Grange, Edinburgh
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The Grange (originally St Giles' Grange) is an affluent suburb of
Edinburgh Edinburgh (; sco, Edinburgh; gd, Dùn Èideann ) is the capital city of Scotland and one of its 32 Council areas of Scotland, council areas. Historically part of the county of Midlothian (interchangeably Edinburghshire before 1921), it is ...

Edinburgh
, just south of the city centre, with Morningside and Greenhill to the west, Newington to the east, The Meadows park and
Marchmont Marchmont is a mainly residential area of Edinburgh Edinburgh (; sco, Edinburgh; gd, Dùn Èideann ) is the capital city of Scotland and one of its 32 Council areas of Scotland, council areas. Historically part of the county of Midlothi ...

Marchmont
to the north, and
Blackford Hill Blackford Hill is a hill in Edinburgh, the capital city of Scotland. It is in the area of Blackford, Edinburgh, Blackford, between Morningside, Edinburgh, Morningside, and the Braid Hills. Together with the Hermitage of Braid, it comprises the ...
to the south. It is a
conservation area Protected areas or conservation areas are locations which receive protection because of their recognized natural, ecological or cultural values. There are several kinds of protected areas, which vary by level of protection depending on the ena ...

conservation area
characterised by large early
Victorian Victorian or Victorians may refer to: 19th century * Victorian era, British history during Queen Victoria's 19th-century reign ** Victorian architecture ** Victorian house ** Victorian decorative arts ** Victorian fashion ** Victorian literature ...
stone-built villas and mansions, often with very large gardens. The Grange was built mainly between 1830 and 1890, and the area represented the idealisation of country living within an urban setting. The suburb includes streets which are renowned for their pricey properties, and it is home to some of Scotland's richest people, top lawyers and businessmen. Whitehouse Terrace, in the Grange area of the Capital, was named as the priciest postcode in Zoopla's 'Rich List for 2021'.


Character of the Area

The architectural form and green environment of The Grange are attributable to the
picturesque Picturesque is an aesthetic ideal introduced into English cultural debate in 1782 by William Gilpin (clergyman), William Gilpin in ''Observations on the River Wye, and Several Parts of South Wales, etc. Relative Chiefly to Picturesque Beauty; made ...
movement and characterised by romantic revivalism of the architectural forms that are original and individual in composition. The buildings are complemented by the profusion of mature trees, spacious garden settings, stone boundary walls and green open spaces. A significant level of uniformity is achieved from the use of local building materials, e.g. local grey sandstone in
ashlar Ashlar () is finely dressed (cut, worked) stone, either an individual stone A rock is any naturally occurring solid mass or aggregate of minerals or mineraloid matter. It is categorized by the minerals included, its chemical composit ...

ashlar
or coursed rubble with hand carved decoration, Scots slates, timber framed sash and case windows with plate glass. The Grange was predominantly developed around 1830, when the growing middle class of merchants and professionals in
Edinburgh Edinburgh (; sco, Edinburgh; gd, Dùn Èideann ) is the capital city of Scotland and one of its 32 Council areas of Scotland, council areas. Historically part of the county of Midlothian (interchangeably Edinburghshire before 1921), it is ...

Edinburgh
were looking for secluded location where to raise their families. The Grange had the advantages of physical separation from the overcrowded medieval city and offered individual dwellings in a predominantly suburban setting in contrast to the tenements of the Georgian
New Town New is an adjective referring to something recently made, discovered, or created. New or NEW may refer to: Music * New, singer of K-pop group The Boyz Boyz or The Boyz may refer to: Music Bands *The Boyz (German band), a German boy band of t ...
. Houses were built with their own private gardens surrounded by high stone walls; this was in contrast with the communal living of the more central areas. Each house has its individual fashionable style of the Victorian times. The outstanding quality of many of the villas is due to the insistence of the Dick Lauder family, who commissioned the houses, on high architectural standards.


Superiors

There are mentions of 'Sanct-Geill-Grange' in charters of King
David David (; ) (traditional spelling), , ''Dāwūd''; grc-koi, Δαυΐδ, Dauíd; la, Davidus, David; gez , ዳዊት, ''Dawit''; xcl, Դաւիթ, ''Dawitʿ''; cu, Давíдъ, ''Davidŭ''; possibly meaning "beloved one". is described in th ...

David
and King
Edgar Edgar is a commonly used English given name English names are names used in, or originating in, England England is a that is part of the . It shares land borders with to its west and to its north. The lies northwest of England an ...

Edgar
, as church lands attached to parish church in Edinburgh, the king retaining the superiority. The word grange is common across Britain and normally links to an extensive farm with a central mansionhouse (corrupting to the word range in America). On 16 June 1376, King Robert II granted the superiority of the barony and lands of St Giles to his eldest son, John, Earl of Carrick, Steward of Scotland. In 1391 the estate was conferred upon the Wardlaw family. On 29 October 1506, St Giles Grange passed to John Cant, a Burgess of Edinburgh, and his spouse Agnes Carkettle, and in 1517 they granted the use of of land to the nuns of St. Catherine of Siena. On 19 March 1691 a John Cant sold St Giles Grange in its entirety to William Dick. At that time, the previously feued to the nuns was now in the possession of Sir
John Napier John Napier of Merchiston (; 1 February 1550 – 4 April 1617), nicknamed Marvellous Merchiston, was a Scottish landowner known as a mathematician A mathematician is someone who uses an extensive knowledge of mathematics Mathema ...

John Napier
, the famous inventor of logarithms. When Isabel Dick, the heiress, married Sir Andrew Lauder, 5th Baronet of Fountainhall, in 1731, The Grange passed to him.


Grange House

The original
tower house A tower house is a particular type of stone structure, built for defensive purposes as well as habitation. Tower houses began to appear in the Middle Ages, especially in mountainous or limited access areas, in order to command and defend strateg ...
appears to be of a very early date, possibly the 13th century, ornamented with two turrets and a battlemented roof; its position was isolated at the eastern end of the
Burgh Muir The Burgh Muir is the historic term for an extensive area of land lying to the south of Edinburgh city centre, upon which much of the southern part of the city now stands following its gradual spread and more especially its rapid expansion in th ...
, which at that time consisted of waste tracts of moorland and morass, stretching out southward as far as the
Braid Hills The Braid Hills form an area towards the south-western edge of Edinburgh, Scotland. The hills themselves are largely open space. Housing in the area is mostly confined to detached villas, and some large terraced houses. The ''Braid Hills Hotel'' ...
and eastward to St. Leonard's Crags. The
mansion A mansion is a large dwelling house. The word itself derives through Old French from the Latin word ''mansio'' "dwelling", an abstract noun derived from the verb ''manere'' "to dwell". The English word ''manse'' originally defined a property la ...

mansion
, The Grange House, was enlarged over the centuries, a major restoration being carried out by Sir
Thomas Dick Lauder Sir Thomas Dick Lauder of Fountainhall, 7th Baronet, FRSE FSA(Scot) LLD (13 August 178429 May 1848) was a Scottish author. He served as Secretary to the Board of Manufactures (1839–), on the Herring Fisheries Board, at the Royal Institution f ...
, Bt. On 16 May 1836,
Lord Cockburn 200px, Lord Cockburn, from the Etching in Crombie's ''Modern Athenians'' Henry Thomas Cockburn of Bonaly, Lord Cockburn ( ; Cockpen, Midlothian, 26 October 1779 – Bonaly, Midlothian, 26 April/18 July 1854) was a Scottish lawyer, judge and lit ...
recorded in his diary: "There was an annular eclipse of the sun yesterday afternoon....it was a beautiful spectacle......I was on the top of the tower at The Grange House, with Sir Thomas Dick Lauder and his family." After Sir Thomas's death in 1848, the fabric of the house gradually deteriorated, and by the 1930s the cost of maintenance and preservation had become prohibitive. Despite widespread protests, the house was demolished in 1936. Bungalows and other houses were built on part of the site, in what is now Grange Crescent. Stone
wyvern A wyvern ( , sometimes spelled wivern) is a legend A legend is a genre of folklore that consists of a narrative A narrative, story or tale is any account of a series of related events or experiences, whether nonfictional ( memoir, biogr ...

wyvern
s from its gateposts, known locally as the 'Lauder griffins', were re-erected in Grange Loan. One was placed at the entrance to a stretch of Lover's Loan, a centuries-old path which was preserved in a late 19th-century redevelopment and is marked out with high stone walls separating it from the gardens on either side. At one point the path borders the Grange
Cemetery A cemetery, burial ground, gravesite or graveyard is a place where the remains of dead people are burial, buried or otherwise interred. The word ''cemetery'' (from Greek language, Greek , "sleeping place") implies that the land is specifically ...

Cemetery
, where various well-known people are buried, including Sir
Thomas Dick Lauder Sir Thomas Dick Lauder of Fountainhall, 7th Baronet, FRSE FSA(Scot) LLD (13 August 178429 May 1848) was a Scottish author. He served as Secretary to the Board of Manufactures (1839–), on the Herring Fisheries Board, at the Royal Institution f ...
,
Hugh Miller Hugh Miller (10 October 1802 – 23/24 December 1856) was a self-taught Scottish geologist and writer, folklorist and an evangelical Christian. Life and work Miller was born in Cromarty, the first of three children of Harriet Wright (''b ...

Hugh Miller
, and
Thomas Chalmers Thomas Chalmers (17 March 178031 May 1847), was a Scotland, Scottish minister (religion), minister, professor of theology, political economist, and a leader of both the Church of Scotland and of the Free Church of Scotland (1843—1900), Fr ...

Thomas Chalmers
.


City expansion

In 1825
Thomas Dick Lauder Sir Thomas Dick Lauder of Fountainhall, 7th Baronet, FRSE FSA(Scot) LLD (13 August 178429 May 1848) was a Scottish author. He served as Secretary to the Board of Manufactures (1839–), on the Herring Fisheries Board, at the Royal Institution f ...
, the then owner of the Grange, sold off a large area of land for development (the area between the present Dick Place and Grange Road). This linked to a new access road to the east (now called Newington Road). Lauder controlled development of the land through a strong feuing plan and developments required his approval. The original feuing plan included curious plot names such as Little Transylvania and Greater Transylvania (both north of Grange Loan). Grange House remained in a large plot in the centre of Grange Loan.Grange Conservation Area Character Appraisal: City of Edinburgh Council From the 1840s, The Grange was developed as an early
suburb A suburb (or suburban area or suburbia) is a commercial Commercial may refer to: * a dose of advertising conveyed through media (such as - for example - radio or television) ** Radio advertisement ** Television advertisement * (adjective ...
, built gradually upon the lands of The Grange
estate Estate or The Estate may refer to: Law * Estate (law), a term in common law for a person's property, entitlements and obligations * Estates of the realm, a broad social category in the histories of certain countries. ** The Estates, representative ...
— still owned by the Dick Lauder family. The area was originally laid out by the architect
David Cousin David Cousin (19 May 1809 – 14 August 1878) was a Scottish architect, landscape architect and Urban planning, planner, closely associated with early cemetery design and many prominent buildings in Edinburgh, Scotland, Edinburgh. From 1841 to ...
but then the feuing was altered (1858) and greatly extended southwards (1877, following great success) by the architect Robert Reid Raeburn. Some of the Victorian villas still retain substantial mature trees and gardens which pre-date the housing. In 1835
Earl Grey Earl Grey is a title in the peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1806 for General Charles Grey, 1st Earl Grey, Charles Grey, 1st Baron Grey. In 1801, he was given the title Baron Grey of Howick in the County of Northumberland, and in ...
(of
Reform Bill In the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Telegraph' use Britain as a synonym for the United Kingdom. Some prefer to ...
fame) stayed with Sir Thomas Dick Lauder at The Grange House, and commemorated his visit by planting an oak-tree in a conspicuous spot in The Avenue, upon the bank of the north side, not very far from the ivy-clad arch. It was called 'Earl Grey's Oak' and was still healthy in 1898. It is not known if it has survived. Within the area lies the campus of the Astley Ainslie Hospital. This large area of ground was gifted as a hospital in 1921 as part of the will of John Ainslie. The grounds of the
Carlton Cricket Club Carlton Cricket Club is an Australian cricket Cricket is a Bat-and-ball games, bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a cricket field, field at the centre of which is a cricket pitch, pitch with a wicket at each end ...
is the last vestige of the major open space which used to surround Grange House.


Grange Cemetery

This was laid out in 1847 by the Edinburgh architect
David Bryce David Bryce Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, FRSE FRIBA Royal Scottish Academy, RSA (3 April 1803 – 7 May 1876) was a Scotland, Scottish architect. Life Bryce was born at 5 South College Street in Edinburgh, the son of David Br ...
and is more rectilinear in layout than its predecessors,
Warriston Cemetery Warriston Cemetery is a cemetery in List of graveyards and cemeteries in Edinburgh, Edinburgh. It lies in Warriston, one of the northern suburbs of Edinburgh, Scotland. It was built by the then newly-formed Edinburgh Cemetery Company, and o ...
and
Dean Cemetery #REDIRECT Dean Cemetery The Dean Cemetery is a historically important Victorian cemetery north of the Dean Village, west of Edinburgh city centre, in Scotland. It lies between Queensferry Road and the Water of Leith, bounded on its east si ...
. It was original entitled the Southern Edinburgh Cemetery. It includes a very interesting "Egyptian portal" to the land of the dead for the wife of a William Stuart (died 1868) on the north wall, by the sculptor Robert Thomson. Sculptures by
William Birnie Rhind William Birnie Rhind Royal Scottish Academy, RSA (1853–1933) was a Scottish sculptor. Rhind was born in Edinburgh as the eldest son of sculptor John Rhind (sculptor), John Rhind (1828–1892), and the elder brother of J. Massey Rhind. The two b ...
(Dr. James Cappie) and
Henry Snell Gamley Henry Snell Gamley (commonly called Harry Gamley) (1865–1928) was a Scottish sculptor specialising in war memorials and sculpture on tombs. He was however also responsible for other figurative sculpture on prominent Edinburgh Edi ...
(David Menzies) can also be found. There are also multiple ornate Celtic crosses, mainly by
Stewart McGlashan Stewart McGlashan or McGlashen(1807–1873) was a Scottish sculptor and mason, responsible for creating the company Stewart McGlashen (sic) which flourished from 1842 to 1974. He was responsible for devising a series of machines capable of creat ...
. The graves of Isabella Russell and Margaret McNicoll were designed by Robert Lorimer in 1904. Other notable graves include: * John Brown Abercromby (1843–1929), artist * Harry Burrows Acton (1908–1974) * Prof David Laird Adams * Sir Andrew Agnew, 7th Baronet * Thomas Croxen Archer (1817–1885) botanist * Rev William Arnot (preacher), William Arnot * Rev David Arnot (minister), David Arnot Doctor of Divinity, DD minister of St Giles Cathedral * Baird baronets, Sir William James and Sir James Gardiner Baird, 7th and 8th Baronets of Saughton Hall * John Baillie (theologian), Very Rev John Baillie, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, 1943/44 * Sir Andrew Balfour, physician (grave vandalised) * James Bannerman (theologian) and his son William Burney Bannerman and his wife Helen Bannerman * John Bartholomew, Sr. and John Bartholomew Jr., mapmakers * John Begg, architect * Alexander Montgomerie Bell, lawyer * Henry McGrady Bell (1880–1958) traveller, diplomat and author * Sir Robert Duncan Bell (1878–1935) senior civil servant in the Indian Raj * George Bertram, engineer and paper-maker * Benjamin Blyth, engineer * Robert Henry Bow FRSE (1827–1909) photographic pioneer and civil engineer * Faculty of Actuaries, Hugh Wylie Brown FRSE, actuary * John Brown (moderator), Very Rev John Brown, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in 1916 (his memorial also marks 4 sons lost in WWI) * George Washington Browne, architect * Viscount Bryce, politician * James Bryce (geologist) and his son John Annan Bryce, MP for Inverness Burghs (UK Parliament constituency), Inverness Burghs * William Moir Bryce LLD (1842–1919) antiquarian * James Buchanan (minister), Rev James Buchanan * Thomas Burns (minister, born 1853), Rev Dr Thomas Burns (1853-1938) founder of the Thomas Burns Homes * Sir John Alexander Calder * Edward Calvert (architect) * Hugh Cameron (artist), Hugh Cameron RSA (1835-1918) artist * James Roderick Johnston Cameron, author, President of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh * Rev W. J. Cameron (d.1990) twice Moderator of the General Assembly to the Free Church of Scotland * Dr John Henry Campbell, monument by John Hutchison (sculptor), John Hutchison RSA * John Irvine Carswell FRSE engineer * Thomas Chalmers, Dr Thomas Chalmers * Elizabeth Chantrelle (nee Dyer) murdered by her husband Eugene Chantrelle * Dugald Christie (missionary) * Very Rev Dr Patrick Clason (1789–1867) Moderator of the General Assembly of the Free Church of Scotland 1848/49 * Rev Prof G. N. M. Collins twice Moderator of the General Assembly of the Free Church of Scotland * Robin Cook * Prof W. M. Court-Brown (1918–1968) radiologist and medical author * Alexander Cowan papermaker and philanthropist, with his son James Cowan (Scottish politician), James, Lord Provost of Edinburgh and MP for Edinburgh * Jown Cowan (steel merchant), Sir John Cowan LLD (1844-1929) steel merchant and his son Andrew Wallace Cowan FRSA and missionary daughter Agnes Marshall Cowan holder of the first Scottish female professorship * Robert Cranston (Scottish politician), Sir Robert Cranston * Rear Admiral Octavius Cumberland (1813–1877) * William Cunningham (theologian), Rev Prof William Cunningham * Walter Scott Dalgleish (1834–1897) author * Prof Andrew B. Davidson * William Soltau Davidson (1846–1924) pioneer of refrigerated shipping * Lt Col Lewis Merson Davies, geologist and anti-evolutionist * Lauder baronets, The Dick Lauder baronets * William Kirk Dickson and his son, Rear Admiral Robert Kirk Dickson * Alexander Graham Donald FRSE FSA FFA (d.1941) actuary * Greta Douglas (1891–1982) artist * Morrell Draper FRSE, Australian born toxicologist *Rev Dr Robert James Drummond, Moderator of the General Assembly of the UF Church in 1918 * Rev Alexander Duff (missionary) * Rev Prof John Duncan (theologian) * Rev Patrick Fairbairn * Prof Kenneth Fearon (1960–2016) cancer specialist * Prof Robert McNair Ferguson LLD (1829–1912) mathematician * Thomas Finlayson (Presbyterian minister), Rev Thomas Finlayson * Robert Flockhart (1778–1857) street preacher * Rev William Galbraith (mathematician) * Rev James Gall astronomer and founder of Carrubbers Close Mission * William Galloway (architectural historian) (1830–897) early conservation architect and historian * Dr Jessie Gellatly MD (1882-1935) one of Britain's first female doctors * Archibald Goldie (meteorologist), Archibald H. R. Goldie, FRSE, meteorologist * Giles Gordon, Giles Alexander Esme Gordon * James Gowans (architect), Sir James Gowans (memorial of his own design) * General James Hope Grant * Alan William Greenwood FRSE, zoologist * David Grieve FRSE Royal Physical Society of Edinburgh, PRPSE, geologist * Edward Graham Guest (d. 1962) of McVitie's, McVities Guest * John William Gulland MP and his nephew, John Masson Gulland Royal Society of London, FRS FRSE, chemist * William Maxwell Gunn LLD (1795–1851) author * Dr Thomas Guthrie * Robert Halliday Gunning, surgeon and philanthropist * Henry Haig (engraver) (1795–1848) * William Hanna (minister), Rev William Hanna (1808–1882) * Canon Edward Joseph Hannan, co-founder of Hibernian Football Club * Admiral John Hay (1804–1899) * George Henderson (architect) (1846–1905) * John Henderson (architect) (1804–1862) * Prof William Henderson (physician and homeopath) * Robert Herdman (artist), Robert Herdman RSA, Victorian artist * Rev William Maxwell Hetherington (stone carved by John Rhind (sculptor), John Rhind) * William Ballantyne Hodgson * William Hole (artist)... (buried in the ground of James Lindsay WS) * The Home baronets, John (1872–1938, 12th Baronet of Blackadder) and David George (1904–1992, 13th Baronet of Blackadder) * John Hutchison (sculptor) * Lady Isabel Emslie Hutton (1887–1960) physician * Prof Ainsley Iggo FRS (1924–2012) * David Irving (librarian) * James Jamieson (dentist) FRSE * Alexander Keith Johnston (1804–1871) geographer (also memorialising his son of the same name, an African explorer). * Christian Isobel Johnstone (1781–1857) author, journalist and feminist * General Sir Gordon Jolly (soldier), Gordon Jolly KCIE (1886–1962) * Prof Arthur Berriedale Keith * David Kennedy (singer), David Kennedy (1825–1886) Scottish singer (subject of a monument at the foot of Calton Hill) plus his daughter Marjory Kennedy-Fraser * Major Allan Ker Victoria Cross, VC (1883–1958) WW1 Victoria Cross recipient (memorialised on grave of Robert Darling Ker WS) * William Joseph Kinloch-Anderson (1846–1901) founder of the kilt-making company which bears his name * John Kinross (architect) * Thomas Knox (1818–1879) bronze portrait by Alexander Rhind (sculptor), Alexander Rhind *
Thomas Dick Lauder Sir Thomas Dick Lauder of Fountainhall, 7th Baronet, FRSE FSA(Scot) LLD (13 August 178429 May 1848) was a Scottish author. He served as Secretary to the Board of Manufactures (1839–), on the Herring Fisheries Board, at the Royal Institution f ...
, author and landowner * Prof Simon Somerville Laurie, educator * Robert Lawson (physician) FRSE (1846–1896) * Robert Lee (minister), Rev Prof Robert Lee DD FRSE theologian (sculpted by John Hutchison (sculptor), John Hutchison) * William Lennie (1779–1852) grammarian * Rev Mary Levison DD (1923-2011) (nee Mary Irene Lusk), first ordained female minister in the Church of Scotland * Prof David Liston * David Fowler Lowe FRSE LLD (1843-1924, Headmaster of George Heriot's School * Lt David Lyell, Royal Scots (d. 1915) survivor of the Quintinshill rail disaster, Gretna Rail Disaster who was killed two months later at Gallipoli (memorial only) * Major General William McBean Victoria Cross, VC (1818-1878) winner of the Victoria Cross at the Siege of Lucknow * Sir George McCrae (politician) (1860–1928) * Very Rev William J. G. McDonald (1924–2015) Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in 1989, presenter on radio's ''Thought for the Day'' * James MacGregor (moderator), Very Rev James MacGregor DD (1834–1910) Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland 1891 * Very Rev Mackintosh MacKay (1793–1873) Moderator of the General Assembly of the Free Church of Scotland (1843–1900), Free Church of Scotland in 1849 (memorial only - buried in Duddingston Kirkyard) * Lieutenant General Colin Mackenzie (Indian Army officer), Colin Mackenzie, (1806–1881), Scottish officer in the Indian Army * Paul MacKenzie (physician) (1919–2015) soldier and sportsman * James MacKillop, MP * Meta Maclean, author * John Macleod (theologian) * Charles Maclaren, founder and editor of the Scotsman newspaper * Very Rev Thomas McLauchlan (1815–1886) Moderator of the General Assembly of the church of Scotland in 1876 * Hector C. Macpherson FRSE author and journalist * Alexander Ramsay-Gibson-Maitland, Sir Alexander Charles Gibson Maitland * Charles Alexander Malcolm, historian and author * William Manson (theologian), Rev Prof William Manson, theologian * Hugh Marshall FRS FRSE (1868–1913) chemist * Hugh Martin (Scottish minister), Rev Dr Hugh Martin, theologian * David Masson historian and his daughters Rosaline Masson and Flora Masson * David Mekie (geographer), David Mekie and his son, Prof D. E. C. Mekie OBE FRSE surgeon * Memorial to Wiliam Babington Melville, killed in the Anglo-Manipur War, Manipur Massacre of 1891 *Duncan Menzies (architect), Duncan Menzies (1837–1910) architect and engineer * John Millar, Lord Craighill (1817–1888) *
Hugh Miller Hugh Miller (10 October 1802 – 23/24 December 1856) was a self-taught Scottish geologist and writer, folklorist and an evangelical Christian. Life and work Miller was born in Cromarty, the first of three children of Harriet Wright (''b ...

Hugh Miller
(pioneer geologist) and his son Hugh Miller the younger, Hugh Miller FRSE * James Miller (surgeon), Prof James Miller FRSE (1812–1864) * Rev Dr William Milligan (1821–1893) * Sir Henry Moncrieff, 2nd Baron Moncrieff, with a sculpture of his wife "Minna" on the stone * Robert Morham, architect * John Muir (indologist) * Sir Andrew Mure (1826–1909) judge * Duncan Napier, herbalist * James Napier (chemist) * Thomas Nelson (publisher) and his son Thomas Nelson (1822-1892) * John Pringle Nichol, astronomer, and his wife Elizabeth Pease Nichol * Rev Dr Maxwell Nicholson DD, author, minister of Tron Kirk and then St Stephen's * Prof James Nicol, geologist * Very Rev Prof Thomas Nicol DD, theological author, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland 1914 * Frederick Niecks, musical scholar * John Nisbet, artist, with his 3 wives * Pollock Sinclair Nisbet, artist * Robert Buchan Nisbet, artist * Rev Prof John Cochrane O'Neill (1930–2003) theological author * Thomas Oliver, co-founder of Oliver & Boyd *Emily Rosaline Orme (1835–1915) * George Ann Panton FRSE (1842–1903), actuary, botanist and geologist, Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh * Sir Edward Parrott politician * Robert Paterson (Scottish architect), Robert Paterson (1825–1889) architect * Waller Hugh Paton RSA, artist * Very Rev David Paul (minister), David Paul DD LLD FLS, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in 1915 * Very Rev Adam Philip Moderator of the General Assembly of the United Free Church of Scotland in 1921. * Sir Robert William Philip, pioneer of tuberculosis * Very Rev K. M. Phin (1816–1888) Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland 1877 * James Ramage (artist) (1824–1887) * James Reed (engineer), James Reed FRSE engineer * Very Rev George T. H. Reid Military Cross, MC DD (1910–1990) Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in 1973 * Rev Prof A. M. Renwick, Alexander Macdonald Renwick DD, theological author, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Free Church of Scotland in 1931 * John Thomas Rochead, architect of the Wallace Monument *Charles Rogers (author), Rev Dr Charles Rogers DD LLD, minister and author * Rose baronets, Sir Hugh Arthur Rose and his son, Sir Hugh Rose (owners of Rose's lime juice) *Lt Gen James Kerr Ross (1792–1872) wounded at the Battle of Waterloo * Frederick Schenck, lithographer * Dr Robert Edmund Scoresby-Jackson FRSE physician and biographer * Sir Thomas Drummond Shiels MP * Sir Alexander Russell Simpson and his sons, Prof James Young Simpson (scientist) and Dr George Freeland Barbour Simpson * Dr David Skae (1814–1873) psychiatrist * Sir William Lowrie Sleigh, Lord Provost of Edinburgh 1923–6 * Prof George Smeaton (theologian), George Smeaton * George Smith (1833-1919) colonial educator and writer on Indian matters * George Smith (Scottish artist), George Smith Royal Scottish Academy, RSA (1870-1934) artist * Thomas Smith (missionary), Very Rev Prof Thomas Smith (1817–1906) missionary, mathematician, Moderator of the Free Church 1891/92 * James Spence (surgeon), Dr James Spence (1812–1882) President of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh * Robert Cunningham Graham Spiers FRSE (1797–1847) Sheriff of Edinburgh (on the grave he is called "Graham Speirs") * The sculptor brothers David Watson Stevenson and William Grant Stevenson buried together * Norman Stevenson, Dr Norman Lang Stevenson (1875–1967) cricketer and 1908 Olympic Bronze Medallist for Scotland at field hockey * Jane Taylor and her daughter Mary Jane Pritchard, both poisoned in 1865 by Edward William Pritchard * Rev William King Tweedie DD (1803-1864) religious author and his son, Major General William Tweedie of the Sepoy mutiny * James Thin (1824-1915) founder of a renowned Edinburgh bookshop * Surgeon Major General Peter Stephenson Turnbull (1836–1921) * Andrew Usher * Usher baronets, Sir John Usher, Baronet * Major General Thomas Valiant (1784–1845) (memorial only) * Cecil Voge FRSE (1898–1978) chemist * Baron Bruntisfield, Sir George Warrender of Lochend, 6th Baronet (after whom the Warrender section of Marchmont is named) * George Mackie Watson (1860–1948) architect * Rev Robert Boog Watson (1823–1910), scientist * David Monro Westland, architect/engineer (creator of the North Bridge) * Prof Charles Richard Whittaker FRSE (1879–1967) anatomist * Dr Dionysius Wielobycki (1813–1882) early Homeopathy, homeopathic doctor * Harry Martin Willsher, author * Robert Wilson (architect), Robert Wilson architect of the Edinburgh Board Schools * Robert Wilson (1871–1928) editor of the Edinburgh Evening News and donor of the Wilson Cup (football), Wilson Cup * Sir James Lawton Wingate (artist) * Sir Alexander Kemp Wright (1859–1933), banker co-founder of the National Savings movement * Prof David F. Wright (1937–2008), historian * Robert Stodart Wyld LLD (1808–1893) historian * Robert Young (biblical scholar) There are war graves of 40 Commonwealth service personnel of both World Wars and a communal grave for the nuns of St Margaret's Convent.


Notable residents

Residents of the suburb have included the author J.K. Rowling and the former Chief executive officer, CEO of The Royal Bank of Scotland, RBS, Fred Goodwin. Goodwin relocated from The Grange after the vandalism to which his property there was subjected but has since returned after his wife's throwing him out of their family home in Colinton due to revelations of his marital infidelity. Oil tycoon Sir Bill Gammell, an old school friend of Tony Blair and who had George W Bush as a wedding guest, purchased property in The Grange. Other notable residents of The Grange include writers Alexander McCall Smith, Ian Rankin, and D. M. Macalister (1832–1909) who was a renowned minister of the Free Church of Scotland and served as Moderator of the General Assembly in 1902/03. In 1900 he was living at 32 Mansionhouse Road. Max Born, Nobel Laureate and former Tait Professor of Natural Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh lived at 84 Grange Loan. Born came to Edinburgh in 1936. He stayed until his retirement in 1952. He is recognised as one of the founders of the field of quantum mechanics. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1954 for fundamental research in quantum mechanics. Marc-André Raffalovich (11 September 1864 – 14 February 1934) was a wealthy French poet, writer and defender of homosexuality, best known today for his patronage of the arts and for his lifelong relationship with the poet John Gray (poet), John Gray. Raffalovich lived at 9 Whitehouse Terrace, and his most important supporter and romantic partner John Gray (poet), John Gray also lived nearby. The two remained together until Raffalovich's sudden death in 1934. A devastated Gray died exactly four months later. Raffalovich's exposition of the view that a homosexual orientation is both natural and morally neutral was a notable contribution to the late 19th century literature on the subject. Francis H. Underwood was an American editor and writer. He was the founder and first associate editor of The Atlantic Monthly in 1857 while still working as a publisher's assistant. He lived at 35 Mansionhouse Road. William Henry Goold (15 December 1815 – 29 June 1897) was a Scottish minister of both the Reformed Presbyterian Church and the Free Church of Scotland who served as Moderator of the General Assembly of the Free Church 1877/78. He lived at 28 Mansionhouse Road. David Patrick (writer) FRSE LLD (1849[1] – 22 March 1914) was a Scottish writer and editor. He edited Chambers's Encyclopaedia from 1888 to 1892,[1] Chambers's Biographical Dictionary in 1897 and Chambers's Cyclopaedia of English Literature with F. H. Groome from 1901 to 1903. He lived at 20 Mansionhouse Road. George Smeaton (theologian), George Smeaton (1814–1889) was a 19th-century Scottish theologian and Greek scholar. He lived at 13 South Mansionhouse Road. John Duns (minister) FRSE (1820–1909) was Professor of Natural Science at New College, Edinburgh. He was a prolific author on both scientific and religious topics. He lived at 4 North Mansionhouse Road. Thomas Smith (missionary) (8 July 1817 – 26 May 1906) was a Scottish missionary and mathematician who was instrumental in establishing India's zenana missions in 1854. He served as Moderator of the General Assembly of the Free Church of Scotland 1891/92. He lived at 10 Mansionhouse Road. Frederick Hallard FRSE PRSSA (11 May 1821 – 12 January 1882) was a Scottish advocate and legal author. He served as senior Sheriff-Substitute for Midlothian 1855 to 1882 and was Director of the Edinburgh Philosophical Institution and President of the Royal Scottish Society of Arts. He lived at 7 Whitehouse Terrace. Elizabeth Blackadder, Dame Elizabeth Blackadder (1931 – 2021), artist and printmaker, lived in Fountainhall Road with her husband John Houston (painter), John Houston from the 1950s until her death in 2021.


In popular culture

The Grange was also a principal filming location during the production of the BBC Three comedy-drama Pramface which starred Scarlett Alice Johnson and Sean Michael Verey in the lead roles. The Grange features extensively in the showpiece but is appropriated in order to pose as an upmarket North London suburb due to its appearance similarities for the sake of plot integration.


Notes


References

* Stewart-Smith, J; ''The Grange of St Giles'', Edinburgh, 1898, ''is possibly the best history of The Grange extant.''


External links


Bartholomew's ''Chronological map of Edinburgh'' (1919)Grange Association
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