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Berks County (Pennsylvania German: Barricks Kaundi) is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 411,442.[2] The county seat is Reading.[3] Berks County comprises the Reading, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which is also included in the Philadelphia-Reading-Camden, PA-NJ-DE-MD Combined Statistical Area. (CSA).

Contents

1 History 2 Geography

2.1 Major highways 2.2 Adjacent counties 2.3 National protected area 2.4 State protected area

3 Demographics 4 Metropolitan and Combined Statistical Area 5 Government

5.1 County Commissioners 5.2 Other county offices 5.3 State Senate[16] 5.4 State House of Representatives[16] 5.5 United States House of Representatives 5.6 United States Senate

6 Politics 7 Education

7.1 Colleges and universities 7.2 Public school districts 7.3 Private high schools 7.4 Technical and trade schools

8 Arts and culture 9 Communities

9.1 City 9.2 Boroughs 9.3 Townships 9.4 Census-designated places 9.5 Unincorporated communities 9.6 Population ranking

10 Notable people 11 See also 12 Footnotes 13 Further reading 14 External links

History[edit] Reading developed during the 1740s when the inhabitants of northern Lancaster County sent several petitions requesting that a separate county be established. With the help of German immigrant Conrad Weiser, the county was formed on March 11, 1752 from parts of Chester County, Lancaster County, and Philadelphia County. It was named after the English county in which William Penn's family home lay - Berkshire, which is often abbreviated to Berks. Berks County began much larger than it is today. The northwestern parts of the county went to the founding of Northumberland County in 1772 and Schuylkill County in 1811, when it reached its current size. In 2005, Berks County was added to the Delaware Valley Planning Area due to a fast-growing population and close proximity to the other communities. In 2016, former Strausstown borough merged with Upper Tulpehocken township. Strausstown is now a village within Upper Tulpehocken Township. Geography[edit] According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 866 square miles (2,240 km2), of which 857 square miles (2,220 km2) is land and 9.2 square miles (24 km2) (1.1%) is water.[4] Most of the county is drained by the Schuylkill River, but an area in the northeast is drained by the Lehigh River via the Little Lehigh Creek and areas are drained by the Susquehanna River via the Swatara Creek in the northwest and the Conestoga River (which starts in Berks County between Morgantown and Elverson) in the extreme south. It has a humid continental climate (Dfa except for some Dfb on Blue Mountain at the northern boundary and on Mount Penn) and the hardiness zone is mostly 6b with 6a in some higher areas and 7a along the Schuylkill in the SE part of the county. Major highways[edit]

I-76 / Penna Turnpike I-176 I-78 / US 22 US 222

US 222 Bus. US 422

US 422 Bus. PA 10 PA 12 PA 23 PA 29 PA 61 PA 73 PA 100 PA 143 PA 183 PA 272 PA 345 PA 401 PA 419 PA 501 PA 562 PA 568 PA 625 PA 645 PA 662 PA 724 PA 737

Adjacent counties[edit]

Schuylkill County (north) Lehigh County (northeast) Montgomery County (east) Chester County (southeast) Lancaster County (southwest) Lebanon County (west)

National protected area[edit]

Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site

State protected area[edit]

French Creek State Park

Demographics[edit]

Historical population

Census Pop.

1790 30,189

1800 32,407

7.3%

1810 43,146

33.1%

1820 46,275

7.3%

1830 53,152

14.9%

1840 64,569

21.5%

1850 77,129

19.5%

1860 93,818

21.6%

1870 106,701

13.7%

1880 122,597

14.9%

1890 137,327

12.0%

1900 159,615

16.2%

1910 183,222

14.8%

1920 200,854

9.6%

1930 231,717

15.4%

1940 241,884

4.4%

1950 255,740

5.7%

1960 275,414

7.7%

1970 296,382

7.6%

1980 312,509

5.4%

1990 336,523

7.7%

2000 373,638

11.0%

2010 411,442

10.1%

Est. 2016 414,812 [5] 0.8%

U.S. Decennial Census[6] 1790–1960[7] 1900–1990[8] 1990–2000[9] 2010–2013[2]

As of the 2010 census, the county was 76.9% White non-Hispanic, 4.9% Black or African American, 0.3% Native American, 1.3% Asian, and 2.5% were two or more races. 16.4% of the population was of Hispanic or Latino ancestry. As of the census[10] of 2010, there were 411,442 people, 154,356 households, and 106,532 families residing in the county. The population density was 479 people per square mile (184.9/km²). There were 164,827 housing units at an average density of 191.9 per square mile (74.1/km²). was 76.9% White non-Hispanic, 4.9% Black or African American, 0.3% Native American, 1.3% Asian, and 2.5% were two or more races. 16.4% of the population was of Hispanic or Latino ancestry.[11] Historically there was a large Pennsylvania Dutch population. It is known as part of Pennsylvania Dutch Country. According to Muninetguide, the median household income for Berks County, as of 2010, is $54,105. According to patchworknation.org Berks County is classified as a Monied 'Burb. There were 154,356 households out of which 33.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.1% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.0% were non-families. 24.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.08. In the county, the population was spread out with 23.9% under the age of 18, 9.9% from 18 to 24, 24.4% from 25 to 44, 27.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.1 years. For every 100 females there were 95.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.70 males. Berks County is home to an Old Order Mennonite community consisting of 136 families, located in the East Penn Valley near Kutztown and Fleetwood.[12] The Old Order Mennonites first bought land in the area in 1949.[13] In 2012, Old Order Mennonites bought two large farms in the Oley Valley. The Old Order Mennonites in the area belong to the Groffdale Conference Mennonite Church and use the horse and buggy as transportation. There are several farms in the area belonging to the Old Order Mennonite community and meetinghouses are located near Kutztown and Fleetwood.[12] Metropolitan and Combined Statistical Area[edit]

Location of Berks County (Reading, PA) in the Philadelphia-Reading-Camden, PA-NJ-DE-MD CSA

See also: List of Metropolitan Statistical Areas and List of Combined Statistical Areas The United States Office of Management and Budget[14] has designated Berks County as the Reading, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). As of the 2010 U.S. Census[15] the metropolitan area ranked 10th most populous in the State of Pennsylvania and the 128th most populous in the United States with a population of 413,491. Berks County is also a part of the larger Philadelphia-Reading-Camden, PA-NJ-DE-MD Combined Statistical Area (CSA), which combines the populations of Berks County as well as several counties around Philadelphia and in the states of Delaware, Maryland and New Jersey. The Combined Statistical Area is the largest in the State of Pennsylvania and 8th most populous in the United States with a population of 7,067,807. Government[edit] County Commissioners[edit]

Berks County Courthouse

Christian Leinbach, Chair Republican Kevin Barnhardt, Vice Chair Democrat Mark C. Scott, Esq. Republican

Other county offices[edit]

Clerk of Courts, James P. Troutman, Republican Controller, Sandy Graffius, Republican Coroner, Dennis J. Hess, Democrat District Attorney, John T. Adams, Democrat Prothonotary, Jonathan K. Del Collo, Republican Recorder of Deeds, Frederick Sheeler, Democrat Register of Wills, Larry J. Medaglia Jr., Republican Sheriff, Eric Weaknecht, Republican Treasurer, Dennis Adams, Republican

State Senate[16][edit]

Judy Schwank, Democrat, Pennsylvania Senate, District 11 Bob Mensch, Republican, Pennsylvania Senate, District 24 Dave Argall, Republican, Pennsylvania Senate, District 29 John C. Rafferty Jr., Republican, Pennsylvania Senate, District 44

State House of Representatives[16][edit]

Barry Jozwiak, Republican, Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 5 Jerry Knowles, Republican, Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 124 Mark Rozzi, Democrat, Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 126 Thomas R. Caltagirone, Democrat, Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 127 Mark Gillen, Republican, Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 128 Jim Cox, Republican, Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 129 David Maloney, Republican, Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 130 Ryan Mackenzie, Republican, Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 134 Gary Day, Republican, Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 187

United States House of Representatives[edit]

Ryan Costello, Republican, Pennsylvania's 6th congressional district Pat Meehan, Republican, Pennsylvania's 7th congressional district Charlie Dent, Republican, Pennsylvania's 15th congressional district Lloyd Smucker, Republican, Pennsylvania's 16th congressional district

United States Senate[edit]

Pat Toomey, Republican Bob Casey, Jr., Democrat

Politics[edit] As of October 24, 2016, there are 259,918 registered voters in Berks County.[17]

Presidential Elections Results[18]

Year Republican Democratic Third Parties

2016 52.5% 96,626 42.6% 78,437 4.9% 9,022

2012 49.6% 84,702 48.6% 83,011 1.7% 2,963

2008 44.6% 80,513 53.8% 97,047 1.6% 2,951

2004 53.0% 87,122 46.4% 76,309 0.6% 1,056

2000 52.7% 71,273 43.7% 59,150 3.6% 4,874

1996 46.3% 56,289 41.0% 49,887 12.8% 15,542

1992 40.3% 52,939 35.0% 46,031 24.7% 32,437

1988 62.4% 70,153 36.5% 41,040 1.1% 1,251

1984 65.9% 74,605 33.5% 37,849 0.6% 691

1980 56.4% 60,576 33.9% 36,449 9.6% 10,360

1976 50.6% 54,452 47.4% 50,994 2.0% 2,107

1972 62.4% 66,172 34.5% 36,563 3.2% 3,392

1968 46.5% 50,623 45.8% 49,877 7.7% 8,424

1964 33.2% 36,726 66.4% 73,444 0.4% 476

1960 54.8% 61,743 44.9% 50,572 0.4% 391

1956 57.3% 57,258 42.4% 42,349 0.3% 320

1952 52.4% 51,720 46.5% 45,874 1.1% 1,074

1948 43.6% 35,608 52.7% 43,075 3.7% 3,043

1944 43.3% 35,274 53.9% 43,889 2.8% 2,247

1940 36.9% 32,111 61.3% 53,301 1.8% 1,530

1936 30.2% 26,699 64.4% 56,907 5.3% 4,721

1932 37.1% 27,073 40.8% 29,763 22.2% 16,187

1928 64.0% 47,073 25.8% 18,960 10.2% 7,481

1924 51.4% 28,186 31.4% 17,220 17.3% 9,487

1920 47.7% 22,221 39.4% 18,361 12.9% 6,009

1916 34.3% 11,937 55.4% 19,267 10.3% 3,565

1912 8.8% 3,032 47.5% 16,430 43.7% 15,098

1908 41.0% 13,642 52.3% 17,381 6.8% 2,245

1904 46.3% 15,539 48.7% 16,357 5.0% 1,683

1900 41.5% 13,952 56.6% 19,013 1.9% 628

1896 43.3% 14,318 54.7% 18,099 2.0% 665

1892 34.8% 10,077 64.2% 18,602 1.1% 312

1888 36.7% 10,626 62.5% 18,105 0.9% 261

Democratic: 120,282 (46.28%) Republican: 100,813 (38.79%) Other parties / No party: 38,823 (14.94%)

The first time since 1964 that a Democrat carried Berks in a Presidential election occurred in November 2008, with Barack Obama receiving 53.9% of the vote to John McCain's 44.7%. The other three statewide winners (Rob McCord for Treasurer, Jack Wagner for Auditor General, and Tom Corbett for Attorney General) also carried it.[19] While Republicans have controlled the commissioner majority most of the time and continue to control most county row offices, Democrats have become more competitive in Berks in recent years. In the 2012 Presidential election, Mitt Romney carried the county by approximately a one-percent margin, 49.6% to 48.6%, however, in 2016, Donald Trump carried Berks by a much larger margin of 52.9% to 42.7%.[20] While Reading itself is heavily Democratic, the rural areas are strongly Republican. Education[edit]

Map of Berks County, Pennsylvania Public School Districts

Colleges and universities[edit]

Albright College Alvernia University Kutztown University of Pennsylvania Penn State Berks Reading Area Community College

Public school districts[edit]

Antietam School District Boyertown Area School District Brandywine Heights Area School District Conrad Weiser Area School District Daniel Boone Area School District Exeter Township School District Fleetwood Area School District Governor Mifflin School District Hamburg Area School District Kutztown Area School District Muhlenberg School District Oley Valley School District Reading School District Schuylkill Valley School District Tulpehocken Area School District Twin Valley School District Upper Perkiomen School District Wilson School District Wyomissing Area School District

Private high schools[edit]

Berks Christian School [2] in Birdsboro Blue Mountain Academy, a Seventh-day Adventist boarding school in Tilden Township Conestoga Christian School in Morgantown, Pennsylvania Fairview Christian School in Reading Gateway Christian School in Mertztown The King's Academy in Mohrsville Berks Catholic High School in Reading

Technical and trade schools[edit]

Berks Technical Institute Pace Institute Reading Hospital School of Nursing Berks Career and Technology Center (east campus in Oley, west campus in Leesport)

Arts and culture[edit] The Reading Public Museum is an art, science, and history museum. The Reading Buccaneers Drum and Bugle Corps are an all-age drum corps based in Berks County. The corps, founded in 1957, is a charter member Drum Corps Associates and an 11-time DCA World Champion. Reading is home to one opera company, Berks Opera Company, founded in 2007 as Berks Opera Workshop. They were named Arts and Entertainment Newsmaker of the Year in 2015. There are two Pennsylvania state parks and a Natural Area in Berks County.

Nolde Forest Environmental Education Center is south of Reading on land once owned by Jacob Nolde, a prominent Reading businessman and Pennsylvania environmentalist. French Creek State Park, a former Recreational Demonstration Area, straddles the Berks and Chester County line. Ruth Zimmerman Natural Area, part of the William Penn Forest District in Oley.[21]

There are two Pennsylvania Historic Sites in Berks County.

Conrad Weiser Homestead near Womelsdorf. Daniel Boone Homestead near Birdsboro.

The Old Morlatton Village in Douglassville is maintained by the Historic Preservation Trust of Berks County. The village is composed of four historic structures: White Horse Inn, George Douglass Mansion, Bridge keeper's House, and the Mouns Jones House, constructed in 1716, which is the oldest recorded building in the county. [3] Communities[edit]

Map of Berks County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Cities and Boroughs (red), Townships (white), and Census-designated places (blue).

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and towns. The following cities, boroughs and townships are located in Berks County: City[edit]

Reading (county seat)

Boroughs[edit]

Adamstown (mostly in Lancaster County) Bally Bechtelsville Bernville Birdsboro Boyertown Centerport Fleetwood Hamburg Kenhorst Kutztown Laureldale Leesport Lenhartsville Lyons Mohnton Mount Penn New Morgan Robesonia St. Lawrence Shillington Shoemakersville Sinking Spring Topton Wernersville West Reading Womelsdorf Wyomissing

Townships[edit]

A farm in Windsor Township

Albany Alsace Amity Bern Bethel Brecknock Caernarvon Centre Colebrookdale Cumru District Douglass Earl Exeter Greenwich Heidelberg Hereford Jefferson Longswamp Lower Alsace Lower Heidelberg Maidencreek Marion Maxatawny Muhlenberg North Heidelberg Oley Ontelaunee Penn Perry Pike Richmond Robeson Rockland Ruscombmanor South Heidelberg Spring Tilden Tulpehocken Union Upper Bern Upper Tulpehocken Washington Windsor

Census-designated places[edit] Census-designated places are geographical areas designated by the U.S. Census Bureau for the purposes of compiling demographic data. They are not actual jurisdictions under Pennsylvania law. Other unincorporated communities, such as villages, may be listed here as well.

Alleghenyville Alsace Manor Amity Gardens Baumstown Bethel Blandon Bowers Colony Park Dauberville Douglassville Dryville Edenburg Flying Hills Fox Chase Frystown Gibraltar Gouglersville Greenfields Grill Hereford Hyde Park Jacksonwald Kempton Kutztown University Lincoln Park Lorane Mertztown Mohrsville Montrose Manor Morgantown Mount Aetna Muhlenberg Park New Berlinville New Jerusalem New Schaefferstown Oley Pennside Pennwyn Rehrersburg Reiffton Riverview Park Schubert Shartlesville South Temple Springmont Spring Ridge Stony Creek Mills Stouchsburg Temple Virginville Walnuttown West Hamburg West Lawn West Wyomissing Whitfield

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Geigertown North Heidelberg Pine Swamp Plowville Pricetown Scarlets Mill State Hill Strausstown Brownsville Blue Marsh Leinbachs Wooltown Cacoosing

Population ranking[edit] The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Berks County.[15] † county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census)

1 † Reading City 88,082

2 Wyomissing Borough 10,461

3 Blandon CDP 7,152

4 Shillington Borough 5,273

5 Birdsboro Borough 5,163

6 Kutztown Borough 5,012

7 Whitfield CDP 4,733

8 Hamburg Borough 4,289

9 Lorane CDP 4,236

10 Pennside CDP 4,215

11 West Reading Borough 4,212

12 Reiffton CDP 4,178

13 Fleetwood Borough 4,085

14 Boyertown Borough 4,055

15 Sinking Spring Borough 4,008

16 Laureldale Borough 3,911

17 West Wyomissing CDP 3,407

18 Amity Gardens CDP 3,402

19 Jacksonwald CDP 3,393

20 Riverview Park CDP 3,380

21 Mount Penn Borough 3,106

22 Mohnton Borough 3,043

23 Kutztown University CDP 2,918

24 Kenhorst Borough 2,877

25 Womelsdorf Borough 2,810

26 Flying Hills CDP 2,568

27 Hyde Park CDP 2,528

28 Wernersville Borough 2,494

29 Topton Borough 2,069

30 Robesonia Borough 2,061

31 West Hamburg CDP 1,979

32 Leesport Borough 1,918

33 Temple CDP 1,877

34 St. Lawrence Borough 1,809

35 West Lawn CDP 1,715

36 Fox Chase CDP 1,622

37 Lincoln Park CDP 1,615

38 Grill CDP 1,468

39 South Temple CDP 1,424

40 Muhlenberg Park CDP 1,420

41 Shoemakersville Borough 1,378

42 New Berlinville CDP 1,368

43 Oley CDP 1,282

44 Greenfields CDP 1,170

45 Alleghenyville CDP 1,134

46 Bally Borough 1,090

47 Colony Park CDP 1,076

48 Stony Creek Mills CDP 1,045

49 Spring Ridge CDP 1,003

50 Bernville Borough 955

51 Bechtelsville Borough 942

52 Hereford CDP 930

53 Dauberville CDP 848

54 Morgantown CDP 826

55 Pennwyn CDP 780

56 Springmont CDP 724

57 Edenburg CDP 681

58 Gibraltar CDP 680

59 Mertztown CDP 664

60 New Jerusalem CDP 649

61 Montrose Manor CDP 604

62 Stouchsburg CDP 600

63 Gouglersville CDP 548

64 Bethel CDP 499

65 Walnuttown CDP 484

T-66 Lyons Borough 478

T-66 Alsace Manor CDP 478

67 Shartlesville CDP 455

68 Douglassville CDP 448

69 Baumstown CDP 422

70 Dryville CDP 398

71 Centerport Borough 387

72 Mohrsville CDP 383

73 Frystown CDP 380

74 Mount Aetna CDP 354

75 Strausstown Borough 342

76 Bowers CDP 326

77 Rehrersburg CDP 319

78 Virginville CDP 309

79 Schubert CDP 249

80 New Schaefferstown CDP 223

81 Kempton CDP 169

82 Lenhartsville Borough 165

83 New Morgan Borough 71

Notable people[edit]

William Addams, congressman from Pennsylvania[22] Kenny Brightbill, NASCAR Driver Priscilla Ahn, folk musician and singer-songwriter Chad Billingsley, pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies Daniel Boone, American pioneer, explorer, and frontiersman (1734–1820) Steve Burns, musician and former Blue's Clues host James Henry Carpenter (1846–1898), Civil War sailor, officer, founder of Carpenter Technology Corporation Bob Cesca, animator, political author and columnist/blogger for The Huffington Post Jack Coggins, illustrator, author and artist, lived in Boyertown from 1948–2006 Rocky Colavito, former Major League Baseball player Kerry Collins, professional football player (Panthers, Saints, Giants, Raiders, Titans, and Colts) Michael Constantine, actor, star of Room 222 and My Big Fat Greek Wedding Amy Cuddy, Harvard psychologist and TED Talks speaker Carl Furillo, (1922-1989) Former Brooklyn-Los Angeles Dodgers right-fielder John Henry Gilmore, Jr., professional football player (Saints, Bears, and Buccaneers) Kate Gosselin of the Gosselin family, Reality TV stars of Jon & Kate Plus 8 Keith Haring, artist Chad Henne, football player for the Miami Dolphins and University of Michigan Chris Hero, professional wrestler Joseph Hiester, governor of Pennsylvania 1820–1823 Tommy Hinnershitz (1912–1999), auto racing pioneer Chad Hurley, co-founder of YouTube (attended Twin Valley and Albright College) Mildred Jordan (1901–1982), novelist Chip Kidd (born 1964), book jacket designer at Knopf Publishing Group[23] Donyell Marshall, former NBA player and graduate of Reading High School Kelly McGillis, actress, [Top Gun/Witness/The Accused] Thomas Morris, Democratic politician, served in the United States Senate[24] Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg, architect, founder of Muhlenberg Greene Architects, American military and political leader 1887–1980 Jillian Murray (b. June 4, 1989), model/actress Jacob Nolde, conservationist Bodo Otto, Senior Surgeon of the Continental Army during the American Revolution (1711–1787) Wallace Stevens, major American Modernist poet, October 2, 1879 – August 2, 1955 Taylor Swift, Grammy Award-winning country/pop singer-songwriter Nicole Tranquillo, semi-finalist on American Idol Ross Tucker, professional football player John Updike, writer, 1932–2009 Gus Yatron, former congressman from Pennsylvania Emily Mae Young, television actor

See also[edit]

Philadelphia portal Pennsylvania portal

National Register of Historic Places listings in Berks County, Pennsylvania

Footnotes[edit]

^ "PHMC Historical Markers Search" (Searchable database). Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Retrieved 2014-01-25.  ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 16, 2013.  ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.  ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 5, 2015.  ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.  ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 22, 2013. Retrieved March 5, 2015.  ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 5, 2015.  ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 24, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 5, 2015.  ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 5, 2015.  ^ http://pasdc.hbg.psu.edu/sdc/pasdc_files/census2010/Berks%20County.pdf ^ "Census 2010: Pennsylvania - USATODAY.com".  ^ a b Orth, Richard L.T. (September 21, 2016). "A Look Back in History: The Old Order Mennonite Sect at Kutztown also preserving the Historic Oley Valley". BerksMont News. Retrieved October 15, 2017.  ^ Shaner, Richard (July 24, 2009). "Kutztown welcomes Old Order Mennonites in 1949". BerksMont News. Retrieved October 15, 2017.  ^ "Office of Management and Budget". 7 February 2017.  ^ a b "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-12-21. Retrieved 2016-02-13.  ^ a b Center, Legislativate Data Processing. "Find Your Legislator". The official website for the Pennsylvania General Assembly. Retrieved 2017-05-23.  ^ [1] Voting & Election Statistics ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org.  ^ http://www.electionreturns.state.pa.us/ElectionsInformation.aspx?ElectionID=28 Archived 2012-11-16 at the Wayback Machine. electionreturns.state.pa.us ^ http://elections.co.berks.pa.us/results/default.aspx. Retrieved 16 November 2016.  Missing or empty title= (help) ^ http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/cs/groups/public/documents/document/dcnr_20031119.pdf ^ Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607–1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1963.  ^ "Reading Eagle". readingeagle.  ^ "Tolleson, Arizona". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved August 24, 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

F.W. Balthaser, The Story of Berks County, Pennsylvania. Reading, PA: Reading Eagle Press, 1925. D.B. Brunner, The Indians of Berks County, Pa., Being a Summary of all the Tangible Records of the Aborigines of Berks County, with Cuts and Descriptions of the Varieties of Relics Found within the County. Reading, PA: Eagle Book Print, 1897. Morton L. Montgomery, History of Berks County in Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: Everts, Peck & Richards, 1886. Morton L. Montgomery, History of Berks County, Pennsylvania, in the Revolution, from 1774 to 1783. Reading, PA: C.F. Haage, printer, 1894. Morton L. Montgomery, Political Hand-Book of Berks County, Pennsylvania, 1752–1883. Reading, PA: B.F. Owen, 1883. Morton L. Montgomery, School history of Berks County in Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: J.B. Rodgers Printing Co., 1889. Kathy M. Scogna, "The Birth of a County — 1752,". Historical Review of Berks County, Winter 2001–02.

External links[edit]

County of Berks, Pennsylvania

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Berks County, Pennsylvania.

Places adjacent to Berks County, Pennsylvania

Schuylkill County Schuylkill County Lehigh County

Lebanon County

Berks County, Pennsylvania

Montgomery County

Lancaster County

Chester County

v t e

Municipalities and communities of Berks County, Pennsylvania, United States

County seat: Reading

City

Reading

Boroughs

Adamstown‡ Bally Bechtelsville Bernville Birdsboro Boyertown Centerport Fleetwood Hamburg Kenhorst Kutztown Laureldale Leesport Lenhartsville Lyons Mohnton Mount Penn New Morgan Robesonia St. Lawrence Shillington Shoemakersville Sinking Spring Topton Wernersville West Reading Womelsdorf Wyomissing

Townships

Albany Alsace Amity Bern Bethel Brecknock Caernarvon Centre Colebrookdale Cumru District Douglass Earl Exeter Greenwich Heidelberg Hereford Jefferson Longswamp Lower Alsace Lower Heidelberg Maidencreek Marion Maxatawny Muhlenberg North Heidelberg Oley Ontelaunee Penn Perry Pike Richmond Robeson Rockland Ruscombmanor South Heidelberg Spring Tilden Tulpehocken Union Upper Bern Upper Tulpehocken Washington Windsor

CDPs

Alleghenyville Alsace Manor Amity Gardens Baumstown Bethel Blandon Bowers Colony Park Dauberville Douglassville Dryville Edenburg Flying Hills Fox Chase Frystown Gibraltar Gouglersville Greenfields Grill Hereford Hyde Park Jacksonwald Kempton Kutztown University Lincoln Park Lorane Mertztown Mohrsville Montrose Manor Morgantown‡ Mount Aetna Muhlenberg Park New Berlinville New Jerusalem New Schaefferstown Oley Pennside Pennwyn Rehrersburg Reiffton Riverview Park Schubert Shartlesville South Temple Spring Ridge Springmont Stony Creek Mills Stouchsburg Temple Virginville Walnuttown West Hamburg West Lawn West Wyomissing Whitfield

Unincorporated communities

Albany Amityville Barto Basket Beckersville Berne Boyers Junction Breezy Corner Brownsville Cacoosing Chapel‡ Clayton Dale Earlville Dreibelbis Eagle Point Eckville Eshbach Evansville Five Points Fredericksville Fritztown Geigertown Greenawald Greenfield Manor Green Hills Grimville Hancock Harlem Henningsville Hinterleiter Host Huffs Church Jalappa Joanna Joanna Heights Kempville Kirbyville Knauers Krumsville Kulptown Landis Store Leinbachs Limekiln Lobachsville Longswamp Maiden Creek Manatawny Maple Grove Maxatawny Molltown Monocacy Station Montello Monterey Morysville Moselem Moselem Springs New Hensingersville‡ North Heidelberg Pikeville Pine Forge Pine Waters Pleasant Valley Pleasantville Plowville Pricetown Quaker City Rittenhouse Gap Sally Ann Scarlets Mill Seisholtzville State Hill Stony Run Strausstown Trexler Tuckerton Unionville Vinemont Weavertown Windsor Castle Wintersville Woodchoppertown Wyomissing Hills Yellow House

Footnotes

‡This populated place also has portions in an adjacent county or counties

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Allentown Altoona Bethlehem Butler Chester DuBois Easton Erie Greensburg Harrisburg Hazleton Johnstown Lancaster Lebanon McKeesport New Castle Philadelphia Pittsburgh Pottsville Reading Scranton Sunbury Wilkes-Barre Williamsport York

Largest municipalities

Abington Bensalem Bethel Park Bristol Cheltenham Cranberry Darby Falls Hampden Haverford Hempfield Lower Macungie Lower Makefield Lower Merion Lower Paxton Manheim McCandless Middletown Millcreek Township Monroeville Mount Lebanon Norristown Northampton North Huntingdon Penn Hills Radnor Ridley Ross Shaler Spring State College Tredyffrin Upper Darby Upper Merion Warminster West Chester Whitehall York Township

Regions

Allegheny Mountains Allegheny National Forest Allegheny Plateau Atlantic Coastal Plain Bald Eagle Valley Blue Ridge Central Coal Region Cumberland Valley Delaware Valley Dutch Country Eastern Endless Mountains Great Valley Mahoning Valley Happy Valley Laurel Highlands Lehigh Valley Main Line Moshannon Valley Nittany Valley Northeastern Northern Tier Northwestern North Penn Valley Ohio Valley Oil Region Oley Valley Pennsylvania Highlands Penns Valley Philicon Valley Piedmont Pocono Mountains Ridge and Valley Saucon Valley South Central Southeastern Southern Southwestern Susquehanna Valley Western Wyoming Valley

Counties

Adams Allegheny Armstrong Beaver Bedford Berks Blair Bradford Bucks Butler Cambria Cameron Carbon Centre Chester Clarion Clearfield Clinton Columbia Crawford Cumberland Dauphin Delaware Elk Erie Fayette Forest Franklin Fulton Greene Huntingdon Indiana Jefferson Juniata Lackawanna Lancaster Lawrence Lebanon Lehigh Luzerne Lycoming McKean Mercer Mifflin Monroe Montgomery Montour Northampton Northumberland Perry Philadelphia Pike Potter Schuylkill Snyder Somerset Sullivan Susquehanna Tioga Union Venango Warren Washington Wayne Westmoreland Wyoming York

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Delaware Valley

Counties

Atlantic Berks Bucks Burlington Camden Cape May Cecil Chester Cumberland Delaware Gloucester Kent Mercer Montgomery New Castle Ocean Philadelphia Salem

Major cities

Philadelphia

Cities and towns 50k-99k

Abington Bensalem Brandywine Hundred Bristol Camden Cherry Hill Gloucester Township Hamilton Lower Merion New Castle Hundred Pennsauken Reading Trenton Upper Darby Vineland Wilmington

Cities and towns 30k-50k

Atlantic City Cheltenham Chester Deptford Dover Egg Harbor Evesham Ewing Falls Galloway Haverford Lawrence Lower Makefield Middletown Millville Monroe Mount Laurel Newark Norristown Northampton Radnor Ridley Warminster Washington Willingboro Winslow

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Reading in Berks County, Pennsylvania

Attractions

The Pagoda Historic Places GoggleWorks Reading Public Museum Historical Society of Berks County Berkshire Mall Fairgrounds Square Mall Santander Arena

Transportation

BARTA Reading Railroad Franklin Street Station Reading Railroad Outer Station Reading Regional Airport Schuylkill Valley Metro (cancelled)

Entertainment

Reading Symphony Youth Orchestra Reading Choral Society Berks Youth Chorus

Education

Reading School District

Reading High School Reading Intermediate High School

Albright College Alvernia University Reading Area Community College Penn State Berks

Industry

Boscov's Carpenter Technology Corporation Penske Truck Leasing Redner's Markets Reading Railroad (defunct) Philadelphia and Reading Railroad (defunct) Daniels Motor Company (defunct) VF Corporation (former)

Sports

Reading Fightin Phils Reading Royals Reading United A.C.

Newspapers

Reading Eagle

Radio

W207AE W222BY W225CF W249AT W253AC W257DI W279BS W279CB W296CL W300BZ WAVT-FM WEEU WBYN-FM WIOV WIOV-FM WMGH-FM WRAW WRFY-FM WXAC WYBQ WYTL WZMV WZXB

Coordinates: 40°25′N 75°56′W / 40.42°N 75.93°W / 4

.