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Hasely Joachim Crawford TC (born 16 August 1950) is a former track and field athlete from Trinidad and Tobago. In 1976, he became his country's first Olympic champion and the first Olympic 100m champion from a Caribbean country. A stadium was renamed in his honor in 2001.

Contents

1 Early years 2 Athletic career 3 References 4 External links

Early years[edit] Crawford was born in San Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago, one of the eleven children of Lionel Crawford and Phyllis Holder, and began pursuing athletics at the age of 17. He is a six-time Trinidad and Tobago 100 metres champion, and won the 200 metre title in 1976. He debuted internationally in 1970, winning a bronze medal in the 100 metres at the Commonwealth Games. Only two years later, he surprisingly qualified for the 100 metres final of the Olympics in Munich, but pulled his hamstring after 20 metres and failed to finish. Athletic career[edit] Crawford ran for Eastern Michigan University
Eastern Michigan University
under coach Bob Parks during his college years. After finishing as the runner up at the 1975 Pan American Games
Pan American Games
in the 100 metres, Crawford was added to the team of American coach Bob Parks. His new coach prepared him for the 100 metres and 200 metres events at the 1976 Summer Olympics
1976 Summer Olympics
with a strategy of only allowing him to run in a few races during the season. This tactic paid off, as Crawford, in the outside lane 1, narrowly won the 100 metres final in a time of 10.06 seconds, just 0.02 seconds in front of Don Quarrie
Don Quarrie
of Jamaica, winning Trinidad and Tobago's first Olympic gold medal.[1] He had also qualified for the 200 metres final, but was forced to pull out mid-race after injuring his groin. After these Games, Crawford met with further success, winning the 100 metres event at the Central American and Caribbean Championships in 1977.[2] On returning home, Hasely Crawford
Hasely Crawford
had both a jet and a stadium named after him. During his reign as the 100 metre Olympic champion, he also appeared on postage stamps and was awarded Trinidad and Tobago's highest honour, Trinity Cross, in 1978. This award was changed to the Order of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Crawford went on to compete in a total of four Olympic Games
Olympic Games
as he also represented T&T at both the Moscow and Los Angeles editions in 1980 and 1984, but was unable to qualify for another final. Crawford's last international medals were a bronze and a silver which he won at the 1978 Commonwealth Games
Commonwealth Games
in the 100 metres and the 4x100 metres relay respectively.[3] In 2000, he was named the Trinidad & Tobago Athlete of the Millennium. He is a member of the Caribbean Hall of Fame, along with Ato Boldon
Ato Boldon
and Artur Wint, one of only three track and field athletes to be inducted.[4] References[edit]

^ Video 1976 Olympic 100m on YouTube ^ "Central American and Caribbean Championships (Men)". gbrathletics.com. Retrieved 22 July 2016.  ^ " Commonwealth Games
Commonwealth Games
Medallists - Athletics (Men)". gbrathletics.com. Retrieved 22 July 2016.  ^ http://caribbean.halloffame.tripod.com/Hasely_Crawford_.html Caribbean Hall of Fame

External links[edit]

Hasely Crawford
Hasely Crawford
profile at IAAF "Hasely Crawford". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC.  Sunday Guardian, September 17, 2000 Page 21

Olympic Games

Preceded by Roger Gibbon Flagbearer for  Trinidad and Tobago Munich 1972, Montreal 1976, Moscow 1980, Los Angeles 1984 Succeeded by Ian Morris

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Olympic champions in men's 100 metres

1896  Thomas Burke (USA) 1900  Frank Jarvis (USA) 1904  Archie Hahn (USA) 1908  Reggie Walker (RSA) 1912  Ralph Craig (USA) 1920  Charlie Paddock (USA) 1924  Harold Abrahams (GBR) 1928  Percy Williams (CAN) 1932  Eddie Tolan (USA) 1936  Jesse Owens (USA) 1948  Harrison Dillard (USA) 1952  Lindy Remigino (USA) 1956  Bobby Morrow (USA) 1960  Armin Hary (EUA) 1964  Bob Hayes (USA) 1968  Jim Hines (USA) 1972  Valeriy Borzov (URS) 1976  Hasely Crawford (TRI) 1980  Allan Wells (GBR) 1984  Carl Lewis (USA) 1988  Carl Lewis (USA) 1992  Linford Christie (GBR) 1996  Donovan Bailey (CAN) 2000  Maurice Greene (USA) 2004  Justin Gatlin (USA) 2008  Usain Bolt (JAM) 2012  Usain Bolt (JAM) 2016  Usain Bolt (JAM)

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Central American and Caribbean Games Champions in Men's 4x100 m

1926: Mexico
Mexico
(Ahumada, Gómez, Ramírez, Aguilar) 1930: Cuba
Cuba
(Torriente, Rodríguez, Alfonso, Seino) 1935: Cuba
Cuba
(Rodríguez, Acosta, Torriente, Verrier) 1938: Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico
(Villodas, Guerra, Malavé, Vázquez) 1946: Panama
Panama
(Loney, Thomas, Clarke, La Beach) 1950: Cuba
Cuba
(Fortún, Farrés, Mazorra, Wilson) 1954: Jamaica
Jamaica
(LaBeach, Rhoden, Gardner, Laing) 1959: Venezuela
Venezuela
(Bonas, Murad, Esteves, Romero) 1962: Venezuela
Venezuela
(Herrera, Murad, Romero, Esteves) 1966: Jamaica
Jamaica
(Clayton, McNeil, Headley, Fray) 1970: Cuba
Cuba
(Ramírez, Montes, Morales, Triana) 1974: Cuba
Cuba
(Triana, Montes, Bandomo, Leonard) 1978: Trinidad and Tobago
Trinidad and Tobago
(Noel, Crawford, Husbands, Serrette) 1982: Cuba
Cuba
(Lara, Casañas, Peñalver, Saborit) 1986: Cuba
Cuba
(Lara, Peñalver, Querol, Simón) 1990: Cuba
Cuba
(Simón, Peñalver, Stevens, Isasi) 1993: Cuba
Cuba
(Simón, I. García, Isasi, Aguilera) 1998: Cuba
Cuba
(A. García, Ortiz, I. García, Pérez) 2002: Dominican Republic
Dominican Republic
(Matos, Morillo, Sainfleur, Báez) 2006: Netherlands Antilles
Netherlands Antilles
(Mariano, Kwidama, Duzant, Martina) 2010: Trinidad and Tobago
Trinidad and Tobago
(Sorrillo, Burns, Callender, Bledman) 2014: Cuba
Cuba
(Ruíz, Mena, Luis, Carrero)

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US National Championship winners in men's 60-meter dash

1906–1979 Amateur Athletic Union

1906: Charles Seitz 1907: James O'Connell 1908: Robert Cloughan 1909: R W Gill 1910: Robert Cloughan 1911: Alvah Meyer 1912: Not held 1913: Howard Drew 1914: Alvah Meyer 1915: Irvin Howe 1916–17: Jo Loomis 1918: William Genzenmueller 1919–20: Loren Murchison 1921: Ward Conway 1922–24: Loren Murchison 1925: Cecil Coaffee 1926: Chester Bowman 1927–28: Karl Wildermuth 1929: James Daley 1930: Chester Bowman 1931: Ira Singer 1932: Emmett Toppino 1933–34: Ralph Metcalfe 1935: Ben Johnson 1936: Ralph Metcalfe 1937–38: Ben Johnson 1939: Herbert Thompson 1940: Mozelle Ellerbe 1941: Herbert Thompson 1942: Barney Ewell 1943: Herbert Thompson 1944: Ed Conwell 1945: Barney Ewell 1946: Tom Carey 1947–48:Ed Conwell 1949: Bill Dwyer 1950: Andy Stanfield 1951: Ed Conwell 1952: John O'Connell 1953-56: John Haines 1957: Ira Murchison 1958: Ed Collymore 1959–60: Paul Winder 1961–62: Frank Budd 1963: Sam Perry 1964: Bob Hayes 1965: Sam Perry 1966–68: Bill Gaines 1969–70: Charles Greene 1971: Jean-Louis Ravelomanantsoa (MAD) 1972: Del Meriwether 1973: Hasely Crawford
Hasely Crawford
(TRI) 1974: Herb Washington 1975: Hasely Crawford
Hasely Crawford
(TRI) 1976: Steve Williams 1977: Steve Riddick 1978: Houston McTear 1979: Steve Riddick

1980–1992 The Athletics Congress

1980: Curtis Dickey 1981: Stanley Floyd 1982: Ron Brown 1983: Carl Lewis 1984: Emmit King 1985: Albert Lawrence (JAM) 1986: Lee McRae 1987: Lee McRae 1988: Emmit King 1989: Leroy Burrell 1990: Brian Cooper 1991: Andrés Simón (CUB); Andre Cason 1992: Leroy Burrell

1993–present USA Track & Field

1993: Jon Drummond 1994: Dennis Mitchell 1995: Tim Harden 1996: Donovan Powell (JAM); Keith Williams 1997: Randall Evans 1998: Kenny Brokenburr 1999: Tim Harden 2000: Jon Drummond 2001: Maurice Greene 2002: Terrence Trammell 2003: Justin Gatlin 2004: Shawn Crawford 2005: Mardy Scales 2006: Leonard Scott 2007: DaBryan Blanton 2008: Michael Rodgers 2009: Mark Jelks 2010–11: Michael Rodgers 2012: Trell Kimmons 2013: D'Angelo Cherry 2014–16: Marvin Bracy 2017: Ronnie Baker 2018: Christian Coleman

Held over 60 yards from 1906 to 1986, with the exception of 1933–39 (60 meters) and 1913–15 (75 meters). Held over 55 mete

.