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Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
was a small county in southwestern Germany. Its rulers belonged to the senior Swabian branch of the House of Hohenzollern. The small sovereign state with the capital city of Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
was annexed to the Kingdom of Prussia
Kingdom of Prussia
in 1850 following the abdication of its sovereign in the wake of the revolutions of 1848, then became part of the newly created Province of Hohenzollern.

Contents

1 History 2 Territories, titles and styles

2.1 Southern Germany

2.1.1 Jurisdiction 2.1.2 Titles 2.1.3 Styles

3 Romanian branch

3.1 Titles 3.2 Styles

4 Coats of arms

4.1 Southern Germany

4.1.1 Major coat of arms 4.1.2 Family coat of arms

4.2 Romania

5 Rulers

5.1 Southern Germany

5.1.1 Counts (Grafen) of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
(1576–1623)[4] 5.1.2 Princes (Fürsten) of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
(1623–1849) 5.1.3 (1849–present)[5]

5.2 Romania

5.2.1 Princes of Romania
Romania
(1866–1881) 5.2.2 King
King
of the Romanians
Romanians
(1866–1947)

6 See also 7 References 8 External links

History[edit] The senior Swabian branch is not as well known to history, as is the junior Franconian line which became Burgraves of Nuremberg and later ruled Brandenburg-Prussia
Brandenburg-Prussia
and the German Empire. The County of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
was created in 1576, upon the partition of the County of Hohenzollern, a fief of the Holy Roman Empire. When the last count of Hohenzollern, Karl I (1512–1579) died, the territory was divided among his three sons:

Eitel Friedrich IV of Hohenzollern-Hechingen
Hohenzollern-Hechingen
(1545–1605) Charles II of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
(1547–1606) Christoph of Hohenzollern- Haigerloch
Haigerloch
(1552–1592)

Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
Castle

The Princes of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
ruled over a small principality in southwest Germany, with a seat at Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
Castle. Unlike the Hohenzollerns of Brandenburg and Prussia, the Hohenzollerns of Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
remained Roman Catholic, along with their cousins of Hohenzollern-Hechingen, the senior line of the Swabian branch of the House of Hohenzollern, and Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
of Haigerloch. The principality became a sovereign state in 1815 after the abolition of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
in 1806 and an independent realm following the Napoleonic Wars
Napoleonic Wars
in 1815. Its ruler, Charles, was deposed in the revolutions of 1848. His son, Karl Anton, succeeded him, and turned to Prussia for aid. Prussian troops arrived in August 1849, and in a treaty signed in December Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
was annexed by Prussia, effective in March 1850. The annexation of their state did not, however, mean the end of the importance of the House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen. The last prince, Karl Anton, served as Minister President of Prussia from 1858-61. Karl Anton's second son, Karl Eitel of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
became prince (1866–1881) and then king (1881–1914) of the Romanians, under the name Carol and the house remained on the throne until the end of the Romanian monarchy in 1947. The last King
King
of Romania, Michael, died on 5th December 2017. Because the eldest Hechingen line of the Hohenzollerns became extinct in 1869 with the death of Constantine, Prince
Prince
of Hohenzollern-Hechingen, the head of the Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
branch, Karl Anton, dropped his line's suffix and took the title of Prince
Prince
(Fürst) of (all) Hohenzollern. French opposition to the candidacy of Carol's elder brother Prince Leopold for the throne of Spain triggered the Franco-Prussian War (1870–1871), which led to the founding of the German Empire
German Empire
in January 1871. Territories, titles and styles[edit] Southern Germany[edit]

Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
region (Württemberg, Germany)

Karl Friedrich, Prince
Prince
of Hohenzollern, head of the Swabian branch of the House of Hohenzollern

Jurisdiction[edit] The head of the Swabian branch of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
ruled over the following territories:

county of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
(1061) burgraviate of Nuremberg (1192) county of Veringen (1535) lordship of Haigerloch
Haigerloch
(1634) lordship of Wehrstein (1634) county of Bergh (1781)

From 1061 until 1806 five of these fiefs (not including Nuremberg) constituted an immediate territory of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
under the counts of Zollern, vassals of the Holy Roman Emperor. From 1806 until 1813 the Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
lands were a realm of the Confederation of the Rhine, a short-lived state set up by Napoleon
Napoleon
I Bonaparte. From 1815 until 1849 the principality was a sovereign country and a member of the German Confederation. In 1849 it lost its independence, and was incorporated into the Kingdom of Prussia
Kingdom of Prussia
as the Province of Hohenzollern. The German Confederation
German Confederation
was succeeded in 1866 by the North German Confederation, which itself was succeeded by the German Empire
German Empire
in 1871. In 1918, the kingdom of Prussia became the Free State of Prussia, and the German Empire
German Empire
was replaced by the Weimar Republic. In 1933 the republic was replaced by the Third Reich. After the defeat of the Nazis
Nazis
the province of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
was merged with other territories into the state of Württemberg-Hohenzollern. This state was part of the Allied Occupation Zones in Germany
Germany
until 1952. In that year, the state of Württemberg-Hohenzollern
Württemberg-Hohenzollern
was merged into Baden-Württemberg, a state of the Federal Republic of Germany. Titles[edit] The head of the House of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
is the historical heir to the titles of:

Prince
Prince
(Fürst) of Hohenzollern Burgrave
Burgrave
(Burggraf) of Nuremberg Imperial Count
Imperial Count
(Reichsgraf) of Hohenzollern Count (Graf) of Sigmaringen Count (Graf) of Veringen Count (Graf) of Bergh Lord
Lord
(Herr) of Haigerloch Lord
Lord
(Herr) of Wehrstein

Styles[edit] The historical titulature of rulers of the House of Hohenzollern
House of Hohenzollern
was, in the German original: Seine Durchlaucht (S.D.) [Name] von Gottes Gnaden, Fürst
Fürst
von Hohenzollern, Burggraf von Nürnberg, Graf
Graf
zu Sigmaringen, Veringen und Berg, Herr zu Haigerloch
Haigerloch
und Wehrstein The English translation is: His Serene Highness (HSH) [Name] by the Grace of God, Prince
Prince
of Hohenzollern, Burgrave
Burgrave
of Nuremberg, Count of Sigmaringen, Veringen and Berg, Lord
Lord
of Haigerloch
Haigerloch
and Wehrstein. Romanian branch[edit]

House of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
(Romanian branch)

Parent house Hohenzollern

Country Romania

Ethnicity German

Founded 10 May 1866

Founder Carol I

Current head ___

Final ruler Michael I

Titles Prince
Prince
(Domnitor, or Principe) (1866 - 1881), King
King
(Rege) (1881 - 1914)

Estate(s) of Romania

Deposition 30 December 1947 (the communist coup; the King
King
was forced to abdicate)

Romanian region.

Prince
Prince
Karl Eitel of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
reigned and, being childless, was succeeded by his nephew Ferdinand on the throne of Romania. The modern state of Romania
Romania
was formed by merger of the principalities of Moldavia
Moldavia
and Wallachia
Wallachia
in 1859 under the Moldavian domnitor Alexandru Ioan Cuza. He was replaced by Karl Eitel of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
in 1866, who ascended the throne as Carol I, Prince
Prince
of Romania. During the Russo-Turkish War, Romania
Romania
fought on the Russian side. In the 1878 Treaty of Berlin, Romania
Romania
was subsequently recognized as an independent state by the Great Powers. In return for reverting to the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
three southern Bessarabian districts that had been regained by Moldavia
Moldavia
after the Crimean War
Crimean War
in 1852, Northern Dobruja
Dobruja
was acquired. In 1881, the principality was raised to a kingdom and Prince
Prince
Carol became King
King
Carol I. He reigned until his death in 1914, and was succeeded by his nephew, Ferdinand. Shortly after taking the throne, Ferdinand, a Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
like his predecessor, agreed to have his children reared in the Romanian Orthodox Church. In 1918 Transylvania
Transylvania
and Bessarabia
Bessarabia
were incorporated. In 1918-19, confirmed by the Treaty of Versailles
Treaty of Versailles
of 1919 and the Treaty of Trianon of 1920, most of the Banat
Banat
became part of Romania. Also, Bukovina
Bukovina
was incorporated in 1918. Ferdinand died in 1927. His eldest son, Crown Prince
Prince
Carol, having renounced his rights, Carol's only son Michael ascended the throne. In 1930, however, Carol reclaimed the throne and was crowned Carol II. Carol was forced to abdicate in 1940, and Michael re-mounted the throne. His reign, and that of the dynasty, ended when he was forced to abdicate by a communist regime in 1947. On 10 May 2011, following lawsuits brought in Germany
Germany
against his family by his German relatives regarding attribution of the title Prince
Prince
of Hohenzollern-Veringen to his son-in-law, Radu Duda, Michael severed dynastic ties with the princely house of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, changed the name of his family to "of Romania", and ceased the use of all princely titles borne by him and his family that derived from the German Hohenzollerns.[1][2] Titles[edit] The head of the Romanian branch continues, since abolition of the monarchy, to use the hereditary title he bore while reigning:

Michael I, King
King
of the Romanians

During the reign of Carol II of Romania
Romania
his son, Michael, was styled "Măria Sa (M.S.) Marele Voievod de Alba Iulia" or the English translation "His Grace The Grand Voivode
Voivode
of Alba Julia". Styles[edit] The Romanian original is: Majestatea Sa (M.S.) N.N., Regele Românilor (or Maiestatea Sa (M.S.) N.N., Regele României; both forms are accepted by the Romanian Academy) The English translation is: His Majesty (H.M.) N.N., King
King
of the Romanians Coats of arms[edit] Southern Germany[edit] Major coat of arms[edit]

Combined coat of arms of the House of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
(1849).

The combined coat of arms of the House of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
is:

Escutcheon: quartering of the shield, parted per pale, twice parted per fess, with an inescutcheon

first sixth: Burgraviate of Nuremberg
Burgraviate of Nuremberg
(1214), on or (gold) a lion rampant sable (black) and a bordure of argent (silver) and gules (red) second sixth: Hereditary Chamberlain of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
(1504), on gules (red, two crossed scepters in or (gold) [3] third sixth: Lordship of Haigerloch
Haigerloch
and Wehrstein (1634), parted per fess gules (red) and argent (silver) fourth sixth: Countship of Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
(1535), on gules (red) a deer or (gold) fifth sixth: Countship of Veringen (1535), on or (gold) three deerhorns horizontally with twice four, and once three antlerpoints gules (red) sixth sixth: County of Berg (1781), on argent (white) a lion rampant gules (red) and a bordure of sable (black) with roundels or (gold) inescutcheon: Countship of Zollern
Zollern
(1061), quarterly sable (black) and argent (silver)

helm: or (gold) a helmet barred and affronté (sovereign), crowned with a coronet of a German prince (Fürstenkrone) crest: sable (black) and argent (white) a head and shoulders of a German hound (Deutsche Bracke) (1317) wreath: sable (black) and argent (white) mantling: manteld sable (black), doubled argent (white) upon a crowned (Fürstenkrone) baldeqin gules (red), doubled ermine motto:

until the 19th century: Hie guet Zollere allwege (We were always good Zollern) from the 19th century onwards: Nihil Sine Deo
Nihil Sine Deo
(Nothing without God)

House of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
coat of arms

Family coat of arms[edit] The combined coat of arms with inclusion of the House coat of arms of the House of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
is:

Escutcheon: quartering of the shield, parted per pale, twice parted per fess, with an inescutcheon

first sixth: Burgraviate of Nuremberg
Burgraviate of Nuremberg
(1214), on or (gold) a lion rampant sable (black) and a bordure of argent (silver) and gules (red) second sixth: Hereditary Chamberlain of the Holy Roman Empire, on gules (red, two crossed scepters in or (gold) [3] third sixth: Lordship of Haigerloch
Haigerloch
and Wehrstein (1634), parted per fess gules (red) and argent (silver) fourth sixth: Countship of Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
(1535), on gules (red) a deer or (gold) fifth sixth: Countship of Veringen (1535), on or (gold) three dearhorns horizontally with twice four, and once three antlerpoints gules (red) sixth sixth: County of Berg (1781), on argent (white) a lion rampant gules (red) and a bordure of sable (black) with roundels or (gold) inescutcheon: Countship of Zollern
Zollern
(1061), quarterly sable (black) and argent (silver)

helm: seven particular helmets, equivalent to the seven particular coat of arms (Hohenzollern, Nuremberg, Sigmaringen, Veringen, Berg, Haigerloch
Haigerloch
and Wehrstein) crest: seven particular crests, equivalent to the seven particular coat of arms (Hohenzollern, Nuremberg, Sigmaringen, Veringen, Berg, Haigerloch
Haigerloch
and Wehrstein) wreath: sable (black) and argent (white) mantling: manteld sable (black), doubled argent (white) supporter: two German hounds compartment: grassy

Romania[edit]

Major coat of arms of the kingdom of the Romanians
Romanians
(1922).

The major coat of arms of the kingdom of the Romanians
Romanians
consisted, from 1922 onwards, of:

an escutcheon of the combination of the territories of  :

Wallachia
Wallachia
Moldavia
Moldavia
Dobruja
Dobruja
Transylvania
Transylvania
Bessarabia
Bessarabia
Banat
Banat
Oltenia
Oltenia
Bukovina
Bukovina
an inescutcheon of the House of Hohenzollern
House of Hohenzollern
(quarterly sable (black) and argent (silver)

helm: The Steel Crown of Romania mantling: a crowned baldeqin gules (red), doubled ermine motto: Nihil Sine Deo
Nihil Sine Deo
(Nothing without God) supporter: two rampant lions compartment: ground

Rulers[edit] Members of the House of Hohenzollern
House of Hohenzollern
reigned as monarchs in Europe. Southern Germany[edit] Counts (Grafen) of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
(1576–1623)[4][edit]

Karl II, Count 1576-1606 (1547-1606), second surviving son of Karl I of Hohenzollern

Johann, Count 1606-1623 (1578-1638), created Reichsfürst
Reichsfürst
von Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
1623

Princes (Fürsten) of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
(1623–1849)[edit]

Johann, 1st Prince
Prince
1623-1638 (1578-1638)

Meinrad I, 2nd Prince
Prince
1638-1681 (1605-1681)

Maximilian, 3rd Prince
Prince
1681-1689 (1636-1689)

Meinrad II, 4th Prince
Prince
1689-1715 (1673-1715)

Josef Friedrich Ernst, 5th Prince
Prince
1715-1769 (1702-1769)

Karl Friedrich, 6th Prince
Prince
1769-1785 (1724-1785)

Anton Aloys, 7th Prince
Prince
1785-1831 (1762-1831)

Karl, 8th Prince
Prince
1831-1848 (1785-1853), abdicated 1848

Karl Anton, 9th Prince
Prince
1848-1849 (1811-1885), ceded sovereignty to Prussia 1849

Leopold, Prince
Prince
of Hohenzollern

(1849–present)[5][edit] Following cession of their sovereignty over the principality to their kinsmen the Kings of Prussia in 1849, the heirs of Karl Anton continued to bear the same title, " Prince
Prince
(Fürst) of Hohenzollern":

Karl Anton, Prince
Prince
1849-1885 (1811-1885), became Prince
Prince
of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
on the death of the last Prince
Prince
of Hohenzollern-Hechingen in 1869

Leopold, Prince
Prince
1885-1905 (1835-1905)

Wilhelm, Prince
Prince
1905-1927 (1864-1927)

Friedrich, Prince
Prince
1927-1965 (1891-1965)

Friedrich Wilhelm, Prince
Prince
1965-2010 (1924-2010)

Karl Friedrich, Prince
Prince
2010–present (born 1952)

Alexander, Hereditary Prince
Prince
(born 1987)

Prince
Prince
Albrecht of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
(born 1954) Prince
Prince
Ferdinand of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
(born 1960)

Prince
Prince
Aloys of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
(1999) Prince
Prince
Fidelis of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
(born 2001)

Prince
Prince
Johann Georg of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
(1932-2016)

Prince
Prince
Carl Christian of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
(born 1962)

Prince
Prince
Nicolas of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
(born 1999)

Prince
Prince
Hubertus of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
(born 1966)

Prince
Prince
Ferfried of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
(born 1943), one son without dynastic rights

Franz Joseph, Prince
Prince
of Hohenzollern-Emden (1891-1964)

Meinrad, Prince
Prince
of Hohenzollern-Emden (1925-2009) Prince
Prince
Emanuel of Hohenzollern-Emden (1929-1999)

Prince
Prince
Carl Alexander of Hohenzollern-Emden (born 1970)

Marie of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
(1845–1912); married to Philippe, Count of Flanders

King
King
Albert I of Belgium

King
King
Ferdinand I of the Romanians
Romanians
(1865-1927)

King
King
Carol II of the Romanians
Romanians
(1893-1953)

King
King
Michael I of the Romanians
Romanians
(1921-2017)

Romania[edit] Princes of Romania
Romania
(1866–1881)[edit]

Carol I 1866–1881

Arms of the Kingdom of Romania

King
King
of the Romanians
Romanians
(1866–1947)[edit]

Carol I 1866–1914 Ferdinand 1914–1927 Michael 1927–1930 Carol II 1930–1940 Michael 1940–1947

See also[edit]

House of Hohenzollern Sigmaringen Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
Castle Line of succession to the former Romanian throne

References[edit]

^ (in Romanian) King
King
Michael I announces the severance of all historical and dynastic ties to the House of Hohenzollern, Adevarul, May 11, 2011 ^ (in Romanian) The history of the conflicts between the Royal House of Romania
Romania
and the Princely House of Hohenzollern, Adevarul, May 11, 2011 ^ a b Eitel Frederick II, Count of Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
and Burgrave
Burgrave
of Nuremberg became Hereditary Chamberlain of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
by appointment of Joachim I, elector and margrave of Brandenburg, Arch-Chamberlain of the Holy Roman Empire, and confirmed by Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor. ^ Marek, Miroslav. "hohz/hohenz11.html". genealogy.euweb.cz. [self-published source][better source needed] ^ Marek, Miroslav. "hohz/hohenz12.html". genealogy.euweb.cz. [self-published source][better source needed]

External links[edit]

Official website of the House of Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
- heraldic background information The official website of The Romanian Royal Family Almanach de Gotha info about Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen "Das Fürstliche Haus Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen" by Hartmut Platte (in German)

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Ascania Carolingian Conradines Ottonian Luitpolding Salian Süpplingenburg Hohenstaufen Welf Habsburg Hanover Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Nassau Luxembourg Wittelsbach Schwarzburg Brunswick-Lüneburg House of Pomerania Hohenzollern Württemberg Oldenburg Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg Orange-Nassau Nassau-Weilburg Mecklenburg Vasa Palatine Zweibrücken Hesse Holstein-Gottorp Romanov Bonaparte Wettin Lippe Zähringen

Hungary

Árpád Přemyslid Wittelsbach Angevin Luxembourg Hunyadi Jagiellon Szapolyai Ottoman Habsburg Habsburg-Lorraine

Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein

Poland

Piast Přemyslid Samborides Griffins Jagiellon Valois Báthory Vasa Wiśniowiecki Sobieski Wettin Leszczyński Poniatowski

After partitions:

Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov
Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov
Kingdom of Poland Habsburg Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria Wettin Duchy of Warsaw Lefebvre Duchy of Gdańsk Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
Duchy of Poznań

v t e

Swabian Circle
Swabian Circle
(1500–1806) of the Holy Roman Empire

Ecclesiastical

Augsburg Constance Ellwangen Kempten Lindau

Secular

Baden Buchau Heiligenberg Hohenzollern-Hechingen Klettgau Liechtenstein Tengen Waldburg

Scheer Trauchburg Waldsee Wolfegg Wurzach Zeil

Württemberg

Prelates

Baindt Buchau Elchingen Gengenbach Gutenzell Heggbach Irsee Kaisheim Mainau Marchtal Neresheim Ochsenhausen Petershausen Roggenburg Rot Rottenmünster Salmanweiler St. George's in Isny Schussenried Söflingen Ursberg Weingarten Weißenau Wettenhausen Zwiefalten

Counts Lords

Altshausen Baar Bondorf Eberstein Eglingen Eglofs Fugger

Jakob Johann Markus

Gundelfingen Gutenstein Hausen Heiligenberg Hohenems Hohengeroldseck Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen Justingen Kinzigerthal Königsegg and Aulendorf Lustenau Meßkirch Mindelheim
Mindelheim
/ Schwabegg Oberdischingen Öttingen

Baldern Öttingen Wallerstein

Rechberg Rothenfels and Stauffen Stühlingen
Stühlingen
and Hohenhöwen Tettnang
Tettnang
/ Langenargen Thannhausen Wiesensteig

Cities

Aalen Augsburg Biberach Bopfingen Buchau Buchhorn Dinkelsbühl Eßlingen Gengenbach Giengen Heilbronn Isny Kaufbeuren Kempten Leutkirch Lindau Memmingen Nördlingen Offenburg Pfullendorf Ravensburg Reutlingen Rottweil Schwäbisch Gmünd Schwäbisch Hall Überlingen Ulm Wangen Weil Wimpfen Zell

Circles est. 1500: Bavarian, Swabian, Upper Rhenish, Lower Rhenish–Westphalian, Franconian, (Lower) Saxon Circles est. 1512: Austrian, Burgundian, Upper Saxon, Electoral Rhenish     ·     Unencircled territories

v t e

States of the Confederation of the Rhine
States of the Confederation of the Rhine
(1806–13)

Rank elevated by Napoleon

Kingdoms

Bavaria Saxony Württemberg

Grand Duchies

Baden Hesse

Duchies

Nassau

States created

Kingdoms

Westphalia

Grand Duchies

Berg Frankfurt1 Würzburg

Principalities

Aschaffenburg2 Leyen Regensburg2

Pre-existing states

Saxon duchies

Coburg-Saalfeld Gotha-Altenburg Hildburghausen Meiningen Weimar3 Eisenach3 Weimar-Eisenach4

Other duchies

Anhalt (Bernburg Dessau Köthen) Arenberg Mecklenburg-Schwerin Mecklenburg-Strelitz Oldenburg

Principalities

Hohenzollern

Hechingen Sigmaringen

Isenburg Liechtenstein Lippe-Detmold Reuss

Ebersdorf Greiz Lobenstein Schleiz

Salm5 Schaumburg-Lippe Schwarzburg

Rudolstadt Sondershausen

Waldeck

1 from 1810 2 until 1810 3 until 1809 4 from 1809 5 until 1811

v t e

States of the German Confederation
States of the German Confederation
(1815–66)

Empires

Austria1

Kingdoms

Prussia1 Bavaria Saxony Hanover Württemberg

Electorates

Hesse-Kassel

Grand Duchies

Baden Hesse-Darmstadt Luxembourg Mecklenburg-Schwerin Mecklenburg-Strelitz Oldenburg Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach

Duchies

Anhalt

Bernburg2 Dessau2 Köthen3

Brunswick Holstein Limburg4 Nassau Saxe-Lauenburg Ernest

Altenburg5 Coburg-Saalfeld6 Coburg-Gotha5 Gotha-Altenburg6 Hildburghausen6 Meiningen

Principalities

Hesse-Homburg Hohenzollern

Hechingen7 Sigmaringen7

Liechtenstein Lippe Reuss-Gera (Junior Line) Reuss-Greiz (Elder Line) Schaumburg-Lippe Schwarzburg

Rudolstadt Sondershausen

Waldeck and Pyrmont

City-states

Bremen Frankfurt Hamburg Lübeck

1 w/o areas listed under other territories 2 Merged with Anhalt from 1863 3 until 1847 4 from 1839 5 from 1826 6 until 1826 7 until 1850 8 1849–60 9 as of 1849 10 until 1837 11 until 1829 12 until 1848/57 13 until 1848 14 as of 1848 15 as of 1829 16 as of 1864

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 50373

.