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The Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
(GCR) in England
England
came into being when the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway
Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway
changed its name in 1897 in anticipation of the opening in 1899 of its London Extension (see Great Central Main Line).[1] On 1 January 1923, the company was grouped into the London and North Eastern Railway.

Contents

1 History

1.1 New name

1.1.1 Coat of arms

1.2 The "London Extension" 1.3 Later history

2 Acquisitions 3 Joint working 4 Key officers

4.1 General Managers 4.2 Locomotive Engineer 4.3 Chief Mechanical Engineer

5 GCR locomotives

5.1 Pollitt's locomotives 5.2 Robinson locomotives

6 Major stations 7 Wath marshalling yard 8 Accidents and incidents 9 Docks

9.1 Grimsby
Grimsby
docks 9.2 Immingham Dock 9.3 Ships

10 References 11 External links

History[edit] New name[edit] On assuming its new title, the Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
had a main line from Manchester London Road Station
Manchester London Road Station
via Penistone, Sheffield
Sheffield
Victoria, Brigg and Grimsby
Grimsby
to Cleethorpes. A second line left the line at Penistone
Penistone
and served Barnsley, Doncaster and Scunthorpe
Scunthorpe
before rejoining the Grimsby
Grimsby
line at Barnetby. Other lines linked Sheffield to Barnsley (via Chapeltown) and Doncaster (via Rotherham) and also Lincoln and Wrawby Junction. Branch lines in north Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
ran to Barton-upon-Humber
Barton-upon-Humber
and New Holland and served ironstone quarries in the Scunthorpe
Scunthorpe
area. In the Manchester
Manchester
area, lines ran to Stalybridge and Glossop. In the 1890s the MS&LR began construction of its Derbyshire lines,[2]:128 the first part of its push southwards. Leaving its east-west main line at Woodhouse Junction, some 5½ miles southeast of Sheffield, the line headed towards Nottingham, a golden opportunity to tap into colliery traffic in the north of the county before reaching the city. A loop line was built to serve its station in Chesterfield.[2]:152 Coat of arms[edit] The Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
was the first railway to be granted a coat of arms. The arms were granted on 25 February 1898 by the Garter, Clarenceux and Norroy Kings of Arms as:

Argent
Argent
on a cross gules voided of the field between two wings in chief sable and as many daggers erect, in base of the second, in the fesse point a morion winged of the third, on a chief also of the second a pale of the first thereon eight arrows saltirewise banded also of the third, between on the dexter side three bendlets enhanced and on the sinister a fleur de lis or. And for the Crest on a Wreath of the Colours A representation of the front of a locomotive engine between two wings Or as the same are in the margin hereof more plainly depicted to be borne and used for ever hereafter by the said Corporation of the Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
Company on seals, shields, banners or otherwise according to the Laws of Arms.

The design included elements representing Manchester
Manchester
(gules ... three bendlets enhanced ... or); Sheffield
Sheffield
(eight arrows saltirewise banded); Lincoln (gules ... a fleur de lis or); Leicester
Leicester
(two wings); and London ( Argent
Argent
... a cross gules ... daggers erect). Also represented was Mercury (a morion winged [sable]). It was used on locomotives and coaches.[3] The London and North Eastern Railway
London and North Eastern Railway
and the British Transport Commission, successors of the GCR, were granted Arms of their own incorporating the GCR motto Forward.[3] The Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
(1976) Company Limited applied to the College of Arms as the successors to British Transport Commission (Loughborough to Birstall Light Railway) for permission to utilise the Coat of Arms of the GCR. A new design incorporating the same armorial components, updated in the modern style was proposed, but was rejected in favour of the original.[citation needed] The "London Extension"[edit] Main article: Great Central Main Line The MS&LR obtained Parliamentary approval in 1893 for its extension to London.[2]:32 On 1 August 1897, the railway's name was changed to Great Central Railway. Building work started in 1895: the new line, 92 miles (147 km) in length, opened for coal traffic on 25 July 1898; for passenger traffic on 15 March 1899,[2]:132 and for goods traffic on 11 April 1899.[1] It was designed for high-speed running throughout. As a Sheffield
Sheffield
company, it retained its nomenclature when the London extension opened. Trains to London were still "down" trains, the opposite of standard practice on every other main line to the capital.

Marylebone station
Marylebone station
frontage

The new line was built from Annesley
Annesley
in Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
to join the Metropolitan Railway
Metropolitan Railway
(MetR) Extension at Quainton Road, where the line became joint MetR/GCR owned (after 1903), and returned to GCR tracks at Canfield Place, near Finchley Road for the final section to Marylebone. In 1903, new rails were laid parallel to the Metropolitan Railway from Harrow to the junction north of Finchley Road, enabling more traffic to use Marylebone. Later history[edit] In 1902 the company introduced an express service from Bournemouth and Southampton to York and Newcastle-on-Tyne.[4] A year later it began a through running express from Dover and Folkestone to Leicester, Nottingham, Sheffield, Leeds, Huddersfield, Halifax, Bradford and Manchester, avoiding London and opening up the South Coast to the Midlands and the North. The route from Banbury to Reading was over Great Western track and from there it traversed South Eastern Railway track via Aldershot and Guildford to Redhill and on to Folkestone and Dover.[4] At the same time the Great Central was gaining a reputation for fast services to and from London. In May 1903 the company promoted its services as Rapid Travel in Luxury,[5] and Sheffield
Sheffield
without a stop, adopted on 1 July 1903,[6] became a trademark for the company, with 163.75 miles (263.53 km) run in three hours, an average of nearly 55 miles per hour (89 km/h).[4] Slip coaches were provided for passengers for Leicester
Leicester
and Nottingham.[6] On 2 April 1906, an "alternative main line" route from Grendon Underwood Junction to Neasden opened.[2]:33 The line was joint GCR/GWR between Ashendon Junction
Ashendon Junction
and Northolt Junction. It was built to increase traffic on the GCR by overcoming capacity constraints on the Metropolitan extension and as a result of disagreements between the MetR and GCR after the resignation of Sir Edward Watkin due to poor health from both companies. By the time the line was built, the companies had settled their differences. On 1 January 1923, under the terms of the Railways Act 1921,[7] the GCR amalgamated with several other railways to create the London and North Eastern Railway. The GCR line was the last complete mainline railway to be built in Britain until section one of High Speed 1
High Speed 1
opened in 2003 and was also one of the shortest-lived intercity railway lines. Yet in its early years its steam-hauled Sheffield
Sheffield
expresses were the fastest in the country.[8]

The last train at Rugby Central on 3 May 1969

Its express services from London to destinations beyond Nottingham were withdrawn in 1960,[2]:34 and the line was closed to passenger trains between Aylesbury and Rugby on 3 September 1966.[2]:34 A diesel multiple unit service ran between Rugby Central and Nottingham (Arkwright Street) until it was withdrawn on 3 May 1969. Since 1996 Chiltern Railways
Chiltern Railways
has used its lines south of Aylesbury for local services into London, and the alternative route south of Haddenham and widened lines south of Neasden for its intercity main line from Birmingham to London. In 2008, in a scheme partly funded by the Department for Transport, about three miles of line north of Aylesbury as far as Aylesbury Vale Parkway railway station
Aylesbury Vale Parkway railway station
was brought back into passenger use. Acquisitions[edit]

The Lancashire, Derbyshire and East Coast Railway
Lancashire, Derbyshire and East Coast Railway
(LD&ECR) opened in 1897, to link the coalfields with deepwater ports, and was intended to run from Sutton on Sea
Sutton on Sea
in Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
to Warrington
Warrington
in Lancashire. In the event only the section between Pyewipe Junction, near Lincoln and Chesterfield Market Place station, with some branch lines, was ever built. It was purchased by the GCR on 1 January 1907,[9] providing a better link between the London main line and the east coast. Wrexham, Mold and Connah's Quay Railway was purchased 1 January 1905. North Wales and Liverpool Railway as acquired at the same time. Wigan Junction Railway was bought on 1 January 1906 as was the Liverpool, St Helens and South Lancashire
Lancashire
Railway[10] North Lindsey Light Railway
North Lindsey Light Railway
Scunthorpe
Scunthorpe
to Whitton opened throughout on 1 December 1910 and worked by the GCR, it carried passengers although its main freight was ironstone.

Joint working[edit] Apart from the three branches in the Liverpool area, the GCR lines in the north of England
England
were all east of Manchester
Manchester
but GCR trains could run from coast to coast by means of joint working with other railways. The largest of those utilized in this way were those under the Cheshire Lines Committee: the other participants were the Midland Railway and the Great Northern Railway, taking in both Liverpool and Southport. Other joint undertakings were (west to east):

Manchester, South Junction and Altrincham Railway
Manchester, South Junction and Altrincham Railway
(GCR/LNWR) Oldham, Ashton and Guide Bridge Railway
Oldham, Ashton and Guide Bridge Railway
(GCR/LNWR) Macclesfield, Bollington and Marple Railway
Macclesfield, Bollington and Marple Railway
(GCR/NSR); including its Hayfield
Hayfield
branch South Yorkshire Joint Railway
South Yorkshire Joint Railway
(GCR, GNR, Lancashire
Lancashire
and Yorkshire Railway, MR and North Eastern Railway) Sheffield
Sheffield
District Railway(GCR and MidR) West Riding and Grimsby
Grimsby
Joint Railway (GCR/GNR) - giving access to Wakefield
Wakefield
and thence to Leeds Hull and Barnsley and Great Central Joint Railway
Hull and Barnsley and Great Central Joint Railway
- opened 1916 for freight traffic only.

There were also joint lines in the south:

Aylesbury Station Joint Committee Great Western and Great Central Joint Railway[11]

Banbury Junction Railway

Metropolitan and Great Central Joint Railway[12]

Watford Joint Railway

Key officers[edit] For those in position before 1899, dates are as served for the MS&LR. General Managers[edit]

1886-1902 Sir William Pollitt
Sir William Pollitt
(knighted 1899, later Lord Stuart of Wortley) 1902-1922 Sir Samuel Fay[11]:348 (knighted 1912)[13]

Locomotive Engineer[edit]

1894-1900 Harry Pollitt[14]:173 1900-1902 John George Robinson[15]

Chief Mechanical Engineer[edit]

1902-1922 John George Robinson, for whom the post was created

GCR locomotives[edit]

No. 506 Butler-Henderson, the sole surviving GCR Class 11F
GCR Class 11F
locomotive

No. 63601, the sole surviving GCR Class 8K
GCR Class 8K
locomotive

These could generally be divided into those intended for passenger work, especially those used on the London Extension and those for the heavy freight work.[16]

see Locomotives of the Great Central Railway

Pollitt's locomotives[edit] Taken over from the MS&LR, mainly of class F2, 2-4-2 tank locomotives, and also classes D5 and D6 4-4-0 locomotives.[16] Robinson locomotives[edit] During Robinson's regime, many of the larger express passenger engines came into being:[16]

Classes B1-B9: 4-6-0 tender locomotives Classes C4/5: 4-4-2 tender locomotives Classes D9-11: 4-4-0 tender locomotives Class J13: 0-6-0T Classes L1/L3: 2-6-4T Classes O4/5: 2-8-0, heavy freight locos, including ROD engines Class Q4: 0-8-0 heavy freight locomotive GCR Class 8H
GCR Class 8H
(LNER Class S1) 0-8-4T
0-8-4T
used at Wath marshalling yard

Major stations[edit]

London Marylebone Manchester
Manchester
London Road Nottingham Victoria Sheffield
Sheffield
Victoria Leicester
Leicester
Central Rugby Central

Wath marshalling yard[edit] Main article: Wath marshalling yard The marshalling yard at Wath-upon-Dearne
Wath-upon-Dearne
opened in November 1907.[17] It was designed to cope with coal trains, full and empty; it was worked with electro-pneumatic signalling. Accidents and incidents[edit]

Main article: Penistone
Penistone
rail accidents

On 30 March 1889, an excursion train was derailed at Penistone, Yorkshire due to a failure of an axle on the locomotive hauling it. A mail train ran into the wreckage at low speed. One person was killed and 61 were injured.[18] On 23 December 1904, an express passenger train was derailed at Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
due to excessive speed on a curve. Another express passenger train ran into the wreckage at low speed. Four people were killed.[19] On 2 February 1908, the driver of a freight train sneezed, his head collided with that of his fireman, knocking both of them out. Due to excessive speed, a van in the train derailed approaching Notton and Royston station, Yorkshire and the train overran signals there. It derailed completely at Ryhill.[20] On 13 December 1911, a freight train ran away and was derailed at Wombwell Central station, Yorkshire. Both locomotive crew were killed.[20] Circa 1913, a coal train was derailed at Torside, Derbyshire. The crew of the locomotive may have been overcome by fumes in the Woodhead Tunnel.[21]

Docks[edit] Grimsby
Grimsby
docks[edit] Grimsby, dubbed the "largest fishing port in the world" in the early-20th century, owed its prosperity to the ownership by the GCR and its forebear, the MS&LR. Coal and timber were among its biggest cargoes. The port had two main docks: the Alexandra Dock (named for Queen Alexandra) and the Royal Dock which was completed in 1852, linked by the Union Dock. The total area of docks was 104.25 acres (42 ha). Immingham Dock[edit] Main article: Immingham Dock This dock—completed in 1912—covered 71 acres (29 ha) and was mainly concerned with the movement of coal. And on 22 July 2012 the docks held an open day to celebrate 100 years of the port. Ships[edit] The Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
operated a number of ships.

Ship Launched Tonnage (GRT) Notes and references

SS Accrington 1910 1,629 Built in 1910 by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull. Sold to Clayton and Davie Limited.[22]

SS Ashton 1884 1,007 Built in 1884 by E. Withy and Company, Hartlepool for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Sold to Cadeby Steam Ship Company in 1916.[22]

SS Barton 1891 123 A tug built in 1891 by Hepple and Company for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Based at Grimsby
Grimsby
Docks. Scrapped in 1936.[22]

SS Blackburn 1910 1,634 Built in 1910 by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull. Sank in a collision with Rook off the Norfolk coast in December 1910.[22]

PS Brocklesby 1912 508 Built by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull for the New Holland to Hull ferry service. Sold in 1935 to the Redcliffe Shipping Company and renamed Highland Queen. Scrapped in 1936.[22]

SS Bury 1911 1,634 Built in 1910 by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull. Scrapped in 1958.[22]

SS Chester 1884 1,010 Built in 1884 by E. Withy and Company, Hartlepool for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Sunk in the River Elbe in September 1910.[22]

SS Chesterfield 1913 1,013 Built in 1913 by Swan Hunter. Lost in 1918.[22]

PS Cleethorpes 1903 302 Built by Gourlay Brothers of Dundee for the New Holland to Hull ferry service. Sold around 1934 to the Redcliffe Shipping Company and renamed Cruising Queen. Scrapped shortly afterwards.[22]

SS City of Bradford 1903 1,341 With City of Leeds, these were the first new ships ordered by the Great Central Railway. Built by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull. Passed to the LNER in 1923 and Associated Humber Lines in 1935.[22] but found to be surplus to requirements. Sold in 1936 to the Near East Shipping Co, London and renamed Hanne. The vessel was bombed and sunk off Malta in February 1942.[23]

SS City of Leeds 1903 1,341 With City of Bradford, these were the first new ships ordered by the Great Central Railway. Built by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull. Passed to the LNER in 1923 and Associated Humber Lines in 1935. Scrapped in 1937[22]

SS Dewsbury 1910 1,631 Built in 1910 by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull. Scrapped in 1959.[22]

PS Grimsby 1888 351 Built in 1888 by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Commissioned for the New Holland to Hull ferry service. Scrapped in 1923.[22]

SS Huddersfield 1872 221 Built in 1872 by J Elder of Fairfield. Wrecked in 1903.[22]

SS Immingham 1906 2,009 Built in 1906 by Swan Hunter
Swan Hunter
in Newcastle. Sunk on war service in 1916.[22]

PS Killingholme 1912 508 Built by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull for the New Holland to Hull ferry service. Withdrawn in 1934.[22]

SS Leicester 1891 1,002 Built by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull. A war loss in 1916.[22]

SS Lincoln 1883 1,075 Built in 1883 by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Sold in 1914 to Greek owners and renamed Elikon.[22] Sunk on 2 February 1917.

SS Lutterworth 1891 1,002 Built by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
of Hull for the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Entered service from Grimsby
Grimsby
to Hamburg. Acquired by LNER in 1923. Served until 1932 when she sold to British and Irish Steam Packet Company and was scrapped the following year.[24]

SS Macclesfield 1914 1,018 Built in 1914 by Swan Hunter. Transferred into Associated Humber Lines. Scrapped in 1958.[22]

PS Manchester 1876 221 Built in 1876 by the Goole Engineering and Shipbuilding Company for the Humber Ferry Service. Scrapped in 1914.[22]

SS Marple 1888 104 Built in 1888 by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Used as a tug and tender in Grimsby
Grimsby
and Immingham. Transferred to the LNER in 1923. Sold to the Tees Towing Company in 1947.[22]

SS Marylebone 1906 2,074 Built in 1906 by Cammell Laird, Birkenhead. Sold in 1932 to the Tramp Shipping Development Company. Renamed Velos, Arafat, and Velos. Scrapped in Italy in 1938. [22]

SS Northenden 1886 843 Built in 1886 by Swan Hunter
Swan Hunter
in Newcastle for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Sold to Progress Company of West Hartlepool in 1909.[22]

SS Nottingham 1891 1,033 Built by Swan Hunter
Swan Hunter
for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire Railway. Entered service when delivered with her sisters Lutterworth and Staveley on the Grimsby
Grimsby
- Hamburg
Hamburg
route, but transferred to Grimsby
Grimsby
- Rotterdam
Rotterdam
in 1897. The vessel served as a naval supply vessel between 1915 and 1918 and changed her name to HMS Notts. Following refurbishment in 1919 she re-entered commercial service returning to her original name of Nottingham. Acquired by LNER in 1923 and served until scrapped in 1935.[24]

SS Oldham 1888 846 Launched in 1888 and delivered in 1889 by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
of Hull for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Used for the Grimsby
Grimsby
to Esbjerg service. Sold to Greek owners in 1913 and renamed Eleftheria.[22]

SS Retford 1883 951 Built in 1883 by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Sold in 1910.[22]

SS Sheffield 1877 644 Built in 1877 by J. Elder for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Sold in 1910 to Turkish owners and renamed Seyyar.[22]

SS Staveley 1891 1,034 Built by Swan Hunter
Swan Hunter
at Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Entered service with her sisters Nottingham and Lutterworth on the Grimsby
Grimsby
- Hamburg
Hamburg
route. Acquired by LNER in 1923 and continued in service until sold to the British and Irish Steam Packet Company in 1932. She was scrapped a year later by Thos.W.Ward at Preston.[24]

SS Stockport 1911 1,637 Built in 1910 by Earle's Shipbuilding
Earle's Shipbuilding
in Hull. Sunk in February 1943.[22]

SS Warrington 1886 840 Built in 1886 by Swan Hunter
Swan Hunter
in Newcastle for the Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway. Ran aground on South Hasborough Sands in December 1903 and lost.[22]

SS Wrexham 1902 1,414 Built in 1902 as Nord II, she was acquired by the Great Central Railway in 1905. Sunk on war service in 1919.[22]

References[edit]

^ a b Simpson, Bill (2007). The Great Central Railway: London Extension Between Marylebone and Rugby. Lamplight Publications. ISBN 9781899246175.  ^ a b c d e f g Leleux, Robin (1976). A Regional History of the Railways of Great Britain. Volume 9 The East Midlands. David & Charles. Newton Abbot. ISBN 0715371657.  ^ a b Dow, George (1962). Great Central, Volume Two: Dominion of Watkin, 1864-1899. Shepperton: Ian Allan. pp. 297–8, frontispiece. ISBN 0-7110-1469-8.  ^ a b c "Railway Enterprise. Important move by the Great Central Railway". Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald. British Newspaper Archive. 7 November 1903. Retrieved 23 July 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).  ^ " Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
Rapid Travel in Luxury". Surrey Mirror. British Newspaper Archive. 22 May 1903. Retrieved 23 July 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).  ^ a b " Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
Summer Express Train Service. Vestibuled Breakfast Car Train Sheffield
Sheffield
to london without a Stop. Commencing 1 July 1903". Sheffield
Sheffield
Daily Telegraph. British Newspaper Archive. 25 June 1903. Retrieved 23 July 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).  ^ Railways Act 1921, HMSO, 19 August 1921  ^ Ellis, Cuthbert Hamilton (1947). The Trains We Loved. Allen.  ^ Kingscott, Geoffrey (2007). Lost Railways of Derbyshire. Newbury: Countryside Books. p. 132. ISBN 978-1-84674-042-8.  ^ Sweeney, Dennis J (2014). The St. Helens and Wigan Junction Railway. Leigh: Triangle Publishing. ISBN 0-85361-292-7.  ^ a b Dow, George (1965). Great Central. Vol III : Fay Sets the Pace, 1900-1922. London: Ian Allan. ISBN 0-7110-0263-0.  ^ Reed, Albin J. (1997). The Met & GC Line An Observer's Notes, 1948-1968. Avon Books.  ^ "No. 28632". The London Gazette. 2 August 1912. p. 5722.  ^ Marshall, John (1978). A Biographical Dictionary of Railway Engineers. Newton Abbot: David & Charles. ISBN 0-7153-7489-3.  ^ "The directors of the Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
have decided to combine the offices of locomotive and carriage and waggon superintendent, and have, from the 1st inst., placed both departments under the control of Mr. John G. Robinson, who has hitherto held the position of locomotive engineer to the company". Manchester
Manchester
Courier and Lancashire
Lancashire
General Advertiser. British Newspaper Archive. 5 May 1902. Retrieved 23 July 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).  ^ a b c Baxter, Bertram (1988). Baxter, David, ed. British Locomotive Catalogue 1825–1923, volume 5B: Great Northern Railway and Great Central Railway. Ashbourne, Derbyshire: Moorland Publishing. ISBN 0-903485-86-9.  ^ "Wath concentration yard & the "Wath Daisies"". GCR Rolling Stock Trust. Retrieved 2008-03-21.  ^ Earnshaw, Alan (1991). Trains in Trouble: Vol. 7. Penryn: Atlantic Books. p. 7. ISBN 0-906899-50-8.  ^ Trevena, Arthur (1981). Trains in Trouble: Vol. 2. Redruth: Atlantic Books. p. 22. ISBN 0-906899-03-6.  ^ a b Earnshaw, Alan (1993). Trains in Trouble: Vol. 8. Penryn: Atlantic Books. pp. 5–6. ISBN 0-906899-52-4.  ^ Trevena, Arthur (1980). Trains in Trouble. Vol. 1. Redruth: Atlantic Books. p. 25. ISBN 0-906899-01-X.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac Duckworth, Christian Leslie Dyce; Langmuir, Graham Easton (1968). Railway and other Steamers. Prescot, Lancashire: T. Stephenson and Sons.  ^ Haws, Duncan (1993). Merchant Fleets - Britain's Railway Steamers - Eastern & North Western Companies + Zeeland and Stena. Hereford: TCL Publications. ISBN 0-946378-22-3.  ^ a b c Haws, Duncan (1993). Britain's Railway Steamers – Eastern and North Western Companies + Zeeland and Stena. Merchant Fleets. 25. Hereford: TCL Publications. ISBN 0-946378-22-3. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Great Central Railway.

Lists of LNER locomotives, including those of the GCR taken over at grouping Homepage of the Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
Society Homepage of the Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
(Leicestershire) Homepage of the Great Central Railway
Great Central Railway
(Nottingham)

v t e

The "Big Four" pre-nationalisation British railway companies

  Great Western   London Midland & Scottish   London & North Eastern   Southern

GWR constituents

Alexandra (Newport and South Wales) Docks and Railway Barry Railway Cambrian Railways Cardiff Railway Great Western Railway Rhymney Railway Taff Vale Railway

Full list

LNER constituents

Great Central Great Eastern Great Northern Great North of Scotland Hull & Barnsley North British North Eastern

Full list

LMS constituents

Caledonian Furness Glasgow & South Western Highland Lancashire
Lancashire
& Yorkshire London and North Western Midland North Staffordshire

Full list

SR constituents

London and South Western Railway London, Brighton and South Coast Railway London, Chatham and Dover Railway South Eastern and Chatham Railway South Eastern Railway

Full list

See also History of rail transport in Great Britain 1923–1947 List of companies involved in the grouping

v t e

Constituent railway companies of the London and North Eastern Railway

Constituent companies

Great Central Railway Great Eastern Railway Great Northern Railway Great North of Scotland Railway Hull and Barnsley Railway North British Railway North Eastern Railway

Subsidiary companies

Brackenhill Light Railway Colne Valley and Halstead Railway East and West Yorkshire Union Railway East Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway Edinburgh and Bathgate Railway Forcett Railway Forth and Clyde Junction Railway Gifford and Garvald Light Railway Great North of England, Clarence and Hartlepool Junction Railway Horncastle Railway Humber Commercial Railway and Dock Kilsyth and Bonnybridge railway Lauder Light Railway London and Blackwall Railway Mansfield Railway Mid-Suffolk Light Railway Newburgh and North Fife Railway North Lindsey Light Railway Nottingham and Grantham Railway and Canal Nottingham Joint Station Committee Nottingham Suburban Railway Seaforth and Sefton Junction Railway Sheffield
Sheffield
District Railway South Yorkshire Junction Railway Stamford and Essendine Railway West Riding and Grimsby
Grimsby
Railway

(Full lis

.