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The Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl is an amphitheater in the Hollywood
Hollywood
Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. The Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl is known for its band shell, a distinctive set of concentric arches that graced the site from 1929 through 2003, before being replaced with a larger one beginning in the 2004 season. The shell is set against the backdrop of the Hollywood Hills
Hollywood Hills
and the famous Hollywood Sign
Hollywood Sign
to the northeast. The "bowl" refers to the shape of the concave hillside the amphitheater is carved into. The bowl is owned by the County of Los Angeles and is the home of the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Orchestra, the summer home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic
Los Angeles Philharmonic
and the host of hundreds of musical events each year. It is located at 2301 North Highland Avenue, west of the (former) The French Village,[1][2] north of Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood Boulevard
and the Hollywood/Highland subway station and south of Route 101.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Discovery and founding 1.2 Band shells

2 Performances

2.1 1920s 2.2 1930s 2.3 1940s 2.4 1950s 2.5 1960s 2.6 1970s 2.7 1980s 2.8 1990s 2.9 2000s 2.10 2010s

3 Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Museum 4 Films 5 Television 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External links

History[edit] Discovery and founding[edit]

Two women performing on a barn door in the first known musical event at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl, ca.1920. According to an article in the San Diego Union newspaper, June 19, 1941, the woman at the piano was Carrie Jacobs-Bond, one of the originators of the Theatre Arts Alliance and a resident of nearby Hollywood
Hollywood
Heights. She was assisting in testing the acoustics. The barn door was placed approximately where the band shell was built.

The site of the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl was chosen in 1919 by William Reed and his son H. Ellis Reed,[3] who were dispatched to find a suitable location for outdoor performances by the members of the newly formed Theatre Arts Alliance headed by Christine Wetherill Stevenson. The Reeds selected a natural amphitheater, a shaded canyon and popular picnic spot known as 'Daisy Dell' in Bolton Canyon.[4] On 11 November 1921 the first Sunrise Service took place at the bowl, in one of its first major events.[5] The Bowl officially opened on July 11, 1922. It was also made near a Chinese Theater. Band shells[edit]

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At first, the Bowl was very close to its natural state, with only makeshift wooden benches for the audience, and eventually a simple awning over the stage. In 1926, a group known as the Allied Architects was contracted to regrade the Bowl, providing permanent seating and a shell. These improvements did provide increased capacity for the all-time record for attendance set in 1936, when 26,410 people crowded into the Bowl to hear opera singer Lily Pons, but were otherwise disappointing[to whom?], as the regrading noticeably[to whom?] degraded the natural acoustics, and the original shell was deemed acoustically unsatisfactory[by whom?] (as well as visually unfashionable, with its murals of sailing ships).[citation needed] For the 1927 season, Lloyd Wright, (Frank Lloyd Wright's son) built a pyramidal shell, with a vaguely Southwestern look, out of left-over lumber from a production of Robin Hood. This was generally regarded[by whom?] as the best shell the Bowl ever had from an acoustic standpoint; unfortunately[to whom?], its appearance was deemed[by whom?] too avant-garde, and it was demolished at the end of the season. It did, however, get Wright a second chance, this time with the stipulation that the shell was to have an arch shape.[citation needed] For the 1928 season, Lloyd Wright
Lloyd Wright
built a shell in the shape of concentric 120-degree arches, with movable panels inside that could be used to tune the acoustics. It was designed to be easily dismantled and stored between concert seasons; apparently for political reasons this was not done[citation needed], and it did not survive the winter. For the 1929 season, the Allied Architects built the shell that stood until 2003, using a transite skin over a metal frame. Its acoustics, though not nearly as good as those of the Lloyd Wright
Lloyd Wright
shells, were deemed satisfactory at first, and its clean lines and white, almost-semicircular arches were copied for music shells elsewhere. As the acoustics deteriorated, various measures were used to mitigate the problems, starting in the 1970s with an inner shell made from large cardboard tubes (of the sort used as forms for round concrete pillars), which were replaced in the early 1980s by large fiberglass spheres (both designed by Frank Gehry[6]) that remained until 2003. These dampened out the unfavorable acoustics, but required massive use of electronic amplification to reach the full audience, particularly since the background noise level had risen sharply since the 1920s. The appearance underwent other, purely visual, changes as well, including the addition of a broad outer arch (forming a proscenium) where it had once had only a narrow rim and the reflecting pool in front of the stage that lasted from 1953 till 1972.[7] Sculptor George Stanley designed the Muse Fountain.[8]

Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl

He had previously done the Oscar statuette.

Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl re-opening night, 2005

Shortly after the end of the 2003 summer season the 1929 shell was replaced with a new, somewhat larger, acoustically improved shell, which had its debut in the 2004 summer season. Preservationists fiercely opposed the demolition for many years, citing the shell's storied history. However, even when it was built, the 1929 shell was (at least acoustically) only the third-best shell in the Bowl's history, behind its two immediate predecessors. By the late 1970s, the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl became an acoustic liability because of continued hardening of its transite skin. The new shell incorporates design elements of not only the 1929 shell, but of both the Lloyd Wright shells. During the 2004 summer season, the sound steadily improved, as engineers learned to work with its live acoustics.[9] The current sound reinforcement system is a line-array configuration of multiple loudspeaker enclosures hung vertically in a curved manner, with the lower enclosures facing the front sections, and the upper enclosures angled towards the rear sections. It is manufactured by L'Acoustics, and includes state-of-the-art audio processing allowing each individual loudspeaker enclosure to be "tuned" and directed towards the near-precise location of the listener, regardless of where in the venue they are sitting. This results in the audience in the rear sections hearing the same audio, at the same level, as in the front sections. This electronic processing includes sound level, frequency equalization, occasional special effects, and time delay (sound passes through wire much faster than through air, therefore the sound coming from the speakers must be delayed, allowing the actual sound from the stage to "catch up" so both sources reach the listeners' ears simultaneously). The system is maintained by Rat Sound Systems, the same company that has provided audio for the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival commonly known as the Coachella Festival, since its inception.[original research?] The 2004 shell incorporates the prominent front arch of the 1926 shell, the broad profile of the 1928 shell, and the unadorned white finish (and most of the general lines) of the 1929 shell. In addition, the ring-shaped structure hung within the shell, supporting lights and acoustic clouds, echoes a somewhat similar structure hung within the 1927 shell. During the 2004 season, because the back wall was not yet finished, a white curtain was hung at the back; beginning with the 2005 season, the curtain was removed to reveal a finished back wall. The architectural design for the shell was developed by the Los Angeles-based architectural practice Hodgetts and Fung, with the structural concept developed by the local office of Arup. At the same time the new shell was being constructed the bowl received four new video screens and towers. During most concerts, three remotely operated cameras in the shell, and a fourth, manually operated camera among the box seats, provide the audience with close-up views of the musicians. Performances[edit]

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On July 11, 1922, with the audience seated on simple wooden benches placed on the natural hillsides of 'Daisy Dell' in Bolton Canyon, conductor Alfred Hertz and the Los Angeles Philharmonic
Los Angeles Philharmonic
inaugurated the first season of music under the stars at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl. While much has changed in the ensuing years, the tradition of presenting the world's greatest musicians and striving for musical excellence has remained a constant goal of this famed Los Angeles
Los Angeles
cultural landmark.

Satellite image showing the seating in front of the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl

The Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl has been the summer home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, since its official opening in 1922, and, in 1991, gave its name to a resident ensemble that has filled a special niche in the musical life of Southern California, the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Orchestra. In 1945, Leopold Stokowski formed the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Symphony Orchestra, drawing its players from among members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic and various film studios orchestras. He made a number of 78 rpm recordings with them for RCA Victor during his two seasons there (1945–46) before returning to New York. The Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Symphony's name was retained for a series of Capitol LPs made in the 1950s under such conductors as Felix Slatkin and Carmen Dragon. In 1951, a financial crisis closed the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl during its summer season. Dorothy Chandler chaired a committee that organized a series of fundraising concerts that was able to reopen it.[10] The film-and-orchestra concert Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
on Broadway, subsequently called " Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
at the Symphony," has played the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl a record 21 times—19 times with the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Phiharmonic, and twice with the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Orchestra, all conducted by George Daugherty. In September 2003, " Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
On Broadway" was the final Los Angeles Philharmonic concert to be performed in the 1929 shell before its demolition started the following day, making way for the new shell. Public Figures – that have appeared at the Bowl throughout the years include President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Mickey Rooney
Mickey Rooney
and Edward G. Robinson, as well as such "teams" as Fonteyn and Nureyev, Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald, Simon and Garfunkel, and Abbott and Costello. Dancers – Mikhail Baryshnikov
Mikhail Baryshnikov
has danced there, as did Fred Astaire. Musicians – Al Jolson, Judy Garland, Billie Holiday, Louis Armstrong, Art Tatum, Buddy Rich, Harry "Sweets" Edison, Nat "King" Cole, Oscar Peterson, Ella Fitzgerald,[11] Carrie Underwood, The Doors, José José, Kylie Minogue, Elton John, Alicia Keys, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers as well as various other Jazz and non-Jazz musicians have headlined star-studded shows at the Bowl.[12] The Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl has provided a showcase for the world's greatest musicians. Bernstein, Walter, Monteux, Mauceri, Koussevitzky, Stokowski, Karajan, Klemperer, and Leinsdorf, as well as Mehta, Giulini, Rattle, and Salonen are just a few of the conductors who have led the Los Angeles Philharmonic
Los Angeles Philharmonic
in summertime concerts over the past seven decades. Jerry Hadley, Philip Glass, Itzhak Perlman, Gregor Piatigorsky, Arthur Rubinstein, Thomas Hayward, Alfred Brendel, Vladimir Horowitz, Andre Watts, Horacio Gutierrez, Jessye Norman, Plácido Domingo, Beverly Sills, Isaac Stern, Kathleen Battle, Jane Eaglen, Marilyn Horne, Alexander Frey, Jennifer Larmore, Sylvia McNair, Andrea Bocelli, Gil Shaham, Stephen Hough, Luciano Pavarotti, Kygo—and other distinguished vocal and instrumental soloists too numerous to mention—represent the illustrious talent that has graced the stage. But never during its long and illustrious history has the Bowl's programming been limited solely to symphonic events; fully staged operas were a regular part of the season in the early years, and the famed Bolshoi Ballet appeared during the 1950s. This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. 1920s[edit]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (November 2015)

1930s[edit]

August 7, 1936: The Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl's all-time attendance record of 26,410 paid admissions was set for a performance by the French opera star Lily Pons.

Playboy Jazz Festival
Playboy Jazz Festival
hosted in the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl 2007

July 4th Fireworks Spectacular at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl 2010

1940s[edit]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (November 2015)

Marian Anderson 1950s[edit]

September 1950: California's official state centennial show, The California
California
Story, ran for five performances. The production, directed by Vladimir Rosing, was immense. A chorus of 200 and hundreds of actors were employed. The shell of the bowl was removed, the stage was enlarged, and the action was expanded to include the surrounding hillsides. Lionel Barrymore
Lionel Barrymore
provided the show's dramatic narration.[13] August 15, 1956: A Jazz at the Philharmonic
Jazz at the Philharmonic
program featuring Louis Armstrong and His All Stars, Ella Fitzgerald, Art Tatum, and Oscar Peterson became the best-attended event of the venue’s history.[14]

1960s[edit]

The Beatles
The Beatles
performed at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl in 1964 and 1965,[15] which resulted in the live album The Beatles
The Beatles
at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl that was released in 1977. This recording was re-released in 2016 with the screams of the fans significantly reduced and sound improved with new technology by Giles Martin.[16] July 5, 1968: L.A. rock band The Doors
The Doors
performed at the Hollywood Bowl. Recordings from this show were released in 1987 as the live album Live at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl. The Bowl was also home to the final performance of The Doors
The Doors
on September 10, 1972. August 16, 1968: Eric Burdon & The Animals
The Animals
performed at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl. A live tape of rather poor quality of their performance exists. September 14, 1968: The Jimi Hendrix Experience appeared at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl.

1970s[edit]

1972: Pink Floyd played "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun" with a flammable gong. At the finale there was a fireworks session. June 17, 1972: Ron "Pigpen" McKernan
Ron "Pigpen" McKernan
played his last show with the Grateful Dead. July 29, 1973: The World of Sid & Marty Krofft, a one performance only live show was filmed here and aired as a television special The World of Sid & Marty Krofft at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl. The show featured performances by Johnny Whitaker, Jack Wild
Jack Wild
with H.R. Pufnstuf characters and The Brady Bunch
The Brady Bunch
Kids. September 7, 1973: Elton John
Elton John
played a concert here that was filmed for inclusion in the Bryan Forbes
Bryan Forbes
documentary film Elton John
Elton John
and Bernie Taupin Say Goodbye Norma Jean and Other Things. 1979: the inaugural Playboy Jazz Festival
Playboy Jazz Festival
was held. It has taken place at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl ever since.[17]

1980s[edit]

1980: The Monty Python
Monty Python
comedy troupe performs. A filmed performance is released as Monty Python
Monty Python
Live at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl. (see below)

1990s[edit]

July 2–4, 1991: The newly formed Hollywood Bowl Orchestra made their debut performance with Independence Day concerts on conducted by John Mauceri. The program included works by Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein, John Williams, George Gershwin
George Gershwin
& Jerome Kern, among others. October 11, 1997: Prince performed at The Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl.

2000s[edit]

July 1, 2002: The Who
The Who
performed their first concert after the death of John Entwistle.[18] April 29–30, 2005: Cher
Cher
performed the final two concerts of her Living Proof: The Farewell Tour.[19] October 1, 2005: Nine Inch Nails
Nine Inch Nails
Live with Teeth November 6 and 8, 2005: The Rolling Stones
The Rolling Stones
A Bigger Bang Tour
A Bigger Bang Tour
concert. October 12 and 13, 2007: Genesis performed the last two concerts of their Turn It On Again: The Tour. These are the last concerts the band has ever performed. At the last of the two concerts, lead singer Phil Collins said, "there was nothing else planned for Genesis after this show." Phil Collins
Phil Collins
would retire from the music industry in 2011.[20] August 16–17, 2009: Depeche Mode
Depeche Mode
performed at the amphitheatre as part of their Tour of the Universe, in front of a crowd of 34,919 people. October 4, 2009: Kylie Minogue
Kylie Minogue
performed at the amphitheatre on during their For You, for Me.

2010s[edit]

May 20, 2011: Kylie Minogue
Kylie Minogue
performed during her Aphrodite: Les Folies Tour. August 2011: Phish
Phish
made their Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl debut.[21] June 2, 2012: The Beach Boys
The Beach Boys
played a concert here as part of their The 50th Reunion Tour. November 8, 2013: Avicii
Avicii
performed at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl, becoming first EDM artist to headline the venue.[citation needed] April 26, 2014: Black Sabbath
Black Sabbath
played in front of 18,000 people to start off the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl season.[citation needed] May 16, 2014: Journey and The Steve Miller Band
The Steve Miller Band
appeared at the Bowl along with opening act Tower of Power. May 17, 22 and 27, 2014: Three sold-out crowds saw Billy Joel
Billy Joel
as he made his Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl debut during his Billy Joel
Billy Joel
in Concert tour. June 2014: Barry Gibb, closing show of his first ever solo tour called "Mythology Tour" Royksopp
Royksopp
Röyksopp
Röyksopp
and Robyn
Robyn
Robyn
Robyn
concert.[citation needed] July 21, 2014: Mötley Crüe
Mötley Crüe
were seen by a sold-out crowd of 16,488 on their Mötley Crüe
Mötley Crüe
Final Tour concert August 25, 2014: Nine Inch Nails
Nine Inch Nails
& Soundgarden: North America 2014 September 17, 2014: Linkin Park
Linkin Park
and Thirty Seconds to Mars
Thirty Seconds to Mars
performed in front of 18,000 fans with AFI as their opening act.[citation needed] May 18, 2015: Lana Del Rey
Lana Del Rey
performed with Courtney Love
Courtney Love
as her opening act as part of The Endless Summer Tour.[citation needed] May 30–31, 2015: Lady Gaga
Lady Gaga
and Tony Bennett
Tony Bennett
performed together as part of their Cheek to Cheek Tour. June 20, 2015: Journey performed with a youth orchestra.[citation needed] September 20, 2015: Empire of the Sun performed for the first time during their Ice on the Dune tour. September 25–26, 2015: Kanye West
Kanye West
performed his 4th solo album 808s & Heartbreak in full for the first time ever.[citation needed] October 16–17, 2015: Florence and the Machine
Florence and the Machine
performed during their How Big Tour. March 25–26, 2016: David Gilmour
David Gilmour
performed during his Rattle That Lock Tour. July 1, 2016: Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor
recorded his final episode of A Prairie Home Companion from the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl which was later released as a Live CD.[22] July 22–23, 2016: "Weird Al" Yankovic
"Weird Al" Yankovic
performed during his Mandatory World Tour September 9, 10, 11, 2016: Electric Light Orchestra
Electric Light Orchestra
performed during their "Alone in the Universe" tour. September 18, 2016: Kraftwerk
Kraftwerk
makes their debut performance during their 3D US Tour.[23] October 1, 2, 2016: Dolly Parton
Dolly Parton
performed during their "Pure & Simple" tour October 8,9 2016: Sia Furler
Sia Furler
performed during her Nostalgic For The Present Tour October 14,15 2016: Kygo
Kygo
performed during his Cloud Nine Tour. The concerts were filmed in the documentary: "Kygo: Live at the Hollywood Bowl" available at iTunes. June 3, 2017 New Kids on The Block headlined the Total Package Tour with Paula Abdul
Paula Abdul
and Boyz II Men June 23, 2017: Jason Mraz's 40th Birthday party and concert.[24] June 26, 27, 2017: Queen + Adam Lambert
Adam Lambert
performed during their Queen + Adam Lambert
Adam Lambert
Tour 2017-2018 July 2, 3, 4, 2017: Pentatonix
Pentatonix
performed during their Pentatonix
Pentatonix
World Tour 2017 July 31, 2017: Lionel Richie
Lionel Richie
and Mariah Carey
Mariah Carey
performed during their All the Hits Tour 2017 September 8, 9, 10: The Muppets
The Muppets
performed September 17, 2017: Mon Laferte
Mon Laferte
performed during her Amarrame Tour alongside La Santa Cecilia and Cafe Tacvba [25] September 21, 22, 25: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers
Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers
completed their 40th Anniversary World Tour; final shows of Petty's career before his death on October 2.[26]

October 1, 2017: Imagine Dragons
Imagine Dragons
performed during their Evolve Tour October 3, 4, 2017: Chance the Rapper
Chance the Rapper
performed during his Be Encouraged Tour October 5, 2017: Lauryn Hill
Lauryn Hill
and Nas
Nas
performed during their Powernomics Tour[27] October 7, 2017: Kings of Leon
Kings of Leon
performed during their WALLS World Tour October 8, 2017: Janet Jackson
Janet Jackson
performed during her State of the World Tour October 12, 14, 16, 18: Depeche Mode
Depeche Mode
performed a record-breaking four-night stand as part of their Global Spirit Tour October 27, 2017: Linkin Park
Linkin Park
held a tribute concert for Chester Bennington[28] June 10, 2018: Parlor Social with Dessy Di Lauro & Ric'key Pageot will perform on day 2 of the 40th annual Playboy Jazz Festival.

Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Museum[edit] The Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Museum features photographs, audio and video recordings, memorabilia and artifacts about the history of the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl and performances. The museum includes the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame, whose honorees include John Williams, Reba McEntire, Garth Brooks, Stevie Wonder, Brian Wilson, Henry Mancini, Sarah Chang, Bernadette Peters, Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra
and more.[29] Films[edit] The Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl is featured in the following motion pictures:

Moonlight Murder (1936), in which police detective Chester Morris solves a murder during a performance of Il Trovatore
Il Trovatore
at the Bowl. A Star Is Born (1937) Hollywood
Hollywood
Hotel (1937)[30] in which Rosemary Lane sings to Dick Powell. Double Indemnity (1944) Anchors Aweigh (1945) with Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra
and Jose Iturbi. Long-Haired Hare
Long-Haired Hare
(1948); Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
short film It's a Great Feeling
It's a Great Feeling
(1949) Tom and Jerry in the Hollywood Bowl
Tom and Jerry in the Hollywood Bowl
(1950); Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
short film Champagne for Caesar (1950); Ronald Colman, Celeste Holm, Vincent Price. Dixieland Droopy
Dixieland Droopy
(1954) MGM short film with Droopy Hollywood or Bust
Hollywood or Bust
(1956) Baton Bunny
Baton Bunny
(1959); Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
short film Two on a Guillotine (1965); with Cesar Romero, Connie Stevens and Dean Jones – directed by William Conrad. A Perfect Couple
A Perfect Couple
(1979) Xanadu (1980) Monty Python
Monty Python
Live at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl (1982) Some Kind of Wonderful (1987) Beaches (1988), where Bette Midler's character CC Bloom is rehearsing for her concert at the Bowl, and where she performs at the end of the film. Hanna-Barbera's 50th: A Yabba Dabba Doo Celebration (1989) Jimmy Hollywood
Jimmy Hollywood
(1994) Pink, Plunk, Plink (1966) Pink Panther prefers the orchestra performing at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl to play The Pink Panther theme than their scheduled program to an audience consisting of the composer Henry Mancini. Escape from L.A. (1996) Lost & Found (1999) Shrek 2
Shrek 2
(2004), in the animated Far Far Away Idol DVD extra Yes Man (2008) Zombieland
Zombieland
(2009) Bill Murray mentions that he saw Eddie Van Halen at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl.

Television[edit]

The Beverly Hillbillies
The Beverly Hillbillies
(1963) in season 1 episode 23 "Jed Buys the Freeway," a conman attempts to sell the Clampetts the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl, Griffith Park
Griffith Park
Zoo, and the freeway connecting the two.[31] The Simpsons
The Simpsons
(1995) in episode 23 "The Springfield Connection" in season 6. There is a parody of the Hollywood
Hollywood
bowl in Springfield, named the Springfield Bowl. Sleeper Cell (2006) in episode 7 "Fitna" in season 2. The Hollywood Bowl is the target of a dirty nuclear bomb. Californication (2008) in episode 9 "La Ronde" in season 2. Ashby steals Karen away on a date and surprises her with a private Lili Haydn concert at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl. CSI: Miami (2010) in episode 16 "L.A." in season 8. Horatio Caine meets Captain Sutter at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl at the end of the episode. Columbo
Columbo
(1972) Étude in Black starring Peter Falk and John Cassavetes. Most of the episode takes place at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl. The New Adventures Of Old Christine
The New Adventures Of Old Christine
(2008) Season 3 Episode #6 "The New Adventures Of Old Christine" Originally aired May 3, 2008. Christine tags along with her ex and her brother to the Hollywood Bowl. Freakazoid (1997) The final scene of the last episode of the 1997 animated superhero comedy Freakazoid features the cast singing We'll Meet Again at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl 90210

See also[edit]

Greater Los Angeles
Los Angeles
portal

Live at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl (other) List of contemporary amphitheatres List of Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Historic-Cultural Monuments in Hollywood National Bowl Waikiki Shell Sidney Myer Music Bowl Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
in the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Long-Haired Hare CNE Bandshell Korean Music Festival

References[edit]

^ https://paradiseleased.wordpress.com/2010/12/09/the-lost-french-village-of-hollywood/ ^ https://martinturnbull.com/2014/11/22/the-french-village-corner-of-highland-ave-cahuenga-blvd/ ^ "From Daisy Dell to the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl, a Little Musical History for Summer". Kcet.org. Retrieved 18 January 2015.  ^ http://www.kcet.org/updaily/socal_focus/history/la-as-subject/from-daisy-dell-to-the-hollywood-bowl-34638.html ^ http://www.hollywoodbowl.com/philpedia/history-and-architecture[permanent dead link] ^ Isenberg, Barbara. Conversations with Frank Gehry. Knopf, 2009, p. 107. ^ " Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl". Hollywoodbowl.com. Retrieved 18 January 2015.  ^ "Muse Fountain". Hollywoodbowl.com. Retrieved 18 January 2015.  ^ " Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Acoustics
Acoustics
Project". Acentech.com. Retrieved 18 January 2015.  ^ "About the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl". Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl.  ^ Scott Yanow. "Jazz at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl – Various Artists – Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards – AllMusic". AllMusic. Retrieved 18 January 2015.  ^ Wood, Mikael (October 16, 2015). "Q&A: Who's responsible for Jay Z, Jimmy Buffett and Kanye at the Bowl? Talk
Talk
to these guys". Los Angeles Times.  ^ Ainsworth, Ed., "Narration by Barrymore Highlight of Pageant", Los Angeles Times, Sept 13, 1950. ^ Maxwell, Tom (November 2016). "The Story of 'Ella and Louis,' 60 Years Later". Longreads. Longreads.com. Retrieved 21 November 2016.  ^ "Rock & Roll". Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl website. Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl. Archived from the original on 24 October 2010. Retrieved 11 October 2010.  ^ https://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2016/08/25/491201322/all-songs-1-the-beatles-are-live-and-sounding-better-than-ever ^ "Playboy Jazz Festival". Playboyjazzfestival.com. Retrieved 18 January 2015.  ^ "The Who: Los Angeles, CA, Mon, 01 July 2002". Thewholive.net. Retrieved 18 January 2015.  ^ "Cher's last stop: Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl". Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times. February 1, 2005. Retrieved 3 December 2010.  ^ Wardrop, Murray (March 3, 2011). " Phil Collins
Phil Collins
calls time on music career". The Telegraph. Retrieved 2 October 2013.  ^ Anderson, Eric (August 11, 2011). "On the Download: Phish
Phish
at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl". Access Hollywood. Retrieved 2 October 2013.  ^ Vankin, Deborah (1 July 2016). " Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor
reflects at the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl, rehearsing for final show: 'I just want it to be good' – LA Times". Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times. Retrieved 3 July 2016.  ^ Stearns, Colby (19 September 2016). "Here come the robots: It's still fun to compute with Kraftwerk
Kraftwerk
in its Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl debut – LA Times". Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times. Retrieved 19 September 2016.  ^ http://www.billboard.com/articles/news/concerts/7842094/jason-mraz-hollywood-bowl-40th-birthday ^ https://www.hollywoodbowl.com/tickets/cafe-tacvba-la-santa-cecilia-mon-laferte/2017-09-17 ^ "Watch Tom Petty Play 'American Girl' at His Final Concert". Rolling Stone. 2017-10-03. Retrieved 2017-10-07.  ^ Leight, Elias (May 30, 2017). "Lauryn Hill, Nas
Nas
Announce North American Tour". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 17 August 2017.  ^ " Linkin Park
Linkin Park
& Friends - Celebrate Life in Honor of Chester Bennington". LinkinPark.com. September 18, 2017. Retrieved September 18, 2017.  ^ " Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Museum". Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl. Retrieved 24 November 2014.  ^ " Hollywood
Hollywood
Hotel (1937)". IMDb. 15 January 1938. Retrieved 18 January 2015.  ^ "Jed Buys The Freeway". Internet Archive. Retrieved 18 January 2015. 

Further reading[edit]

John Rubinstein
John Rubinstein
(2002). The Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl – Music Under the Stars (Documentary). Video Artists International, Inc. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl.

Official website The Story of a Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Soundman "A Day in the Life" brief podcast about music at the venue.

Places adjacent to Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl

Studio City Toluca Lake & Universal City Burbank

Hollywood Hills
Hollywood Hills
& Runyon Canyon Park

Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl

I-101 & Cahuenga Pass
Cahuenga Pass
& Hollywood Hills
Hollywood Hills
& Griffith Park

West Hollywood Hollywood East Hollywood

v t e

Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards

Ceremonies

The Big Ballot 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Hosts

Paula Abdul David Arquette Jack Black Candace Cameron John Cena Dave Coulier Tony Danza Cameron Diaz Josh Duhamel Nicole Eggert David Faustino Debbie Gibson Brian Austin Green Whitney Houston Kevin James Dwayne Johnson Nick Jonas Joey Lawrence LL Cool J Mandy Moore Frankie Muniz Mike Myers Corin Nemec Rosie O'Donnell Brian Robbins Holly Robinson Peete Dan Schneider Blake Shelton Will Smith Tori Spelling Ben Stiller Justin Timberlake Mark Wahlberg Marc Weiner Wil Wheaton

Venues

Candlestick Park Barker Hangar The Forum Galen Center Grand Olympic Auditorium Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Pantages Theatre Pauley Pavilion The Summit Universal Studios Hollywood Staples Center
Staples Center
(planned for 2019)

International versions

Argentina Australia Brazil Colombia France Germany Indonesia Italy Mexico Netherlands / Flanders Philippines Sweden UK

Sports awards

2014 2015 2016 2017

Book' Category Television portal / Nickelodeon portal

v t e

Music venues of California

Outdoor venues

Angel Stadium AT&T Park Dodger Stadium Greek Theatre Harder Stadium Hearst Greek Theatre Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl John Anson Ford Amphitheatre Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Memorial Coliseum Levi's Stadium Mountain Winery Oakland Coliseum Pacific Amphitheatre Petco Park Qualcomm Stadium Rose Bowl San Manuel Amphitheater Santa Barbara Bowl Shoreline Amphitheatre Sleep Train Amphitheatre (Chula Vista, California) Toyota Amphitheatre Concord Pavilion Spartan Stadium Starlight Bowl (Burbank) Starlight Bowl (San Diego) StubHub Center

Indoor venues

Arlington Theater Bimbo's 365 Club City National Grove of Anaheim The Church on York Dolby Theatre Universal Amphitheatre Great American Music Hall Hollywood
Hollywood
Palladium Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Music Center Majestic Ventura Theatre Microsoft Theater Nob Hill Masonic Center Pasadena Civic Auditorium Rabobank Theater Roxy Theatre Sacramento Memorial Auditorium City National Civic Segerstrom Center for the Arts Shrine Auditorium Terrapin Crossroads The Troubadour War Memorial and Performing Arts Center Whisky a Go Go Yoshi's

Arenas

Anaheim Convention Center Bren Events Center Citizens Business Bank Arena Coussoulis Arena Cow Palace Del Mar Arena Golden Hall Golden 1 Center Jenny Craig Pavilion Farm Credit Dairy Center The Forum Bill Graham Civic Auditorium Honda Center Long Beach Arena Oracle Arena Orange Pavilion Paso Robles Event Center Pauley Pavilion Rabobank Arena RIMAC Arena SAP Center Save Mart Center Selland Arena Sleep Train Arena Alex G. Spanos Center Staples Center Stockton Arena Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium Thunderdome Valley View Casino Center Viejas Arena

Festivals

BottleRock Napa Valley Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival Hardly Strictly Bluegrass High Sierra Music Festival Monterey Jazz Festival Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival Spirit West Coast Stagecoach Festival

Historic venues

The Boarding House Bop City Fillmore West Sweetwater Saloon

Demolished

Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Memorial Sports Arena Candlestick Park

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 143211

.