HOME
        TheInfoList






History

The origins of the Houdan breed are unknown; as they predate modern agricultural writing, little can be said with certainty. The breed was described in detail in 1858.[4] The Houdan combines a number of distinctive features, which in the nineteenth century gave rise to speculation about the breeds that might have contributed to its development.[5] Cross-breeding with the Crèvecœur or perhaps the Polish was suspected to have given the Houdan its crest, and with either the Dorking or a native five-toed fowl of France was thought have to resulted in its fifth toe.

It was first imported into England in 1850,[6] and to North America in 1865, where it appeared in the first edition of the American Standard of Perfection in 1874.[7]:121

Characteristics

Houdans have small earlobes and wattles, a backward flowing crest, and facial feathering consisting of a beard and muffing near the ears. On hens, comb and wattles are sometimes completely obscured by the feathering. Houdan combs are V-shaped in the American standard, and butterfly-shaped in the British, Australian and French standards.

The most common colour variety is mottled (or caillouté, "pebbled" in France), a pattern of black with white spotting. In the past there was a lighter variation of the mottled pattern; in the 1800s, it may have been more similar to the splashy mixture of white and black which today is called Exchequer.[5] Four other colour varieties are recognised in the Poultry Standard for Europe of the Entente Européenne d'Aviculture et de Cuniculture: black, cuckoo, pearled grey, and white.[2]

The Houdan is a light breed: cocks weigh 2.5–3 kg and hens 2–2.5 kg.[8]The origins of the Houdan breed are unknown; as they predate modern agricultural writing, little can be said with certainty. The breed was described in detail in 1858.[4] The Houdan combines a number of distinctive features, which in the nineteenth century gave rise to speculation about the breeds that might have contributed to its development.[5] Cross-breeding with the Crèvecœur or perhaps the Polish was suspected to have given the Houdan its crest, and with either the Dorking or a native five-toed fowl of France was thought have to resulted in its fifth toe.

It was first imported into England in 1850,[6] and to North America in 1865, where it appeared in the first edition of the American Standard of Perfection in 1874.[7]:121

Characteristics

Houdans have small earlobes and wattles, a backward flowing crest, and facial feathering consisting of a beard and muffing near the ears. On hens, comb and wattles are sometimes completely obscured by the feathering. Houdan combs are V-shaped in the American standard, and butterfly-shaped in the British, Australian and French standards.

The most common [6] and to North America in 1865, where it appeared in the first edition of the American Standard of Perfection in 1874.[7]:121

Houdans have small earlobes and wattles, a backward flowing crest, and facial feathering consisting of a beard and muffing near the ears. On hens, comb and wattles are sometimes completely obscured by the feathering. Houdan combs are V-shaped in the American standard, and butterfly-shaped in the British, Australian and French standards.

The most common colour variety is mottled (or caillouté, "pebbled" in France), a pattern of black with white spotting. In the past there was a lighter variation of the mottled pattern; in the 1800s, i

The most common colour variety is mottled (or caillouté, "pebbled" in France), a pattern of black with white spotting. In the past there was a lighter variation of the mottled pattern; in the 1800s, it may have been more similar to the splashy mixture of white and black which today is called Exchequer.[5] Four other colour varieties are recognised in the Poultry Standard for Europe of the Entente Européenne d'Aviculture et de Cuniculture: black, cuckoo, pearled grey, and white.[2]

The Houdan is a light breed: cocks weigh 2.5–3 kg and hens 2–2.5 kg.[8] A bantam Houdan was created in Britain in the 1940s, and further developed in Germany.[citation needed]

Originally a dual-purpose fowl kept for both eggs and meat, and for part of the 1800s one of France's main meat breeds, the Houdan today is primarily a rare show bird. However, with a fairly quick rate of maturation and the ability to lay a respectable number of white eggs, it is still occasionally kept in backyard flocks.

References

Normal Exit PeriodicService.php