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The George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum, the world's oldest museum dedicated to photography[3][4] and one of the world's oldest film archives, opened to the public in 1949 in Rochester, New York. World-renowned for its collections in the fields of photography and cinema, the museum is also a leader in film preservation and photograph conservation, educating archivists and conservators from around the world. Home to the 500-seat Dryden Theatre, the museum is located on the estate of entrepreneur and philanthropist George Eastman, the founder of Eastman Kodak
Eastman Kodak
Company. The estate was designated a National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
in 1966.

Contents

1 History 2 Governance

2.1 Directors 2.2 Board of Trustees 2.3 Finances

3 Collections

3.1 Photography
Photography
collection 3.2 Moving image collection 3.3 George Eastman
George Eastman
Legacy Collection

4 George Eastman
George Eastman
Awards 5 George Eastman's Estate 6 References 7 External links

7.1 Official websites 7.2 Guides

History[edit]

Interior

The Rochester estate of George Eastman
George Eastman
(1854–1932) was bequeathed upon his death to the University of Rochester. University presidents (first Benjamin Rush Rhees, then Alan Valentine) occupied Eastman's mansion as a residence for ten years.[5] In 1948, the university transferred the property to the museum and the Georgian Revival Style mansion was adapted to serve the museum's operations.[3] George Eastman
George Eastman
House was chartered as a museum in 1947.[6] From the outset, the museum's mission has been to collect, preserve, and present the history of photography and film. The museum opened its doors on November 9, 1949, displaying its core collections in the former public rooms of Eastman's house. In October 2015, the museum changed its name from George Eastman
George Eastman
House to the George Eastman Museum.[7] The museum's original collections included the Medicus collection of Civil War photographs by Alexander Gardner, Eastman Kodak
Eastman Kodak
Company's historical collection, and the massive Gabriel Cromer collection of nineteenth-century French photography. The Eastman Museum
Museum
has received donations of entire archives, corporate and individual collections, and the estates of leading photographers, as well as thousands of motion pictures and massive holdings of cinematic ephemera. By 1984, the museum's holdings were considered by many to be among the world's finest, but with the collections growing at a rapid pace, the museum was increasingly burdened by its own success. Additional space became critical to store and study the increasing number of collected objects. The museum's expansion facility opened to the public in January 1989.[8] In 1999, the George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum
Museum
launched the Mellon Advanced Residency Program in Photograph
Photograph
Conservation, made possible with grant support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The program trained top photograph archivists and conservators from around the world. In 1996, the museum opened the Louis B. Mayer Conservation Center in nearby Chili, New York. One of only four film conservation centers in the United States (as of March 2006), the facility houses the museum's rare 35 mm
35 mm
prints made on cellulose nitrate. That same year, the Eastman House launched the first school of film preservation in the United States to teach restoration, preservation, and archiving of motion pictures. The L. Jeffrey Selznick School of Film
Film
Preservation was founded with support from The Louis B. Mayer Foundation. George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum
Museum
has organized numerous groundbreaking exhibitions, including New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape in 1975. Governance[edit] Directors[edit] The current director of the George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum
Museum
is Bruce Barnes who was appointed in September 2012.[9]

Directors of George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum[10]

Name Tenure

Oscar N. Solbert 1947–1958

Beaumont Newhall 1958–1971

Van Deren Coke 1971–1972

Robert J. Doherty 1972–1981

Robert A. Mayer 1981–1989

James L. Enyeart 1989–1995

Anthony Bannon 1996–2012

Bruce Barnes 2012–present

Board of Trustees[edit] The George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum
Museum
is headed by a board of trustees. Kevin Gavagan is the current chair of board. Finances[edit] The George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum's annual budget is approximately $10 million. As of December 2014, its endowment exceeded $35 million. Collections[edit] The museum's holdings comprise more than 400,000 photographs and negatives dating from the invention of photography to the present day; 28,000 motion picture films; three million other cinematic objects, including letters, scripts, musical scores, lobby cards, posters, film stills, and celebrity portraits; more than 16,000 objects of photographic and cinematographic technology; an internationally renowned research collection of books, periodicals, and other materials on photography and moving images; and George Eastman's home furnishings and decorative arts, personal and business correspondence, private library, photographs, negatives, films, and related personal items. Photography
Photography
collection[edit]

"A&P, COFFEE, SANTA CLAUS", 1958, photograph by Nickolas Muray

The photography collection embraces numerous landmark processes, objects of great rarity, and monuments of art history that trace the evolution of the medium as a technology, as a means of scientific and historical documentation, and as one of the most potent and accessible means of personal expression of the modern era. More than 14,000 photographers are represented in the collection, including virtually all the major figures in the history of the medium. The collection includes original vintage works produced by nearly every process and printing medium employed. Notable holdings include:

One of the world's largest collection of daguerreotypes, including more than 1,000 by Southworth & Hawes A major collection of nineteenth-century photographs of the American West by photographers including Carleton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Timothy H. O'Sullivan, and William Henry Jackson A major collection of ca. 1890s–1910s glass negatives from French photojournalist Charles Chusseau-Flaviens The photographic estates of Lewis Hine, Edward Steichen, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Nickolas Muray
Nickolas Muray
and Victor Keppler A major collection of Ansel Adams’ early and vintage prints

The museum's collection includes works by leading contemporary artists, including Andy Warhol, Candida Höfer, David Levinthal, Cindy Sherman, Adam Fuss, Vik Muniz, Gillian Wearing, Ori Gersht, Mickalene Thomas, Chris McCaw, and Matthew Brandt. Moving image collection[edit] The George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum
Museum
Motion Picture Collection is one of the major moving image archives in the United States. It was established in 1949 by the first curator of film, James Card (1915–2000) who helped to build the George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum
Museum
as a leading force in the field with holdings of over 25,000 titles and a collection of stills, posters and papers with over 3 million artifacts. The George Eastman Museum's collection includes the complete moving-image works of William Kentridge. George Eastman
George Eastman
Legacy Collection[edit] This collection includes George Eastman’s house and the George Eastman Archive and Study Center.[11] Opened in April 1999[12], the George Eastman
George Eastman
Archive and Study Center contains Eastman’s personal possessions and documents pertaining to Kodak’s early history.[13] It has over half a million items[11] within its climate controlled vault[12]. The archive is accessible from the second floor of the house.[12] Items within the house itself include fragments of Eastman’s coffin[14], a mounted elephant head[15], and an Aeolian pipe organ[16]. George Eastman
George Eastman
Awards[edit] The George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum
Museum
established the George Eastman
George Eastman
Award for distinguished contribution to the art of film in 1955 as the first award given by an American film archive and museum to honor artistic work of enduring value. George Eastman's Estate[edit] George Eastman
George Eastman
built his residence at 900 East Avenue between 1902 and 1905. He created a unique urban estate complete with 10.5 acres (42,000 m2) of working farm land, formal gardens, greenhouses, stables, barns, pastures, and a 35,000-square-foot (3,300 m2), 50-room Colonial Revival
Colonial Revival
mansion with a fireproof structure made of reinforced concrete. Eastman's house presented a neoclassical Georgian Revival facade of decorative craftsmanship. Beneath this exterior were such modern conveniences as an electrical generator, an internal telephone system with 21 stations, a built-in vacuum cleaning system, a central clock network, an elevator, and a great Aeolian pipe organ. Eastman used the house as a center of the city's rich musical life from 1905 until his death in 1932. The estate was declared a National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
in 1966.[2][17] References[edit]

^ National Park Service
National Park Service
(2007-01-23). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.  ^ a b " George Eastman
George Eastman
House". National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
summary listing. National Park Service. 2007-09-14. Archived from the original on 2009-05-22.  ^ a b "History of George Eastman
George Eastman
House". George Eastman
George Eastman
House website. Archived from the original on 2010-01-14. Retrieved 2010-01-27.  ^ Archives of American Art. "Oral history interview with Beaumont Newhall, 1965 Jan. 23". si.edu.  ^ Chao, Mary (November 22, 2010). "Historic houses are finding new lives in Rochester". Democrat and Chronicle. Rochester, New York. Gannett Company. pp. 1A, 4A. Archived from the original on November 22, 2010. Retrieved November 22, 2010.  ^ Newhall, Beaumont (September–December 1982). "The First Decade" (PDF). Image; Journal of Photography
Photography
and Motion Pictures of the International Museum
Museum
of Photography
Photography
at George Eastman
George Eastman
House (Vol. 25, No. 3–4). p. 3. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-25. Retrieved 2011-01-27.  ^ " George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum
Museum
Announces New Name George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum". Retrieved 2015-10-09.  ^ Quigley, Kathleen (1990-03-18). "Splendor Restored At Eastman House". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-10-25.  ^ Dougherty, Nate (2012-09-27). " George Eastman
George Eastman
House selects new director". Rochester Business Journal. Retrieved 2012-09-28.  ^ "IMAGE (1972. vol 15. issue 4.)". eastmanhouse.org. Archived from the original on 2011-07-25.  ^ a b "Who's behind the scenes at the Eastman House". Democrat and Chronicle. 18 Apr 1999.  ^ a b c Fennessy, Steve (28 Mar 1999). "When the archive opens, you, too, can poke through Eastman's possessions". Democrat and Chronicle.  ^ "Museums". Democrat and Chronicle. 1 May 2003.  ^ " George Eastman
George Eastman
House". Democrat and Chronicle. 27 Feb 2000.  ^ "The Museum
Museum
as Home". Democrat and Chronicle. 21 Jan 1990.  ^ Dobbin, Sean (5 May 2012). "Donation to Eastman to help restore organ". Democrat and Chronicle.  ^ Richard Greenwood (January 8, 1976). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: George Eastman
George Eastman
House" (pdf). National Park Service.  and Accompanying 2 photos, 1 exterior from 1905 and 1 interior from 1920. (518 KiB)

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to George Eastman
George Eastman
House.

Official websites[edit]

Official George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum
Museum
website Flickr.com: Eastman House

Guides[edit]

RocWiki.org: George Eastman
George Eastman
House article PBS.org: Virtual Tour of the George Eastman
George Eastman
House

Coordinates: 43°09′08″N 77°34′49″W / 43.152147°N 77.580278°W / 43.152147; -77.580278

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Directors of George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum

Oscar Solbert
Oscar Solbert
(1949) Beaumont Newhall (1958) Van Deren Coke (1971) Robert J. Doherty (1972) Robert A. Mayer (1981) James L. Enyeart (1989) Anthony Bannon
Anthony Bannon
(1996) Bruce Barnes (2012)

v t e

University of Rochester

Academics

College of Arts, Sciences, and Engineering Eastman School of Music Margaret Warner Graduate School of Education and Human Development School of Medicine and Dentistry School of Nursing Simon Business School The Institute of Optics

Campuses and locations

River Campus University of Rochester
University of Rochester
Medical Center Eastman Campus South Campus Rush Rhees Library Memorial Art Gallery George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum Eastman Theatre Sibley Music Library University of Rochester
University of Rochester
Arboretum Other Properties

Research facilities

C. E. K. Mees Observatory Laboratory for Laser Energetics University of Rochester
University of Rochester
Medical Center

v t e

Photography

Outline

Terminology

35 mm
35 mm
equivalent focal length Angle of view Aperture Black and white Chromatic aberration Circle of confusion Color
Color
balance Color
Color
temperature Depth of field Depth of focus Exposure Exposure compensation Exposure value Zebra patterning F-number Film
Film
format

Large Medium

Film
Film
speed Focal length Guide number Hyperfocal distance Metering mode Orb (optics) Perspective distortion Photograph Photographic printing Photographic processes Reciprocity Red-eye effect Science of photography Shutter speed Sync Zone System

Genres

Abstract Aerial Architectural Astrophotography Banquet Conceptual Conservation Cloudscape Documentary Ethnographic Erotic Fashion Fine-art Fire Forensic Glamour High-speed Landscape Lomography Nature Neues Sehen Nude Photojournalism Pornography Portrait Post-mortem Selfie Social documentary Sports Still life Stock Street Vernacular Underwater Wedding Wildlife

Techniques

Afocal Bokeh Brenizer Burst mode Contre-jour Cyanotype ETTR Fill flash Fireworks Harris shutter HDRI High-speed Holography Infrared Intentional camera movement Kirlian Kite aerial Long-exposure Macro Mordançage Multiple exposure Night Panning Panoramic Photogram Print toning Redscale Rephotography Rollout Scanography Schlieren photography Sabatier effect Stereoscopy Stopping down Strip

Slit-scan

Sun printing Tilt–shift

Miniature faking

Time-lapse Ultraviolet Vignetting Xerography

Composition

Diagonal method Framing Headroom Lead room Rule of thirds Simplicity Golden triangle (composition)

Equipment

Camera

light-field field instant pinhole press rangefinder SLR still TLR toy view

Darkroom

enlarger safelight

Film

base format holder stock

Filter Flash

beauty dish cucoloris gobo hood hot shoe monolight Reflector snoot Softbox

Lens

Wide-angle lens Zoom lens Telephoto lens

Manufacturers Monopod Movie projector Slide projector Tripod

head

Zone plate

History

Timeline of photography technology Analog photography Autochrome Lumière Box camera Calotype Camera
Camera
obscura Daguerreotype Dufaycolor Heliography Painted photography backdrops Photography
Photography
and the law Glass plate Visual arts

Digital photography

Digital camera

D-SLR

comparison

MILC camera back

Digiscoping Digital versus film photography Film
Film
scanner Image sensor

CMOS APS CCD Three-CCD camera Foveon X3 sensor

Image sharing Pixel

Color photography

Color Print film Reversal film Color
Color
management

color space primary color CMYK color model RGB color model

Photographic processing

Bleach bypass C-41 process Cross processing Developer Digital image processing Dye coupler E-6 process Fixer Gelatin silver process Gum printing Instant film K-14 process Print permanence Push processing Stop bath

Lists

Most expensive photographs Photographers

Norwegian Polish street women

 Category  Portal

v t e

U.S. National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
in New York

Topics

Contributing property Keeper of the Register Historic district History of the National Register of Historic Places National Park Service Property types

Lists by county

Albany Allegany Bronx Broome Cattaraugus Cayuga Chautauqua Chemung Chenango Clinton Columbia Cortland Delaware Dutchess Erie Essex Franklin Fulton Genesee Greene Hamilton Herkimer Jefferson Kings (Brooklyn) Lewis Livingston Madison Monroe Montgomery Nassau New York (Manhattan) Niagara Oneida Onondaga Ontario Orange Orleans Oswego Otsego Putnam Queens Rensselaer Richmond (Staten Island) Rockland Saratoga Schenectady Schoharie Schuyler Seneca St. Lawrence Steuben Suffolk Sullivan Tioga Tompkins Ulster Warren Washington Wayne Westchester

Northern Southern

Wyoming Yates

Lists by city

Albany Buffalo New Rochelle New York City

Bronx Brooklyn Queens Staten Island Manhattan

Below 14th St. 14th–59th St. 59th–110th St. Above 110th St. Minor islands

Niagara Falls Peekskill Poughkeepsie Rhinebeck Rochester Syracuse Yonkers

Other lists

Bridges and tunnels National Historic Landmarks

Category: National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
in New York (state) Portal:National Register of Historic Places

v t e

City of Rochester, New York

History - Nathaniel Rochester
Nathaniel Rochester
- Other notable residents - List of mayors

Transportation

Rochester-Genesee Regional Transportation Authority Greater Rochester International Airport Rochester Amtrak Station Erie Canal Douglass-Anthony Bridge Veterans Memorial Bridge Former

Rochester Subway

Aqueduct

Lehigh Valley Railroad Station Erie Railroad Depot Spirit of Ontario I

Neighborhoods

Downtown Charlotte 19th Ward (Arvine Heights Chili–West) Browncroft Corn Hill South Wedge

Linden–South

Maplewood East End Eastman Business Park North Winton City Hall Historic District High Falls

State Street Brown's Race Historic District

14621 Neighborhood

Parks and landmarks

Mount Hope Cemetery Highland Park Durand Eastman Park Genesee Valley Park Seneca Park Zoo George Eastman
George Eastman
Museum Susan B. Anthony House Rundel Memorial Library Federal Building/City Hall Powers Building Blue Cross Arena Frontier Field Capelli Sport Stadium Sibley's, Lindsay and Curr Building First Federal Plaza Legacy Tower Kodak
Kodak
Tower Times Square Building Five Star Bank Plaza Xerox
Xerox
Tower Tower 280
Tower 280
(Midtown Tower) The Metropolitan

Entertainment

Sports in Rochester Strong National Museum
Museum
of Play Rochester Museum
Museum
and Science Center Memorial Art Gallery Rochester Contemporary Art Center Little Theatre Eastman Theatre Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra Water Street Music Hall Rochester Lilac Festival Rochester International Film
Film
Festival High Falls Film
Film
Festival Rochester International Jazz Festival Geva Theatre Center

Food

Nick Tahou Hots Zweigle's

White hot

Abbott's Frozen Custard DiBella's Harts Local Grocers Mark's Pizzeria Wegmans Genesee Brewing Company

Research and education

University of Rochester

Eastman School of Music Medical Center

Rochester Institute of Technology

Center for Urban Entrepreneurship

Rochester City School District Rochester Academy Charter School Aquinas Institute Monroe Community College Rochester Area Colleges

Other

Democrat and Chronicle Rochester Police Department List of tallest buildings in Rochester, New York Hickey Freeman Bausch & Lomb Eastman Kodak Xerox French's Rochester Products (defunct) Midtown Plaza (defunct)

McCurdy's B. Forman Co.

Sibley's
Sibley's
(defunct)

Rochester Metro Area - Monroe County - Western New York
Western New York
- Finger Lakes -

.