HMS Ganges (1821)
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HMS ''Ganges'' was an 84-gun
second-rate In the rating system of the Royal Navy The rating system of the Royal Navy and its predecessors was used by the Royal Navy between the beginning of the 17th century and the middle of the 19th century to categorise sailing warships, initia ...
ship of the line A ship of the line was a type of naval warship A warship or combatant ship is a naval ship that is built and primarily intended for naval warfare. Usually they belong to the armed forces of a state. As well as being armed, warships are des ...
of the
Royal Navy The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare Naval warfare is combat Combat ( French for ''fight'') is a purposeful violent conflict meant to physically harm or kill the opposition. Combat may be armed (using weapon A ...
, launched on 10 November 1821 at
Bombay Dockyard Bombay Dockyard—also known as Naval Dockyard—is an India India, officially the Republic of India (Hindi Hindi (Devanagari: , हिंदी, ISO 15919, ISO: ), or more precisely Modern Standard Hindi (Devanagari: , ISO 15919, ...
, constructed from
teak Teak (''Tectona grandis'') is a tropical hardwood is a popular hardwood Hardwood is wood Wood is a porous and fibrous structural tissue found in the Plant stem, stems and roots of trees and other woody plants. It is an organic mat ...

teak
. She was the last sailing ship of the Navy to serve as a
flagship A flagship is a vessel used by the commanding officer The commanding officer (CO) or sometimes, if the incumbent is a general officer A general officer is an officer of high rank in the armies, and in some nations' air forces, spac ...
, and was the second ship to bear the name.
Admiralty Admiralty usually refers to: * Admiralty (United Kingdom), military department in command of the Royal Navy from 1707 to 1964 *The rank of admiral Admiral is one of the highest ranks in some navy, navies, and in many navies is the highest rank ...
orders of 4 June 1816 directed her to be built as a facsimile of (the ex-French ship ''Franklin'', which had fought at the
Battle of the Nile The Battle of the Nile (also known as the Battle of Aboukir Bay; french: Bataille d'Aboukir) was a major naval battle fought between the British Royal Navy The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare Naval warfare is com ...

Battle of the Nile
). Building began in May 1819, under the direction of master shipbuilder Jamsetjee Bomanjee Wadia. When was paid off at
Bombay Mumbai (, ; also known as Bombay — the official name until 1995) is the capital city A capital or capital city is the municipality holding primary status in a Department (country subdivision), department, country, Constituent state, ...

Bombay
in January 1822, ''Liverpool''s captain,
Francis Augustus Collier Rear Admiral (Royal Navy), Rear Admiral Sir Francis Augustus Collier, Order of the Bath, CB, Royal Guelphic Order, KCH (7 August 1786 – 28 October 1849) was a senior officer of the British Royal Navy during the early nineteenth century. Born int ...
, and his officers and crew transferred to the newly built ''Ganges'' and sailed her back to Spithead, arriving on 6 October 1822. ''Ganges'' was commissioned at
Portsmouth Portsmouth ( ) is a port and island city status in the United Kingdom, city with Unitary authorities of England, unitary authority status in the ceremonial county of Hampshire, southern England. It is the most densely populated city in the Unit ...

Portsmouth
in 1823, and served in several locations over the following decades. Notable events included a period as
flagship A flagship is a vessel used by the commanding officer The commanding officer (CO) or sometimes, if the incumbent is a general officer A general officer is an officer of high rank in the armies, and in some nations' air forces, spac ...
of the
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South America
Station for three years, during which she landed
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in
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Rio de Janeiro
after a mutiny by
Brazil Brazil ( pt, Brasil; ), officially the Federative Republic of Brazil (Portuguese: ), is the largest country in both South America and Latin America. At 8.5 million square kilometers (3.2 million square miles) and with over 211 mill ...

Brazil
ian soldiers. She also saw action in the
Mediterranean The Mediterranean Sea is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Western Europe, Western and Southern Europe and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa ...

Mediterranean
from 1838 to 1840, bombarding
Beirut Beirut ( ; ar, بيروت, ) is the Capital city, capital and largest city of Lebanon. , Greater Beirut has a population of 2.2 million, which makes it the List of largest cities in the Levant region by population, third-largest city in ...

Beirut
and blockading
Alexandria Alexandria ( or ; ar, الإسكندرية ; arz, اسكندرية ; Coptic language, Coptic: Rakodī; el, Αλεξάνδρεια ''Alexandria'') is the List of cities and towns in Egypt, third-largest city in Egypt after Cairo and Giza, ...

Alexandria
. She was
paid off Ship commissioning is the act or ceremony of placing a ship in active service and may be regarded as a particular application of the general concepts and practices of project commissioning Project commissioning is the process of assuring that ...
during the
Crimean War The Crimean War, , was a military conflict fought from October 1853 to February 1856 in which Russian Empire, Russia lost to an alliance of Second French Empire, France, the Ottoman Empire, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, ...
, and saw no action. From 1857 to 1861, she was the flagship of the Pacific Station, based at Valparaíso, Chile under the command of Rear admiral Robert Lambert Baynes. She spent considerable time addressing the San Juan Boundary Dispute from the Esquimalt Royal Navy Dockyard at the Colony of Vancouver Island after which she returned to England to be converted into a training ship; she began service as the training ship HMS Ganges (shore establishment), HMS ''Ganges'' in 1865 at Mylor Harbour, near Falmouth, Cornwall, Falmouth; in 1899, she was moved to Harwich Dockyard, Harwich. In 1905, she became part of RNTE Shotley, RNTE (Royal Naval Training Establishment) Shotley, which also included the ships HMS ''Caroline'' and HMS ''Boscawen III''. She was renamed ''Tenedos III'' in 1906, then moved to HMNB Devonport, Devonport to become part of the training establishment HMS Indus (shore establishment 1906), HMS ''Indus''; on 13 August 1910, she was renamed ''Indus V''. In October 1922, she was renamed ''Impregnable III'' and transferred to the training establishment HMS ''Impregnable'', also at Devonport. She was finally taken out of service in 1923, and transferred to the dockyard; in 1929, she was sold for breaking up. The following year, after over a century in service, she was finally broken up at Plymouth. Upon breaking, some of the timber was used to make souvenirs, usually having a small brass plaque with some of the ship's history attached. The panelling in the captain's cabin was purchased by Thomas Nelson, 4th Earl Nelson, Thomas Nelson, 4th Earl Nelson, who installed it in the principal top-floor room at Trafalgar Park, Wiltshire, Trafalgar Park in Wiltshire.The History of Trafalgar Park
/ref> The captain's cabin in the stern was used in the construction of the Burgh Island Hotel in Devon, where it remains to this day. In 1933, timbers from the ship were also used to construct the cross that stands outside the eastern end of Guildford Cathedral in Surrey. The town of Ganges, British Columbia, on Salt Spring Island, and the adjacent waters of Ganges Harbour are named after HMS ''Ganges''. In addition, the transom board of one of HMS ''Ganges'' ship's boats has pride of place in Centennial Park in the town of Ganges. The community of Vesuvius Bay, British Columbia, Vesuvius Bay, also on Saltspring Island, was named after , which, with ''Ganges'', was also assigned to the Pacific Station. The ship's badge has been adopted by the Saltspring Island Sailing Club, and the badge's distinctive elephant is the key symbol in the club's burgee.


Citations


References

*Lavery, Brian (2003) ''The Ship of the Line - Volume 1: The development of the battlefleet 1650-1850.'' Conway Maritime Press. . *


External links

*
The HMS ''Ganges'' Association Website
has a detailed timeline of the activities of the ''Ganges''.
GANGES Museum
Houses memorabilia from the old shore establishment. {{DEFAULTSORT:Ganges (1821) Canopus-class ships of the line British ships built in India 1821 ships Battleships of the Royal Navy Victorian-era battleships of the United Kingdom