HOME
        TheInfoList






Geospatial metadata (also geographic metadata) is a type of metadata applicable to geographic data and information. Such objects may be stored in a geographic information system (GIS) or may simply be documents, data-sets, images or other objects, services, or related items that exist in some other native environment but whose features may be appropriate to describe in a (geographic) metadata catalog (may also be known as a data directory or data inventory).

Definition

ISO 19115:2013 "Geographic Information – Metadata"[1] from ISO/TC 211, the industry standard for geospatial metadata, describes its scope as follows:

[This standard] provides information about the identification, the extent, the quality, the spatial and temporal aspects, the content, the spatial reference, the portrayal, distribution, and other properties of digital geographic data and services.[1]

ISO 19115:2013 also provides for non-digital mediums:

Though this part of ISO 19115 is applicable to digital data and services, its principles can be extended to many other types of resources such as maps, charts, and textual documents as well as non-geographic data.[1]

The U.S. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) describes geospatial metadata as follows:

A metadata record is a file of information, usually presented as an XML document, which captures the basic characteristics of a data or information resource. It represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the resource. Geospatial metadata commonly document geographic digital data such as Geographic Information System (GIS) files, geospatial databases, and earth imagery but can also be used to document geospatial resources including data catalogs, mapping applications, data models and related websites. Metadata records include core library catalog elements such as Title, Abstract, and Publication Data; geographic elements such as Geographic Extent and Projection Information; and database elements such as Attribute Label Definitions and Attribute Domain Values.[2]

History

The growing appreciation of the value of geospatial metadata through the 1980s and 1990s led to the development of a number of initiatives to collect metadata according to a variety of formats either within agencies, communities of practice, or countries/groups of countries. For example, NASA's "DIF" metadata format was developed during an Earth Science and Applications Data Systems Workshop in 1987,[3] and formally approved for adoption in 1988. Similarly, the U.S. FGDC developed its geospatial metadata standard over the period 1992–1994.[4] The Spatial Information Council of Australia and New Zealand (ANZLIC),[5] a combined body representing spatial data interests in Australia and New Zealand, released version 1 of its "metadata guidelines" in 1996.[6] ISO/TC 211 undertook the task of harmonizing the range of formal and de facto standards over the approximate period 1999–2002, resulting in the release of ISO 19115 "Geographic Information – Metadata" in 2003 and a subseq

ISO 19115:2013 "Geographic Information – Metadata"[1] from ISO/TC 211, the industry standard for geospatial metadata, describes its scope as follows:

[This standard] provides information about the identification, the extent, the quality, the spatial and temporal aspects, the content, the spatial reference, the portrayal, distribution, and other properties of digital geographic data and services.[1]

ISO 19115:2013 also provides for non-digital mediums:

Though this part of ISO 19115 is applicable to digital data and services, its principles can be extended to many other types of resources such as maps, charts, and textual documents as well as non-geographic data.[1]

The U.S. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) describes geospatial metadata as follows:

A metadata record is a file of information, usually presented as an XML document, which captures the basic characteristics of a data or information resource. It represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the resource. Geospatial metadata commonly document geographic digital data such as Geographic Information System (GIS) files, geospatial databases, and earth imagery but can also be used to document geospatial resources including data catalogs, mapping applications, data models and related websites. Metadata records include core library catalog elements such a

[This standard] provides information about the identification, the extent, the quality, the spatial and temporal aspects, the content, the spatial reference, the portrayal, distribution, and other properties of digital geographic data and services.[1]

ISO 19115:2013 also provides for non-digital mediums:

Though this part of Though this part of ISO 19115 is applicable to digital data and services, its principles can be extended to many other types of resources such as maps, charts, and textual documents as well as non-geographic data.[1]

The U.S. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) describes geospatial metadata as follows: The U.S. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) describes geospatial metadata as follows:

[2]

History