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Henry Louis Bouquet, generally known as Henry Bouquet[1] (1719 – 2 September 1765), was a Swiss mercenary who rose to prominence in British service during the French and Indian War and Pontiac's War. Bouquet is best known for his victory over a Native American force at the Battle of Bushy Run, lifting the siege of Fort Pitt during Pontiac's War. During the conflict Bouquet gained lasting infamy in an exchange of letters with his commanding officer Amherst who suggested a form of biological warfare in the use of blankets infected with smallpox which were to be distributed to Native Americans.Pontiac's Rebellion

Henry Louis Bouquet, generally known as Henry Bouquet[1] (1719 – 2 September 1765), was a Swiss mercenary who rose to prominence in British service during the French and Indian War and Pontiac's War. Bouquet is best known for his victory over a Native American force at the Battle of Bushy Run, lifting the siege of Fort Pitt during Pontiac's War. During the conflict Bouquet gained lasting infamy in an exchange of letters with his commanding officer Amherst who suggested a form of biological warfare in the use of blankets infected with smallpox which were to be distributed to Native Americans.[2] Despite this indictment historians have praised Bouquet for leading British forces in several demanding campaigns on the Western Frontier in which they "protected and rescued" settlers from increasingly frequent attacks.[3]

Early life

Bouquet was born into a moderately wealthy family in Rolle, Swiss Confederacy and the oldest of seven brothers. The son of a Swiss roadhouse owner and his well-to-do wife, he entered military service at the age of 17.[1] Like many military officers of his day, Bouquet traveled between countries serving as a professional soldier. He began his military career in the army of the Dutch Republic and later was in the service of the Kingdom of Sardinia. In 1748, he was again in Dutch service as lieutenant colonel of the Swiss guards.

French and Indian War

He entered the British Army in 1754 as a lieutenant colonel in the 60th Regiment of Foot (The Royal American Regiment),[1]Henry Louis Bouquet, generally known as Henry Bouquet[1] (1719 – 2 September 1765), was a Swiss mercenary who rose to prominence in British service during the French and Indian War and Pontiac's War. Bouquet is best known for his victory over a Native American force at the Battle of Bushy Run, lifting the siege of Fort Pitt during Pontiac's War. During the conflict Bouquet gained lasting infamy in an exchange of letters with his commanding officer Amherst who suggested a form of biological warfare in the use of blankets infected with smallpox which were to be distributed to Native Americans.[2] Despite this indictment historians have praised Bouquet for leading British forces in several demanding campaigns on the Western Frontier in which they "protected and rescued" settlers from increasingly frequent attacks.[3]