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Great Budworth
Great Budworth
is a civil parish and village, approximately four miles (6.4 km) north of Northwich, England, within the unitary authority of Cheshire
Cheshire
West and Chester
Chester
and the ceremonial county of Cheshire. It lies off the A559 road, east of Comberbach, northwest of Higher Marston and southeast of Budworth Heath.[3] Until 1948, Great Budworth was part of the Arley Hall
Arley Hall
estate.

Contents

1 Etymology 2 Geography 3 History 4 Notable landmarks

4.1 St Mary and All Saints' Church 4.2 Houses 4.3 George and Dragon pub 4.4 54–57 High Street

5 Flora and fauna 6 Culture 7 See also 8 References 9 External links

Etymology[edit] According to Sir Peter Leycester, the name Great Budworth
Great Budworth
comes from the Old Saxon
Old Saxon
words bode ("dwelling") and wurth ("a place by water").[4] Geography[edit]

Budworth Mere with Great Budworth
Great Budworth
church in the distance

Great Budworth
Great Budworth
is approached from the main Warrington
Warrington
to Northwich road and lies about two miles (3.2 km) from the town of Northwich. It is situated along a ridge overlooking two meres, Budworth to the west and Pickmere to the east.[5] It was situated in the hundred of Bucklow and deanery of Frodsham. At fifteen miles (24 km) in length and ten miles (16 km) in width, it was considered to be the second largest parish in Cheshire, after Prestbury. The parish contained nineteen townships: Budworth, Anderton, Appleton-cum-Hull, Aston-juxta-Budworth, Barnton, Barterton, or Bartington, Cogfoall, Comberbach, Dutton, Little-Leigh, Marbury, Marston, Pickmere, Stretton, Nether-Tabley, Over-Witley, Nether Witley, and Wincham.[6] History[edit] The early history of Great Budworth
Great Budworth
is documented in the Domesday Book, which mentions a priest at Great Budworth. In 1130, St Mary and All Saints Church was given to the Augustinian canon of Norton Priory[7] by William FitzNigel, Constable
Constable
of Chester
Chester
and Baron of Halton. The lord of the manor during the reign of Henry III was Geoffrey de Dutton. He donated to Norton Priory
Norton Priory
a third of his land to endow masses for his soul.[8] After the dissolution of the monasteries, King Henry VIII granted the estate to John Grimsditch. It was afterwards divided into several parcels.[6] There may have been a school in Great Budworth
Great Budworth
as early as 1563, but certainly one existed by 1578.[9] For centuries, the village was owned by the head of Arley Hall
Arley Hall
who would collect rent from the villagers.[10] Rowland Egerton-Warburton
Rowland Egerton-Warburton
of Arley Hall
Arley Hall
paid for restorations and improvements to the church in the 1850s.[11] Egerton-Warburton also undertook a "campaign to render it (the village) picturesque in Victorian eyes".[12] To this end he commissioned architects including William Nesfield and John Douglas to work on buildings in the village.[13] Douglas remodelled the George and Dragon inn in 1875,[14] and restored some of the cottages.[15] A running pump was the only source of drinking water for the whole community until 1934 when a piped supply was first connected. Until 1948, Great Budworth
Great Budworth
was part of the Arley Hall
Arley Hall
estate.[16] Notable landmarks[edit] The Grade I listed St Mary and All Saints Church is located in the village. The village is a popular location for films and television including Cluedo[10] and more recently a NatWest advert. Arley Hall, a historic house, is nearby.[10] Also of note in the area are the George and Dragon and Cock o' Budworth public houses,[10] 54–57 High Street, Dene Cottages, Goldmine House and Belmont Hall. St Mary and All Saints' Church[edit] Main article: St Mary and All Saints' Church, Great Budworth

St Mary and All Saints Church

St Mary and All Saints' Church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England
England
as a designated Grade I listed building.[17] It is an active Anglican
Anglican
parish church in the diocese of Chester, the archdeaconry of Chester
Chester
and the deanery of Great Budworth.[18] Clifton-Taylor includes it in his list of best English parish churches.[19] Richards describes it as "one of the finest examples of ecclesiastical architecture remaining in Cheshire".[20] The architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner
Nikolaus Pevsner
considered it to be "one of the most satisfactory Perpendicular churches in Cheshire".[21] In the north chapel is a memorial to Sir Peter Leicester, the 17th-century historian, and in the Warburton Chapel is the alabaster effigy of Sir John Warburton who died in 1575.[20] In the north chapel is an organ designed by Samuel Renn, installed in 1839. Houses[edit] Goldmine House and its attached cottage (Rose Cottage), designated as a Grade II listed building,[22] were built in 1870 for Rowland Egerton-Warburton of Arley Hall
Arley Hall
and were designed by the Chester architect John Douglas.[23] Built with brown brick with some timber framing, and clay tile roofs the house faces west. It is a double storied building with two gabled bays. The cottage is simple in form with a dormer and blue brick diapering.[22] Dene Cottages, a Grade II listed pair of cottages, were built in 1867–68, again for Rowland Egerton-Warburton
Rowland Egerton-Warburton
and by Douglas.[24] The lower storeys are constructed in brown brick. The upper storeys are timber-framed with plaster panels. The roof is in clay tiles. The plaster panels are pargetted with floral motifs.[25] Belmont Hall in this parish was built by J. H. Smith-Barry Esq., who deposited in it his valuable collection of pictures and statues, afterwards removed to Marbury. Smith-Barry sold it to Henry Clarke.[6] Built in 1755 and designed by James Gibbs, it is a Grade I listed building.[26] As of 2014 it is occupied by Cransley School.[27] George and Dragon pub[edit]

The George and Dragon pub

The George and Dragon pub, another Grade II listed building,[28] was initially built as a simple three-bay Georgian inn. In 1875, John Douglas was commissioned to restore it by Egerton-Warburton. He added tall rubbed chimneys, mullioned windows and a steep pyramidal turret.[29] The double-storied inn has bays built in brick with a roughcast rendering on the upper storey. It has clay tiled covered hipped roofs. Its other architectural features comprise a projecting two-storey porch with oak post-and-rail fence inscribed with a number of sayings on either side, lateral bay with four-light mullioned window in the lower storey and a three-light mullioned window in the upper storey, a tall rubbed brick chimneystack, and the inn sign located diagonally from the right corner.[28][29] The inn continues to function as a public house and restaurant.[30] 54–57 High Street[edit] 54–57 High Street is a row of four Grade II listed[31] dwellings in the High Street, built in the early 18th century.[31] They were refaced and partly rebuilt for Rowland Egerton-Warburton
Rowland Egerton-Warburton
of Arley Hall
Arley Hall
by John Douglas in 1870 or 1875.[28][32] The two outer buildings are houses and the two central buildings are cottages. They are built in brown brick with clay tile roofs, and have two storeys plus attics. Each building has a gable, those on the outer buildings larger than those on the inner, all decorated with brick and plaster.[31] Flora and fauna[edit] In the Middle Ages, Budworth Mere was used as a fish hatchery. Stocked with bream and pike, its reeds shelter breeding reed warblers and great crested grebes.[33] Other avifauna includes mallards and coots.[16] Culture[edit] The Soul Cakers Play is a seasonal folk play performed in the village every November which brings together the whole community. It features Saint George, the Black Knight and a Hobby Horse.[16] In Great Budworth, the "soul cake" may be a glass of beer or other sustenance; into it comes the devil, or Beelzebub, now "Belshy Bob".[34] See also[edit]

Cheshire
Cheshire
portal

Listed buildings in Great Budworth

References[edit] Citations

^ "Parish population 2011". Retrieved 29 May 2015.  ^ http://greatbudworth.com/groups-clubs/ ^ Google Maps
Google Maps
(Map). Google.  ^ Green, Henry (1859). Knutsford, its traditions and history: with reminiscences, anecdotes, and notices of the neighbourhood. Smith, Elder, & Co. p. 13. Retrieved 11 July 2011.  ^ The British architect: a journal of architecture and the accessory arts. 1884. pp. 282–. Retrieved 16 July 2011.  ^ a b c Lysons, Daniel (1810). Magna Britannia: being a concise topographical account of the several counties of Great Britain. Containing Cambridgeshire, and the County Palatine of Chester. Cadell. pp. 519–. Retrieved 11 July 2011.  ^ Greene 2004, p. 67. ^ Lancashire and Cheshire
Cheshire
Antiquarian Society (1897). Transactions of the Lancashire and Cheshire
Cheshire
Antiquarian Society. pp. 95–. Retrieved 16 July 2011.  ^ Cox, Marjorie; Hopkins, L. A. (1975). A history of Sir John Deane's Grammar School, Northwich, 1557–1908. Manchester University Press ND. p. 52. ISBN 978-0-7190-1282-2. Retrieved 11 July 2011.  ^ a b c d Lambert, Nick (1 July 1996). Cheshire
Cheshire
walks with children. Sigma Leisure. p. 72. ISBN 978-1-85058-560-2. Retrieved 11 July 2011.  ^ Steele, Robert J. (May 2003), A Brief History of Great Budworth Church, St Mary's and All Saints Church, archived from the original on 23 August 2007, retrieved 9 September 2007  ^ Hubbard, p. 92 ^ Hubbard, pp. 79–80 ^ Hubbard, pp. 92–93, 246 ^ Hubbard, pp. 240, 242, 278 ^ a b c Boast, Howard. "History on your doorstep – Great Budworth". Cheshire
Cheshire
Magazine. Retrieved 16 July 2011.  ^ Historic England. "Church of St Mary and All Saints, Great Budworth (1139156)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 26 March 2015.  ^ "St Mary & All Saints, Great Budworth". Church of England. Retrieved 1 January 2011.  ^ Clifton-Taylor, Alec (1974). English Parish Churches as Work of Art. Batsford. p. 240. ISBN 0-7134-2776-0.  ^ a b Richards, Raymond (1947). Old Cheshire
Cheshire
Churches. Batsford. pp. 170–175.  ^ Pevsner, Nikolaus; Hubbard, Edward (2003) [1971]. Cheshire. The Buildings of England. Yale University Press. pp. 227–228. ISBN 0-300-09588-0.  ^ a b Historic England. "Goldmine House, Rose Cottage, Great Budworth (1329888)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 26 March 2015.  ^ Hubbard, p.278 ^ Hubbard, p.240 ^ Historic England. "Dene Cottages, 1 and 2 Warrington
Warrington
Road, Great Budworth (1329854)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 26 March 2015.  ^ Historic England. "Belmont Hall (1139129)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 26 March 2015.  ^ "Cransley School". Cransley School. Archived from the original on 7 June 2008. Retrieved 16 July 2008.  ^ a b c Historic England. "George and Dragon Inn, Great Budworth (1329885)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 26 March 2015.  ^ a b Hubbard, pp. 92–93 ^ "George and Dragon". Onionring. Retrieved 14 July 2011.  ^ a b c Historic England. "Jasmine Cottage, Nos. 55 & 56 and No. 57 High Street, Great Budworth
Great Budworth
(1139118)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 26 March 2015.  ^ Hubbard, p. 242 ^ Darling, Jen (1 April 1988). West Cheshire
Cheshire
Walks. Sigma. pp. 73–. ISBN 978-1-85058-111-6. Retrieved 16 July 2011.  ^ Wright, Peter (1974). The language of British industry. Macmillan. p. 66. Retrieved 16 July 2011. 

Bibliography

Boyd, Arnold (1951). A Country Parish: Great Budworth
Great Budworth
in the county of Chester. Collins. OCLC 221053881.  Foster, Charles (1999). "The History of the House and the Family". In Albrighton, Tom (ed.). Arley Hall
Arley Hall
and Gardens, Cheshire. Jarrold. CS1 maint: Extra text: editors list (link) Greene, J. Patrick (2004). Norton Priory: The Archaeology of a Medieval Religious House. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-60278-5.  Groves, Linden (2004). Historic Parks & Gardens of Cheshire. Landmark. ISBN 1-84306-124-4.  Hubbard, Edward (1991). The Work of John Douglas. Victorian Society. ISBN 0-901657-16-6. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Great Budworth.

v t e

Cheshire
Cheshire
West and Chester

Principal settlements

Chester Ellesmere Port Frodsham Neston Northwich Winsford

Civil parishes (current)

Acton Bridge Agden Aldersey Aldford
Aldford
and Saighton Allostock Alvanley Anderton with Marbury Antrobus Ashton Hayes
Ashton Hayes
and Horton cum Peel Aston Bache Backford Barnton Barrow Barton Beeston Bostock Broxton Burwardsley Byley Capenhurst Carden Chester
Chester
Castle Chidlow Chorlton Chowley Christleton Clotton Hoofield Clutton Coddington Comberbach Croughton Crowton Cuddington Cuddington Darnhall Davenham Delamere and Oakmere Dodleston Duckington Duddon Dunham-on-the-Hill and Hapsford Dutton Eaton and Eccleston Edgerley Elton Farndon Frodsham Golborne David Great Boughton Great Budworth Guilden Sutton Handley Hargrave and Huxley Hartford Harthill Helsby Huntington Ince Kelsall Kingsley Lach Dennis Lea-by-Backford Ledsham Little Budworth Little Leigh Little Stanney Littleton Lostock Gralam Malpas Manley Marston Mickle Trafford
Mickle Trafford
and District Mollington Moston Mouldsworth Moulton Neston Nether Peover No Man’s Heath and District Norley Northwich Poulton and Pulford Puddington Rowton Rudheath Rushton Saughall
Saughall
and Shotwick
Shotwick
Park Shocklach Oviatt
Shocklach Oviatt
and District Shotwick
Shotwick
Park Sproston Stanthorne
Stanthorne
and Wimboldsley Stoak Stretton Sutton Tarporley Tarvin Tattenhall
Tattenhall
and District Thornton-le-Moors Threapwood Tilston Tiverton and Tilstone Fearnall Tushingham-cum-Grindley, Macefen
Macefen
and Bradley Upton by Chester Utkinton Waverton Weaverham Wervin Whitegate and Marton Whitley Wigland Willington Wincham Winsford

Civil parishes (former)

Aldford Ashton Hayes Bickley Bradley Bridge Trafford Bruen Stapleford Buerton Burton Caldecott Caughall Chorlton-by-Backford Church Shocklach Churton by Aldford Churton by Farndon Churton Heath Claverton Cotton Abbotts Cotton Edmunds Crewe
Crewe
by Farndon Delamere Dunham-on-the-Hill Eaton Eccleston Edge Foulk Stapleford Golborne Bellow Grafton Hampton Hapsford Hatton Hockenhull Hoole Village Horton-by-Malpas Horton cum Peel Huxley Iddinshall Kings Marsh Larkton Lea Newbold Lower Kinnerton Macefen Marlston cum Lache Mickle Trafford Newton by Malpas Newton-by-Tattenhall Oakmere Oldcastle Overton Picton Poulton Prior's Heys Pulford Saighton Saughall Shocklach Oviatt Shotwick Shotwick
Shotwick
Park Stanthorne Stockton Tattenhall Tilstone Fearnall Tiverton Tushingham-cum-Grindley Wimbolds Trafford Wimboldsley Woodbank Wychough

Unparished areas

Chester Ellesmere Port

v t e

Ceremonial county of Cheshire

Cheshire
Cheshire
Portal

Unitary authorities

Cheshire
Cheshire
East Cheshire
Cheshire
West and Chester Halton Warrington

Major settlements

Alsager Birchwood Bollington Chester Congleton Crewe Ellesmere Port Frodsham Handforth Knutsford Macclesfield Middlewich Nantwich Neston Northwich Poynton Runcorn Sandbach Warrington Widnes Wilmslow Winsford See also: List of civil parishes in Cheshire

Rivers

Bollin Croco Dane Dean Dee Gowy Goyt Mersey Weaver Wheelock

Topics

Flag Parliamentary constituencies Places Population of major settlements SSSIs Country houses Listed buildings Grade I listed churches Grade I listed non-ecclesiastical buildings Grade II* listed buildings History Museums Lord Lieuten

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