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The Governor of Tennessee
Tennessee
is the head of government of the U.S. state of Tennessee. The governor is the only official in Tennessee
Tennessee
state government who is directly elected by the voters of the entire state. The current governor is Bill Haslam, a Republican. Haslam won election in November 2010 and took office on January 15, 2011.

Contents

1 Qualifications 2 Powers and duties 3 Compensation 4 Line of succession 5 List of governors 6 References

Qualifications[edit] The Tennessee
Tennessee
Constitution provides that the governor must be at least 30 years old and must have lived in the state for at least seven years before being elected to the office. The governor is elected to a four-year term and may serve no more than two terms consecutively.[2] The governor is the only official of the Tennessee
Tennessee
state government who is directly elected by the voters of the State of Tennessee. Judges on several state courts also appear on statewide ballots, but in accordance with the Tennessee
Tennessee
Plan they are subject to votes only on their retention in office.</ref> There are only two other U.S. states, New Jersey and Hawaii, where the governor is the only state official to be elected statewide.[3] Powers and duties[edit] The Tennessee
Tennessee
Constitution provides that “The supreme executive power of this state shall be vested in a governor.”[4] Most state department heads and some members of boards and commissions are appointed by the governor.[4] The governor is the commander-in-chief of the state's army and navy and the state militia, except when they have been called up into federal service.[5] The governor chairs the Tennessee
Tennessee
Board of Regents and the University of Tennessee
Tennessee
Board of Trustees and holds seats on the State Funding Board, State Building Commission, Board of Equalization, Tennessee
Tennessee
Local Development Authority, School Bond Authority, and Tennessee
Tennessee
Industrial and Agricultural Development Commission.[4] The Tennessee
Tennessee
governor can veto laws passed by the Tennessee
Tennessee
General Assembly and has line-item veto authority for individual spending items included in bills passed by the legislature. In either situation, the governor's veto can be overridden by a simple majority of both houses of the legislature. If a governor exercises the veto authority after the legislature has adjourned, the veto stands.[2] It is uncommon for Tennessee
Tennessee
governors to use their veto power, probably because it is so easy for the General Assembly to override a veto.[6] The state constitution empowers the governor to call the General Assembly into special session, with the subjects to be considered limited to matters specified in the call.[2] Compensation[edit] As of 2010[update], the governor's salary was set at $170,340 per year. This is the ninth highest U.S. gubernatorial salary.[7] Haslam and his predecessor, Phil Bredesen, both were independently wealthy before taking office and refused to accept state salaries for their service as governor.[7][8] Line of succession[edit] Further information: Lieutenant Governor of Tennessee Tennessee
Tennessee
does not elect a lieutenant governor. If a vacancy occurs in the office of governor due to the governor's death, removal, or resignation from office, the Tennessee
Tennessee
Constitution provides for the Speaker of the Tennessee
Tennessee
Senate to become governor.[2][4] Because this has the effect of making the speaker the lieutenant governor, the speaker is often referred to by the title "lieutenant governor." and was also granted this title by statute in 1951.[2] Following the lieutenant governor/senate speaker in the line of succession are the speaker of the Tennessee
Tennessee
House of Representatives, the secretary of state, and the comptroller.[4] List of governors[edit] Further information: List of Governors of Tennessee Governor William Blount
William Blount
served from 1790 to 1796, when Tennessee
Tennessee
was known as the Southwest Territory. He was replaced by John Sevier, the state's first governor. Other notable governors include Willie Blount (William's half-brother), Sam Houston
Sam Houston
(better known for his role as the President of the Republic of Texas), and future U.S Presidents James K. Polk
James K. Polk
and Andrew Johnson.

Tennessee
Tennessee
portal

References[edit]

^ "CSG Releases 2013 Governor Salaries" (Press release). Council of State Governments. June 25, 2013. Retrieved November 23, 2014.  ^ a b c d e Lyons, William; Scheb, John M.; Stair, Billy (2001). Government and Politics in Tennessee. University of Tennessee
Tennessee
Press. pp. 48–49. ISBN 978-1-57233-141-9.  ^ Goodman, Josh (January 6, 2009). "Why Everyone Is Running for Governor of Tennessee". Governing.com. . Judges on several state courts also appear on statewide ballots, but in accordance with the Tennessee
Tennessee
Plan they are subject to votes only on their retention in office. ^ a b c d e "Office of the Governor" (PDF). Tennessee
Tennessee
Blue Book 2009-2010. pp. 123–125.  ^ Lester, Connie L. " Tennessee
Tennessee
Governor's Office". Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture.  ^ Sisk, Chas (May 3, 2012). "Gov. Bill Haslam
Bill Haslam
Uses First Veto on Vanderbilt's 'All-Comers' Bill". The Tennessean. [dead link] ^ a b "The Governors: Compensation, Staff, Travel and Residence (Table 4.3)" (PDF). The Book of the States 2010. Council of State Governments. pp. 199–200.  ^ " Tennessee
Tennessee
Gov. Haslam Exempts Himself and Top Staff from Financial Disclosure". AllGov.com. January 20, 2011. 

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Governors of Tennessee

Sevier Roane Sevier Blount McMinn Carroll Houston Hall Carroll Cannon Polk Jones A. Brown N. Brown Trousdale Campbell Johnson Harris Johnson East Brownlow Senter J. Brown Porter Marks Hawkins Bate R. Taylor Buchanan Turney R. Taylor McMillin Frazier Cox Patterson Hooper Rye Roberts A. Taylor Peay Horton McAlister Browning Cooper McCord Browning Clement Ellington Clement Ellington Dunn Blanton Alexander McWherter Sundquist Bredesen Haslam

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Officers of the State of Tennessee

Executive offices

Governor Lieutenant Governor

Legislative offices

Speaker of the Senate Speaker of the House of Representatives Secretary of State State Treasurer State Comptroller

Judicial offices

Tennessee
Tennessee
Supreme Court Attorney General

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 State of Tennessee

Nashville (capital)

Topics

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Constitution Elections Governors Lieutenant Governors General Assembly Supreme Court Tennessee
Tennessee
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Seal of Tennessee

Grand Divisions

East Tennessee Middle Tennessee West Tennessee

Regions

Blue Ridge Mountains Cumberland Mountains Cumberland Plateau Highland Rim Mississippi Plain Nashville Basin Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians Tennessee
Tennessee
Valley Tri-Cities

Largest cities

Bartlett Bristol Chattanooga Clarksville Cleveland Franklin Hendersonville Jackson Johnson City Kingsport Knoxville Memphis Murfreesboro Nashville

Counties

Anderson Bedford Benton Bledsoe Blount Bradley Campbell Cannon Carroll Carter Cheatham Chester Claiborne Clay Cocke Coffee Crockett Cumberland Davidson Decatur DeKalb Dickson Dyer Fayette Fentress Franklin Gibson Giles Grainger Greene Grundy Hamblen Hamilton Hancock Hardeman Hardin Hawkins Haywood Henderson Henry Hickman Houston Humphreys Jackson Jefferson Johnson Knox Lake Lauderdale Lawrence Lewis Lincoln Loudon Macon Madison Marion Marshall Maury McMinn McNairy Meigs Monroe Montgomery Moore Morgan Obion Overton Perry Pickett Polk Putnam Rhea Roane Robertson Rutherford Scott Sequatchie Sevier Shelby Smith Stewart Sullivan Sumner Tipton Trousdale Unicoi Union Van Buren Warren Washington Wayne Weakley White

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