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History

The force was founded in 1839, six hours after Wiltshire Constabulary, making it the second rural police force formed in Britain.[6] The force in its present form dates from 1 April 1974, when the southern part of Gloucestershire became part of the County of Avon and thus covered by the newly formed Avon and Somerset Constabulary.[4]

In 1965, the force had an establishment of 1,010 and an actual strength of 867.[7]

Between 2010 and 2019, the force lost 238 officers due to Government budget cuts.[8]

From 2013 to 2019, specialist teams – roads, firearms and police dogs – operated in a "tri-force" collaboration with the Avon and Somerset, and Wiltshire forces.[9] In April 2019, this arrangement was ended by the PCC for Gloucestershire, Martin Surl, following Avon and Somerset Police withdrawing from the alliance.[10]

In 2019, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services rated the force as 'inadequate' for crime reporting arrangements, after finding that over 7,900 incidents of crime in the county per year, and only 69.2% of violent crimes were recorded accurately.[11][12] The inspection also found

The force formally covered the area of South Gloucestershire, however this was transformed to the newly-formed Avon and Somerset Constabulary in 1974.[4]

The force covers an area of around 1,025 square miles (2,650 km2) and a population of 605,000, and covers a number of Royal Residences, as well as Cheltenham Racecourse and the headquarters of GCHQ.[5]

As of August 2020, the force consisted of 1,176 Police officers, 100 Police Community Support Officers, 113 Special constables and 358 Police Support Volunteers.[2]

The force was founded in 1839, six hours after Wiltshire Constabulary, making it the second rural police force formed in Britain.[6] The force in its present form dates from 1 April 1974, when the southern part of Gloucestershire became part of the County of Avon and thus covered by the newly formed Avon and Somerset Constabulary.[4]

In 1965, the force had an establishment of 1,010 and an actual strength of 867.[7]

Between 2010 and 2019, the force lost 238 officers due to Government budget cuts.[8]

From 2013 to 2019, specialist teams – roads, firearms and police dogs – operated in a "tri-force" collaboration with the Avon and Somerset, and Wiltshire forces.[9] In April 2019, this arrangement was ended by the PCC for Gloucestershire, Martin Surl, following Avon and Somerset Police withdrawing from the alliance.[10]

In 2019, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services rated the force as 'inadequate' for crime reporting arrangements, after finding that over 7,900 incidents of crime in the county per year, and only 69.2% of violent crimes were recorded accurately.[11][12] The inspection also found 38% of victims were not informed when crime reports were cancelled.[13]

In 2020, the force opened a new £6.8 million police academy, the Sabrina Centre, on the grounds of the former [7]

Between 2010 and 2019, the force lost 238 officers due to Government budget cuts.[8]

From 2013 to 2019, specialist teams – roads, firearms and police dogs – operated in a "tri-force" collaboration with the Avon and Somerset, and Wiltshire forces.[9] In April 2019, this arrangement was ended by the PCC for Gloucestershire, Martin Surl, following Avon and Somerset Police withdrawing from the alliance.[10]

In 2019, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services rated the force as 'inadequate' for crime reporting arrangements, after finding that over 7,900 incidents of crime in the county per year, and only 69.2% of violent crimes were recorded accurately.[11][12] The inspection also found 38% of victims were not informed when crime reports were cancelled.[13]

In 2020, the force opened a new £6.8 million police academy, the Sabrina Centre, on the grounds of the former Berkeley Nuclear Power Station.[8][14] This coincided with the force offering new Police Constable Degree Apprenticeships in partnership with the University of South Wales.[14]

Day-to-day policing in the county is split into 55 local communities, organised by 3 Local Policing Areas each overseen by a superintendent: Cheltenham and Tewkesbury, Gloucester and the Forest of Dean, and Cotswolds and Stroud.[15] Each of these areas contains a Local Policing Team, providing an initial response to incidents, as well as a Neighbourhood Policing Team, which manage local concerns.[15][16]

Special Constabulary