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Coordinates: 35°40′35.5″N 139°44′40.5″E / 35.676528°N 139.744583°E / 35.676528; 139.744583

House of Councillors 参議院 Sangiin

Type

Type

Upper house

Leadership

President

Chūichi Date, LDP (caucus: independent) Since 1 August 2016

Vice President

Akira Gunji, DP (caucus: independent) Since 1 August 2016

Structure

Seats 242

Political groups

Government (150)   LDP–PJK (125)    Kōmeitō
Kōmeitō
(25) Opposition (92)   DP (42)   JCP (14)   Ishin (11)   SDP–LP (6)   CDP (6)   Kibo (3)   Energize (2)    Okinawa
Okinawa
Whirlwind (2)   Kokumin no Koe (2)   Independents (4)

Elections

Voting system

Parallel voting: Single non-transferable vote (146 seats) Party-list proportional representation
Party-list proportional representation
(96 seats) Staggered elections

Last election

10 July 2016

Next election

July 2019

Meeting place

Chamber of the House of Councillors

Website

www.sangiin.go.jp

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The House of Councillors (参議院, Sangiin) is the upper house of the National Diet
National Diet
of Japan. The House of Representatives is the lower house. The House of Councillors is the successor to the pre-war House of Peers. If the two houses disagree on matters of the budget, treaties, or designation of the prime minister, the House of Representatives can insist on its decision. In other decisions, the House of Representatives can override a vote of the House of Councillors only by a two-thirds majority of members present. The House of Councillors has 242 members who each serve six-year terms, two years longer than those of the House of Representatives. Councillors must be at least 30 years old, compared with 25 years old in the House of Representatives. The House cannot be dissolved, as only half of its membership is elected at each election. Of the 121 members subject to election each time, 73 are elected from the 47 prefectural districts (by single non-transferable vote) and 48 are elected from a nationwide list by proportional representation with open lists.[1]

Contents

1 Current composition 2 Latest election 3 Historical notes 4 See also 5 References 6 External links

Current composition[edit] (as of 17 January 2018 [after 195th National Diet
National Diet
session])[2]

Caucus (English name) (domestic name) Members

Term expires Total

July 25, 2022 July 28, 2019

Liberal Democratic Party and the Party for Japanese Kokoro Jiyūminshutō・Kokoro 56 69 125

  The Democratic Party and the Shin-Ryokufukai Minshintō・Shin-Ryokufūkai (~"Dem. Prog. Party, New Ryokufūkai") 26 16 42

Komeito Kōmeitō
Kōmeitō
(~"Justice/Fairness Party") 14 11 25

Japanese Communist Party Nihon Kyōsantō 6 8 14

Nippon Ishin no Kai
Nippon Ishin no Kai
(~" Japan
Japan
Innovation/Restoration Association") 6 5 11

Hope Coalition Kibō no kai (jiyū, shamin) (~"Assembly of Hope (LP, SDP)") 4 2 6

Constitutional Democratic Party Rikkenminshutō 4 2 6

Kibō no Tō
Kibō no Tō
(~"Party of Hope") 0 3 3

Independents Club Mushozoku kurabu 0 2 2

Okinawa
Okinawa
Whirlwind Okinawa
Okinawa
no kaze (~"Wind of Okinawa") 1 1 2

Kokumin no Koe (~"People's Voice") 2 0 2

Independents (Members who do not sit with a caucus, includes Pres., Vice Pres.) 2 2 4

Total 121 121 242

For a list of individual members, see the List of members of the Diet of Japan. Latest election[edit]

e • d Summary of the 10 July 2016 Japanese House of Councillors election results[3][4][5]

Party Pre-election SNTV/FPTP majoritarian D'Hondt proportional Seats won New total Change from

Total Not up Up Votes[6] % Seats Votes[6] % Seats Before 2013 2010

Ruling parties 135 76 59

69 145 +10 +10 +42

Liberal Democratic Party LDP 115 65 50 22,590,793 39.94 % 36 20,114,788 35.91 % 19 55 120 +5 +5 +36

Komeito K 20 11 9 4,263,422 7.54 % 7 7,572,960 13.52 % 7 14 25 +5 +5 +6

Revisionist opposition parties 10 8 2

7 15 +5 (new +15) +6 from JRP (new +15)

Initiatives from Osaka

7 5 2 3,303,419 5.84 % 3 5,153,584 9.20 % 4 7 12 +5 (new +12) (new +12)

Party for Japanese Kokoro

3 3 0 535,517 0.95 % 0 734,024 1.31 % 0 0 3 0 (new +3) (new +3) 0 from SPJ

Anti-revisionist opposition parties (joint nominations in single-member districts) 79 27 52

40 67 -12 n/a n/a

Democratic Party DP 62 17 45 14,215,956 25.14 % 21 11,751,015 20.98 % 11 32 49 -13 (new +49) -10 from DPJ (new +49) -57 from DPJ

Japanese Communist Party JCP 11 8 3 4,103,514 7.26 % 1 6,016,195 10.74 % 5 6 14 +3 +3 +8

People's Life Party PLP 3 1 2 not contested independently 1,067,301 1.91 % 1 1 2 -1 -1 (new +2)

Social Democratic Party SDP 3 1 2 289,899 0.51 % 0 1,536,239 2.74 % 1 1 2 -1 -1 -2

New Renaissance Party NRP 2 0 2 60,431 0.11 % 0 580,653 1.04 % 0 0 0 -2 -1 -1

Happiness Realization Party HRP 0 0 0 963,585 1.70 % 0 366,815 0.65 % 0 0 0 0 0 -1

Seitō shiji nashi ("no party supported")

0 0 0 127,367 0.23 % 0 647,071 1.16 % 0 0 0 0 (new 0) (new 0)

Angry voice of the people

0 0 0 82,357 0.15 % 0 466,706 0.83 % 0 0 0 0 (new 0) (new 0)

Others

0 0 0 279,681 0.49 % 0 not contested 0 0 n/a n/a n/a

Assembly to Energize Japan AEJ 3 2 1 not contested 0 2 -1 (new +2) -16 from YP (new +2) -9 from YP

Okinawa
Okinawa
Socialist Mass Party OSMP 1 1 0 not contested 0 1 0 0 0

Independents (incl. some joint opposition-endorsed "independents" & 1 successful LDP-endorsed "independent")

11 7 4 5,739,452 10.15 % 5 n/a 5 12 +1 +9 +10

Total (valid votes) 241 121 120 56,555,393 100.00 % 73 56,007,353 100.00 % 48 121 242 +1 (vacant) 0 0

Turnout out of 106,202,873 eligible voters 58,094,005 54.70 %

58,085,678 54.69 %

Historical notes[edit] Article 102 of the Japanese Constitution
Japanese Constitution
provided that half of the councillors elected in the first House of Councillors election in 1947 would be up for re-election three years later in order to introduce staggered six-year terms. The House initially had 250 seats. Two seats were added to the House in 1970 after the agreement on the repatriation of Okinawa, increasing the House to a total of 252.[7] Legislation aimed at addressing malapportionment that favoured less-populated prefectures was introduced in 2000; this resulted in ten seats being removed (five each at the 2001 and 2004 elections), bringing the total number of seats to 242.[7] Further reforms to address malapportinoment took effect in 2007 and 2016, but did not change the total number of members in the house.[7] From 1947 to 1983, the House had 100 seats allocated to a national block (全国区, zenkoku-ku), of which fifty seats were allocated in each election.[7] It was originally intended to give nationally prominent figures a route to the House without going through local electioneering processes.[citation needed] Some national political figures, such as feminists Shidzue Katō and Fusae Ichikawa
Fusae Ichikawa
and former Imperial Army general Kazushige Ugaki, were elected through the block, along with a number of celebrities such as comedian Yukio Aoshima (later Governor of Tokyo), journalist Hideo Den and actress Yūko Mochizuki.[citation needed] Shintaro Ishihara
Shintaro Ishihara
won a record 3 million votes in the national block in the 1968 election.[citation needed] The national block was last seen in the 1980 election and was replaced with a nationwide proportional representation block in the 1983 election.[7] The national proportional representation block was reduced to 96 members in the 2000 reforms.[7] See also[edit]

List of Speakers of the House of Councillors of Japan List of districts of the House of Councillors of Japan

References[edit]

Specific

^ Hayes 2009, p. 50 ^ House of Councillors: Members Strength of the Political Groups in the House (only caucus totals and female members; full Japanese version partitioned by class/end of term and election segment 会派別所属議員数一覧) ^ Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications: Results of the 24th regular election of members of the House of Councillors (in Japanese) ^ Yomiuri Shimbun: 2016 election results ^ Asahi Shimbun: 2016 election results ^ a b Decimals from proportionate fractional votes (按分票 anbunhyō) rounded to full numbers ^ a b c d e f "参議院議員選挙制度の変遷" [Changes to the electoral system of the House of Councillors] (in Japanese). Retrieved 12 December 2016. 

Bibliography

Hayes, L. D., 2009. Introduction to Japanese Politics. 5th ed. New York: M.E. Sharpe. ISBN 978-0-7656-2279-2

External links[edit]

House of Councillors Website (in English) House of Councillors internet TV - Official site (in Japanese)

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