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Route map: Google Template:Attached KML/ Houston
Houston
Street KML is from Wikidata

Houston
Houston
Street

Looking east from Orchard Street

Length 2.0 mi (3.2 km)

Location New York

Postal code 10002, 10009, 10012, 10014

West end NY 9A/West Side Highway

East end Franklin D. Roosevelt East River Drive
Franklin D. Roosevelt East River Drive
(FDR Drive)

Houston
Houston
Street (/ˈhaʊstən/ HOW-stən) is a major east-west thoroughfare in downtown Manhattan, running crosstown across the full width of the island of Manhattan, from Franklin D. Roosevelt East River Drive (FDR Drive) and East River Park
East River Park
on the East River
East River
to Pier 40 and West Street
West Street
on the Hudson River. It generally serves as the boundary between neighborhoods, with Alphabet City, the East Village, NoHo, Greenwich Village, and the West Village
West Village
lying to the north of the street, and the Lower East Side, most of the Bowery, Nolita, and SoHo
SoHo
to the south. The numeric street-naming grid in Manhattan, created as part of the Commissioners' Plan of 1811, begins immediately north of Houston
Houston
Street with 1st Street at Avenue A, although the grid does not fully come into effect until 13th Street.[1] The street's name is pronounced "HOW-stən", unlike the city of Houston
Houston
in Texas, which is pronounced "HYOO-stən". This is because the street was named for William Houstoun, whereas the city was named for Sam Houston.[2]

Contents

1 Description 2 History 3 Transportation 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External links

Description[edit]

Houston
Houston
Street (1917) by George Luks

At its east end, Houston
Houston
Street meets FDR Drive
FDR Drive
in an interchange at East River
East River
Park. West of FDR Drive
FDR Drive
it intersects with Avenue D. Further west, other streets, including First Avenue, the Bowery, Lafayette Street
Lafayette Street
and Broadway, intersect Houston
Houston
Street. The Broadway intersection is the division point between East Houston
Houston
Street and West Houston
Houston
Street. Sixth Avenue intersects Houston
Houston
Street at a curve in the road in Greenwich Village. East of Sixth Avenue, Houston
Houston
street is bidirectional and separated by a median; west of Sixth, the street is narrower and unidirectional westbound.[3] West Houston
Houston
Street terminates at an intersection with West Street
West Street
near Pier 40 on the Hudson River. History[edit]

East Houston
Houston
Street between Clinton and Suffolk Streets in the 1920s

Houston
Houston
Street is named for William Houstoun, who was a delegate from the state of Georgia to the Continental Congress from 1784 through 1786 and to the Constitutional Convention in 1787.[1] The street was christened by Nicholas Bayard III, whose daughter, Mary, was married to Houstoun in 1788.[4] The couple met while Houstoun, a member of an ancient and aristocratic Scottish family, was serving in the Congress. Bayard cut the street through a tract he owned in the vicinity of Canal Street in which he lived, and the city later extended it to include North Street, the northern border of New York's east side at the beginning of the 19th century.[4] The current spelling of the name is a corruption: the street appears as Houstoun in the city's Common Council minutes for 1808 and the official map drawn in 1811 to establish the street grid that is still current. In those years, the Texas
Texas
hero Sam Houston, for whom the street is sometimes incorrectly said to have been named, was an unknown teenager in Tennessee.[1] Also mistaken is the explanation that the name derives from the Dutch words huis for house and tuin for garden.[4] The narrow, westernmost stretch of the current Houston Street, from Sixth Avenue to the West Side Highway, was known as "Hammersley Street" (also spelled "Hamersly Street") until the middle 19th century,[5] and was inside Greenwich Village. It later came to be regarded as the Village's southern boundary. In 1891, Nikola Tesla
Nikola Tesla
established his Houston
Houston
Street laboratory. Much of Tesla's research was lost in an 1895 fire. The street, originally narrow, was markedly widened from Sixth Avenue to Essex Street
Essex Street
in the early 1930s during construction of the Independent Subway System's Sixth Avenue Line. The street widening involved demolition of buildings on both sides of the street, resulting in numerous small, empty lots.[6] Although some of these lots have been redeveloped, many of them are now used by vendors, and some have been turned into playgrounds and, more recently, community gardens.

Houston
Houston
Street at Lafayette Street
Lafayette Street
in 1974

Lower Manhattan's SoHo
SoHo
district takes its name from an acronym for "South of Houston", as the street serves as SoHo's northern boundary; another, narrower neighborhood north of Houston
Houston
Street is correspondingly called NoHo. A reconstruction project has been rebuilding parts of the street since 2005; it is nearly complete as of 2014[update].[7] Transportation[edit] As of 2010[update], Houston
Houston
Street is served by the M21 New York City Bus route from the FDR Drive
FDR Drive
to Washington Street.[8] The bus route itself had replaced an earlier streetcar line, which is now the M9 from Avenues A to C. A portion of the New York City Subway's IND Sixth Avenue Line
IND Sixth Avenue Line
runs under Houston
Houston
Street, between Sixth Avenue to just before Avenue A;[9] there are stations at Second Avenue (F and ​M trains) and Broadway – Lafayette Street
Lafayette Street
(B, ​D, ​F, and ​M trains). Additionally, there is a station at Seventh Avenue, for the Houston
Houston
Street (1 and ​2 trains).[10] The Bleecker Street
Bleecker Street
station (4, ​6, and <6> trains) has station entrances on the north side of Houston
Houston
Street, due to its connection with the Broadway – Lafayette Street
Lafayette Street
station as part of a larger station complex.[11] Exit 5 on the FDR Drive
FDR Drive
is on Houston
Houston
Street. The street also connects directly with West Street
West Street
and the West Side Highway; however, by then, Houston
Houston
Street is westbound-only.

References[edit]

^ a b c Peretz Square, New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. Accessed July 12, 2007. "North Street, then the northern boundary of settled Manhattan, was later renamed for William Houstoun, a Georgia delegate to the Continental Congress; at the time of the renaming, the more famous Sam Houston
Houston
was an unknown teenager" ^ "New York Bookshelf; An Oddly Named Street, A Dark Night, a Gamy Club". The New York Times. Feb 8, 2004. Retrieved 19 January 2011.  ^ West Houston
Houston
Street - NYC.gov ^ a b c Moscow, Henry. The Street Book: An Encyclopedia of Manhattan's Street Names and Their Origins. New York: Fordham University Press, 1990. ISBN 0-8232-1275-0. p. 61. ^ New York City Parks Department Hammersley Street ^ Gray, Christopher (April 18, 2004). "Amid the Giant Ad Signs, New Buildings Sprout". The New York Times. Retrieved July 29, 2010.  ^ http://www.nyc.gov/html/ddc/downloads/pdf/brochures/hwm738.pdf ^ " Manhattan
Manhattan
Bus Map" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved August 19, 2015.  ^ 2nd Avenue – nycsubway.org ^ "Subway Map" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. January 18, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2018.  ^ "MTA Neighborhood Maps: East Village" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved August 19, 2015. 

Further reading[edit]

Knight, Sam. "What a Street! (But Do You Ever Remember Being There?)" The New York Times, October 17, 2004. Naureckas, Jim. " Houston
Houston
Street". New York Songlines.  Walsh, Kevin. "Houston". Forgotten New York – Street Scenes. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Houston
Houston
Street (Manhattan) at Wikimedia Commons

v t e

Streets of Manhattan

Commissioners' Plan of 1811 List of eponymous streets in New York City

North–South

East Side

FDR Dr Ave D Ave C (Loisaida Ave) Ave B / East End Ave Ave A / York Ave / Sutton Pl / Pleasant Ave Asser Levy Pl / Beekman Pl 1st Ave 2nd Ave Shevchenko Pl 3rd Ave Irving Pl / Lexington Ave Park Ave

Tunnel Viaduct 4th Ave / Park Ave S

Broadway Vanderbilt Ave Madison Ave 5th Ave / Museum Mile

West Side

5th Ave / Museum Mile Rockefeller Plz 6th Ave / Ave of the Americas / Lenox Ave / Malcolm X Blvd / East Dr 6½ Ave Center Dr 7th Ave / Fashion Ave / Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd / West Dr / Shubert Alley 8th Ave / Central Park W / Douglas Blvd 9th Ave / Columbus Ave / Morningside Dr Dyer Ave / Lincoln Tunnel Expwy 10th Ave / Amsterdam Ave Broadway Hudson Blvd 11th Ave / West End Ave Riverside Dr 12th Ave 13th Ave Audubon Ave St. Nicholas Ave / Duarte Blvd Claremont Ave Ft. Washington Ave Cabrini Blvd Sylvan Pl

Lower East Side

Allen / Pike Baxter / Centre Market Pl Bowery Centre Division Chrystie Coenties Slip Eldridge Street Elizabeth Essex Forsyth Lafayette Doyers Rivington Ludlow Mott Mulberry Orchard Park Row Spring University Pl

Lower West Side

Church / Trinity Pl Greenwich Hudson Jones Macdougal Patchin Pl Sullivan Gay Thompson Varick Washington W Broadway / LaGuardia Pl Weehawken West Bank

East–West

Downtown

Roosevelt Chambers E Broadway Henry Madison Cherry Worth N Moore Beach Broome Canal Hester Grand Delancey Stanton Houston Vandam 1st–14th

Bleecker Bond Great Jones 4th Waverly Pl / Washington Square N Astor Pl / Washington Mews / Stuyvesant / Macdougal Aly 8th / St. Mark's Pl / Greenwich Ave Christopher Charles 14th

Midtown

15th–59th

23rd 34th 42nd 45th / George Abbott Way 47th 50th 51st 52nd / Swing Alley / St of Jazz 53rd 54th 55th 57th 59th / Central Park S

Uptown

60th–215th

66th / Peter Jennings Way 72nd 74th 79th 85th 86th 89th 93rd 95th 96th 110th / Cathedral Pkwy / Central Park N 112th 116th 120th 122nd / Mother Hale Way / Seminary Row 125th / Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd 130th / Astor Row 132nd 135th 139th / Strivers' Row 145th 155th 181st 187th Bogardus Pl Dyckman Plaza Lafayette

Intersections

Circles

Columbus Duke Ellington Frederick Douglass

Squares

Chatham Cooper Duarte Duffy Foley Gramercy Grand Army Hanover Herald Hudson Jackson Lincoln Madison Mulry Pershing Petrosino Sherman Stuyvesant Times Tompkins Union Verdi Washington Zuccotti

Financial District

Nassau Gold William Broad South Whitehall Bridge Brewers / Stone State Pearl Marketfield Wall Albany Liberty Cortlandt Maiden Dey Fulton Vesey / Ann Theatre Alley

Italics indicate streets no longer in existence. All entries are streets unless otherwise noted See also: Manhattan
Manhattan
addre

.