million in 2011[3] and $69.2 million in 2014.[4]

Contents

1 History 2 Profile

2.1 Allegations of bias 2.2 Comparison with Amnesty International

3 Financing and services 4 Notable staff 5 Publications 6 See also 7 References 8 External links

History[edit] Main article: Helsinki Watch Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
was founded by Robert L. Bernstein[5] as a private American NGO
NGO
in 1978, under the name Helsinki Watch, to monitor the then-Soviet Union's compliance with the Helsinki Accords.[6] Helsinki Watch adopted a practice of publicly "naming and shaming" abusive governments through media coverage and through direct exchanges with policymakers. By shining the international spotlight on human rights violations in the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and its European partners, Helsinki Watch says it contributed to the democratic transformations of the region in the late 1980s.[6] Americas
Americas
Watch was founded in 1981 while bloody civil wars engulfed Central America. Relying on extensive on-the-ground fact-finding, Americas
Americas
Watch not only addressed perceived abuses by government forces but also applied international humanitarian law to investigate and expose war crimes by rebel groups. In addition to raising its concerns in the affected countries, Americas
Americas
Watch also examined the role played by foreign governments, particularly the United States government, in providing military and political support to abusive regimes. Asia
Asia
Watch (1985), Africa
Africa
Watch (1988), and Middle East
Middle East
Watch (1989) were added to what was known as "The Watch Committees". In 1988, all of these committees were united under one umbrella to form Human Rights Watch.[7][8] Profile[edit]

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Pursuant to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Human Rights Watch (HRW) opposes violations of what are considered basic human rights under the UDHR. This includes capital punishment and discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. HRW advocates freedoms in connection with fundamental human rights, such as freedom of religion and freedom of the press. HRW seeks to achieve change by publicly pressuring governments and their policy makers to curb human rights abuses, and by convincing more powerful governments to use their influence on governments that violate human rights.[9][1] Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
publishes research reports on violations of international human rights norms as set out by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and what it perceives to be other internationally accepted, human-rights norms. These reports are used as the basis for drawing international attention to abuses and pressuring governments and international organizations to reform. Researchers conduct fact-finding missions to investigate suspect situations also using diplomacy, staying in touch with victims, making files about public and individuals, and providing required security for them in critical situations and in a proper time generate coverage in local and international media. Issues raised by Human Rights Watch in its reports include social and gender discrimination, torture, military use of children, political corruption, abuses in criminal justice systems, and the legalization of abortion.[6] HRW has documented and reported various violations of the laws of war and international humanitarian law. Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
also supports writers worldwide, who are being persecuted for their work and are in need of financial assistance. The Hellman/Hammett grants are financed by the estate of the playwright Lillian Hellman
Lillian Hellman
in funds set up in her name and that of her long-time companion, the novelist Dashiell Hammett. In addition to providing financial assistance, the Hellman/Hammett grants help raise international awareness of activists who are being silenced for speaking out in defense of human rights.[10]

Nabeel Rajab
Nabeel Rajab
helping an old woman after Bahraini police attacked a peaceful protest on 14 August 2010

Each year, Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
presents the Human Rights Defenders Award to activists around the world who demonstrate leadership and courage in defending human rights. The award winners work closely with HRW in investigating and exposing human rights abuses.[11][12] Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
was one of six international NGOs that founded the Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers in 1998. It is also the co-chair of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, a global coalition of civil society groups that successfully lobbied to introduce the Ottawa Treaty, a treaty that prohibits the use of anti-personnel landmines. Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
is a founding member of the International Freedom of Expression Exchange, a global network of non-governmental organizations that monitor censorship worldwide. It also co-founded the Cluster Munition Coalition, which brought about an international convention banning the weapons. HRW employs more than 275 staff—country experts, lawyers, journalists, and academics – and operates in more than 90 countries around the world.[13] The current executive director of HRW is Kenneth Roth, who has held the position since 1993. Roth conducted investigations on abuses in Poland
Poland
after martial law was declared 1981. He later focused on Haiti, which had just emerged from the Duvalier dictatorship
Duvalier dictatorship
but continued to be plagued with problems. Roth’s awareness of the importance of human rights began with stories his father had told about escaping Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
in 1938. Roth graduated from Yale Law School
Yale Law School
and Brown University. Allegations of bias[edit] Main article: Criticism of Human Rights Watch HRW has been criticized for perceived bias by the national governments it has investigated for human rights abuses,[14][15][16] and by NGO Monitor,[17] and HRW's founder, and former Chairman, Robert L. Bernstein.[5] Bias allegations include undue influence by United States government policy, and claims that HRW is biased both for Israel and against Israel. HRW has routinely publicly responded to, and often rejected, criticism of its reporting and findings.[18][19][20][21][22][23][24] Comparison with Amnesty International[edit] Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
and Amnesty International
Amnesty International
are the only two Western-oriented international human rights organizations operating in most situations of severe oppression or abuse worldwide.[12] The major differences lie in the group's structure and methods for promoting change. Amnesty International
Amnesty International
is a mass-membership organization. Mobilization of those members is the organization's central advocacy tool. Human Rights Watch's main products are its crisis-directed research and lengthy reports, whereas Amnesty International
Amnesty International
lobbies and writes detailed reports, but also focuses on mass letter-writing campaigns, adopting individuals as "prisoners of conscience" and lobbying for their release. Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
will openly lobby for specific actions for other governments to take against human rights offenders, including naming specific individuals for arrest, or for sanctions to be levied against certain countries, recently calling for punitive sanctions against the top leaders in Sudan
Sudan
who have overseen a killing campaign in Darfur. The group has also called for human rights activists who have been detained in Sudan
Sudan
to be released.[25] Its documentations of human rights abuses often include extensive analysis of the political and historical backgrounds of the conflicts concerned, some of which have been published in academic journals. AI's reports, on the other hand, tend to contain less analysis, and instead focus on specific abuses of rights.[citation needed] In 2010, The Times
The Times
of London
London
wrote that HRW has "all but eclipsed" Amnesty International. According to The Times, instead of being supported by a mass membership, as AI is, HRW depends on wealthy donors who like to see the organization's reports make headlines. For this reason, according to The Times, HRW tends to "concentrate too much on places that the media already cares about", especially in disproportionate coverage of Israel.[26] Financing and services[edit] For the financial year ending June 2008, HRW reported receiving approximately US$44 million in public donations.[27] In 2009, Human Rights Watch stated that they receive almost 75% of their financial support from North America, 25% from Western Europe
Europe
and less than 1% from the rest of the world.[28] According to a 2008 financial assessment, HRW reports that it does not accept any direct or indirect funding from governments and is financed through contributions from private individuals and foundations.[29] Financier and philanthropist George Soros
George Soros
of the Open Society Foundation announced in 2010 his intention to grant US $100 million to HRW over a period of ten years to help it expand its efforts internationally. He said, " Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
is one of the most effective organizations I support. Human rights
Human rights
underpin our greatest aspirations: they're at the heart of open societies."[30][31][32] The donation increases Human Rights Watch's operating staff of 300 by 120 people. The donation was the largest in the organization's history.[33] Charity Navigator
Charity Navigator
gave Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
a four-star rating overall, and its financial rating increased from three stars in 2015 to the maximum four as of June 2016.[34] The Better Business Bureau said Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
meets its standards for charity accountability. Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
published the following program and support services spending details for the financial year ending June 2011.

Program services 2011 expenses (USD)[3]

Africa $5,859,910

Americas $1,331,448

Asia $4,629,535

Europe
Europe
and Central Asia $4,123,959

Middle East
Middle East
and North Africa $3,104,643

United States $1,105,571

Children's Rights $1,551,463

Health & Human Rights $1,962,015

International Justice $1,325,749

Woman's Rights $2,083,890

Other programs $11,384,854

Supporting services

Management and general $3,130,051

Fundraising $9,045,910

Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
published the following program and support services spending details for the financial year ending June 2008.

Program services 2008 expenses (USD)[27]

Africa $5,532,631

Americas $1,479,265

Asia $3,212,850

Europe
Europe
and Central Asia $4,001,853

Middle East
Middle East
and North Africa $2,258,459

United States $1,195,673

Children's Rights $1,642,064

International Justice $1,385,121

Woman's Rights $1,854,228

Other programs $9,252,974

Supporting services

Management and general $1,984,626

Fundraising $8,641,358

Notable staff[edit]

Kenneth Roth
Kenneth Roth
and the Prime Minister of the Netherlands, Mark Rutte, 2 February 2012

Some notable current and former staff members of Human Rights Watch:[35]

Robert L. Bernstein, Founding Chair Emeritus Kenneth Roth, Executive Director Jan Egeland, Deputy Director and the Director of Human Rights Watch Europe John Studzinski, Vice Chair;[36] developed European arm;[37][38] former Director; member of Executive Committee; Chairman of Investment Committee[39][40][41][42][43] Minky Worden, Media Director Jamie Fellner, Senior Counsel for the United States
United States
Program of Human Rights Watch Brad Adams, Asia
Asia
Director Scott Long, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Rights Director Sarah Leah Whitson, Middle East
Middle East
and North Africa
Africa
Director Joe Stork Marc Garlasco, former staff member, resigned due to a scandal involving his Nazi memorabilia
Nazi memorabilia
collection[44] Sharon Hom Tae-Ung Baik, former research consultant Nabeel Rajab, member of the Advisory Committee of Human Rights Watch's Middle East
Middle East
Division

Publications[edit] Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
publishes reports on many different topics[45] and compiles an annual World Report presenting an overview of the worldwide state of human rights.[46] It has been published by Seven Stories Press since 2006; the current edition, World Report 2017: Demagogues Threaten Human Rights, was released in January 2017, and covers events of 2016.[47] Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
has reported extensively on subjects such as the Rwandan Genocide
Rwandan Genocide
of 1994,[48] Democratic Republic of the Congo[49] and US sex offender registries due to their over-breadth and application to juveniles.[50][51] In the summer of 2004, the Rare Book and Manuscript Library
Rare Book and Manuscript Library
at Columbia University
Columbia University
in New York became the depository institution for the Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
Archive, an active collection that documents decades of human rights investigations around the world. The archive was transferred from its previous location at the Norlin Library at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The archive includes administrative files, public relations documents, as well as case and country files. With some exceptions for security considerations, the Columbia University
Columbia University
community and the public have access to field notes, taped and transcribed interviews with alleged victims of human rights violations, video and audio tapes, and other materials documenting the organization’s activities since its founding in 1978 as Helsinki Watch.[52] See also[edit]

Human rights
Human rights
portal

American Freedom Campaign Avocats Sans Frontières Freedom House Helsinki Committee for Human Rights Human Rights First International Freedom of Expression Exchange Shia Rights Watch US Human Rights Network Academic freedom in the Middle East

References[edit]

^ a b "Frequently Asked Questions". Human Rights Watch. Retrieved 2015-01-21.  ^ https://www.hrw.org/history ^ a b "Financial Statements, Year Ended June 30, 2011" (PDF). Human Rights Watch. Retrieved 2012-06-26.  ^ "Financial Statements, Year Ended June 30, 2014" (PDF). Human Rights Watch. Retrieved 2016-08-03.  ^ a b Bernstein, Robert L. (2009-10-19). "Rights Watchdog, Lost in the Mideast". The NY Times. Retrieved 2009-10-20.  ^ a b c "Our History". Human Rights Watch. Retrieved 2009-07-23.  ^ "Our History". Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
(HRW.org). Retrieved 28 February 2014.  ^ Chauhan, Yamini. "Human Rights Watch". Encyclopædia Britannica.  ^ Historical Dictionary of Human Rights and Humanitarian Organizations; Edited by Thomas E. Doyle, Robert F. Gorman, Edward S. Mihalkanin; Rowman & Littlefield, 2016; Pg. 137-138 ^ Hellman-Hammett Grants,Human Rights Watch ^ Human Rights Watch. "Five Activists Win Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
Awards". Human Rights Watch. Retrieved 23 February 2013.  ^ a b SocialSciences.in. "Human Rights Watch". Retrieved 23 February 2013.  ^ "Who We Are". Human Rights Watch. Retrieved 2009-07-23.  ^ "After Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
Report, Egypt Says Group Broke Law". The New York Times. 12 August 2016. ^ "Saudi Arabia outraged by Amnesty International
Amnesty International
and Human Rights Watch’s criticism". Ya Libnan. 1 July 2016. ^ "A row over human rights". The Economist. 2009-02-05.  ^ "HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH (HRW)". NGO
NGO
Monitor. Retrieved 2014-08-10.  ^ The Transformation of Human Rights Fact-Finding; Sarah Knuckey; Oxford University Press, 2015; Pgs. 355-376 ^ Cook, Jonathan (7 September 2006). "The Israel Lobby Works Its Magic, Again". CounterPunch.  ^ Whitson, Sarah Leah (September 22, 2006). "Hezbollah's Rockets and Civilian Casualties: A Response to Jonathan Cook". Counterpunch. Retrieved 2006-10-14. [dead link] ^ Cook, Jonathan (September 26, 2006). " Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
still denying Lebanon the right to defend itself". Z Communications. Archived from the original on March 10, 2007. Retrieved 2006-10-14.  ^ "Palestinians Are Being Denied the Right of Non-Violent Resistance? » CounterPunch: Tells the Facts, Names the Names". CounterPunch. 2006-11-30. Archived from the original on 2011-06-28. Retrieved 2013-08-18.  ^ Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
Must Retract Its Shameful Press Release; CounterPunch; November 29, 2006 ^ Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
(HRW) Whitewashes Israel, The Law Supports Hamas: Reflections on Israel’s Latest Massacre; Centre for Research on Globalization; Norman Finkelstein; July 20, 2014 ^ Human rights
Human rights
group says activists detained in Sudan ^ NGO
NGO
Monitor research featured in Sunday Times: "Nazi scandal engulfs Human Rights Watch", March 28, 2010. Retrieved 2012-07-19. ^ a b "Financial Statements. Year Ended June 30, 2008" (PDF). Human Rights Watch. Retrieved 2009-07-23.  ^ " Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
Visit to Saudi Arabia". Human Rights Watch. 2009-07-17. Retrieved 2009-07-23.  ^ "Financials". Human Rights Watch. 2008-09-22. Retrieved 2009-07-23.  ^ " George Soros
George Soros
to Give $100 Million to Human Rights Watch". Human Rights Watch.  ^ Colum Lynch (2010-09-12). "With $100 million Soros gift, Human Rights Watch looks to expand global reach". Washington Post. The donation, the largest single gift ever from the Hungarian-born investor and philanthropist, is premised on the belief that U.S. leadership on human rights has been diminished by a decade of harsh policies in the war on terrorism.  ^ See page 16 for the Open Society Foundation's contribution ^ George Soros
George Soros
gives $100 million to Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
(The Guardian, Sept. 7, 2010) ^ "Charity Rating - Human Rights Watch." Charity Navigator
Charity Navigator
- America's Largest Charity Evaluator Human Rights Watch. [1] ^ Human Rights Watch: Our People Archived September 17, 2009, at the Wayback Machine. ^ John J. Studzinski. Human Rights Watch. ^ Wachman, Richard. "Cracking the Studzinski code". The Observer. October 7, 2006. ^ "Most influential Americans in the UK: 20 to 11". The Telegraph. November 22, 2007. ^ "Donation provides cornerstone for new Transforming Tate Modern development". Tate Modern. May 22, 2007. ^ John Studzinski Archived 2014-05-21 at Archive.is. Debrett's. ^ John Studzinski Archived 2015-04-08 at the Wayback Machine.. Institute for Public Policy Research. ^ "Royal Honor for John Studzinski '78, Architectural Accolades for Namesake". Bowdoin College
Bowdoin College
Campus News. Bowdoin.edu. February 26, 2008. ^ Human Rights Watch. Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
World Report, 2003. Human Rights Watch, 2003. p. 558. ^ Pilkington, Ed (2009-09-15). " Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
investigator suspended over Nazi memorabilia". The Guardian. Retrieved 2010-02-15.  ^ "Publications". Human Rights Watch. Retrieved 2009-07-28.  ^ "Previous World Reports". Human Rights Watch. Retrieved 2009-07-28.  ^ "World Report 2017: Demagogues Threaten Human Rights Seven Stories Press". Sevenstories.com. Retrieved 2017-03-29.  ^ Rwandan genocide report,Human Rights Watch ^ Congo report,Human Rights Watch ^ "No Easy Answers: Sex Offender Laws in the US". Human Rights Watch. 12 September 2007.  ^ "Raised on the Registry: The Irreparable Harm of Placing Children on Sex Offender Registries in the US". Human Rights Watch. 1 May 2013.  ^ Library Journal, March 11, 2004

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Human Rights Watch.

Official website

v t e

International human rights organisations and institutions

Types

Human rights
Human rights
group Human rights
Human rights
commission Human rights
Human rights
institutions Truth and reconciliation commission

International institutions

Committee on the Rights of the Child Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities International Criminal Court Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights UN Human Rights Committee UN Human Rights Council UN Security Council

Regional bodies

African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights African Court of Justice European Court of Human Rights European Committee for the Prevention of Torture Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Inter-American Court of Human Rights

Multi-lateral bodies

European Union Council of Europe Organisation of American States (OAS) UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
(UNOCHA) International Labour Organization
International Labour Organization
(ILO) World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO) UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) UN Population Fund (UNFPA) UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) UN Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) UN Development Programme (UNDP) Food and Agriculture Organization
Food and Agriculture Organization
of the UN (FAO) UN Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT)

Major NGOs

Amnesty International FIDH Human Rights Watch International Committee of the Red Cross
International Committee of the Red Cross
(ICRC) Emergency NGO Human Rights First

v t e

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Washington, D.C.

Northeast Washington

Ward 5

Center of Concern

Ward 6

American Foreign Policy Council Center on Budget and Policy Priorities Center for Public Justice The Heritage Foundation International Intellectual Property Institute Mathematica Policy Research Niskanen Center World Resources Institute

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American Principles Project American Security Council Foundation Americans for the Arts The Arab Gulf States Institute Atlantic Council Atlas Network The Atlas Society Bipartisan Policy Center Capital Research Center Cato Institute Center for a New American Security Center for Advanced Defense Studies Center for American Progress Center for Economic and Policy Research Center for European Policy Analysis Center for Global Development Center on Global Interests Center for Immigration Studies Center for International Policy Center for Public Integrity Center for the National Interest Center for Security Policy Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget Competitive Enterprise Institute Constitution Project Cordell Hull Institute Corporation for Enterprise Development Economic Policy Institute Eisenhower Institute Employee Benefit Research Institute Employment Policies Institute Endowment for Middle East
Middle East
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Africa
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United States
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Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 309563566 LCCN: n88622031 ISNI: 0000 0001 1426 7863 GND: 1220965-X SUDOC: 034724095 BNF:

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